Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Canterbury Tales Prologue to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Canterbury Tales Prologue to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Canterbury Tales Prologue has 860 lines, and 6% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 61% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 33% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.09 strong matches and 2.79 weak matches.

13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 1

Whan that Aprille with his shoures sote
13

Miller's Tale: 10

Whan that men sholde have droghte or elles shoures, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 118

Wher-so yow list, in droghte or elles shoures, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 2

The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote,
13

Miller's Tale: 10

[continues previous] Whan that men sholde have droghte or elles shoures,
10

Squire's Tale: 118

[continues previous] Wher-so yow list, in droghte or elles shoures,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 4083

Perced to be, with many a wounde, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 3

And bathed every veyne in swich licour,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 4082

[continues previous] Thurgh-out myn herte, in every veyne
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 5

Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 547

With swete breeth and wel savoured.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 7

The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
14

Squire's Tale: 385

As rody and bright as dooth the yonge sonne, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 386

That in the Ram is four degrees up-ronne; [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 8

Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
14

Squire's Tale: 385

[continues previous] As rody and bright as dooth the yonge sonne,
14

Squire's Tale: 386

[continues previous] That in the Ram is four degrees up-ronne;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 279

But er that he hadde halfe his cours y-seyled,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 907

As he that hadde his dayes cours y-ronne; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 9

And smale fowles maken melodye,
10

Merchant's Tale: 795

Proserpina, and al hir fayërye [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 796

Disporten hem and maken melodye [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 908

[continues previous] And whyte thinges wexen dimme and donne [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 10

That slepen al the night with open yë,
10

Merchant's Tale: 795

[continues previous] Proserpina, and al hir fayërye
11

Monk's Tale: 274

And rennen in the montaignes al the night,
11

Monk's Tale: 275

And slepen under a bush, and she coude eke
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 907

[continues previous] As he that hadde his dayes cours y-ronne;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 11

(So priketh hem nature in hir corages):
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 18

ne binimeth nat fro the corages of goode folk hir propre [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 597

As thou dost myn to longen hir to see; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 12

Than longen folk to goon on pilgrimages
11

Parson's Tale: 4

... children, and swich maner thing. Another is, whan a man hath sinned openly, of which sinne the fame is openly spoken in the contree; and thanne holy chirche by Iugement destreineth him for to do open penaunce. Commune penaunce is that preestes enioinen men comunly in certeyn caas; as for to goon, peraventure, naked in pilgrimages, or bare-foot. Privee penaunce is thilke that men doon alday for privee sinnes, of whiche we shryve us prively and receyve privee penaunce. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 18

[continues previous] ne binimeth nat fro the corages of goode folk hir propre
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 597

[continues previous] As thou dost myn to longen hir to see;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 598

[continues previous] Than woot I wel, that she nil not soiorne.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 13

(And palmers for to seken straunge strondes)
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 657

And suffreth his wyf to go seken halwes, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 658

Is worthy to been hanged on the galwes!" [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 4

[continues previous] ... of children, and swich maner thing. Another is, whan a man hath sinned openly, of which sinne the fame is openly spoken in the contree; and thanne holy chirche by Iugement destreineth him for to do open penaunce. Commune penaunce is that preestes enioinen men comunly in certeyn caas; as for to goon, peraventure, naked in pilgrimages, or bare-foot. Privee penaunce is thilke that men doon alday for privee sinnes, of whiche we shryve us prively and receyve privee penaunce.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 14

To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 657

[continues previous] And suffreth his wyf to go seken halwes,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 658

[continues previous] Is worthy to been hanged on the galwes!"
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 27

Eek for to winne love in sondry ages,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 28

In sondry londes, sondry ben usages. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 15

And specially, from every shires ende
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 29

[continues previous] And for-thy if it happe in any wyse,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 16

Of Engelond, to Caunterbury they wende,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 771

Ye goon to Caunterbury; God yow spede, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 17

The holy blisful martir for to seke,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 771

[continues previous] Ye goon to Caunterbury; God yow spede,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 772

[continues previous] The blisful martir quyte yow your mede.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5733

They wolde that fourty were seke at onis, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 18

That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5732

[continues previous] Ful litel care for hem they make.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5733

[continues previous] They wolde that fourty were seke at onis,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 19

Bifel that, in that seson on a day,
11

Miller's Tale: 85

Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas,
11

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas
11

Friar's Tale: 77

And so bifel, that ones on a day
12

Summoner's Tale: 5

And so bifel, that on a day this frere
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 20

In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 720

In Southwerk, at this gentil hostelrye,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 721

That highte the Tabard, faste by the Belle.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 21

Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage
12

Knight's Tale: 1356

He roos, to wenden on his pilgrimage [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 22

To Caunterbury with ful devout corage,
10

Knight's Tale: 1355

[continues previous] With holy herte, and with an heigh corage
12

Knight's Tale: 1356

[continues previous] He roos, to wenden on his pilgrimage
11

Second Nun's Tale: 131

She, ful devout and humble in hir corage,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 23

At night was come in-to that hostelrye
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 720

In Southwerk, at this gentil hostelrye, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 721

That highte the Tabard, faste by the Belle. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 17

A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 70

His felawe was go walked in-to toun,
12

Summoner's Tale: 71

Forth with his knave, in-to that hostelrye
11

Summoner's Tale: 72

Wher-as he shoop him thilke night to lye.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 24

Wel nyne and twenty in a companye,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 719

[continues previous] Why that assembled was this companye
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 720

[continues previous] In Southwerk, at this gentil hostelrye,
11

Miller's Tale: 17

[continues previous] A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye
11

Miller's Tale: 18

[continues previous] Allone, with-outen any companye,
10

Parson's Prologue: 4

Degreës nyne and twenty as in highte. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 25

Of sondry folk, by aventure y-falle
10

Parson's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] Foure of the clokke it was tho, as I gesse;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 31

So hadde I spoken with hem everichon,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 812

Of nobles fette, and took hem everichon [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 32

That I was of hir felawshipe anon,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 811

[continues previous] This preest the somme of fourty pound anon
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 812

[continues previous] Of nobles fette, and took hem everichon
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 33

And made forward erly for to ryse,
12

Knight's Tale: 1630

But by the cause that they sholde ryse [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1631

Erly, for to seen the grete fight, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 201

To goon to reste, and erly for to ryse, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 202

To seen this flour to sprede, as I devyse. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 34

To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse.
12

Knight's Tale: 1631

[continues previous] Erly, for to seen the grete fight,
12

Franklin's Tale: 740

Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 741

'Is ther oght elles, Dorigen, but this?' [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 193

And but I do, god take on me vengeance [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 201

[continues previous] To goon to reste, and erly for to ryse,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 202

[continues previous] To seen this flour to sprede, as I devyse.
10

Parlement of Foules: 389

Your makes, as I prik yow with plesaunce. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 435

And al the whyl which that I yow devyse, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 35

But natheles, whyl I have tyme and space,
11

Squire's Tale: 493

Whyl that I have a leyser and a space, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 740

[continues previous] Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse:
10

Franklin's Tale: 741

[continues previous] 'Is ther oght elles, Dorigen, but this?'
11

Shipman's Tale: 193

[continues previous] And but I do, god take on me vengeance
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 5

A thousand tyme, whan I have tyme and space. [continues next]
13

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 47

In hasty tyme, whyl I have lyves space: [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 389

[continues previous] Your makes, as I prik yow with plesaunce.
10

Parlement of Foules: 390

[continues previous] But natheles, my rightful ordenaunce
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

[continues previous] This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 435

[continues previous] And al the whyl which that I yow devyse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 942

And ever shal, whyl I to live have space, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 943

So, er that I departe out of this place, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 36

Er that I ferther in this tale pace,
12

Miller's Prologue: 61

But tolde his cherles tale in his manere; [continues next]
12

Miller's Prologue: 62

Me thinketh that I shal reherce it here. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 493

[continues previous] Whyl that I have a leyser and a space,
11

Squire's Tale: 494

[continues previous] Myn harm I wol confessen, er I pace.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 895

Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 896

I can na-more, my tale is at an ende. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 21

I gan beholde upon this place.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 22

And certein, or I ferther pace,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 23

I wol yow al the shap devyse
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 5

[continues previous] A thousand tyme, whan I have tyme and space.
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 6

[continues previous] For she, that is my verray sorowes grounde,
13

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 47

[continues previous] In hasty tyme, whyl I have lyves space:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 942

[continues previous] And ever shal, whyl I to live have space,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 943

[continues previous] So, er that I departe out of this place,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 37

Me thinketh it acordaunt to resoun,
12

Miller's Prologue: 62

[continues previous] Me thinketh that I shal reherce it here.
10

Summoner's Tale: 495

Is ther oght elles? telle me faithfully.' [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 496

'Madame,' quod he, 'how thinketh yow her-by?' [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 34

But for to telle yow al hir beautee, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 35

It lyth nat in my tonge, nin my conning; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 895

[continues previous] Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1264

Me thinketh thus, that neither ye nor I [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

For al to long it were for to dwelle.' [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 38

To telle yow al the condicioun
10

Knight's Tale: 1109

Why sholde I noght as wel eek telle yow al
10

Knight's Tale: 1110

The portreiture, that was up-on the wal
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

To telle yow al the descripcioun.
10

Summoner's Tale: 495

[continues previous] Is ther oght elles? telle me faithfully.'
10

Summoner's Tale: 496

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'how thinketh yow her-by?'
11

Squire's Tale: 34

[continues previous] But for to telle yow al hir beautee,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

[continues previous] So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 831

Trewe as steel in ech condicioun; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 832

On of the beste enteched creature, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

[continues previous] Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

[continues previous] For al to long it were for to dwelle.'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 39

Of ech of hem, so as it semed me,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 371

Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Pardoner's Tale: 445

But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 831

[continues previous] Trewe as steel in ech condicioun;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 832

[continues previous] On of the beste enteched creature,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 40

And whiche they weren, and of what degree;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 370

[continues previous] Hir girdles and hir pouches every-deel.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 626

How pore he was, ne eek of what degree. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

[continues previous] they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 41

And eek in what array that they were inne:
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 626

[continues previous] How pore he was, ne eek of what degree.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 627

[continues previous] What sholde I seye, but, at the monthes ende,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 42

And at a knight than wol I first biginne.
11

Knight's Tale: 34

And ther I lefte, I wol ageyn biginne. [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 2216

Ther wol we first amenden and biginne. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 670

And ther I lefte I wol ageyn biginne. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 10

And nat a man, at him I wol biginne; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 43

A Knight ther was, and that a worthy man,
11

Knight's Tale: 34

[continues previous] And ther I lefte, I wol ageyn biginne.
10

Knight's Tale: 383

And art a knight, a worthy and an able,
10

Knight's Tale: 384

That by som cas, sin fortune is chaungeable,
11

Knight's Tale: 919

As wel as to a proud despitous man [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 2216

[continues previous] Ther wol we first amenden and biginne.
12

Merchant's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge in Lumbardye [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 2

A worthy knight, that born was of Pavye, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 670

[continues previous] And ther I lefte I wol ageyn biginne.
11

Franklin's Tale: 2

Ther was a knight that loved and dide his payne [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 10

[continues previous] And nat a man, at him I wol biginne;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1267

And by hir wente a knight dauncing [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1268

That worthy was and wel speking, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 44

That fro the tyme that he first bigan
11

Knight's Tale: 920

[continues previous] That wol maynteyne that he first bigan!
11

Knight's Tale: 921

That lord hath litel of discrecioun,
12

Merchant's Tale: 2

[continues previous] A worthy knight, that born was of Pavye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 2

[continues previous] Ther was a knight that loved and dide his payne
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1268

[continues previous] That worthy was and wel speking,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 132

In curteisye was set ful muche hir lest. [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 18

And ful of honour and of curteisye; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 34

His yeman eek was ful of curteisye, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 35

And seyde, 'sires, now in the morwe-tyde [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 160

As alle trouthe and alle gentillesse,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 161

Wysdom, honour, fredom, and worthinesse.'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 47

Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 132

[continues previous] In curteisye was set ful muche hir lest.
12

Knight's Tale: 1295

An hundred lordes hadde he in his route [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 18

[continues previous] And ful of honour and of curteisye;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 34

[continues previous] His yeman eek was ful of curteisye,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 48

And therto hadde he riden (no man ferre)
12

Knight's Tale: 1295

[continues previous] An hundred lordes hadde he in his route
11

Manciple's Tale: 14

Coude never singen half so wel as he. [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 15

Therto he was the semelieste man [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 427

Anon as Gamelyn hadde eten wel and fyn, [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 428

And therto y-dronke wel of the rede wyn, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 49

As wel in Cristendom as hethenesse,
11

Manciple's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Coude never singen half so wel as he.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 427

[continues previous] Anon as Gamelyn hadde eten wel and fyn,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 50

And ever honoured for his worthinesse.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1059

And therto had the worthinesse [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1060

Of Alisaundre, and al the richesse [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1061

That ever was in Babiloyne, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 58

At Lyeys was he, and at Satalye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 59

Whan they were wonne; and in the Grete See
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 357

At sessiouns ther was he lord and sire; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 358

Ful ofte tyme he was knight of the shire. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 6

Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 491

For god it woot, he sat ful ofte and song [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 492

Whan that his shoo ful bitterly him wrong. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 665

For whom ful ofte in greet peril he was, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1060

[continues previous] Of Alisaundre, and al the richesse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1124

And whan that it was tyme for to go, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1013

Hir glove he took, of which he was ful fayn. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1014

And fynally, whan it was waxen eve, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1584

Ful pitously, he lefte it nought for slouthe, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 52

Ful ofte tyme he hadde the bord bigonne
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 357

[continues previous] At sessiouns ther was he lord and sire;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 358

[continues previous] Ful ofte tyme he was knight of the shire.
11

Knight's Tale: 6

[continues previous] Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 491

[continues previous] For god it woot, he sat ful ofte and song
12

Merchant's Tale: 794

Ful ofte tyme he, Pluto, and his quene,
11

Squire's Tale: 665

[continues previous] For whom ful ofte in greet peril he was,
11

Squire's Tale: 666

[continues previous] Ne hadde he ben holpen by the stede of bras;
10

Physician's Tale: 62

She hath ful ofte tyme syk hir feyned,
10

Prioress' Tale: 77

Ful ofte tyme upon his knowes bare.
12

Parson's Tale: 47

Now comth biwreying of conseil, thurgh which a man is defamed; certes, unnethe may he restore the damage. Now comth manace, that is an open folye; for he that ofte manaceth, he threteth more than he may perfourne ful ofte tyme. Now cometh ydel wordes, that is with-outen profit of him that speketh tho wordes, and eek of him that herkneth tho wordes. Or elles ydel wordes been tho that been nedelees, or with-outen entente of naturel profit. And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme venial sinne, yet sholde men ...
10

Parson's Tale: 83

... a womman eschue the companye of hem by whiche he douteth to be tempted; for al-be-it so that the dede is withstonden, yet is ther greet temptacioun. Soothly a whyt wal, al-though it ne brenne noght fully by stikinge of a candele, yet is the wal blak of the leyt. Ful ofte tyme I rede, that no man truste in his owene perfeccioun, but he be stronger than Sampson, and holier than Daniel, and wyser than Salomon.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 119

causes, wil desireth and embraceth ful ofte tyme the deeth
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1124

[continues previous] And whan that it was tyme for to go,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1125

[continues previous] Ful prevely him-self, with-outen mo,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1013

[continues previous] Hir glove he took, of which he was ful fayn.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1583

[continues previous] To hir he wroot yet ofte tyme al newe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1584

[continues previous] Ful pitously, he lefte it nought for slouthe,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 55

No Cristen man so ofte of his degree.
10

Knight's Tale: 1998

And eek most honurable in his degree. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 56

In Gernade at the sege eek hadde he be
10

Knight's Tale: 1998

[continues previous] And eek most honurable in his degree.
10

Knight's Tale: 1999

[continues previous] And at the laste he took conclusioun,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 58

At Lyeys was he, and at Satalye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 59

Whan they were wonne; and in the Grete See
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

[continues previous] At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 68

And though that he were worthy, he was wys,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 481

That was ful wys, and worthy of his hond [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 69

And of his port as meke as is a mayde.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 480

[continues previous] Under Alla, king of al Northumberlond,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 481

[continues previous] That was ful wys, and worthy of his hond
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3403

Ful meke of port, and simple of chere,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 70

He never yet no vileinye ne sayde
11

Knight's Tale: 1686

No maner shot, ne pollax, ne short knyf [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

[continues previous] In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 188

[continues previous] Ne widwe, that contraried that he sayde,
12

Friar's Tale: 323

Ne never I nas but of my body trewe! [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 18

That never in al his lyf he, day ne night, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 86

... or in chirche-hawe; in chirche dedicat, or noon. For if the chirche be halwed, and man or womman spille his kinde inwith that place by wey of sinne, or by wikked temptacion, the chirche is entredited til it be reconciled by the bishop; and the preest that dide swich a vileinye, to terme of al his lyf, he sholde na-more singe masse; and if he dide, he sholde doon deedly sinne at every tyme that he so songe masse. The fourthe circumstaunce is, by whiche mediatours or by whiche messagers, as for entycement, or for consentement to bere companye with felaweshipe; ... [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 71

In al his lyf, un-to no maner wight.
11

Knight's Tale: 1685

[continues previous] No man therfor, up peyne of los of lyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 1686

[continues previous] No maner shot, ne pollax, ne short knyf
12

Friar's Tale: 322

[continues previous] Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf;
11

Squire's Tale: 557

Ne so coude thanke a wight as he did me! [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 558

His maner was an heven for to see [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 18

[continues previous] That never in al his lyf he, day ne night,
10

Physician's Tale: 6

No children hadde he mo in al his lyf. [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 13

He semeth elvish by his contenaunce, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 14

For un-to no wight dooth he daliaunce. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 86

[continues previous] ... chirche dedicat, or noon. For if the chirche be halwed, and man or womman spille his kinde inwith that place by wey of sinne, or by wikked temptacion, the chirche is entredited til it be reconciled by the bishop; and the preest that dide swich a vileinye, to terme of al his lyf, he sholde na-more singe masse; and if he dide, he sholde doon deedly sinne at every tyme that he so songe masse. The fourthe circumstaunce is, by whiche mediatours or by whiche messagers, as for entycement, or for consentement to bere companye with felaweshipe; for many a wrecche, for to ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 6: 9

maker, thanne nis ther no forlived wight, but-yif he norisshe [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 6: 10

his corage un-to vyces, and forlete his propre burthe. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 835

That Troilus was never un-to no wight, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 836

As in his tyme, in no degree secounde [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 72

He was a verray parfit gentil knight.
11

Squire's Tale: 557

[continues previous] Ne so coude thanke a wight as he did me!
11

Squire's Tale: 558

[continues previous] His maner was an heven for to see
10

Physician's Tale: 6

[continues previous] No children hadde he mo in al his lyf.
10

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 14

[continues previous] For un-to no wight dooth he daliaunce.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 6: 9

[continues previous] maker, thanne nis ther no forlived wight, but-yif he norisshe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 835

[continues previous] That Troilus was never un-to no wight,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 73

But for to tellen yow of his array,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 209

Hit nedeth noght yow for to tellen,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 259

To folwen him that so wel can yow lede.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 260

But for to tellen forth in special
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 74

His hors were gode, but he was nat gay.
10

Summoner's Tale: 19

Nat for to holde a preest Ioly and gay, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 20

He singeth nat but o masse in a day; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 75

Of fustian he wered a gipoun
11

Knight's Tale: 1262

In a brest-plat and in a light gipoun; [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 20

[continues previous] He singeth nat but o masse in a day;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 76

Al bismotered with his habergeoun;
11

Knight's Tale: 1261

[continues previous] Som wol ben armed in an habergeoun,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 77

For he was late y-come from his viage,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 75

To doon viage, and took his wey ful sone [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 78

And wente for to doon his pilgrimage.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 75

[continues previous] To doon viage, and took his wey ful sone
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 79

With him ther was his sone, a yong Squyer,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 27

Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 28

That on a day cam rydinge fro river; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 80

A lovyere, and a lusty bacheler,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 27

[continues previous] Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 28

[continues previous] That on a day cam rydinge fro river;
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 82

Of twenty yeer of age he was, I gesse.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 603

Sin that his lord was twenty yeer of age; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1314

Of fyve and twenty yeer his age I caste. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 37

Of eightetene yeer she was of age. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 38

Ialous he was, and heeld hir narwe in cage, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1045

When passed was a yeer, even as I gesse, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1046

Out of this world this king Alla he hente, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 680

Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 681

He to the court of Rome, in subtil wyse [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 455

Of the age of four and twenty yeer. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 850

That from she was twelve yeer of age,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 851

She of hir love graunt him made.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 83

Of his stature he was of evene lengthe,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 603

[continues previous] Sin that his lord was twenty yeer of age;
11

Knight's Tale: 1314

[continues previous] Of fyve and twenty yeer his age I caste.
11

Miller's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Of eightetene yeer she was of age.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1046

[continues previous] Out of this world this king Alla he hente,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 680

[continues previous] Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 681

[continues previous] He to the court of Rome, in subtil wyse
11

Book of the Duchesse: 455

[continues previous] Of the age of four and twenty yeer.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 828

So noble he was of his stature,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 87

And born him wel, as of so litel space,
12

Knight's Tale: 1038

Was noon in erthe, as in so litel space; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 443

Declared hath ful wel in litel space).[continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 444

'Fareth now wel, god have yow in his grace.' [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 73

Beth fructuous, and that in litel space, [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 74

And to do wel god sende yow his grace!' [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 88

In hope to stonden in his lady grace.
12

Knight's Tale: 1038

[continues previous] Was noon in erthe, as in so litel space;
11

Knight's Tale: 1039

[continues previous] For in the lond ther nas no crafty man,
12

Merchant's Tale: 443

[continues previous] Declared hath ful wel in litel space). —
11

Parson's Prologue: 73

[continues previous] Beth fructuous, and that in litel space,
11

Parson's Prologue: 74

[continues previous] And to do wel god sende yow his grace!'
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 89

Embrouded was he, as it were a mede
11

Franklin's Tale: 419

And somtyme floures springe as in a mede; [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 41

That, of alle the floures in the mede, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 41

That, of alle the floures in the mede, [continues next]
13

Parlement of Foules: 260

And in a privee corner, in disporte, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4121

To me ful welcome were the deeth; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 90

Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede.
13

Knight's Tale: 195

She gadereth floures, party whyte and rede,
11

Franklin's Tale: 420

[continues previous] Somtyme a vyne, and grapes whyte and rede;
11

Franklin's Tale: 421

Somtyme a castel, al of lym and stoon;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 382

And see the fresshe floures how they springe;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 383

Ful is myn herte of revel and solas.'
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 42

[continues previous] Than love I most these floures whyte and rede,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 42

[continues previous] Than love I most these floures whyte and rede,
13

Compleynt of Mars: 2

Lo! Venus risen among yon rowes rede!
13

Compleynt of Mars: 3

And floures fresshe, honoureth ye this day;
12

Parlement of Foules: 186

With floures whyte, blewe, yelowe, and rede;
11

Parlement of Foules: 258

Upon his hede to sette, of sondry hewe,
13

Parlement of Foules: 259

[continues previous] Garlondes ful of fresshe floures newe.
13

Parlement of Foules: 260

[continues previous] And in a privee corner, in disporte,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1432

And fresshe pervinke, riche of hewe,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1433

And floures yelowe, whyte, and rede;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4120

[continues previous] So fer the fresshe floures fro,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4121

[continues previous] To me ful welcome were the deeth;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 158

And swote smellen floures whyte and rede,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 50

In May, that moder is of monthes glade,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 51

That fresshe floures, blewe, and whyte, and rede,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 91

Singinge he was, or floytinge, al the day;
10

Merchant's Tale: 652

As fresh as is the brighte someres day. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 92

He was as fresh as is the month of May.
12

Merchant's Tale: 651

[continues previous] In halle sit this Ianuarie, and May
12

Merchant's Tale: 652

[continues previous] As fresh as is the brighte someres day.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 94

Wel coude he sitte on hors, and faire ryde.
12

Reeve's Tale: 142

And to the hors he gooth him faire and wel; [continues next]
12

Reeve's Tale: 143

He strepeth of the brydel right anon. [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

And if a rethor coude faire endyte, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1158

And ofte tyme I song hem loude; [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 95

He coude songes make and wel endyte,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 327

Therto he coude endyte, and make a thing, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 328

Ther coude no wight pinche at his wryting; [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 142

[continues previous] And to the hors he gooth him faire and wel;
10

Reeve's Tale: 143

[continues previous] He strepeth of the brydel right anon.
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

[continues previous] And if a rethor coude faire endyte,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 388

[continues previous] He in a cronique saufly mighte it wryte,
14

Legend of Philomela: 129

And coude eek rede, and wel y-nogh endyte, [continues next]
10

Legend of Philomela: 130

But with a penne coude she nat wryte; [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1160

Al-thogh I coude not make so wel
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1161

Songes, ne knowe the art al,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1627

I dar not, ther I am, wel lettres make,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1628

Ne never yet ne coude I wel endyte. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 96

Iuste and eek daunce, and wel purtreye and wryte,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 327

[continues previous] Therto he coude endyte, and make a thing,
14

Legend of Philomela: 129

[continues previous] And coude eek rede, and wel y-nogh endyte,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1158

[continues previous] And ofte tyme I song hem loude;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1629

[continues previous] Eek greet effect men wryte in place lyte.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 99

Curteys he was, lowly, and servisable,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 250

Curteys he was, and lowly of servyse. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 100

And carf biforn his fader at the table.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 250

[continues previous] Curteys he was, and lowly of servyse.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 102

At that tyme, for him liste ryde so;
11

Knight's Tale: 819

That he nis clad, and redy for to ryde [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 103

And he was clad in cote and hood of grene;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 566

A whyt cote and a blew hood wered he. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 614

And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 615

In youthe he lerned hadde a good mister; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 819

[continues previous] That he nis clad, and redy for to ryde
10

Friar's Tale: 84

He hadde up-on a courtepy of grene; [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 214

And she was clad in real habit grene. [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 215

A fret of gold she hadde next hir heer, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 573

And she hadde on a cote of grene [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 104

A sheef of pecok-arwes brighte and kene
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 566

[continues previous] A whyt cote and a blew hood wered he.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 567

[continues previous] A baggepype wel coude he blowe and sowne,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 614

[continues previous] And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 615

[continues previous] In youthe he lerned hadde a good mister;
14

Knight's Tale: 1108

A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene. [continues next]
14

Friar's Tale: 83

[continues previous] A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene; [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 84

[continues previous] He hadde up-on a courtepy of grene; [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 215

[continues previous] A fret of gold she hadde next hir heer,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 573

[continues previous] And she hadde on a cote of grene
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 574

[continues previous] Of cloth of Gaunt; withouten wene,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 105

Under his belt he bar ful thriftily;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 715

To winne silver, as he ful wel coude; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 716

Therefore he song so meriely and loude. [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1108

[continues previous] A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene.
11

Reeve's Prologue: 10

'So theek,' quod he, 'ful wel coude I yow quyte [continues next]
14

Friar's Tale: 83

[continues previous] A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene;
14

Friar's Tale: 84

[continues previous] He hadde up-on a courtepy of grene;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1269

And ful wel coude he doon honour. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 211

She took hir leve at hem ful thriftily, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 106

(Wel coude he dresse his takel yemanly:
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 715

[continues previous] To winne silver, as he ful wel coude;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 716

[continues previous] Therefore he song so meriely and loude.
11

Reeve's Prologue: 10

[continues previous] 'So theek,' quod he, 'ful wel coude I yow quyte
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1269

[continues previous] And ful wel coude he doon honour.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 212

[continues previous] As she wel coude, and they hir reverence
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 108

And in his hand he bar a mighty bowe.
12

Knight's Tale: 1108

A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene. [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 82

A gay yeman, under a forest-syde. [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 83

A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 109

A not-heed hadde he, with a broun visage.
12

Knight's Tale: 1108

[continues previous] A bowe he bar and arwes brighte and kene.
12

Friar's Tale: 82

[continues previous] A gay yeman, under a forest-syde.
12

Friar's Tale: 83

[continues previous] A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 110

Of wode-craft wel coude he al the usage.
10

Miller's Tale: 147

And as wel coude he pleye on his giterne. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 148

In al the toun nas brewhous ne taverne [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 434

He was, so wel dissimulen he coude.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 435

And al the whyl which that I yow devyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 288

For in his herte he coude wel devyne, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 289

That Troilus al night for sorwe wook; [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 111

Upon his arm he bar a gay bracer,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 113

And on that other syde a gay daggere, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 619

A long surcote of pers up-on he hade, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 620

And by his syde he bar a rusty blade. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 147

[continues previous] And as wel coude he pleye on his giterne.
13

Squire's Tale: 83

Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 84

And by his syde a naked swerd hanging; [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 43

He priketh thurgh a fair forest, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 288

[continues previous] For in his herte he coude wel devyne,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

[continues previous] A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 561

[continues previous] His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 620

[continues previous] And by his syde he bar a rusty blade.
15+

Reeve's Tale: 99

With good swerd and with bokeler by hir syde. [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 83

[continues previous] Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And by his syde a naked swerd hanging; [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 85

[continues previous] And up he rydeth to the heighe bord. [continues next]
13

Sir Thopas' Tale: 41

And in his honde a launcegay,
13

Sir Thopas' Tale: 42

[continues previous] A long swerd by his syde.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 43

[continues previous] He priketh thurgh a fair forest,
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat ... [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 113

And on that other syde a gay daggere,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 111

[continues previous] Upon his arm he bar a gay bracer,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

[continues previous] And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 559

[continues previous] His nose-thirles blake were and wyde.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

[continues previous] A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde;
10

Knight's Tale: 474

And Venus sleeth me on that other syde
11

Knight's Tale: 1762

Another lad is on that other syde.
11

Knight's Tale: 1763

And som tyme dooth hem Theseus to reste,
11

Knight's Tale: 2048

And on that other syde duk Theseus,
15+

Reeve's Tale: 99

[continues previous] With good swerd and with bokeler by hir syde.
13

Squire's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And by his syde a naked swerd hanging;
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat ...
10

Hous of Fame 3: 61

For on that other syde I sey
11

Legend of Thisbe: 46

And on that other syde stood Tisbe,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 101

And ever set Desire myn herte on fire;
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 102

Eek on that other syde, wher-so I go,
11

Parlement of Foules: 293

Alle these were peynted on that other syde,
11

Parlement of Foules: 294

And al hir love, and in what plyte they dyde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 164

But resoun seyde him, on that other syde,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 114

Harneised wel, and sharp as point of spere;
10

Knight's Tale: 1691

But o cours, with a sharp y-grounde spere; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 115

A Cristofre on his brest of silver shene.
10

Knight's Tale: 1691

[continues previous] But o cours, with a sharp y-grounde spere;
10

Knight's Tale: 1692

[continues previous] Foyne, if him list, on fote, him-self to were.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 117

A forster was he, soothly, as I gesse.
12

Knight's Tale: 244

But Venus is it, soothly, as I gesse.'
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 118

Ther was also a Nonne, a Prioresse,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 6

In pacience ladde a ful simple lyf, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6350

[continues previous] And now a nonne, and now abbesse;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 119

That of hir smyling was ful simple and coy;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 6

[continues previous] In pacience ladde a ful simple lyf,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 7

[continues previous] For litel was hir catel and hir rente;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 425

That maked was lyk hir semblaunce. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 426

She was ful simple of countenaunce, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 427

And she was clothed and eek shod, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 120

Hir gretteste ooth was but by sëynt Loy;
12

Friar's Tale: 266

I pray god save thee and sëynt Loy! [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 425

[continues previous] That maked was lyk hir semblaunce.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 426

[continues previous] She was ful simple of countenaunce,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 121

And she was cleped madame Eglentyne.
12

Friar's Tale: 266

[continues previous] I pray god save thee and sëynt Loy!
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 210

Ful foul in peynting was that vice; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 122

Ful wel she song the service divyne,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 210

[continues previous] Ful foul in peynting was that vice;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 123

Entuned in hir nose ful semely;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 135

Of grece, whan she dronken hadde hir draughte. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 136

Ful semely after hir mete she raughte, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 152

Hir nose tretys; hir eyen greye as glas; [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1102

And on hir heed, ful semely for to see, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 135

[continues previous] Of grece, whan she dronken hadde hir draughte.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 136

[continues previous] Ful semely after hir mete she raughte,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 137

[continues previous] And sikerly she was of greet disport,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

[continues previous] Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 275

His botes clasped faire and fetisly.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 276

His resons he spak ful solempnely,
12

Knight's Tale: 1101

[continues previous] A citole in hir right hand hadde she,
12

Knight's Tale: 1102

[continues previous] And on hir heed, ful semely for to see,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5838

And spak ful faire in his praying;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 127

At mete wel y-taught was she with-alle;
12

Legend of Thisbe: 107

For by the mone she seigh hit wel with-alle. [continues next]
12

Legend of Thisbe: 108

And, as she ran, her wimpel leet she falle, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 128

She leet no morsel from hir lippes falle,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 107

[continues previous] For by the mone she seigh hit wel with-alle.
12

Legend of Thisbe: 108

[continues previous] And, as she ran, her wimpel leet she falle,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 290

Which somdel deynous was, for she leet falle
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 291

Hir look a lite a-side, in swich manere,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 129

Ne wette hir fingres in hir sauce depe.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 212

As she wel coude, and they hir reverence [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 130

Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 595

Wel coude he kepe a gerner and a binne;
11

Monk's Tale: 444

Is ther no morsel breed that ye do kepe? [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 15

[continues previous] No deyntee morsel passed thurgh hir throte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 212

[continues previous] As she wel coude, and they hir reverence
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 131

That no drope ne fille up-on hir brest.
13

Knight's Tale: 1433

Up-on hir heed was set ful fair and mete. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 444

[continues previous] Is ther no morsel breed that ye do kepe?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 815

Hir brest, hir face y-bathed was ful wete; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 132

In curteisye was set ful muche hir lest.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 47

Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre,
13

Knight's Tale: 1433

[continues previous] Up-on hir heed was set ful fair and mete.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 815

[continues previous] Hir brest, hir face y-bathed was ful wete;
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 135

Of grece, whan she dronken hadde hir draughte.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 123

Entuned in hir nose ful semely; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 152

Hir nose tretys; hir eyen greye as glas; [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1101

A citole in hir right hand hadde she, [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1102

And on hir heed, ful semely for to see, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 680

To liven whan she hadde lost hir name?
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 136

Ful semely after hir mete she raughte,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

[continues previous] And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

[continues previous] Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 152

[continues previous] Hir nose tretys; hir eyen greye as glas;
14

Knight's Tale: 1101

[continues previous] A citole in hir right hand hadde she, [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1102

[continues previous] And on hir heed, ful semely for to see, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 137

And sikerly she was of greet disport,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

[continues previous] And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
12

Knight's Tale: 1102

[continues previous] And on hir heed, ful semely for to see,
10

Miller's Tale: 57

Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye: [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 58

And sikerly she hadde a likerous yë. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 7

so that she was ful of so greet age, that men ne wolde nat trowen, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1225

Hir herte wolde have ful greet pitee, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1226

She was so amiable and free. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 138

And ful plesaunt, and amiable of port,
10

Miller's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye:
10

Miller's Tale: 58

[continues previous] And sikerly she hadde a likerous yë.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 7

[continues previous] so that she was ful of so greet age, that men ne wolde nat trowen,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1225

[continues previous] Hir herte wolde have ful greet pitee,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1226

[continues previous] She was so amiable and free.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4621

Discrete and wys, and ful plesaunt, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4622

And of hir porte ful avenaunt. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 139

And peyned hir to countrefete chere
10

Clerk's Tale: 920

And peyned hir to doon al that she mighte,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4621

[continues previous] Discrete and wys, and ful plesaunt,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4622

[continues previous] And of hir porte ful avenaunt.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 140

Of court, and been estatlich of manere,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 21

for to ben right digne of reverence; and enforcen hem to ben [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 141

And to ben holden digne of reverence.
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 21

[continues previous] for to ben right digne of reverence; and enforcen hem to ben [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 815

But for to speken of hir eyen clere, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 142

But, for to speken of hir conscience,
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 21

[continues previous] for to ben right digne of reverence; and enforcen hem to ben
12

Anelida and Arcite: 81

And for to speken of hir stedfastnesse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 815

[continues previous] But for to speken of hir eyen clere,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 143

She was so charitable and so pitous,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 82

[continues previous] She passed hath Penelope and Lucresse,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 144

She wolde wepe, if that she sawe a mous
10

Miller's Tale: 160

I dar wel seyn, if she had been a mous, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 161

And he a cat, he wolde hir hente anon. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 145

Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 148

But sore weep she if oon of hem were deed, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 149

Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte: [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 160

[continues previous] I dar wel seyn, if she had been a mous,
10

Miller's Tale: 161

[continues previous] And he a cat, he wolde hir hente anon.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 146

Of smale houndes had she, that she fedde
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 148

[continues previous] But sore weep she if oon of hem were deed,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 147

With rosted flesh, or milk and wastel-breed.
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... misterie of preesthode to the peple, ne god ne knowe they nat; they ne helde hem nat apayd, as seith the book, of soden flesh that was to hem offred, but they toke by force the flesh that is rawe. Certes, so thise shrewes ne holden hem nat apayed of rosted flesh and sode flesh, with which the peple fedden hem in greet reverence, but they wole have raw flesh of folkes wyves and hir doghtres. And certes, thise wommen that consenten to hir harlotrie doon greet wrong to Crist and to holy chirche and alle halwes, and to alle soules; for they bireven alle thise ...
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 148

But sore weep she if oon of hem were deed,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 145

Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 146

Of smale houndes had she, that she fedde [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 149

Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte:
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 145

[continues previous] Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 150

And al was conscience and tendre herte.
10

Knight's Tale: 1102

And on hir heed, ful semely for to see, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 123

Entuned in hir nose ful semely; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 135

Of grece, whan she dronken hadde hir draughte. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 136

Ful semely after hir mete she raughte, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1102

[continues previous] And on hir heed, ful semely for to see, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 131

His rode was reed, his eyen greye as goos; [continues next]
15+

Reeve's Tale: 53

This wenche thikke and wel y-growen was, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1216

For it was gentil and tretys; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 152

Hir nose tretys; hir eyen greye as glas;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 123

[continues previous] Entuned in hir nose ful semely;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 135

[continues previous] Of grece, whan she dronken hadde hir draughte.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 136

[continues previous] Ful semely after hir mete she raughte,
10

Knight's Tale: 1102

[continues previous] And on hir heed, ful semely for to see,
12

Miller's Tale: 131

[continues previous] His rode was reed, his eyen greye as goos;
15+

Reeve's Tale: 54

[continues previous] With camuse nose and yën greye as glas; [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 2

... Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and betten his wyf, and wounded his doghter with fyve mortal woundes in fyve sondry places; this is to seyn, in hir feet, in hir handes, in hir eres, in hir nose, and in hir mouth; and leften hir for deed, and wenten awey. [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 545

Hir nose of good proporcioun, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 546

Hir yën greye as a faucoun, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 822

With metely mouth and yën greye; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 823

His nose by mesure wrought ful right; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1022

Unto hir heles doun they raughten: [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1023

Hir nose, hir mouth, and eye and cheke [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1216

[continues previous] For it was gentil and tretys;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1218

Hir heer doun to hir heles wente. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 153

Hir mouth ful smal, and ther-to softe and reed;
10

Miller's Tale: 57

Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye: [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 58

And sikerly she hadde a likerous yë. [continues next]
12

Reeve's Tale: 54

[continues previous] With camuse nose and yën greye as glas;
11

Reeve's Tale: 55

[continues previous] With buttokes brode and brestes rounde and hye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 2

[continues previous] ... Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and betten his wyf, and wounded his doghter with fyve mortal woundes in fyve sondry places; this is to seyn, in hir feet, in hir handes, in hir eres, in hir nose, and in hir mouth; and leften hir for deed, and wenten awey.
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 545

[continues previous] Hir nose of good proporcioun,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 546

[continues previous] Hir yën greye as a faucoun,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 822

[continues previous] With metely mouth and yën greye;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1022

[continues previous] Unto hir heles doun they raughten:
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1023

[continues previous] Hir nose, hir mouth, and eye and cheke
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1218

[continues previous] Hir heer doun to hir heles wente.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 154

But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed;
12

Miller's Tale: 58

[continues previous] And sikerly she hadde a likerous yë.
11

Squire's Tale: 395

But nathelees, it was so fair a sighte [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 155

It was almost a spanne brood, I trowe;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 217

The bacoun was nat fet for hem, I trowe, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 394

[continues previous] Made the sonne to seme rody and brood;
11

Squire's Tale: 395

[continues previous] But nathelees, it was so fair a sighte
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 156

For, hardily, she was nat undergrowe.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 217

[continues previous] The bacoun was nat fet for hem, I trowe,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 158

Of smal coral aboute hir arm she bar
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7371

But she forgat not hir sautere; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7372

A peire of bedis eek she here [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 159

A peire of bedes, gauded al with grene;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7372

[continues previous] A peire of bedis eek she here
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 160

And ther-on heng a broche of gold ful shene,
12

Knight's Tale: 121

Of gold ful riche, in which ther was y-bete [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1192

Unto a lady maad present
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1193

Of a gold broche, ful wel wrought.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1194

And certes, it missat hir nought;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 161

On which ther was first write a crowned A,
12

Knight's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Of gold ful riche, in which ther was y-bete
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 163

Another Nonne with hir hadde she,
11

Franklin's Tale: 707

For oon of Macedoine hadde hir oppressed, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 708

She with hir deeth hir maydenhede redressed. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 673

As she that hadde hir herte and al hir minde [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 164

That was hir chapeleyne, and Preestes three.
11

Franklin's Tale: 707

[continues previous] For oon of Macedoine hadde hir oppressed,
11

Franklin's Tale: 708

[continues previous] She with hir deeth hir maydenhede redressed.
14

Shipman's Tale: 24

Amonges alle his gestes, grete and smale, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 25

Ther was a monk, a fair man and a bold, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 494

For that a preestes sone yaf him a knok [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 673

[continues previous] As she that hadde hir herte and al hir minde
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 165

A Monk ther was, a fair for the maistrye,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 25

[continues previous] Ther was a monk, a fair man and a bold,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 493

[continues previous] Among his vers, how that ther was a cok,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 494

[continues previous] For that a preestes sone yaf him a knok
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 168

Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable:
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 212

He hadde maad ful many a mariage
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 351

Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in mewe,
10

Knight's Tale: 6

Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne;
11

Clerk's Tale: 179

And whan it fil that he mighte hir espye, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 565

And many a letuarie hadde he ful fyn,
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith by Zakarie the prophete, 'I wol confounde the ryderes of swiche horses.' This folk taken litel reward of the rydinge of goddes sone of hevene, and of his harneys whan he rood up-on the asse, and ne hadde noon other harneys but the povre clothes of hise disciples; ne we ne rede nat that evere he rood on other beest. I speke this for the sinne of superfluitee, and nat for reasonable honestetee, whan reson it requyreth. And forther, certes pryde is greetly notified in holdinge of greet ... [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5912

For, whan his hors is in the stable, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5913

He may it selle ageyn, pardee, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 169

And, whan he rood, men mighte his brydel here
11

Clerk's Tale: 178

[continues previous] As he on hunting rood paraventure;
11

Clerk's Tale: 179

[continues previous] And whan it fil that he mighte hir espye,
11

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith by Zakarie the prophete, 'I wol confounde the ryderes of swiche horses.' This folk taken litel reward of the rydinge of goddes sone of hevene, and of his harneys whan he rood up-on the asse, and ne hadde noon other harneys but the povre clothes of hise disciples; ne we ne rede nat that evere he rood on other beest. I speke this for the sinne of superfluitee, and nat for reasonable honestetee, whan reson it requyreth. And forther, certes pryde is greetly notified in holdinge ...
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5912

[continues previous] For, whan his hors is in the stable,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5913

[continues previous] He may it selle ageyn, pardee,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 170

Ginglen in a whistling wind as clere,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 712

He gan to blasen out a soun, [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 3: 713

As loude as belweth wind in helle. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 171

And eek as loude as dooth the chapel-belle,
13

Hous of Fame 3: 713

[continues previous] As loude as belweth wind in helle.
13

Hous of Fame 3: 714

[continues previous] And eek therwith, [the] sooth to telle,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 178

That seith, that hunters been nat holy men;
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

... this same resoun shul ye clepen to your conseil, of your freendes that been of age, swiche as han seyn and been expert in manye thinges, and been approved in conseillinges. For the book seith, that "in olde men is the sapience and in longe tyme the prudence." And Tullius seith: that "grete thinges ne been nat ay accompliced by strengthe, ne by delivernesse of body, but by good conseil, by auctoritee of persones, and by science; the whiche three thinges ne been nat feble by age, but certes they enforcen and encreesen day by day." And thanne shul ye kepe this for a general reule. First ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 57

... every syde and sheten at him at discovert, by temptacion on every syde. This ydelnesse is the thurrok of alle wikked and vileyns thoghtes, and of alle Iangles, trufles, and of alle ordure. Certes, the hevene is yeven to hem that wol labouren, and nat to ydel folk. Eek David seith: that 'they ne been nat in the labour of men, ne they shul nat been whipped with men,' that is to seyn, in purgatorie. Certes, thanne semeth it, they shul be tormented with the devel in helle, but-if they doon penitence. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 123

whan men wene that they ne be nat punisshed.' [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 179

Ne that a monk, whan he is cloisterlees,
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... same resoun shul ye clepen to your conseil, of your freendes that been of age, swiche as han seyn and been expert in manye thinges, and been approved in conseillinges. For the book seith, that "in olde men is the sapience and in longe tyme the prudence." And Tullius seith: that "grete thinges ne been nat ay accompliced by strengthe, ne by delivernesse of body, but by good conseil, by auctoritee of persones, and by science; the whiche three thinges ne been nat feble by age, but certes they enforcen and encreesen day by day." And thanne shul ye kepe this for a general ...
11

Parson's Tale: 57

[continues previous] ... sheten at him at discovert, by temptacion on every syde. This ydelnesse is the thurrok of alle wikked and vileyns thoghtes, and of alle Iangles, trufles, and of alle ordure. Certes, the hevene is yeven to hem that wol labouren, and nat to ydel folk. Eek David seith: that 'they ne been nat in the labour of men, ne they shul nat been whipped with men,' that is to seyn, in purgatorie. Certes, thanne semeth it, they shul be tormented with the devel in helle, but-if they doon penitence.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 123

[continues previous] whan men wene that they ne be nat punisshed.'
12

Compleynt of Mars: 239

Til mony a fish is wood til that he be [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 180

Is lykned til a fish that is waterlees;
12

Compleynt of Mars: 239

[continues previous] Til mony a fish is wood til that he be [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 181

This is to seyn, a monk out of his cloistre.
11

Compleynt of Mars: 239

[continues previous] Til mony a fish is wood til that he be
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 183

And I seyde, his opinioun was good.
10

Melibee's Tale: 6

This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges folk in sorwe, but it is rather graunted him ... [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 184

What sholde he studie, and make him-selven wood,
11

Franklin's Tale: 396

At Orliens in studie a book he say [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 6

[continues previous] This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges folk in sorwe, but it is rather ...
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 185

Upon a book in cloistre alwey to poure,
11

Franklin's Tale: 395

[continues previous] He him remembred that, upon a day,
11

Franklin's Tale: 396

[continues previous] At Orliens in studie a book he say
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 192

Was al his lust, for no cost wolde he spare.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 416

For winning wolde I al his lust endure,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 77

His blinde lust was al his covetinge.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 194

With grys, and that the fyneste of a lond;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 24

A clote-leef he hadde under his hood [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 195

And, for to festne his hood under his chin,
11

Squire's Tale: 83

Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 24

[continues previous] A clote-leef he hadde under his hood [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 25

[continues previous] For swoot, and for to kepe his heed from hete. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 196

He hadde of gold y-wroght a curious pin:
11

Squire's Tale: 83

[continues previous] Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 24

[continues previous] A clote-leef he hadde under his hood
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 197

A love-knotte in the gretter ende ther was.
10

Knight's Tale: 5

That gretter was ther noon under the sonne. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 198

His heed was balled, that shoon as any glas,
10

Knight's Tale: 4

[continues previous] And in his tyme swich a conquerour,
10

Knight's Tale: 5

[continues previous] That gretter was ther noon under the sonne.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 34

For hit was lyk a thing of glas,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 35

But that hit shoon ful more clere;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 201

His eyen stepe, and rollinge in his heed,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 269

His eyen twinkled in his heed aright,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 755

A large man he was with eyen stepe,
12

Knight's Tale: 1273

The cercles of his eyen in his heed,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 203

His botes souple, his hors in greet estat.
11

Knight's Tale: 98

That whylom weren of so greet estat. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 99

And in his armes he hem alle up hente, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 162

In helle, ther ye been in your estat?' [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 204

Now certeinly he was a fair prelat;
11

Knight's Tale: 99

[continues previous] And in his armes he hem alle up hente,
10

Friar's Tale: 163

[continues previous] 'Nay, certeinly,' quod he, 'ther have we noon;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 205

He was nat pale as a for-pyned goost.
11

Summoner's Tale: 222

Fat as a whale, and walkinge as a swan; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 206

A fat swan loved he best of any roost.
11

Summoner's Tale: 222

[continues previous] Fat as a whale, and walkinge as a swan;
11

Franklin's Tale: 211

Had loved hir best of any creature [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1131

That she best loved of any thing; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 207

His palfrey was as broun as is a berye.
11

Franklin's Tale: 210

[continues previous] Which that y-cleped was Aurelius,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1132

[continues previous] His lust was muche in housholding.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 211

So muche of daliaunce and fair langage.
11

Merchant's Tale: 565

And many a letuarie hadde he ful fyn, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 212

He hadde maad ful many a mariage
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 168

Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 351

Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in mewe,
10

Knight's Tale: 6

Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne;
11

Clerk's Tale: 1071

Than was the revel of hir mariage. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 1072

Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 565

[continues previous] And many a letuarie hadde he ful fyn,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 213

Of yonge wommen, at his owne cost.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 665

In daunger hadde he at his owne gyse [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 666

The yonge girles of the diocyse, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 806

Right at myn owne cost, and be your gyde.
10

Miller's Tale: 643

For with the fal he brosten hadde his arm; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 644

But stonde he moste un-to his owne harm. [continues next]
10

Cook's Tale: 54

Anon he sente his bed and his array [continues next]
10

Cook's Tale: 55

Un-to a compeer of his owne sort, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 1071

[continues previous] Than was the revel of hir mariage.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 214

Un-to his ordre he was a noble post.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 665

[continues previous] In daunger hadde he at his owne gyse
11

Knight's Tale: 571

But half so wel biloved a man as he [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 572

Ne was ther never in court, of his degree; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 643

[continues previous] For with the fal he brosten hadde his arm;
10

Miller's Tale: 644

[continues previous] But stonde he moste un-to his owne harm.
10

Cook's Tale: 54

[continues previous] Anon he sente his bed and his array
10

Cook's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Un-to a compeer of his owne sort,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 215

Ful wel biloved and famulier was he
11

Knight's Tale: 571

[continues previous] But half so wel biloved a man as he
11

Shipman's Tale: 31

That in his hous as famulier was he [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 216

With frankeleyns over-al in his contree,
11

Shipman's Tale: 31

[continues previous] That in his hous as famulier was he
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 226

Is signe that a man is wel y-shrive.
11

Parson's Tale: 87

... The fourthe signe is, that he ne lette nat for shame to shewen his confessioun. Swich was the confessioun of the Magdelene, that ne spared, for no shame of hem that weren atte feste, for to go to oure lord Iesu Crist and biknowe to him hir sinnes. The fifthe signe is, that a man or a womman be obeisant to receyven the penaunce that him is enioyned for hise sinnes; for certes Iesu Crist, for the giltes of a man, was obedient to the deeth.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 229

For many a man so hard is of his herte,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 739

He may nat spare, al-thogh he were his brother; [continues next]
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 119

With herte sore and ful of besy peyne.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 84

The tyme is than so savorous.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 85

Hard is his herte that loveth nought
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 230

He may nat wepe al-thogh him sore smerte.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 739

[continues previous] He may nat spare, al-thogh he were his brother;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 740

[continues previous] He moot as wel seye o word as another.
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 118

[continues previous] Thus for your deth I may wel wepe and pleyne
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 119

[continues previous] With herte sore and ful of besy peyne.'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 235

And certeinly he hadde a mery note;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 759

Eek therto he was right a mery man, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 236

Wel coude he singe and pleyen on a rote.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 760

[continues previous] And after soper pleyen he bigan,
12

Manciple's Tale: 9

Pleyen he coude on every minstralcye,
12

Manciple's Tale: 10

And singen, that it was a melodye,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 746

, [the] blisful and the lighte;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 747

Wel coude she singe and lustily,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 237

Of yeddinges he bar utterly the prys.
11

Monk's Tale: 120

And bar the heven on his nekke longe. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7414

About his nekke he bar a bible, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 238

His nekke whyt was as the flour-de-lys;
11

Monk's Tale: 120

[continues previous] And bar the heven on his nekke longe.
11

Monk's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Was never wight, sith that the world bigan,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7414

[continues previous] About his nekke he bar a bible,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 244

Acorded nat, as by his facultee,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 435

Him for to seke and have his aqueyntaunce, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 436

Noght knowinge of his false governaunce. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 245

To have with seke lazars aqueyntaunce.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 435

[continues previous] Him for to seke and have his aqueyntaunce,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 247

For to delen with no swich poraille,
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... hem that been of oon affinitee, or elles with hem with whiche hir fadres or hir kinrede han deled in the sinne of lecherie; this sinne maketh hem lyk to houndes, that taken no kepe to kinrede. And certes, parentele is in two maneres, outher goostly or fleshly; goostly, as for to delen with hise godsibbes. For right so as he that engendreth a child is his fleshly fader, right so is his godfader his fader espirituel. For which a womman may in no lasse sinne assemblen with hir godsib than with hir owene fleshly brother. The fifthe spece is thilke abhominable sinne, of which that no ...
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 250

Curteys he was, and lowly of servyse.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 99

Curteys he was, lowly, and servisable,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 100

And carf biforn his fader at the table.
10

Knight's Tale: 589

And bar him so in pees and eek in werre, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 591

And in this blisse lete I now Arcite, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

And eek he was of swich discrecioun, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 159

That half so trewe a man ther nas of love [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 590

[continues previous] Ther nas no man that Theseus hath derre.
11

Knight's Tale: 1039

For in the lond ther nas no crafty man,
14

Squire's Tale: 13

[continues previous] Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 14

[continues previous] That ther nas no-wher in no regioun [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 15

So excellent a lord in alle thing;
11

Squire's Tale: 422

For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude.
11

Squire's Tale: 423

For ther nas never yet no man on lyve —
11

Monk's Tale: 3

And fillen so that ther nas no remedie
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 159

[continues previous] That half so trewe a man ther nas of love
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 167

Ther nas no lak, but that he was agast [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 252

He was the beste beggere in his hous;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

[continues previous] No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas,
14

Squire's Tale: 13

[continues previous] Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

[continues previous] And eek he was of swich discrecioun,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 167

[continues previous] Ther nas no lak, but that he was agast
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 254

Noon of his bretheren cam ther in his haunt;]
10

Merchant's Tale: 230

Bitwixen freendes in disputisoun, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 231

Ther fil a stryf bitwixe his bretheren two, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 255

For thogh a widwe hadde noght a sho,
10

Merchant's Tale: 231

[continues previous] Ther fil a stryf bitwixe his bretheren two,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 460

That therin dwelled hadde many a yeer, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 256

So plesaunt was his "In principio,"
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 461

[continues previous] Which was so plesaunt and so servisable
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 257

Yet wolde he have a ferthing, er he wente.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 610

He coude bettre than his lord purchace. [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 480

As though he wolde han slayn it er he wente.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 258

His purchas was wel bettre than his rente.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 609

[continues previous] With grene treës shadwed was his place. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 610

[continues previous] He coude bettre than his lord purchace. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 259

And rage he coude, as it were right a whelpe.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 610

[continues previous] He coude bettre than his lord purchace.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 611

[continues previous] Ful riche he was astored prively,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 262

With a thredbar cope, as is a povre scoler,
13

Miller's Tale: 4

With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 263

But he was lyk a maister or a pope.
13

Miller's Tale: 4

[continues previous] With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler,
13

Miller's Tale: 5

[continues previous] Had lerned art, but al his fantasye
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 268

And in his harping, whan that he had songe,
12

Knight's Tale: 682

Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke,
11

Prioress' Tale: 209

As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 269

His eyen twinkled in his heed aright,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 201

His eyen stepe, and rollinge in his heed,
12

Knight's Tale: 1273

The cercles of his eyen in his heed,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 271

This worthy limitour was cleped Huberd.
11

Friar's Prologue: 1

This worthy limitour, this noble Frere, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 31

That other sone was cleped Cambalo. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 32

A doghter hadde this worthy king also, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 272

A Marchant was ther with a forked berd,
10

Friar's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] He made alwey a maner louring chere
11

Squire's Tale: 31

[continues previous] That other sone was cleped Cambalo.
11

Squire's Tale: 32

[continues previous] A doghter hadde this worthy king also,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 273

In mottelee, and hye on horse he sat,
10

Knight's Tale: 1317

Up-on his heed he wered of laurer grene [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 730

This sely man sat stille, as he were deed; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 411

Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 274

Up-on his heed a Flaundrish bever hat;
10

Knight's Tale: 1316

[continues previous] His voys was as a trompe thunderinge.
10

Knight's Tale: 1317

[continues previous] Up-on his heed he wered of laurer grene
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 729

[continues previous] How Xantippa caste pisse up-on his heed; [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 84

He hadde up-on a courtepy of grene; [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 85

An hat up-on his heed with frenges blake. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 411

[continues previous] Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 275

His botes clasped faire and fetisly.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 729

[continues previous] How Xantippa caste pisse up-on his heed;
12

Friar's Tale: 85

[continues previous] An hat up-on his heed with frenges blake.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2265

Of shoon and botes, newe and faire,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5838

And spak ful faire in his praying; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 276

His resons he spak ful solempnely,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 124

[continues previous] And Frensh she spak ful faire and fetisly,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5838

[continues previous] And spak ful faire in his praying;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 281

This worthy man ful wel his wit bisette;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 140

ne woot wel that a man is a thing imaginable and sensible; and [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1665

To kepe it ay; but now, ful wel he wiste, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1666

His lady nas no lenger on to triste. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 282

Ther wiste no wight that he was in dette,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 493

Ther was no wight, save god and he, that wiste,
11

Merchant's Tale: 762

So secrely, that no wight of it wiste, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 51

For in this world, certein, ther no wight is,
10

Franklin's Tale: 52

That he ne dooth or seith som-tyme amis.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 139

[continues previous] how so that this knowinge is universel, yet nis ther no wight that
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 140

[continues previous] ne woot wel that a man is a thing imaginable and sensible; and
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 481

That, to ben in his gode governaunce, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1665

[continues previous] To kepe it ay; but now, ful wel he wiste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1666

[continues previous] His lady nas no lenger on to triste.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 283

So estatly was he of his governaunce,
11

Merchant's Tale: 762

[continues previous] So secrely, that no wight of it wiste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 481

[continues previous] That, to ben in his gode governaunce, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 482

[continues previous] So wys he was, she was no more afered, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 284

With his bargaynes, and with his chevisaunce.
12

Shipman's Tale: 329

That nedes moste he make a chevisaunce. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 347

Maken a chevisaunce, as for his beste, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 348

And thanne he sholde been in Ioye and reste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 481

[continues previous] That, to ben in his gode governaunce,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 285

For sothe he was a worthy man with-alle,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 753

A semely man our hoste was with-alle
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 754

For to han been a marshal in an halle;
12

Shipman's Tale: 329

[continues previous] That nedes moste he make a chevisaunce.
12

Shipman's Tale: 330

[continues previous] For he was bounde in a reconissaunce
10

Shipman's Tale: 347

[continues previous] Maken a chevisaunce, as for his beste,
10

Shipman's Tale: 348

[continues previous] And thanne he sholde been in Ioye and reste.
10

Legend of Thisbe: 10

And sooth to seyn, that o man hadde a sone, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 286

But sooth to seyn, I noot how men him calle.
10

Miller's Tale: 151

But sooth to seyn, he was somdel squaymous
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 11: 28

your herte? this is to seyn, how sholden men demen the sooth of
10

Legend of Thisbe: 10

[continues previous] And sooth to seyn, that o man hadde a sone,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 287

A Clerk ther was of Oxenford also,
11

Miller's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 2

A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 527

He som-tyme was a clerk of Oxenford,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 673

And eek ther was som-tyme a clerk at Rome,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 288

That un-to logik hadde longe y-go.
11

Miller's Tale: 2

[continues previous] A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 293

For he had geten him yet no benefyce,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 516

And on his bak toward the wode him beer, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 517

For yet ne was ther no man that him sewed. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 294

Ne was so worldly for to have offyce.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 517

[continues previous] For yet ne was ther no man that him sewed.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 295

For him was lever have at his beddes heed
12

Miller's Tale: 25

On shelves couched at his beddes heed: [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 26

His presse y-covered with a falding reed. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 411

Right at her beddes heed, so gan he hye [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1696

And fond, as hap was, at his beddes heed,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 296

Twenty bokes, clad in blak or reed,
11

Miller's Tale: 26

[continues previous] His presse y-covered with a falding reed.
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... more-over, the wrecched swollen membres that they shewe thurgh the degysinge, in departinge of hir hoses in whyt and reed, semeth that half hir shameful privee membres weren flayn. And if so be that they departen hire hoses in othere colours, as is whyt and blak, or whyt and blew, or blak and reed, and so forth; thanne semeth it, as by variance of colour, that half the partie of hir privee membres were corrupt by the fyr of seint Antony, or by cancre, or by other swich meschaunce. Of the hindre part of hir buttokes, it is ful horrible for to see. For ... [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 569

Which that the word in erthe spak,
12

Hous of Fame 2: 570

Be hit clothed reed or blak; [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 410

[continues previous] Whan he fro Dido stal in her sleping,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 297

Of Aristotle and his philosophye,
11

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... mone. And more-over, the wrecched swollen membres that they shewe thurgh the degysinge, in departinge of hir hoses in whyt and reed, semeth that half hir shameful privee membres weren flayn. And if so be that they departen hire hoses in othere colours, as is whyt and blak, or whyt and blew, or blak and reed, and so forth; thanne semeth it, as by variance of colour, that half the partie of hir privee membres were corrupt by the fyr of seint Antony, or by cancre, or by other swich meschaunce. Of the hindre part of hir buttokes, it is ful horrible for to see. For certes, ...
12

Hous of Fame 2: 571

[continues previous] And hath so verray his lyknesse
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 298

Than robes riche, or fithele, or gay sautrye.
13

Miller's Tale: 27

And al above ther lay a gay sautrye, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 299

But al be that he was a philosophre,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 565

And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 27

[continues previous] And al above ther lay a gay sautrye,
13

Man of Law's Prologue: 25

Wel can Senek, and many a philosophre [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 844

And broghte gold un-to this philosophre, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 300

Yet hadde he but litel gold in cofre;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 565

[continues previous] And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee.
13

Man of Law's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] Biwailen tyme, more than gold in cofre.
12

Franklin's Tale: 843

[continues previous] With herte soor he gooth un-to his cofre,
12

Franklin's Tale: 844

[continues previous] And broghte gold un-to this philosophre,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 380

And is his tresour, and his gold in cofre.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 306

Noght o word spak he more than was nede,
10

Clerk's Tale: 550

Ne of hir doghter noght a word spak she.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1057

And held hir pees; not o word spak she more.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 308

And short and quik, and ful of hy sentence.
11

Physician's Tale: 53

She spak, and alle hir wordes more and lesse [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 54

Souninge in vertu and in gentillesse. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 335

And in hem greet [and hy] sentence; [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 336

And folk of digne reverence, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 309

Souninge in moral vertu was his speche,
12

Physician's Tale: 54

[continues previous] Souninge in vertu and in gentillesse. [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Shamfast she was in maydens shamfastnesse, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 335

[continues previous] And in hem greet [and hy] sentence;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1786

And most of love and vertu was his speche, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1787

And in despyt hadde alle wrecchednesse; [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 310

And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.
12

Physician's Tale: 54

[continues previous] Souninge in vertu and in gentillesse.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1786

[continues previous] And most of love and vertu was his speche,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1787

[continues previous] And in despyt hadde alle wrecchednesse;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 312

That often hadde been at the parvys,
11

Knight's Tale: 122

The Minotaur, which that he slough in Crete. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1082

Was shet the riche chevesaile, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 313

Ther was also, ful riche of excellence.
11

Knight's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Of gold ful riche, in which ther was y-bete
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1082

[continues previous] Was shet the riche chevesaile,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1083

[continues previous] In which ther was ful gret plentee
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 318

For his science, and for his heigh renoun
12

Monk's Tale: 106

Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 107

For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 124

What for his strengthe, and for his heigh bountee,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 319

Of fees and robes hadde he many oon.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 343

His breed, his ale, was alwey after oon; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 106

[continues previous] Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun;
12

Monk's Tale: 107

[continues previous] For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 491

To herberwe briddes many oon. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 320

So greet a purchasour was no-wher noon.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 345

With-oute bake mete was never his hous, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1973

So greet a weping was ther noon, certayn, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 14

That ther nas no-wher in no regioun [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 492

[continues previous] So riche a yerd was never noon
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3346

And he was called by name a Freend; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3347

A trewer felowe was no-wher noon. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 321

Al was fee simple to him in effect,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 344

[continues previous] A bettre envyned man was no-wher noon.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 345

[continues previous] With-oute bake mete was never his hous,
11

Knight's Tale: 1973

[continues previous] So greet a weping was ther noon, certayn,
10

Squire's Tale: 13

[continues previous] Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3347

[continues previous] A trewer felowe was no-wher noon.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3348

[continues previous] In haste to him I wente anoon,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 252

He was the beste beggere in his hous;
12

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
13

Squire's Tale: 14

That ther nas no-wher in no regioun
13

Squire's Tale: 15

So excellent a lord in alle thing;
11

Squire's Tale: 423

For ther nas never yet no man on lyve — [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 159

That half so trewe a man ther nas of love
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 565

But wel he wiste, as fer as tonges spaken,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 566

Ther nas a man of gretter hardinesse
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 324

And yet he semed bisier than he was.
11

Squire's Tale: 423

[continues previous] For ther nas never yet no man on lyve —
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 325

In termes hadde he caas and domes alle,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 199

That with hir termes and hir domes [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 326

That from the tyme of king William were falle.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 199

[continues previous] That with hir termes and hir domes
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 327

Therto he coude endyte, and make a thing,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 95

He coude songes make and wel endyte, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 96

Iuste and eek daunce, and wel purtreye and wryte, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 121

To al this thing, ther seyde no wight nay; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 886

They been accorded, rouninge thurgh a wal, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 887

Ther no wight coude han founde out swich a sleighte. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

And if a rethor coude faire endyte, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 388

He in a cronique saufly mighte it wryte, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 328

Ther coude no wight pinche at his wryting;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 95

[continues previous] He coude songes make and wel endyte,
11

Clerk's Tale: 121

[continues previous] To al this thing, ther seyde no wight nay;
13

Merchant's Tale: 887

[continues previous] Ther no wight coude han founde out swich a sleighte.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

[continues previous] And if a rethor coude faire endyte,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 329

And every statut coude he pleyn by rote.
10

Prioress' Tale: 70

Til he the firste vers coude al by rote. [continues next]
10

Prioress' Tale: 71

Noght wiste he what this Latin was to seye, [continues next]
12

Prioress' Tale: 93

Fro day to day, til he coude it by rote, [continues next]
12

Prioress' Tale: 94

And than he song it wel and boldely [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 330

He rood but hoomly in a medlee cote
10

Prioress' Tale: 71

[continues previous] Noght wiste he what this Latin was to seye,
12

Prioress' Tale: 93

[continues previous] Fro day to day, til he coude it by rote,
12

Prioress' Tale: 94

[continues previous] And than he song it wel and boldely
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 332

Of his array telle I no lenger tale.
11

Franklin's Tale: 437

What sholde I make a lenger tale of this? [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 438

Un-to his brotheres bed he comen is, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 333

A Frankeleyn was in his companye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 437

[continues previous] What sholde I make a lenger tale of this?
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 14

Whyt was his face as payndemayn, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 15

His lippes rede as rose; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 334

Whyt was his berd, as is the dayesye.
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 14

[continues previous] Whyt was his face as payndemayn,
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 15

[continues previous] His lippes rede as rose;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 343

His breed, his ale, was alwey after oon;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 319

Of fees and robes hadde he many oon. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 344

A bettre envyned man was no-wher noon.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 320

[continues previous] So greet a purchasour was no-wher noon. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 321

Al was fee simple to him in effect, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3346

And he was called by name a Freend; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3347

A trewer felowe was no-wher noon. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 345

With-oute bake mete was never his hous,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 320

[continues previous] So greet a purchasour was no-wher noon.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 321

[continues previous] Al was fee simple to him in effect,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3347

[continues previous] A trewer felowe was no-wher noon.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 347

It snewed in his hous of mete and drinke,
11

Summoner's Tale: 167

Of mete and drinke, and in hir foul delyt. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 192

To gete a glotoun deyntee mete and drinke! [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 193

Of this matere, o Paul, wel canstow trete, [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 61

To fostre it tendrely with mete and drinke, [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 62

Of alle deyntees that thou canst bithinke, [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 63

And keep it al-so clenly as thou may; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... of tresor, of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been in defaute of ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... hem that been corrupt; and this sinne men clepen pollucioun, that comth in foure maneres. Somtyme, of languissinge of body; for the humours been to ranke and habundaunt in the body of man. Somtyme of infermetee; for the feblesse of the vertu retentif, as phisik maketh mencioun. Som-tyme, for surfeet of mete and drinke. And somtyme of vileyns thoghtes, that been enclosed in mannes minde whan he goth to slepe; which may nat been with-oute sinne. For which men moste kepen hem wysely, or elles may men sinnen ful grevously. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 95

After this, thou shalt understonde, that bodily peyne stant in wakinge; for Iesu Crist seith, 'waketh, and preyeth that ye ne entre in wikked temptacioun.' Ye shul understanden also, that fastinge stant in three thinges; in forberinge of bodily mete and drinke, and in forberinge of worldly Iolitee, and in forberinge of deedly sinne; this is to seyn, that a man shal kepen him fro deedly sinne with al his might. [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 348

Of alle deyntees that men coude thinke.
11

Summoner's Tale: 167

[continues previous] Of mete and drinke, and in hir foul delyt.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 193

[continues previous] Of this matere, o Paul, wel canstow trete,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 62

[continues previous] Of alle deyntees that thou canst bithinke,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been ...
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... hem that been corrupt; and this sinne men clepen pollucioun, that comth in foure maneres. Somtyme, of languissinge of body; for the humours been to ranke and habundaunt in the body of man. Somtyme of infermetee; for the feblesse of the vertu retentif, as phisik maketh mencioun. Som-tyme, for surfeet of mete and drinke. And somtyme of vileyns thoghtes, that been enclosed in mannes minde whan he goth to slepe; which may nat been with-oute sinne. For which men moste kepen hem wysely, or elles may men sinnen ful grevously.
11

Parson's Tale: 95

[continues previous] After this, thou shalt understonde, that bodily peyne stant in wakinge; for Iesu Crist seith, 'waketh, and preyeth that ye ne entre in wikked temptacioun.' Ye shul understanden also, that fastinge stant in three thinges; in forberinge of bodily mete and drinke, and in forberinge of worldly Iolitee, and in forberinge of deedly sinne; this is to seyn, that a man shal kepen him fro deedly sinne with al his might.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 350

So chaunged he his mete and his soper.
11

Merchant's Tale: 564

Of spyces hote, tencresen his corage; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 565

And many a letuarie hadde he ful fyn, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 351

Ful many a fat partrich hadde he in mewe,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 168

Ful many a deyntee hors hadde he in stable:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 212

He hadde maad ful many a mariage
10

Knight's Tale: 6

Ful many a riche contree hadde he wonne;
11

Merchant's Tale: 565

[continues previous] And many a letuarie hadde he ful fyn,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 353

Wo was his cook, but-if his sauce were
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 354

Poynaunt and sharp, and redy al his gere.
14

Reeve's Tale: 96

This Aleyn maketh redy al his gere, [continues next]
14

Reeve's Tale: 97

And on an hors the sak he caste anon. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 355

His table dormant in his halle alway
14

Reeve's Tale: 96

[continues previous] This Aleyn maketh redy al his gere,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 356

Stood redy covered al the longe day.
11

Legend of Thisbe: 119

But al to longe, allas! at hoom was he. [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 120

The mone shoon, men mighte wel y-see, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 357

At sessiouns ther was he lord and sire;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 52

Ful ofte tyme he hadde the bord bigonne [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 215

That he was born, ful ofte he seyde, 'alas!' [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 216

And so bifel, by aventure or cas, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 794

Ful ofte tyme he, Pluto, and his quene, [continues next]
10

Prioress' Tale: 76

This preyde he him to construe and declare [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 365

In helle wher that he is lord and sire,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 366

Nis ther more wo, ne more rancour ne ire.
10

Parson's Tale: 47

Now comth biwreying of conseil, thurgh which a man is defamed; certes, unnethe may he restore the damage. Now comth manace, that is an open folye; for he that ofte manaceth, he threteth more than he may perfourne ful ofte tyme. Now cometh ydel wordes, that is with-outen profit of him that speketh tho wordes, and eek of him that herkneth tho wordes. Or elles ydel wordes been tho that been nedelees, or with-outen entente of naturel profit. And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 119

causes, wil desireth and embraceth ful ofte tyme the deeth [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 119

[continues previous] But al to longe, allas! at hoom was he.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1576

And ofte tyme he was in purpos grete [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1584

Ful pitously, he lefte it nought for slouthe, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 358

Ful ofte tyme he was knight of the shire.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

[continues previous] At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 52

[continues previous] Ful ofte tyme he hadde the bord bigonne
10

Knight's Tale: 215

[continues previous] That he was born, ful ofte he seyde, 'alas!'
12

Merchant's Tale: 794

[continues previous] Ful ofte tyme he, Pluto, and his quene,
10

Physician's Tale: 62

She hath ful ofte tyme syk hir feyned,
10

Prioress' Tale: 76

[continues previous] This preyde he him to construe and declare
10

Prioress' Tale: 77

[continues previous] Ful ofte tyme upon his knowes bare.
12

Parson's Tale: 47

[continues previous] Now comth biwreying of conseil, thurgh which a man is defamed; certes, unnethe may he restore the damage. Now comth manace, that is an open folye; for he that ofte manaceth, he threteth more than he may perfourne ful ofte tyme. Now cometh ydel wordes, that is with-outen profit of him that speketh tho wordes, and eek of him that herkneth tho wordes. Or elles ydel wordes been tho that been nedelees, or with-outen entente of naturel profit. And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme venial sinne, yet sholde men ...
10

Parson's Tale: 83

... a man or a womman eschue the companye of hem by whiche he douteth to be tempted; for al-be-it so that the dede is withstonden, yet is ther greet temptacioun. Soothly a whyt wal, al-though it ne brenne noght fully by stikinge of a candele, yet is the wal blak of the leyt. Ful ofte tyme I rede, that no man truste in his owene perfeccioun, but he be stronger than Sampson, and holier than Daniel, and wyser than Salomon.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 119

[continues previous] causes, wil desireth and embraceth ful ofte tyme the deeth
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1576

[continues previous] And ofte tyme he was in purpos grete
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1583

[continues previous] To hir he wroot yet ofte tyme al newe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1584

[continues previous] Ful pitously, he lefte it nought for slouthe,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 359

An anlas and a gipser al of silk
15+

Miller's Tale: 49

A ceynt she werede barred al of silk, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 51

Up-on hir lendes, ful of many a gore. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 64

And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 65

Tasseld with silk, and perled with latoun. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 639

And in a purs of silk, heng on his sherte, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1195

For through hir smokke, wrought with silk, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 360

Heng at his girdel, whyt as morne milk.
15+

Miller's Tale: 50

[continues previous] A barmclooth eek as whyt as morne milk [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 64

[continues previous] And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether
11

Miller's Tale: 138

As whyt as is the blosme up-on the rys. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 639

[continues previous] And in a purs of silk, heng on his sherte,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1196

[continues previous] The flesh was seen, as whyt as milk.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 361

A shirreve hadde he been, and a countour;
15+

Miller's Tale: 50

[continues previous] A barmclooth eek as whyt as morne milk
11

Miller's Tale: 137

[continues previous] And ther-up-on he hadde a gay surplys
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 365

Were with us eek, clothed in o liveree,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 289

In Surrie, with a greet solempne route, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 366

Of a solempne and greet fraternitee.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 289

[continues previous] In Surrie, with a greet solempne route, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 290

[continues previous] And hastily this sowdan sente his sonde, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 367

Ful fresh and newe hir gere apyked was;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 459

Ful streite y-teyd, and shoos ful moiste and newe. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 460

Bold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 158

But by hir cote-armures, and by hir gere, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1322

Al armed, sauf hir heddes, in al hir gere, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1323

Ful richely in alle maner thinges. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 290

[continues previous] And hastily this sowdan sente his sonde,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 368

Hir knyves were y-chaped noght with bras,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 460

[continues previous] Bold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.
11

Knight's Tale: 157

[continues previous] Nat fully quike, ne fully dede they were,
11

Knight's Tale: 158

[continues previous] But by hir cote-armures, and by hir gere,
12

Knight's Tale: 1322

[continues previous] Al armed, sauf hir heddes, in al hir gere,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 370

Hir girdles and hir pouches every-deel.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 40

And whiche they weren, and of what degree; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 371

Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 39

[continues previous] Of ech of hem, so as it semed me,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 42

The firste night had many a mery fit
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 375

For catel hadde they y-nogh and rente,
14

Reeve's Tale: 42

Algate they wolde hir wyves wenden so. [continues next]
14

Reeve's Tale: 43

And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 7

For litel was hir catel and hir rente; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 737

She rente, and eek hir fingres longe and smale [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 376

And eek hir wyves wolde it wel assente;
13

Miller's Tale: 525

Wel bet than thee, by Iesu, Absolon! [continues next]
14

Reeve's Tale: 42

[continues previous] Algate they wolde hir wyves wenden so. [continues next]
14

Reeve's Tale: 43

[continues previous] And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 32

Or elles that the lord best wolde assente [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 7

[continues previous] For litel was hir catel and hir rente;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 486

It wolde wel have lyked me. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 737

[continues previous] She rente, and eek hir fingres longe and smale
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 377

And elles certein were they to blame.
13

Miller's Tale: 524

[continues previous] I love another, and elles I were to blame,
12

Reeve's Tale: 43

[continues previous] And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich,
10

Clerk's Tale: 32

[continues previous] Or elles that the lord best wolde assente
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 485

[continues previous] By laddre, or elles by degree,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 378

It is ful fair to been y-clept "ma dame,"
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 85

Quod Pandarus, 'ma dame, god yow see, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 379

And goon to vigilyës al bifore,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 86

[continues previous] With al your book and al the companye!'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 384

Wel coude he knowe a draughte of London ale.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 128

Now, have I dronke a draughte of corny ale,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 386

Maken mortreux, and wel bake a pye.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1093

To love, it was a greet empryse. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 387

But greet harm was it, as it thoughte me,
11

Knight's Tale: 893

Gret pitee was it, as it thoughte hem alle, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1093

[continues previous] To love, it was a greet empryse.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1094

[continues previous] But as my wit coude best suffyse,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 49

That it was May me thoughte tho, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 50

It is fyve yere or more ago; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 678

That me thoughte it no briddes song,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 679

But it was wonder lyk to be
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 388

That on his shine a mormal hadde he;
10

Knight's Tale: 894

[continues previous] That ever swich a chaunce sholde falle;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 49

[continues previous] That it was May me thoughte tho,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 391

For aught I woot, he was of Dertemouthe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1177

She cold was and with-outen sentement, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1178

For aught he woot, for breeth ne felte he noon; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 392

He rood up-on a rouncy, as he couthe,
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith by Zakarie the prophete, 'I wol confounde the ryderes of swiche horses.' This folk taken litel reward of the rydinge of goddes sone of hevene, and of his harneys whan he rood up-on the asse, and ne hadde noon other harneys but the povre clothes of hise disciples; ne we ne rede nat that evere he rood on other beest. I speke this for the sinne of superfluitee, and nat for reasonable honestetee, whan reson it requyreth. And forther, certes pryde is greetly ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1178

[continues previous] For aught he woot, for breeth ne felte he noon;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 394

A daggere hanging on a laas hadde he
11

Merchant's Tale: 121

Thurgh which his fadres benisoun he wan. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 606

Whyl that he sang; so chaunteth he and craketh. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 3: 3

he hadde his nekke y-charged with precious stones of the rede [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1574

With that his arm al sodeynly he thriste [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 395

Aboute his nekke under his arm adoun.
11

Merchant's Tale: 120

[continues previous] Bond the kides skin aboute his nekke; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Thurgh which his fadres benisoun he wan. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 459

Forth comth the preest, with stole aboute his nekke,
10

Merchant's Tale: 605

[continues previous] The slakke skin aboute his nekke shaketh,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 3: 2

[continues previous] al of gold, yit sholde it never staunchen his coveitise; and though
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 3: 3

[continues previous] he hadde his nekke y-charged with precious stones of the rede
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1574

[continues previous] With that his arm al sodeynly he thriste
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1575

[continues previous] Under hir nekke, and at the laste hir kiste.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 396

The hote somer had maad his hewe al broun;
10

Miller's Tale: 444

But er that he had maad al this array, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 445

He sente his knave, and eek his wenche also, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 120

[continues previous] Bond the kides skin aboute his nekke;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 14

whan the hote somer is comen. Thy might atempreth the
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 6: 21

somer-sesoun warminge; and the hote somer dryeth the cornes;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1213

She was not broun ne dun of hewe, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 397

And, certeinly, he was a good felawe.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 651

He wolde suffre, for a quart of wyn, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 652

A good felawe to have his concubyn [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 653

A twelf-month, and excuse him atte fulle: [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 444

[continues previous] But er that he had maad al this array,
10

Miller's Tale: 445

[continues previous] He sente his knave, and eek his wenche also,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1213

[continues previous] She was not broun ne dun of hewe,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 398

Ful many a draughte of wyn had he y-drawe
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 651

[continues previous] He wolde suffre, for a quart of wyn,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 652

[continues previous] A good felawe to have his concubyn
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 653

[continues previous] A twelf-month, and excuse him atte fulle:
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

[continues previous] Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 402

By water he sente hem hoom to every lond.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 19

He sente hem word by lettres they schulden hye blyve,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 405

His herberwe and his mone, his lodemenage,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 40

That ther nas noon that liste been his fo, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 301

That, in his dayes, nas ther noon y-founde [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 406

Ther nas noon swich from Hulle to Cartage.
11

Knight's Tale: 1732

For ther nas noon so wys that coude seye,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 40

[continues previous] That ther nas noon that liste been his fo,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 162

Of thise three pointes ther nas noon him liche; [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 301

[continues previous] That, in his dayes, nas ther noon y-founde
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 407

Hardy he was, and wys to undertake;
11

Squire's Tale: 18

He kepte his lay, to which that he was sworn;
11

Squire's Tale: 19

And ther-to be was hardy, wys, and riche,
13

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

[continues previous] And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche. —
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 408

With many a tempest hadde his berd been shake.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 18

He hadde a semely nose. [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 19

His heer, his berd was lyk saffroun, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 409

He knew wel alle the havenes, as they were,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 18

[continues previous] He hadde a semely nose.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 413

With us ther was a Doctour of Phisyk,
11

Squire's Tale: 63

Of which if I shal tellen al tharray, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1130

For windowe on the wal ne was ther noon,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 336

For she hir-self wolde al the contree lede.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde,
15+

Squire's Tale: 62

[continues previous] That in this world ne was ther noon it liche.
10

Squire's Tale: 86

In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
11

Franklin's Tale: 50

Ye shul it lerne, wher-so ye wole or noon.
11

Franklin's Tale: 51

For in this world, certein, ther no wight is,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature,
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 93

For in that contree was ther noon [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 94

That to him dorste ryde or goon, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 167

Wher-as in Chaldey clerk ne was ther noon [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 311

Ne more labour mighte in werre endure,
12

Monk's Tale: 312

Was noon, thogh al this world men sholde seke.
13

Book of the Duchesse: 818

Soth to seyn, I saw [ther] oon [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 819

That was lyk noon of [al] the route; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

Ne ther was noon to teche me; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 946

But iren was ther noon ne steel; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 947

For al was gold, men mighte it see,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1073

For in this world is noon it liche,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1074

Ne by a thousand deel so riche,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4184

In al this world no richer was,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4185

Ne better ordeigned therwithal.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5801

In al this world than pore noon
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 129

For al this world ne can I reden what
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 177

In al this world ther nis a bettre knight
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 675

That al this world ne mighte hir love unbinde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1323

Thal al this world ne mighte our blisse telle.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1646

For in this world ther liveth lady noon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 203

Ne noon to him dar speke a word for drede. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 415

To speke of phisik and of surgerye;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 452

[continues previous] That to the offring bifore hir sholde goon;
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 94

[continues previous] That to him dorste ryde or goon,
11

Monk's Tale: 168

[continues previous] That wiste to what fyn his dremes souned.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 10

hadde comprehended al this by noumbre of acountinge in [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 11

astronomye. And over this, he was wont to seken the causes [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 819

[continues previous] That was lyk noon of [al] the route;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

[continues previous] Ne ther was noon to teche me;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 945

[continues previous] And sharpe for to kerven weel.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 203

[continues previous] Ne noon to him dar speke a word for drede.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 416

For he was grounded in astronomye.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 10

[continues previous] hadde comprehended al this by noumbre of acountinge in
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 11

[continues previous] astronomye. And over this, he was wont to seken the causes
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 418

In houres, by his magik naturel.
11

Franklin's Tale: 426

That hadde this mones mansions in minde,
13

Franklin's Tale: 427

Or other magik naturel above, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 419

Wel coude he fortunen the ascendent
13

Franklin's Tale: 428

[continues previous] He sholde wel make my brother han his love.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 422

Were it of hoot or cold, or moiste, or drye,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 402

Another seyde, the fyr was over hoot:
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 403

But, be it hoot or cold, I dar seye this,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 423

And where engendred, and of what humour;
11

Knight's Tale: 517

Engendred of humour malencolyk,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 427

Ful redy hadde he his apothecaries,
10

Friar's Tale: 23

He hadde a Somnour redy to his hond, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 428

To sende him drogges and his letuaries,
10

Knight's Tale: 1766

Togidre y-met, and wroght his felawe wo; [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 23

[continues previous] He hadde a Somnour redy to his hond,
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 287

They lived in Ioye and in felicitee; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere. [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 48

His bretheren mighte yeve him lond whan he good cowde. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

For ech of hem made other for to winne;
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

[continues previous] Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 209

Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 447

[continues previous] For whan they sawe it moste nedes be, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 375

[continues previous] To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

[continues previous] And ech of hem gan other for tassure
11

Shipman's Tale: 42

[continues previous] Of bretherhede, whyl that hir lyf may dure.
11

Shipman's Tale: 142

And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste.
11

Monk's Tale: 288

[continues previous] For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
11

Monk's Tale: 746

For to biginne a newe werre agayn. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

[continues previous] And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 15

is lakkinge to other, they ne han no power to bringen a good that
10

Former Age: 51

Hadden no fantasye to debate,
10

Former Age: 52

But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce;
11

Parlement of Foules: 670

For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 430

Hir frendschipe nas nat newe to biginne.
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
12

Monk's Tale: 745

[continues previous] Whan he escaped was, he can nat stente [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 746

[continues previous] For to biginne a newe werre agayn. [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 3

... sith I have declared yow what thing is Penitence, now shul ye understonde that ther been three accions of Penitence. The firste accion of Penitence is, that a man be baptized after that he hath sinned. Seint Augustin seith: 'but he be penitent for his olde sinful lyf, he may nat biginne the newe clene lif.' For certes, if he be baptized withouten penitence of his olde gilt, he receiveth the mark of baptisme, but nat the grace ne the remission of his sinnes, til he have repentance verray. Another defaute is this, that men doon deedly sinne after that they han received baptisme. ... [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 431

Wel knew he the olde Esculapius,
12

Monk's Tale: 745

[continues previous] Whan he escaped was, he can nat stente
12

Monk's Tale: 747

[continues previous] He wende wel, for that fortune him sente
15+

Parson's Tale: 3

[continues previous] And now, sith I have declared yow what thing is Penitence, now shul ye understonde that ther been three accions of Penitence. The firste accion of Penitence is, that a man be baptized after that he hath sinned. Seint Augustin seith: 'but he be penitent for his olde sinful lyf, he may nat biginne the newe clene lif.' For certes, if he be baptized withouten penitence of his olde gilt, he receiveth the mark of baptisme, but nat the grace ne the remission of his sinnes, til he have repentance verray. Another defaute is this, that men doon deedly sinne after that they han received ...
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 433

Old Ypocras, Haly, and Galien;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 572

Noght Ypocras, ne Galien;
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 437

Of his diete mesurable was he,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 187

He wolde been the more mesurable [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 188

Of his diete, sittinge at his table. [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 438

For it was of no superfluitee,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 188

[continues previous] Of his diete, sittinge at his table.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 441

In sangwin and in pers he clad was al,
12

Monk's Tale: 315

She was al clad in perree and in gold,
11

Monk's Tale: 316

And eek she lafte noght, for noon hunting,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 446

Therfore he lovede gold in special.
11

Franklin's Tale: 175

In which that they had maad hir ordinaunce [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 35

Now had this Phebus in his hous a wyf, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 36

Which that he lovede more than his lyf, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 447

A good Wyf was ther of bisyde Bathe,
11

Franklin's Tale: 174

[continues previous] Un-to a gardin that was ther bisyde,
11

Manciple's Tale: 35

[continues previous] Now had this Phebus in his hous a wyf,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1130

For windowe on the wal ne was ther noon, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1850

That of hem alle was ther noon y-slayn, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1851

Al were they sore y-hurt, and namely oon, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 336

For she hir-self wolde al the contree lede. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 337

Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 188

Ne widwe, that contraried that he sayde, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 62

That in this world ne was ther noon it liche. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 86

In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
11

Franklin's Tale: 654

But was ther noon of al that companye [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 93

For in that contree was ther noon [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 167

Wher-as in Chaldey clerk ne was ther noon [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 818

Soth to seyn, I saw [ther] oon [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 819

That was lyk noon of [al] the route; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

Ne ther was noon to teche me; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 946

But iren was ther noon ne steel; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 452

That to the offring bifore hir sholde goon;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 415

[continues previous] To speke of phisik and of surgerye;
11

Knight's Tale: 1130

[continues previous] For windowe on the wal ne was ther noon,
10

Knight's Tale: 1850

[continues previous] That of hem alle was ther noon y-slayn,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 336

[continues previous] For she hir-self wolde al the contree lede.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

[continues previous] Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 188

[continues previous] Ne widwe, that contraried that he sayde,
10

Squire's Tale: 62

[continues previous] That in this world ne was ther noon it liche.
11

Franklin's Tale: 654

[continues previous] But was ther noon of al that companye
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 94

[continues previous] That to him dorste ryde or goon,
12

Monk's Tale: 168

[continues previous] That wiste to what fyn his dremes souned.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 819

[continues previous] That was lyk noon of [al] the route;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

[continues previous] Ne ther was noon to teche me;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 945

[continues previous] And sharpe for to kerven weel.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 453

And if ther dide, certeyn, so wrooth was she,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1082

For wrooth was she that shulde his sorwes lighte. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 454

That she was out of alle charitee.
11

Knight's Tale: 765

O Cupide, out of alle charitee!
11

Knight's Tale: 766

O regne, that wolt no felawe have with thee!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1082

[continues previous] For wrooth was she that shulde his sorwes lighte.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 455

Hir coverchiefs ful fyne were of ground;
12

Manciple's Tale: 172

Now lystow deed, with face pale of hewe, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 173

Ful giltelees, that dorste I swere, y-wis! [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1103

The barres were of gold ful fyne,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 456

I dorste swere they weyeden ten pound
12

Manciple's Tale: 173

[continues previous] Ful giltelees, that dorste I swere, y-wis!
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 457

That on a Sonday were upon hir heed.
10

Clerk's Tale: 324

Ful rudely, and with hir fingres smale [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 325

A corone on hir heed they han y-dressed, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 382

Shal on hir heed now were a vitremyte; [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 134

And also on hir heed, parde, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 135

Hir rose-garlond whyt and reed, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 136

And hir comb to kembe hir heed, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 137

Hir dowves, and daun Cupido, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

And on hir heed she hadde a crown. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3202

Hir semede wel an high persoun; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 458

Hir hosen weren of fyn scarlet reed,
10

Clerk's Tale: 324

[continues previous] Ful rudely, and with hir fingres smale
10

Clerk's Tale: 325

[continues previous] A corone on hir heed they han y-dressed,
11

Monk's Tale: 382

[continues previous] Shal on hir heed now were a vitremyte;
11

Hous of Fame 1: 134

[continues previous] And also on hir heed, parde,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 135

[continues previous] Hir rose-garlond whyt and reed,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 136

[continues previous] And hir comb to kembe hir heed,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 137

[continues previous] Hir dowves, and daun Cupido,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

[continues previous] And on hir heed she hadde a crown.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3202

[continues previous] Hir semede wel an high persoun;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 459

Ful streite y-teyd, and shoos ful moiste and newe.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 367

Ful fresh and newe hir gere apyked was; [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 128

My wages been ful streite and ful smale.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 460

Bold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 367

[continues previous] Ful fresh and newe hir gere apyked was;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 368

[continues previous] Hir knyves were y-chaped noght with bras,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1772

Bisechinge every lady bright of hewe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1773

And every gentil womman, what she be, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 461

She was a worthy womman al hir lyve,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 5

Thonked be god that is eterne on lyve, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 781

They haten that hir housbondes loveth ay." [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 782

He seyde, "a womman cast hir shame away, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1773

[continues previous] And every gentil womman, what she be,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 462

Housbondes at chirche-dore she hadde fyve,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 6

[continues previous] Housbondes at chirche-dore I have had fyve;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 781

[continues previous] They haten that hir housbondes loveth ay."
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 464

But therof nedeth nat to speke as nouthe.
12

Squire's Tale: 453

Of other harm it nedeth nat to speke.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 465

And thryes hadde she been at Ierusalem;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 467

At Rome she hadde been, and at Boloigne, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 466

She hadde passed many a straunge streem;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 467

[continues previous] At Rome she hadde been, and at Boloigne, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 467

At Rome she hadde been, and at Boloigne,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 465

And thryes hadde she been at Ierusalem;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 466

[continues previous] She hadde passed many a straunge streem;
11

Melibee's Tale: 17

... mekely biseken to the heighe god that he wol be your conseillour; and shapeth yow to swich entente, that he yeve yow conseil and confort, as taughte Thobie his sone. "At alle tymes thou shalt blesse god, and praye him to dresse thy weyes"; and looke that alle thy conseils been in him for evermore. Seint Iame eek seith: "if any of yow have nede of sapience, axe it of god." And afterward thanne shul ye taken conseil in your-self, and examine wel your thoghtes, of swich thing as yow thinketh that is best for your profit. And thanne shul ye ... [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 468

In Galice at seint Iame, and at Coloigne.
11

Melibee's Tale: 17

[continues previous] ... biseken to the heighe god that he wol be your conseillour; and shapeth yow to swich entente, that he yeve yow conseil and confort, as taughte Thobie his sone. "At alle tymes thou shalt blesse god, and praye him to dresse thy weyes"; and looke that alle thy conseils been in him for evermore. Seint Iame eek seith: "if any of yow have nede of sapience, axe it of god." And afterward thanne shul ye taken conseil in your-self, and examine wel your thoghtes, of swich thing as yow thinketh that is best for your profit. And thanne shul ye dryve fro your herte three thinges ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 46

... and the pacient man atempreth hem and stilleth." He seith also: "it is more worth to be pacient than for to be right strong; and he that may have the lordshipe of his owene herte is more to preyse, than he that by his force or strengthe taketh grete citees." And therfore seith seint Iame in his epistle: that "pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun."'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 470

Gat-tothed was she, soothly for to seye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 797

And me also; for, soothly for to seye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 471

Up-on an amblere esily she sat,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

And on hir heed she hadde a crown. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

With that she gan hir eyen on him caste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 156

Ful esily, and ful debonairly, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 472

Y-wimpled wel, and on hir heed an hat
11

Miller's Tale: 79

A brooch she baar up-on hir lowe coler, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

[continues previous] And on hir heed she hadde a crown.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3202

[continues previous] Hir semede wel an high persoun;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 689

[continues previous] Un-to Criseyde, that heng hir heed ful lowe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

[continues previous] Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen on him caste
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 473

As brood as is a bokeler or a targe;
11

Miller's Tale: 80

[continues previous] As brood as is the bos of a bocler.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 474

A foot-mantel aboute hir hipes large,
12

Knight's Tale: 1218

With smale houndes al aboute hir feet; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 475

And on hir feet a paire of spores sharpe.
12

Knight's Tale: 1218

[continues previous] With smale houndes al aboute hir feet;
12

Knight's Tale: 1219

[continues previous] And undernethe hir feet she hadde a mone,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 597

After the bere, me thoughte he hadde a paire
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 598

Of legges and of feet so clene and faire,
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 187

A steede ther was sadeled smertely and skeet;
15+

Gamelyn's Tale: 188

Gamelyn did a paire spores fast on his feet.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 478

For she coude of that art the olde daunce.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4300

For she knew al the olde daunce.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 694

But Pandarus, that wel coude eche a del [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 695

The olde daunce, and every poynt ther-inne, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 479

A good man was ther of religioun,
11

Clerk's Tale: 148

Amonges thise povre folk ther dwelte a man [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 149

Which that was holden povrest of hem alle; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 694

[continues previous] But Pandarus, that wel coude eche a del
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 480

And was a povre Persoun of a toun;
11

Clerk's Tale: 148

[continues previous] Amonges thise povre folk ther dwelte a man
11

Clerk's Tale: 149

[continues previous] Which that was holden povrest of hem alle;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 482

He was also a lerned man, a clerk,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 195

Thus was I ones lerned of a clerk. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 483

That Cristes gospel trewely wolde preche;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 196

[continues previous] Of that no charge, I wol speke of our werk.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6552

And in this wyse wolde it preche [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6763

As William Seynt Amour wolde preche, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6764

And ofte wolde dispute and teche [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 484

His parisshens devoutly wolde he teche.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6551

[continues previous] And right thus were men wont to teche;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6552

[continues previous] And in this wyse wolde it preche
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6763

[continues previous] As William Seynt Amour wolde preche,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6764

[continues previous] And ofte wolde dispute and teche
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 486

And in adversitee ful pacient;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 352

And yet ful ofte he renneth in a blame; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 487

And swich he was y-preved ofte sythes.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 351

[continues previous] Algate I wool wel he hath swich a name, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 352

[continues previous] And yet ful ofte he renneth in a blame; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1233

And took it him: he thonked hir and seyde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1234

'God woot, of thing ful ofte looth bigonne [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1235

Cometh ende good; and nece myn, Criseyde, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 488

Ful looth were him to cursen for his tythes,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 352

[continues previous] And yet ful ofte he renneth in a blame;
11

Manciple's Tale: 41

For him were looth by-iaped for to be.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1234

[continues previous] 'God woot, of thing ful ofte looth bigonne
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 489

But rather wolde he yeven, out of doute,
11

Clerk's Tale: 848

For out of doute this olde povre man [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 304

And of this moving, out of doute, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 490

Un-to his povre parisshens aboute
11

Clerk's Tale: 848

[continues previous] For out of doute this olde povre man [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 491

Of his offring, and eek of his substaunce.
11

Clerk's Tale: 848

[continues previous] For out of doute this olde povre man
10

Hous of Fame 2: 304

[continues previous] And of this moving, out of doute,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 178

And eek vilaynous for to be, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 179

And litel coude of norture, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 492

He coude in litel thing han suffisaunce.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 179

[continues previous] And litel coude of norture,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 499

That first he wroghte, and afterward he taughte;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 530

He taughte, and first he folwed it him-selve.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 502

That if gold ruste, what shal iren do?
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 504

No wonder is a lewed man to ruste; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 503

For if a preest be foul, on whom we truste,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 505

[continues previous] And shame it is, if a preest take keep,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 504

No wonder is a lewed man to ruste;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 502

That if gold ruste, what shal iren do? [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 892

And if he do, he is a lewed man.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 505

And shame it is, if a preest take keep,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 503

[continues previous] For if a preest be foul, on whom we truste,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 509

He sette nat his benefice to hyre,
10

Physician's Tale: 207

He gooth him hoom, and sette him in his halle, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 510

And leet his sheep encombred in the myre,
10

Physician's Tale: 207

[continues previous] He gooth him hoom, and sette him in his halle,
10

Physician's Tale: 208

[continues previous] And leet anon his dere doghter calle,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 518

He was to sinful man nat despitous,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... two contraries, and pees and werre, vengeaunce and suffraunce, discord and accord, and manye othere thinges. But certes, wikkednesse shal be warisshed by goodnesse, discord by accord, werre by pees, and so forth of othere thinges. And heer-to accordeth Seint Paul the apostle in manye places. He seith: "ne yeldeth nat harm for harm, ne wikked speche for wikked speche; but do wel to him that dooth thee harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven ... [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 519

Ne of his speche daungerous ne digne,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... wikkednesse been two contraries, and pees and werre, vengeaunce and suffraunce, discord and accord, and manye othere thinges. But certes, wikkednesse shal be warisshed by goodnesse, discord by accord, werre by pees, and so forth of othere thinges. And heer-to accordeth Seint Paul the apostle in manye places. He seith: "ne yeldeth nat harm for harm, ne wikked speche for wikked speche; but do wel to him that dooth thee harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of ...
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 521

To drawen folk to heven by fairnesse
10

Second Nun's Tale: 92

Or Cecile is to seye 'the wey to blinde,' [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 93

For she ensample was by good techinge; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 522

By good ensample, was his bisinesse:
11

Second Nun's Tale: 93

[continues previous] For she ensample was by good techinge;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 527

He wayted after no pompe and reverence,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 434

Ye sholde been al pacient and meke, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 435

And han a swete spyced conscience, [continues next]
12

Prioress' Tale: 85

'And is this song maked in reverence [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 528

Ne maked him a spyced conscience,
12

Prioress' Tale: 85

[continues previous] 'And is this song maked in reverence [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 529

But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 434

[continues previous] Ye sholde been al pacient and meke,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 435

[continues previous] And han a swete spyced conscience,
12

Prioress' Tale: 86

[continues previous] Of Cristes moder?' seyde this innocent;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 530

He taughte, and first he folwed it him-selve.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 499

That first he wroghte, and afterward he taughte;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 531

With him ther was a Plowman, was his brother,
10

Miller's Tale: 3

And of his craft he was a Carpenter.
10

Miller's Tale: 4

With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 883

Thus ended the false knight with his treccherye, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 884

That ever hadde y-lad his lyf in falsnes and folye. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 532

That hadde y-lad of dong ful many a fother,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 884

[continues previous] That ever hadde y-lad his lyf in falsnes and folye.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 535

God loved he best with al his hole herte
11

Melibee's Tale: 17

... conseil, I wol enforme yow how ye shul governe your-self in chesinge of your conseillours. Ye shul first, in alle your werkes, mekely biseken to the heighe god that he wol be your conseillour; and shapeth yow to swich entente, that he yeve yow conseil and confort, as taughte Thobie his sone. "At alle tymes thou shalt blesse god, and praye him to dresse thy weyes"; and looke that alle thy conseils been in him for evermore. Seint Iame eek seith: "if any of yow have nede of sapience, axe it of god." And afterward thanne shul ye taken conseil in ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 21

... man turneth his herte fro god, which that is verray sovereyn bountee, that may nat chaunge, and yeveth his herte to thing that may chaunge and flitte'; and certes, that is every thing, save god of hevene. For sooth is, that if a man yeve his love, the which that he oweth al to god with al his herte, un-to a creature, certes, as muche of his love as he yeveth to thilke creature, so muche he bireveth fro god; and therfore doth he sinne. For he, that is dettour to god, ne yeldeth nat to god al his dette, that is to seyn, al the love of his ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1293

That al the daunce mighte it see; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 536

At alle tymes, thogh him gamed or smerte,
11

Melibee's Tale: 17

[continues previous] ... wol enforme yow how ye shul governe your-self in chesinge of your conseillours. Ye shul first, in alle your werkes, mekely biseken to the heighe god that he wol be your conseillour; and shapeth yow to swich entente, that he yeve yow conseil and confort, as taughte Thobie his sone. "At alle tymes thou shalt blesse god, and praye him to dresse thy weyes"; and looke that alle thy conseils been in him for evermore. Seint Iame eek seith: "if any of yow have nede of sapience, axe it of god." And afterward thanne shul ye taken conseil in your-self, and examine wel ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1292

[continues previous] At alle tymes that him liste,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 537

And thanne his neighebour right as him-selve.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 919

He wolde him-selve slee; and if I wende [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 538

He wolde thresshe, and ther-to dyke and delve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 919

[continues previous] He wolde him-selve slee; and if I wende
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 540

Withouten hyre, if it lay in his might.
10

Knight's Tale: 292

To helpen me, if it lay in thy might,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 197

He wolde it do, if it lay in his might. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 467

Of your disese, if it lay in my might,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 541

His tythes payed he ful faire and wel,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 197

[continues previous] He wolde it do, if it lay in his might.
11

Parlement of Foules: 594

Ye, quek!' yit quod the doke, ful wel and faire,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6034

For they shal speke with hem so faire
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6035

That ye shal holde you payed ful wel,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 542

Bothe of his propre swink and his catel.
12

Reeve's Tale: 58

In purpos was to maken hir his heir
13

Reeve's Tale: 59

Bothe of his catel and his messuage,
11

Reeve's Tale: 60

And straunge he made it of hir mariage.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 547

The Miller was a stout carl, for the nones,
11

Knight's Tale: 565

For he was yong and mighty for the nones, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 283

His knave was a strong carl for the nones, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 284

And by the haspe he haf it up atones; [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 548

Ful big he was of braun, and eek of bones;
11

Knight's Tale: 566

[continues previous] And ther-to be was strong and big of bones
12

Miller's Tale: 284

[continues previous] And by the haspe he haf it up atones;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 549

That proved wel, for over-al ther he cam,
11

Merchant's Tale: 372

He was apoynted ther he wolde abyde. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 373

Placebo cam, and eek his freendes sone, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 550

At wrastling he wolde have alwey the ram.
11

Merchant's Tale: 372

[continues previous] He was apoynted ther he wolde abyde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 552

Ther nas no dore that he nolde heve of harre,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

And eek he was of swich discrecioun,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 167

Ther nas no lak, but that he was agast
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 556

Up-on the cop right of his nose he hade
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 619

A long surcote of pers up-on he hade,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 620

And by his syde he bar a rusty blade.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 559

His nose-thirles blake were and wyde.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 113

And on that other syde a gay daggere, [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

[continues previous] And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 619

A long surcote of pers up-on he hade, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 620

And by his syde he bar a rusty blade. [continues next]
15+

Reeve's Tale: 99

With good swerd and with bokeler by hir syde.
12

Squire's Tale: 83

Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 84

And by his syde a naked swerd hanging; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 85

And up he rydeth to the heighe bord. [continues next]
13

Sir Thopas' Tale: 42

A long swerd by his syde. [continues next]
13

Sir Thopas' Tale: 43

He priketh thurgh a fair forest, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ...
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 561

His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

[continues previous] And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 620

[continues previous] And by his syde he bar a rusty blade.
11

Squire's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And by his syde a naked swerd hanging;
13

Sir Thopas' Tale: 42

[continues previous] A long swerd by his syde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 564

Wel coude he stelen corn, and tollen thryes;
11

Squire's Tale: 84

And by his syde a naked swerd hanging; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 565

And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 299

But al be that he was a philosophre,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 300

Yet hadde he but litel gold in cofre;
15+

Squire's Tale: 83

[continues previous] Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And by his syde a naked swerd hanging; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 566

A whyt cote and a blew hood wered he.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 103

And he was clad in cote and hood of grene; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 104

A sheef of pecok-arwes brighte and kene [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 614

And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 615

In youthe he lerned hadde a good mister; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 681

But thinne it lay, by colpons oon and oon; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 682

But hood, for Iolitee, ne wered he noon, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 83

[continues previous] Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring,
10

Squire's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And by his syde a naked swerd hanging;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 567

A baggepype wel coude he blowe and sowne,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 104

[continues previous] A sheef of pecok-arwes brighte and kene
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 595

Wel coude he kepe a gerner and a binne;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 614

[continues previous] And have a thank, and yet a cote and hood.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 615

[continues previous] In youthe he lerned hadde a good mister;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 682

[continues previous] But hood, for Iolitee, ne wered he noon,