Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Franklin's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Franklin's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Franklin's Tale has 896 lines, and 11% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 72% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 17% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.2 strong matches and 4.32 weak matches.

Franklin's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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11

Franklin's Tale: 2

Ther was a knight that loved and dide his payne
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 43

A Knight ther was, and that a worthy man,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 44

That fro the tyme that he first bigan
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2110

That for to serven doth his payne [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 3

To serve a lady in his beste wyse;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2110

[continues previous] That for to serven doth his payne
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2111

[continues previous] Unto that lord, which in no wyse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 162

And to the temple, in al hir beste wyse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 163

In general, ther wente many a wight, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 955

And in his beste wyse his lady grette; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1594

He gan him thonken in his beste wyse; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1595

A hondred sythe he gan the tyme blesse, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 4

And many a labour, many a greet empryse
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 52

He hath take on him many a greet empryse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 163

[continues previous] In general, ther wente many a wight,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 955

[continues previous] And in his beste wyse his lady grette;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1595

[continues previous] A hondred sythe he gan the tyme blesse,
13

Franklin's Tale: 5

He for his lady wroghte, er she were wonne.
13

Clerk's Tale: 156

Than was she oon the faireste under sonne; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 52

[continues previous] He hath take on him many a greet empryse,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 6

For she was oon, the faireste under sonne,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 156

[continues previous] Than was she oon the faireste under sonne;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 157

[continues previous] For povreliche y-fostred up was she,
11

Franklin's Tale: 7

And eek therto come of so heigh kinrede,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 232

Therwith me thoughte his face shoon so brighte [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 979

And that ye been of noble and heigh kinrede, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 8

That wel unnethes dorste this knight, for drede,
11

Franklin's Tale: 213

But never dorste he telle hir his grevaunce; [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 224

For Narcisus, that dorste nat telle hir wo. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 233

[continues previous] That wel unnethes mighte I him beholde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 980

[continues previous] I have wel herd it tellen, out of drede.
13

Franklin's Tale: 9

Telle hir his wo, his peyne, and his distresse.
11

Knight's Tale: 1406

Al telle I noght as now his observaunces. [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 39

But atte laste his maister him bithoghte, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

But atte laste, with muchel care and wo, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 492

And mekely she to the sergeant preyde, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 212

[continues previous] Two yeer and more, as was his aventure,
11

Franklin's Tale: 213

[continues previous] But never dorste he telle hir his grevaunce;
13

Franklin's Tale: 224

[continues previous] For Narcisus, that dorste nat telle hir wo.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 520

Ful wo and anguissous of this. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 792

And he is come in swich peyne and distresse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 842

Peyne, torment, pleynte, wo, distresse.
12

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
11

Knight's Tale: 1406

[continues previous] Al telle I noght as now his observaunces.
11

Knight's Tale: 1407

[continues previous] But atte laste the statue of Venus shook,
11

Cook's Tale: 39

[continues previous] But atte laste his maister him bithoghte,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

[continues previous] But atte laste, with muchel care and wo,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
10

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
11

Clerk's Tale: 491

[continues previous] But atte laste speken she bigan, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 492

[continues previous] And mekely she to the sergeant preyde, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 971

But atte laste, whan that thise lordes wende
11

Merchant's Tale: 228

But atte laste, shortly for to seyn,
10

Merchant's Tale: 837

But atte laste, after a monthe or tweye,
10

Squire's Tale: 445

Till atte laste she spak in this manere
10

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
10

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
10

Second Nun's Tale: 359

How many wondres Iesus for hem wroghte;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 360

But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn,
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the ...
10

Hous of Fame 3: 636

But atte laste hit was on-lofte.
12

Legend of Lucretia: 157

Ne upon hem she dorste nat beholde.
12

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 521

[continues previous] Til atte laste bithoughte I me,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 793

[continues previous] That, but he be al fully wood by this,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1829

Swich fyn hath al his grete worthinesse; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 11

And namely for his meke obeysaunce,
11

Clerk's Tale: 492

[continues previous] And mekely she to the sergeant preyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1828

[continues previous] Swich fyn hath, lo, this Troilus for love, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1829

[continues previous] Swich fyn hath al his grete worthinesse; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 12

Hath swich a pitee caught of his penaunce,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1829

[continues previous] Swich fyn hath al his grete worthinesse;
11

Franklin's Tale: 13

That prively she fil of his accord
11

Franklin's Tale: 63

Heer may men seen an humble wys accord; [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 50

... may nat liven with-oute the soule, namore may it live with-outen temporel goodes. And by richesses may a man gete him grete freendes. And therfore seith Pamphilles: "if a net-herdes doghter," seith he, "be riche, she may chesen of a thousand men which she wol take to hir housbonde; for, of a thousand men, oon wol nat forsaken hir ne refusen hir." And this Pamphilles seith also: "if thou be right happy, that is to seyn, if thou be right riche, thou shalt find a greet nombre of felawes and freendes. And if thy fortune change that thou wexe povre, farewel ... [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 14

To take him for hir housbonde and hir lord,
12

Miller's Tale: 226

And to hir housbonde bad hir for to seye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 64

[continues previous] Thus hath she take hir servant and hir lord,
11

Franklin's Tale: 194

That was hir housbonde and hir love also.
11

Melibee's Tale: 13

... conseilled him certeyn thing, and conseilled him the contrarie in general audience. Whan Melibeus hadde herd that the gretteste partie of his conseil weren accorded that he sholde maken werre, anoon he consented to hir conseilling, and fully affermed hir sentence. Thanne dame Prudence, whan that she saugh how that hir housbonde shoop him for to wreken him on his foos, and to biginne werre, she in ful humble wyse, when she saugh hir tyme, seide him thise wordes: 'My lord,' quod she, 'I yow biseche as hertely as I dar and can, ne haste yow nat to faste, and for alle guerdons as yeveth me audience. For ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... the body of a man may nat liven with-oute the soule, namore may it live with-outen temporel goodes. And by richesses may a man gete him grete freendes. And therfore seith Pamphilles: "if a net-herdes doghter," seith he, "be riche, she may chesen of a thousand men which she wol take to hir housbonde; for, of a thousand men, oon wol nat forsaken hir ne refusen hir." And this Pamphilles seith also: "if thou be right happy, that is to seyn, if thou be right riche, thou shalt find a greet nombre of felawes and freendes. And if thy fortune change that thou wexe povre, ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 80

Now how that a womman sholde be subget to hir housbonde, that telleth seint Peter. First, in obedience. And eek, as seith the decree, a womman that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a ... [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 15

Of swich lordshipe as men han over hir wyves;
11

Melibee's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... may nat liven with-oute the soule, namore may it live with-outen temporel goodes. And by richesses may a man gete him grete freendes. And therfore seith Pamphilles: "if a net-herdes doghter," seith he, "be riche, she may chesen of a thousand men which she wol take to hir housbonde; for, of a thousand men, oon wol nat forsaken hir ne refusen hir." And this Pamphilles seith also: "if thou be right happy, that is to seyn, if thou be right riche, thou shalt find a greet nombre of felawes and freendes. And if thy fortune change that thou wexe povre, farewel ...
14

Monk's Tale: 102

That no men telle hir conseil til hir wyves
14

Monk's Tale: 103

Of swich thing as they wolde han secree fayn,
12

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] Now how that a womman sholde be subget to hir housbonde, that telleth seint Peter. First, in obedience. And eek, as seith the decree, a womman that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] The seconde manere of chastitee is for to been a clene widewe, and eschue the embracinges of man, and desyren the embracinge of Iesu Crist. Thise been tho that han been wyves and han forgoon hir housbondes, and eek wommen that han doon lecherie and been releeved by Penitence. And certes, if that a wyf coude kepen hir al chaast by licence of hir housbonde, so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite. Thise manere wommen that ... [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 16

And for to lede the more in blisse hir lyves,
10

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] The seconde manere of chastitee is for to been a clene widewe, and eschue the embracinges of man, and desyren the embracinge of Iesu Crist. Thise been tho that han been wyves and han forgoon hir housbondes, and eek wommen that han doon lecherie and been releeved by Penitence. And certes, if that a wyf coude kepen hir al chaast by licence of hir housbonde, so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite. Thise manere wommen that observen chastitee ...
15+

Franklin's Tale: 17

Of his free wil he swoor hir as a knight,
11

Knight's Tale: 101

And swoor his ooth, as he was trewe knight,
11

Knight's Tale: 102

He wolde doon so ferforthly his might
12

Squire's Tale: 541

And yeven him my trewe herte, as free
12

Squire's Tale: 542

As he swoor he his herte yaf to me;
10

Parson's Tale: 89

Also the verray shrifte axeth certeine condiciouns. First, that thou shryve thee by thy free wil, noght constreyned, ne for shame of folk, ne for maladie, ne swiche thinges; for it is resoun that he that trespasseth by his free wil, that by his free wil he confesse his trespas; and that noon other man telle his sinne but he him-self, ne he shal nat nayte ne denye his sinne, ne wratthe him agayn the preest for his amonestinge to leve sinne. The seconde condicioun is, that thy shrift be laweful; that is to seyn, that thou that shryvest ...
11

Hous of Fame 1: 263

As he hir swoor; and her-by demed [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 264

That he was good, for he swich semed. [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 223

And called him my hertes lyf, my knight, [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 224

And was al his, as fer as hit was right; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 113

For trewely he swoor hir, as a knight, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 18

That never in al his lyf he, day ne night,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 70

He never yet no vileinye ne sayde
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 71

In al his lyf, un-to no maner wight.
10

Knight's Tale: 354

Ever in his lyf, by day or night or stounde
12

Knight's Tale: 965

Ne make werre up-on me night ne day, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 18

That he ne swoor he sholde anon abegge. [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 322

Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf;
11

Friar's Tale: 323

Ne never I nas but of my body trewe!
11

Merchant's Tale: 855

That ever was; for neither night ne day [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 856

Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May, [continues next]
14

Melibee's Tale: 24

... the bettre and more profitable, and hast approved it by manye wyse folk and olde; thanne shaltou considere, if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende. For certes, resoun wol nat that any man sholde biginne a thing, but-if he mighte parfourne it as him oghte. Ne no wight sholde take up-on hym so hevy a charge that he mighte nat bere it. For the proverbe seith: "he that to muche embraceth, distreyneth litel." And Catoun seith: "assay to do swich thing as thou hast power to doon, lest that the charge oppresse thee so sore, that ... [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 193

Ne never in al thy lyf ne shaltou speke. [continues next]
14

Parson's Tale: 15

... to the companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to the service of Iesu Crist, and ther-of doon him hommage. For soothly, oure swete lord Iesu Crist hath spared us so debonairly in our folies, that if he ne hadde pitee of mannes soule, a sory song ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 86

... chirche dedicat, or noon. For if the chirche be halwed, and man or womman spille his kinde inwith that place by wey of sinne, or by wikked temptacion, the chirche is entredited til it be reconciled by the bishop; and the preest that dide swich a vileinye, to terme of al his lyf, he sholde na-more singe masse; and if he dide, he sholde doon deedly sinne at every tyme that he so songe masse. The fourthe circumstaunce is, by whiche mediatours or by whiche messagers, as for entycement, or for consentement to bere companye with felaweshipe; for many a wrecche, for to bere ... [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 390

But mete ne drink had he non neither day ne night. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 264

[continues previous] That he was good, for he swich semed.
14

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 273

Ne sholde her never falsen, night ne day, [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 223

[continues previous] And called him my hertes lyf, my knight,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 224

[continues previous] And was al his, as fer as hit was right;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4255

Ne that he saugh never, in his lyf,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1538

So glad ne was he never in al his lyve;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 868

To putte his lyf al night in Iupartye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 869

'Hadde I him never leef? By god, I wene
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 877

Shul putte al night his lyf in Iupartye
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 114

[continues previous] That ther nas thing with whiche he mighte hir plese,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 19

Ne sholde up-on him take no maistrye
12

Knight's Tale: 965

[continues previous] Ne make werre up-on me night ne day,
11

Reeve's Tale: 17

[continues previous] Ther dorste no wight hand up-on him legge,
11

Reeve's Tale: 18

[continues previous] That he ne swoor he sholde anon abegge.
11

Merchant's Tale: 193

Ne children sholde I none up-on hir geten; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 855

[continues previous] That ever was; for neither night ne day
11

Merchant's Tale: 856

[continues previous] Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May,
15+

Melibee's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... partie is the bettre and more profitable, and hast approved it by manye wyse folk and olde; thanne shaltou considere, if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende. For certes, resoun wol nat that any man sholde biginne a thing, but-if he mighte parfourne it as him oghte. Ne no wight sholde take up-on hym so hevy a charge that he mighte nat bere it. For the proverbe seith: "he that to muche embraceth, distreyneth litel." And Catoun seith: "assay to do swich thing as thou hast power to doon, lest that the charge oppresse thee so sore, that thee bihoveth to weyve thing ... [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 193

[continues previous] Ne never in al thy lyf ne shaltou speke.
14

Parson's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... the companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to the service of Iesu Crist, and ther-of doon him hommage. For soothly, oure swete lord Iesu Crist hath spared us so debonairly in our folies, that if he ne hadde pitee ...
10

Parson's Tale: 86

[continues previous] ... For if the chirche be halwed, and man or womman spille his kinde inwith that place by wey of sinne, or by wikked temptacion, the chirche is entredited til it be reconciled by the bishop; and the preest that dide swich a vileinye, to terme of al his lyf, he sholde na-more singe masse; and if he dide, he sholde doon deedly sinne at every tyme that he so songe masse. The fourthe circumstaunce is, by whiche mediatours or by whiche messagers, as for entycement, or for consentement to bere companye with felaweshipe; for many a wrecche, for to bere companye, ...
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 390

[continues previous] But mete ne drink had he non neither day ne night.
14

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 273

[continues previous] Ne sholde her never falsen, night ne day,
11

Franklin's Tale: 20

Agayn hir wil, ne kythe hir Ialousye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 193

[continues previous] Ne children sholde I none up-on hir geten;
10

Melibee's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... the bettre and more profitable, and hast approved it by manye wyse folk and olde; thanne shaltou considere, if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende. For certes, resoun wol nat that any man sholde biginne a thing, but-if he mighte parfourne it as him oghte. Ne no wight sholde take up-on hym so hevy a charge that he mighte nat bere it. For the proverbe seith: "he that to muche embraceth, distreyneth litel." And Catoun seith: "assay to do swich thing as thou hast power to doon, lest that the charge oppresse thee so sore, that ...
11

Franklin's Tale: 21

But hir obeye, and folwe hir wil in al
11

Clerk's Tale: 841

The folk hir folwe wepinge in hir weye,
11

Clerk's Tale: 842

And fortune ay they cursen as they goon;
10

Melibee's Tale: 47

... of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir wikked wil and hir corage. And therfore, me thinketh men oghten nat repreve me, though I putte me in a litel peril for to venge me, and though I do a greet excesse, that is to seyn, that I venge oon outrage by another.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 24

That wolde he have for shame of his degree.
11

Legend of Dido: 225

And of the present that his fader sente [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 25

She thanked him, and with ful greet humblesse
14

Parson's Tale: 94

This preyere moste be trewely seyd and in verray feith, and that men preye to god ordinatly and discreetly and devoutly; and alwey a man shal putten his wil to be subget to the wille of god. This orisoun moste eek been seyd with greet humblesse and ful pure; honestly, and nat to the anoyaunce of any man or womman. It moste eek been continued with the werkes of charitee. It avayleth eek agayn the vyces of the soule; for, as seith seint Ierome, 'By fastinge been saved the vyces of the flesh, and by preyere the vyces of the soule.'
12

Legend of Dido: 226

[continues previous] She thanked him ful ofte, in good entente. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2060

Sith thou semest so ful of treuthe.' [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 26

She seyde, 'sire, sith of your gentillesse
12

Legend of Dido: 226

[continues previous] She thanked him ful ofte, in good entente.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2060

[continues previous] Sith thou semest so ful of treuthe.'
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2061

[continues previous] 'Sire, if thee list to undirstande,
11

Franklin's Tale: 29

As in my gilt, were outher werre or stryf.
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

... louteth to thee with his heed, ne trust him never. For certes, he maketh thilke feyned humilitee more for his profit than for any love of thy persone; by-cause that he demeth to have victorie over thy persone by swich feyned contenance, the which victorie he mighte nat have by stryf or werre. And Peter Alfonce seith: "make no felawshipe with thyne olde enemys; for if thou do hem bountee, they wol perverten it in-to wikkednesse." And eek thou most eschewe the conseilling of hem that been thy servants, and beren thee greet reverence; for peraventure they seyn it more for drede than ...
12

Franklin's Tale: 30

Sir, I wol be your humble trewe wyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

And be to yow a trewe humble wyf,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6154

Religioun humble, and trewe also,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6155

Wol I not blame, ne dispyse,
13

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
11

Knight's Tale: 286

And ever shal, til that myn herte sterve.
11

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

[continues previous] 'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!'
11

Squire's Tale: 525

Til that myn herte, to pitous and to nyce,
11

Franklin's Tale: 270

Have heer my trouthe in al that ever I can.'
12

Franklin's Tale: 328

Do this miracle, or do myn herte breste
12

Franklin's Tale: 329

That now, next at this opposicioun,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 427

Have heer my trouthe, as thou art his aspye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 200

I blowe the fyr til that myn herte feynte.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

And ever shal, til that myn herte dye;
11

Legend of Ariadne: 150

For ever-mo, til that myn herte sterve.
13

Anelida and Arcite: 175

But 'mercy, cruel herte myn, Arcite!' [continues next]
13

Anelida and Arcite: 176

And thus endureth, til that she was so mate [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1108

And yit she sit so in myn herte,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1109

That, by my trouthe, I nolde noght,
11

Complaint to My Mortal Foe: 30

That I may fare the better for my trouthe;
11

Complaint to My Mortal Foe: 31

Sith I am youres, til deth my herte kerve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 599

Yet wole I telle it, though myn herte breste;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 306

Flee forth out of myn herte, and lat it breste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 579

Encressen eek the causes of my care;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 580

So wel-a-wey, why nil myn herte breste? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

Myn herte, which that is at point to breste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 976

The whos myn herte al was, til that he deyde;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1008

I may yow seen, or do myn herte breste.' [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 32

Thus been they bothe in quiete and in reste.
13

Anelida and Arcite: 176

[continues previous] And thus endureth, til that she was so mate
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1679

A-bedde broughte, whan hem bothe leste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1680

And thus they ben in quiete and in reste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 581

[continues previous] For, as in love, ther is but litel reste.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1007

[continues previous] Yet bidde I god, in quiete and in reste
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1009

[continues previous] But in effect, and shortly for to seye,
12

Franklin's Tale: 33

For o thing, sires, saufly dar I seye,
11

Clerk's Tale: 814

In-with your chambre, dar I saufly sayn;
12

Squire's Tale: 581

For o thing dar I tellen boldely,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 962

Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye, [continues next]
11

Gentilesse: 6

And noght the revers, saufly dar I deme,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1320

Er dayes ten, this dar I saufly seyn.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1845

For he nil falsen no wight, dar I seye, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 34

That frendes everich other moot obeye,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 962

[continues previous] Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 963

[continues previous] That she was lyk to torche bright,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

[continues previous] This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1609

[continues previous] That thanked be the heighe worthinesse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1846

[continues previous] That wol his herte al hoolly on him leye.
11

Franklin's Tale: 36

Love wol nat ben constreyned by maistrye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 41

And nat to ben constreyned as a thral;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 22

yvel, it moot nedes be that they ben constreyned by three
10

Franklin's Tale: 39

Love is a thing as any spirit free;
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... the sones of Belial, that is, the devel. Belial is to seyn 'with-outen Iuge'; and so faren they; hem thinketh they been free, and han no Iuge, na-more than hath a free bole that taketh which cow that him lyketh in the toun. So faren they by wommen. For right as a free bole is y-nough for al a toun, right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun y-nough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree. Thise preestes, as seith the book, ne conne nat the misterie of preesthode to the peple, ne god ne knowe they nat; they ne helde hem nat apayd, ... [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 40

Wommen of kinde desiren libertee,
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... that they weren the sones of Belial, that is, the devel. Belial is to seyn 'with-outen Iuge'; and so faren they; hem thinketh they been free, and han no Iuge, na-more than hath a free bole that taketh which cow that him lyketh in the toun. So faren they by wommen. For right as a free bole is y-nough for al a toun, right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun y-nough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree. Thise preestes, as seith the book, ne conne nat the misterie of preesthode to the peple, ne god ne knowe they ...
12

Franklin's Tale: 41

And nat to ben constreyned as a thral;
11

Franklin's Tale: 36

Love wol nat ben constreyned by maistrye;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 120

that nature dredeth; that is to seyn as thus: that a man may [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 121

ben constreyned so, by som cause, that his wil desireth and [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 42

And so don men, if I soth seyen shal.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 121

[continues previous] ben constreyned so, by som cause, that his wil desireth and
12

Franklin's Tale: 43

Loke who that is most pacient in love,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 257

Loke who that is most vertuous alway,
11

Franklin's Tale: 44

He is at his avantage al above.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4925

For Youthe set man in al folye, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 45

Pacience is an heigh vertu certeyn;
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 327

Glad povert is an honest thing, certeyn; [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 85

Glosinge is a glorious thing, certeyn, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 209

He wol yow haten mortally, certeyn. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 46

For it venquisseth, as thise clerkes seyn,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 328

[continues previous] This wol Senek and othere clerkes seyn.
13

Summoner's Tale: 86

[continues previous] For lettre sleeth, so as we clerkes seyn.
13

Merchant's Tale: 728

(For alle thing hath tyme, as seyn thise clerkes)
12

Merchant's Tale: 729

To any womman, for to gete hir love,
13

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 34

For certeinly, as that thise clerkes seyn, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 210

[continues previous] Daun Salomon, as wyse clerkes seyn,
13

Parson's Tale: 22

Now sith man understondeth generally, which is venial sinne, thanne is it covenable to tellen specially of sinnes whiche that many a man per-aventure ne demeth hem nat sinnes, and ne shryveth him nat of the same thinges; and yet nathelees they been sinnes. Soothly, as thise clerkes wryten, this is to seyn, that at every tyme that a man eteth or drinketh more than suffyseth to the sustenaunce of his body, in certein he dooth sinne. And eek whan he speketh more than nedeth, it is sinne. Eke whan he herkneth nat benignely the compleint of the povre. Eke whan he is ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 2

by atempre stillenesse myn attencioun, she seide thus: (As who [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 3

mighte seyn thus: After thise thinges she stinte a litel; and whan [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 134

soverein delyt. Conclusio. What seyst thou thanne of alle thise [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 135

thinges, that is to seyn, suffisaunce, power, and this othre thinges; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4925

[continues previous] For Youthe set man in al folye,
13

Franklin's Tale: 47

Thinges that rigour sholde never atteyne.
13

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 34

[continues previous] For certeinly, as that thise clerkes seyn,
13

Parson's Tale: 22

[continues previous] ... understondeth generally, which is venial sinne, thanne is it covenable to tellen specially of sinnes whiche that many a man per-aventure ne demeth hem nat sinnes, and ne shryveth him nat of the same thinges; and yet nathelees they been sinnes. Soothly, as thise clerkes wryten, this is to seyn, that at every tyme that a man eteth or drinketh more than suffyseth to the sustenaunce of his body, in certein he dooth sinne. And eek whan he speketh more than nedeth, it is sinne. Eke whan he herkneth nat benignely the compleint of the povre. Eke whan he is in ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 3

[continues previous] mighte seyn thus: After thise thinges she stinte a litel; and whan
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 135

[continues previous] thinges, that is to seyn, suffisaunce, power, and this othre thinges;
12

Franklin's Tale: 49

Lerneth to suffre, or elles, so moot I goon,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 736

Al speke he never so rudeliche and large;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 737

Or elles he moot telle his tale untrewe,
11

Miller's Prologue: 6

Our Hoste lough and swoor, 'so moot I goon,
12

Summoner's Tale: 326

'Ye shul be deed,' quod he, 'so moot I thryve! [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1061

I am a womman, nedes moot I speke,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1062

Or elles swelle til myn herte breke.
11

Shipman's Tale: 186

Lene me this somme, or elles moot I deye.
10

Monk's Prologue: 26

And out at dore anon I moot me dighte,
10

Monk's Prologue: 27

Or elles I am but lost, but-if that I
10

Legend of Ariadne: 212

That she mot goon with me, if that I go,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 213

Or elles suffre deeth as wel as I,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 954

And, for the beste, ay suffre to the tyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 955

Or elles al our labour is on ydel;
13

Franklin's Tale: 50

Ye shul it lerne, wher-so ye wole or noon.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 326

[continues previous] 'Ye shul be deed,' quod he, 'so moot I thryve!
11

Merchant's Tale: 880

Which ye shul heren, if ye wole abyde.
11

Squire's Tale: 62

That in this world ne was ther noon it liche. [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 18

For in this world was noon so fair on lyve. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 39

Now wol I speken of lesinges, which generally is fals significacioun of word, in entente to deceyven his evene-cristene. Som lesinge is of which ther comth noon avantage to no wight: and som lesinge turneth to the ese or profit of o man, and to disese and damage of another man. Another lesinge is for to saven his lyf or his catel. Another lesinge comth of delyt for to lye, in which delyt they wol forge a ... [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 81

Than shulde ye fele wher it wer so or noon; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1072

Ne trowe not that I lye or madde; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1073

For in this world is noon it liche, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1646

For in this world ther liveth lady noon, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 51

For in this world, certein, ther no wight is,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 282

Ther wiste no wight that he was in dette, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

[continues previous] In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
12

Summoner's Tale: 350

That wyn ne dooth to folk no swich offence. [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 351

Ther is no wyn bireveth me my might [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 420

Ther is no wight that hereth it but we tweye. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 62

[continues previous] That in this world ne was ther noon it liche.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 295

No wight in al this world wiste of this lone,
10

Shipman's Tale: 311

Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... it folweth nat therfore that alle wommen ben wikke. For though that he ne fond no good womman, certes, ful many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

... with thyne olde enemys; for if thou do hem bountee, they wol perverten it in-to wikkednesse." And eek thou most eschewe the conseilling of hem that been thy servants, and beren thee greet reverence; for peraventure they seyn it more for drede than for love. And therfore seith a philosophre in this wyse: "ther is no wight parfitly trewe to him that he to sore dredeth." And Tullius seith: "ther nis no might so greet of any emperour, that longe may endure, but-if he have more love of the peple than drede." Thou shalt also eschewe the conseiling of folk that been dronkelewe; for they ne can ...
15+

Melibee's Tale: 31

... to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne kept suffisantly withouten the keping of our lord Iesu Crist. To this sentence accordeth the prophete David, that seith: "if god ne kepe the citee, in ydel waketh he that it kepeth." Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your ... [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 18

[continues previous] For in this world was noon so fair on lyve.
10

Parson's Tale: 39

[continues previous] Now wol I speken of lesinges, which generally is fals significacioun of word, in entente to deceyven his evene-cristene. Som lesinge is of which ther comth noon avantage to no wight: and som lesinge turneth to the ese or profit of o man, and to disese and damage of another man. Another lesinge is for to saven his lyf or his catel. Another lesinge comth of delyt for to lye, in which delyt they wol forge a long tale, and peynten ...
11

Parson's Tale: 49

... and the moevynges of mannes corage in his herte, in swich manere that they ne skippe nat out by angre ne by Ire. Suffrance suffreth swetely alle the anoyaunces and the wronges that men doon to man outward. Seint Ierome seith thus of debonairetee, that 'it doth noon harm to no wight, ne seith; ne for noon harm that men doon or seyn, he ne eschaufeth nat agayns, his resoun.' This vertu som-tyme comth of nature; for, as seith the philosophre, 'a man is a quik thing, by nature debonaire and tretable to goodnesse; but whan debonairetee is enformed of grace, thanne ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 67

his sone or of his doughter. And for this ther ne acordeth no
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 68

wight lightly to the condicioun of his fortune; for alwey to every
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 143

oon were destroyed, certes, beinge ne shulde ther non dwellen [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 23

ther nis no wight that may merveylen y-nough, ne compleine, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 84

'Knit forth the remenaunt,' quod I; 'for no wight ne douteth [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 139

how so that this knowinge is universel, yet nis ther no wight that [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 162

That in this world ther shal no man me knowe, [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 12

Ther is no wight that wol me wo bereve [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 82

[continues previous] For in this worlde living is ther noon
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1073

[continues previous] For in this world is noon it liche,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 795

Or wher bicomth it, whan it is ago; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 796

Ther is no wight that woot, I trowe so, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 836

Ther is no verray wele in this world here.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1033

With pietee so wel repressed is, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 386

For in this world ther is no creature,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1646

[continues previous] For in this world ther liveth lady noon,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 52

That he ne dooth or seith som-tyme amis.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 282

[continues previous] Ther wiste no wight that he was in dette,
12

Summoner's Tale: 350

[continues previous] That wyn ne dooth to folk no swich offence.
11

Clerk's Tale: 420

[continues previous] Ther is no wight that hereth it but we tweye.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 534

[continues previous] That ete or dronke hath of this confiture
10

Shipman's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn,
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... that alle wommen ben wikke. For though that he ne fond no good womman, certes, ful many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it ...
15+

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne kept suffisantly withouten the keping of our lord Iesu Crist. To this sentence accordeth the prophete David, that seith: "if god ne kepe the citee, in ydel waketh he that it kepeth." Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your trewe freendes that been approved ...
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the bountee of his neighebore. The fourthe spece of bakbyting is this; that if men speke goodnesse of a man, thanne wol the bakbyter seyn, 'parfey, swich a ...
11

Parson's Tale: 49

[continues previous] ... moevynges of mannes corage in his herte, in swich manere that they ne skippe nat out by angre ne by Ire. Suffrance suffreth swetely alle the anoyaunces and the wronges that men doon to man outward. Seint Ierome seith thus of debonairetee, that 'it doth noon harm to no wight, ne seith; ne for noon harm that men doon or seyn, he ne eschaufeth nat agayns, his resoun.' This vertu som-tyme comth of nature; for, as seith the philosophre, 'a man is a quik thing, by nature debonaire and tretable to goodnesse; but whan debonairetee is enformed of grace, thanne is it the more worth.'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 143

[continues previous] oon were destroyed, certes, beinge ne shulde ther non dwellen
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 23

[continues previous] ther nis no wight that may merveylen y-nough, ne compleine,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 84

[continues previous] 'Knit forth the remenaunt,' quod I; 'for no wight ne douteth
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 85

[continues previous] that he that may gon by naturel office of feet ne be more mighty
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 139

[continues previous] how so that this knowinge is universel, yet nis ther no wight that
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 140

[continues previous] ne woot wel that a man is a thing imaginable and sensible; and
10

Legend of Ariadne: 162

[continues previous] That in this world ther shal no man me knowe,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 12

[continues previous] Ther is no wight that wol me wo bereve
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 796

[continues previous] Ther is no wight that woot, I trowe so,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1034

[continues previous] That it unnethe dooth or seyth amis,
11

Franklin's Tale: 54

Wyn, wo, or chaunginge of complexioun
10

Knight's Tale: 1617

Al be ye noght of o complexioun, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... more be we in peril to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of his gentrye is ful greet folye; for ofte tyme the gentrye of the body binimeth the gentrye of the soule; and eek we ben alle of o fader and of ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 345

Or elles doon of good entencioun, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 55

Causeth ful ofte to doon amis or speken.
10

Knight's Tale: 1618

[continues previous] That causeth al day swich divisioun.
11

Monk's Tale: 190

Was he to doon amis, or more trespace;
12

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of his gentrye is ful greet folye; for ofte tyme the gentrye of the body binimeth the gentrye of the soule; and eek we ben alle of o fader and of o moder; and alle we been of o nature roten and ...
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4259

Whan that she hereth, or may espye, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4260

A man speken of lecherye. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 344

[continues previous] But tak this, that ye loveres ofte eschuwe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 345

[continues previous] Or elles doon of good entencioun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 346

[continues previous] Ful ofte thy lady wole it misconstrue,
10

Franklin's Tale: 56

On every wrong a man may nat be wreken;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4259

[continues previous] Whan that she hereth, or may espye,
14

Franklin's Tale: 58

To every wight that can on governaunce.
10

Merchant's Tale: 772

(For craft is al, who-so that do it can)
10

Merchant's Tale: 773

That every wight is fayn to speke him good;
10

Merchant's Tale: 1001

To every wight that wit and reson can. [continues next]
14

Compleynt of Mars: 44

That hath this worthy knight in governaunce? [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 59

And therfore hath this wyse worthy knight,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1001

[continues previous] To every wight that wit and reson can.
14

Compleynt of Mars: 44

[continues previous] That hath this worthy knight in governaunce? [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 60

To live in ese, suffrance hir bihight,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 43

[continues previous] Who regneth now in blisse but Venus,
12

Compleynt of Mars: 44

[continues previous] That hath this worthy knight in governaunce?
11

Franklin's Tale: 61

And she to him ful wisly gan to swere
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche
11

Franklin's Tale: 62

That never sholde ther be defaute in here.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 133

alle thinges that men may desiren? Thanne sholde ther be doon [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 63

Heer may men seen an humble wys accord;
11

Franklin's Tale: 13

That prively she fil of his accord [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 277

Heer men may seen how sinne hath his meryte!
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 133

[continues previous] alle thinges that men may desiren? Thanne sholde ther be doon
11

Franklin's Tale: 64

Thus hath she take hir servant and hir lord,
11

Franklin's Tale: 14

[continues previous] To take him for hir housbonde and hir lord,
11

Franklin's Tale: 71

And whan he was in this prosperitee,
11

Physician's Tale: 207

He gooth him hoom, and sette him in his halle, [continues next]
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 11

Whan he was fallen in prosperitee,
14

Franklin's Tale: 72

Hoom with his wyf he gooth to his contree,
11

Reeve's Tale: 233

To bedde he gooth, and with him goth his wyf.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 462

For she drank wyn, thogh I hadde been his wyf, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 463

He sholde nat han daunted me fro drinke; [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 207

[continues previous] He gooth him hoom, and sette him in his halle,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 282

He stal him hoom agayn to his contree, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 368

The somme of gold, and gat of hem his bond;
11

Shipman's Tale: 369

And hoom he gooth, mery as a papeiay.
13

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 5: 7

contree, thou nart nat put out of it; but thou hast failed of thy [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 2: 139

And noght only fro fer contree [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 2: 140

That ther no tyding comth to thee, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 51

To senden him in-to som fer contree [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 73

Nat fer fro Penmark, ther his dwelling was,
12

Reeve's Tale: 1

At Trumpington, nat fer fro Cantebrigge,
12

Reeve's Tale: 2

Ther goth a brook and over that a brigge,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 463

[continues previous] He sholde nat han daunted me fro drinke;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 678

That was abbesse nat fer fro Parys;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 282

[continues previous] He stal him hoom agayn to his contree,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 283

[continues previous] And seyde, 'ther wol I nat lese my name;
13

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 5: 6

[continues previous] tale ne hadde shewed it to me. But certes, al be thou fer fro thy
13

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 5: 7

[continues previous] contree, thou nart nat put out of it; but thou hast failed of thy
14

Hous of Fame 2: 139

[continues previous] And noght only fro fer contree
14

Hous of Fame 2: 140

[continues previous] That ther no tyding comth to thee,
10

Legend of Dido: 126

Aryved is, nat fer fro that citee;
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 51

[continues previous] To senden him in-to som fer contree
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 52

[continues previous] Ther as this Iasoun may destroyed be.
12

Franklin's Tale: 74

Wher-as he liveth in blisse and in solas.
12

Merchant's Tale: 29

And lede his lyf in Ioye and in solas,
12

Merchant's Tale: 30

Wher-as thise bacheleres singe 'allas,'
14

Franklin's Tale: 77

That is bitwixe an housbonde and his wyf?
14

Merchant's Tale: 16

That is bitwixe an housbond and his wyf; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 17

And for to live under that holy bond [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 109

Bitwixe a wyf that is of heigh degree, [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 42

... is repreved. Lo, what seith seint Augustin: 'ther is no-thing so lyk the develes child as he that ofte chydeth.' Seint Paul seith eek: 'I, servant of god, bihove nat to chyde.' And how that chydinge be a vileyns thing bitwixe alle manere folk, yet it is certes most uncovenable bitwixe a man and his wyf; for there is nevere reste. And therfore seith Salomon, 'an hous that is uncovered and droppinge, and a chydinge wyf, been lyke.' A man that is in a droppinge hous in many places, though he eschewe the droppinge in o place, it droppeth on him in another place; so fareth it by a ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 76

... soules; for they bireven alle thise him that sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to hir lecherie, the malisoun of al the court cristen, till they come to amendement. The thridde spece of avoutrie is som-tyme bitwixe a man and his wyf; and that is whan they take no reward in hir assemblinge, but only to hire fleshly delyt, as seith seint Ierome; and ne rekken of nothing but that they been assembled; by-cause that they been maried, al is good y-nough, as thinketh to hem. But in swich folk hath the devel power, as ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 80

... be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente of engendrure ...
12

Franklin's Tale: 78

A yeer and more lasted this blisful lyf,
12

Merchant's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is bitwixe an housbond and his wyf;
12

Merchant's Tale: 17

[continues previous] And for to live under that holy bond
10

Manciple's Tale: 109

[continues previous] Bitwixe a wyf that is of heigh degree,
12

Parson's Tale: 42

[continues previous] ... repreved. Lo, what seith seint Augustin: 'ther is no-thing so lyk the develes child as he that ofte chydeth.' Seint Paul seith eek: 'I, servant of god, bihove nat to chyde.' And how that chydinge be a vileyns thing bitwixe alle manere folk, yet it is certes most uncovenable bitwixe a man and his wyf; for there is nevere reste. And therfore seith Salomon, 'an hous that is uncovered and droppinge, and a chydinge wyf, been lyke.' A man that is in a droppinge hous in many places, though he eschewe the droppinge in o place, it droppeth on him in ...
12

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... bireven alle thise him that sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to hir lecherie, the malisoun of al the court cristen, till they come to amendement. The thridde spece of avoutrie is som-tyme bitwixe a man and his wyf; and that is whan they take no reward in hir assemblinge, but only to hire fleshly delyt, as seith seint Ierome; and ne rekken of nothing but that they been assembled; by-cause that they been maried, al is good y-nough, as thinketh to hem. But in swich folk hath the devel ...
12

Franklin's Tale: 80

That of Kayrrud was cleped Arveragus,
12

Franklin's Tale: 623

For out of toune was goon Arveragus. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 81

Shoop him to goon, and dwelle a yeer or tweyne
12

Franklin's Tale: 623

[continues previous] For out of toune was goon Arveragus.
12

Franklin's Tale: 624

[continues previous] But to hir-self she spak, and seyde thus,
10

Franklin's Tale: 82

In Engelond, that cleped was eek Briteyne,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 952

And fairest eek, was cleped
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 953

That other arowe, that hurteth lesse,
12

Franklin's Tale: 85

And dwelled ther two yeer, the book seith thus.
11

Franklin's Tale: 695

To sleen my-self, than been defouled thus. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 99

Thus seith the book, with-outen any lees.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6385

Ones a yeer, as seith the book,
13

Franklin's Tale: 86

Now wol I stinte of this Arveragus,
11

Knight's Tale: 475

For Ielousye, and fere of him Arcite.' [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 476

Now wol I stinte of Palamon a lyte, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1235

But stinte I wol of Theseus a lyte,
11

Franklin's Tale: 696

[continues previous] I wol be trewe un-to Arveragus,
13

Franklin's Tale: 822

What sholde I lenger of this cas endyte? [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 823

Arveragus and Dorigene his wyf [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 53

After the sinnes of Envie and of Ire, now wol I speken of the sinne of Accidie. For Envye blindeth the herte of a man, and Ire troubleth a man; and Accidie maketh him hevy, thoghtful, and wrawe. Envye and Ire maken bitternesse in herte; which bitternesse is moder of Accidie, and binimeth him the love of alle goodnesse. Thanne is Accidie the ... [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7209

But I wol stinte of this matere,
13

Franklin's Tale: 87

And speken I wole of Dorigene his wyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 475

[continues previous] For Ielousye, and fere of him Arcite.'
10

Knight's Tale: 476

[continues previous] Now wol I stinte of Palamon a lyte,
11

Knight's Tale: 477

[continues previous] And lete him in his prison stille dwelle,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 377

Right so a wyf destroyeth hir housbonde; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 365

That loveth thee, as his owene hertes lyf. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 813

But every wyf be-war of hir biheste, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 814

On Dorigene remembreth atte leste. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 822

[continues previous] What sholde I lenger of this cas endyte?
10

Parson's Tale: 53

[continues previous] After the sinnes of Envie and of Ire, now wol I speken of the sinne of Accidie. For Envye blindeth the herte of a man, and Ire troubleth a man; and Accidie maketh him hevy, thoghtful, and wrawe. Envye and Ire maken bitternesse in herte; which bitternesse is moder of Accidie, and binimeth him the love of alle goodnesse. Thanne is Accidie ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5055

Be she mayde, be she wyf, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6383

'But for as moche as man and wyf [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 88

That loveth hir housbonde as hir hertes lyf.
10

Miller's Tale: 226

And to hir housbonde bad hir for to seye, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 227

If that he axed after Nicholas, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 377

[continues previous] Right so a wyf destroyeth hir housbonde;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 378

[continues previous] This knowe they that been to wyves bonde.'
13

Franklin's Tale: 365

[continues previous] That loveth thee, as his owene hertes lyf. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 813

[continues previous] But every wyf be-war of hir biheste,
11

Franklin's Tale: 824

[continues previous] In sovereyn blisse leden forth hir lyf.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5056

[continues previous] That quik wol selle hir, by hir lyf.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6384

[continues previous] Shuld shewe hir paroche-prest hir lyf
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1065

First he gan hir his righte lady calle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1066

His hertes lyf, his lust, his sorwes leche, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 89

For his absence wepeth she and syketh,
10

Miller's Tale: 226

[continues previous] And to hir housbonde bad hir for to seye,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 59

Thise noble wyves and thise loveres eek. [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 887

That for his wyf wepeth and syketh sore,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 888

I wol retourne, and lete I wol Custance
10

Merchant's Tale: 8

And whan that he was passed sixty yeer, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 365

[continues previous] That loveth thee, as his owene hertes lyf.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1065

[continues previous] First he gan hir his righte lady calle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1066

[continues previous] His hertes lyf, his lust, his sorwes leche,
11

Franklin's Tale: 90

As doon thise noble wyves whan hem lyketh.
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 59

[continues previous] Thise noble wyves and thise loveres eek.
10

Merchant's Tale: 7

[continues previous] As doon thise foles that ben seculeer.
10

Merchant's Tale: 8

[continues previous] And whan that he was passed sixty yeer,
12

Franklin's Tale: 92

Desyr of his presence hir so distreyneth,
11

Knight's Tale: 1460

And fro me turne awey hir hertes so, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1461

That al hir hote love, and hir desyr, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1048

This wyde world hir dredeth alle; [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 93

That al this wyde world she sette at noght.
11

Knight's Tale: 1461

[continues previous] That al hir hote love, and hir desyr,
13

Knight's Tale: 2241

And God, that al this wyde world hath wroght,
10

Summoner's Tale: 263

Thou woldest han our labour al for noght.
10

Summoner's Tale: 264

The hye god, that al this world hath wroght,
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 23

That al the world he sette at no value.
12

Proverbs: 5

Of al this world the wyde compas
12

Franklin's Tale: 94

Hir frendes, whiche that knewe hir hevy thoght,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1048

[continues previous] This wyde world hir dredeth alle;
12

Franklin's Tale: 95

Conforten hir in al that ever they may;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2706

Bicause with hir they been prive. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2707

They shal hir telle how they thee fand [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1624

To been hir helpe in al that ever they mighten. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 96

They prechen hir, they telle hir night and day,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 309

That she hadde suffred day and night [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 310

Made hir ful yelwe, and no-thing bright, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2706

[continues previous] Bicause with hir they been prive.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2707

[continues previous] They shal hir telle how they thee fand
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3048

For Venus hir assailith so, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3049

That night and day from hir she stal [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1624

[continues previous] To been hir helpe in al that ever they mighten.
11

Franklin's Tale: 97

That causelees she sleeth hir-self, allas!
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 309

[continues previous] That she hadde suffred day and night
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3049

[continues previous] That night and day from hir she stal
12

Franklin's Tale: 98

And every confort possible in this cas
12

Knight's Tale: 390

That may me helpe or doon confort in this. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 657

Al hir entente, and in this cas the beste; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 99

They doon to hir with al hir bisinesse,
12

Knight's Tale: 390

[continues previous] That may me helpe or doon confort in this.
11

Clerk's Tale: 535

He sholde it take, and shewe hir this matere, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 536

Bisekinge hir to don hir bisinesse [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 641

To helen with this hauk; fro day to night [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 642

She dooth hir bisinesse and al hir might. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 643

And by hir beddes heed she made a mewe, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 5

That is to seyn, by leveful bisinesse, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 6

Wel oghten we to doon al our entente, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 657

[continues previous] Al hir entente, and in this cas the beste;
12

Franklin's Tale: 100

Al for to make hir leve hir hevinesse.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 854

To make an ende of al hir hevinesse.
11

Clerk's Tale: 535

[continues previous] He sholde it take, and shewe hir this matere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 536

[continues previous] Bisekinge hir to don hir bisinesse
11

Squire's Tale: 641

[continues previous] To helen with this hauk; fro day to night
12

Squire's Tale: 642

[continues previous] She dooth hir bisinesse and al hir might.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 6

[continues previous] Wel oghten we to doon al our entente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 802

If I discreven wolde hir hevinesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 803

It sholde make hir sorwe seme lesse
11

Franklin's Tale: 102

Men may so longe graven in a stoon,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 87

And priketh over style and stoon
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 89

Til he so longe had riden and goon [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 103

Til som figure ther-inne emprented be.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 89

[continues previous] Til he so longe had riden and goon [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 104

So longe han they conforted hir, til she
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 89

[continues previous] Til he so longe had riden and goon
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7423

So longe forth hir way they nomen,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7424

Til they to Wicked-Tonge comen,
11

Franklin's Tale: 106

The emprenting of hir consolacioun,
10

Franklin's Tale: 112

Or elles hadde this sorwe hir herte slayn. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 113

Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 114

And preyede hir on knees, for goddes sake, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 821

Hir tery face a-twixe hir armes hyde, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 107

Thurgh which hir grete sorwe gan aswage;
13

Merchant's Tale: 838

His sorwe gan aswage, sooth to seye;
11

Squire's Tale: 422

For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 112

[continues previous] Or elles hadde this sorwe hir herte slayn.
11

Franklin's Tale: 113

[continues previous] Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake,
10

Franklin's Tale: 114

[continues previous] And preyede hir on knees, for goddes sake,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 57

she bringeth a wight in sorwe? For sin she may nat ben withholden [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 820

[continues previous] Whan she him saw, she gan for sorwe anoon [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 821

[continues previous] Hir tery face a-twixe hir armes hyde, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 108

She may nat alwey duren in swich rage.
11

Squire's Tale: 422

[continues previous] For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 57

[continues previous] she bringeth a wight in sorwe? For sin she may nat ben withholden
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 4: 55

weren born, ne duren nat thilke dignitees alwey? Certes, the
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 820

[continues previous] Whan she him saw, she gan for sorwe anoon
14

Franklin's Tale: 112

Or elles hadde this sorwe hir herte slayn.
10

Franklin's Tale: 106

The emprenting of hir consolacioun, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 107

Thurgh which hir grete sorwe gan aswage; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 167

Hir freendes sawe that it was no disport [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 900

She gan to prenten in hir herte faste; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 96

Allas! I ne hadde y-brought hir in hir sherte! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 97

For sorwe of which I wol not live to morwe, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 723

That hir hadde herd compleynen in hir sorwe, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 113

Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 102

He loved hir most, and trusted hir also; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 103

He preyede hir, that to no creature [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 236

And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 106

[continues previous] The emprenting of hir consolacioun, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 107

[continues previous] Thurgh which hir grete sorwe gan aswage; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 167

[continues previous] Hir freendes sawe that it was no disport
11

Franklin's Tale: 168

[continues previous] To romen by the see, but disconfort;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 367

And called on hir suster Anne, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 368

And gan hir to compleyne thanne; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 899

[continues previous] But every word which that she of hir herde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 900

[continues previous] She gan to prenten in hir herte faste;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 96

[continues previous] Allas! I ne hadde y-brought hir in hir sherte!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 723

[continues previous] That hir hadde herd compleynen in hir sorwe,
13

Franklin's Tale: 114

And preyede hir on knees, for goddes sake,
10

Knight's Tale: 459

For Goddes sake, to letten of his wille, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 102

[continues previous] He loved hir most, and trusted hir also;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 103

[continues previous] He preyede hir, that to no creature
10

Summoner's Tale: 9

To trentals, and to yeve, for goddes sake, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 236

[continues previous] And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle,
11

Clerk's Tale: 237

[continues previous] And with sad contenance kneleth stille
10

Clerk's Tale: 921

Preying the chambereres, for goddes sake, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 106

[continues previous] The emprenting of hir consolacioun,
10

Franklin's Tale: 107

[continues previous] Thurgh which hir grete sorwe gan aswage;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 367

[continues previous] And called on hir suster Anne,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 368

[continues previous] And gan hir to compleyne thanne;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

[continues previous] To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

[continues previous] And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 118

[continues previous] And seyde, 'y-wis, we Grekes con have Ioye
11

Franklin's Tale: 115

To come and romen hir in companye,
10

Knight's Tale: 459

[continues previous] For Goddes sake, to letten of his wille,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 460

To pleyen and to romen to and fro; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 461

And in hir walk this blinde man they mette [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 9

[continues previous] To trentals, and to yeve, for goddes sake,
10

Clerk's Tale: 922

[continues previous] To hasten hem, and faste swepe and shake;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2799

Than Swete-Thought shal come, as blyve, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1524

Peyneth hir on ladyes for to lye? [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 116

Awey to dryve hir derke fantasye.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 460

[continues previous] To pleyen and to romen to and fro;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 82

with so grete a fare? I trowe thou seke to dryve awey nede with
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2800

[continues previous] Awey his angre for to dryve.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3295

'I rede thee Love awey to dryve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1523

[continues previous] Now seestow not this fool of fantasye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1524

[continues previous] Peyneth hir on ladyes for to lye?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1525

[continues previous] Awey,' quod he, 'ther Ioves yeve thee sorwe!
11

Franklin's Tale: 117

And finally, she graunted that requeste;
11

Hous of Fame 3: 448

And somme of hem she graunted sone, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 449

And somme she werned wel and faire; [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 450

And somme she graunted the contraire [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3506

For wel they saugh that it was nede. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 118

For wel she saugh that it was for the beste.
11

Clerk's Tale: 931

To chaunge his wyf, for it was for the beste.
11

Clerk's Tale: 932

For she is fairer, as they demen alle,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 448

[continues previous] And somme of hem she graunted sone,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 449

[continues previous] And somme she werned wel and faire;
11

Hous of Fame 3: 450

[continues previous] And somme she graunted the contraire
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3506

[continues previous] For wel they saugh that it was nede.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 808

That for the beste it was accorded thus,
11

Franklin's Tale: 119

Now stood hir castel faste by the see,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 829

Under the castel, faste by,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1275

Pandare, which that stood hir faste by, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 120

And often with hir freendes walketh she
12

Melibee's Tale: 71

And whan dame Prudence hadde herd the assent of hir lord Melibee, and the conseil of hise freendes, accorde with hir wille and hir entencioun, she was wonderly glad in hir herte, and seyde: 'ther is an old proverbe,' quod she, 'seith: that "the goodnesse that thou mayst do this day, do it; and abyde nat ne delaye it nat til to-morwe." And therfore I conseille that ye sende your messages, swiche as been discrete and ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1276

[continues previous] Felte iren hoot, and he bigan to smyte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1132

And she to that answerde him as hir leste; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1133

And with hir goodly wordes him disporte [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1134

She gan, and ofte his sorwes to comforte. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 121

Hir to disporte up-on the bank an heigh,
11

Miller's Tale: 385

And broke an hole an heigh, up-on the gable,
12

Melibee's Tale: 71

[continues previous] And whan dame Prudence hadde herd the assent of hir lord Melibee, and the conseil of hise freendes, accorde with hir wille and hir entencioun, she was wonderly glad in hir herte, and seyde: 'ther is an old proverbe,' quod she, 'seith: that "the goodnesse that thou mayst do this day, do it; and abyde nat ne delaye it nat til to-morwe." And therfore I conseille that ye sende your messages, swiche as been ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1132

[continues previous] And she to that answerde him as hir leste;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1133

[continues previous] And with hir goodly wordes him disporte
13

Franklin's Tale: 122

Wher-as she many a ship and barge seigh
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 42

For men may overlade a ship or barge;
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 43

And forthy to theffect than wol I skippe,
13

Legend of Phyllis: 14

With him com many a ship and many a barge
10

Franklin's Tale: 123

Seilinge hir cours, wher-as hem liste go;
10

Franklin's Tale: 338

Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye; [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 124

But than was that a parcel of hir wo.
12

Knight's Tale: 1093

Lo, alle thise folk so caught were in hir las, [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1094

Til they for wo ful ofte seyde 'allas!' [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 338

[continues previous] Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 125

For to hir-self ful ofte 'allas!' seith she,
14

Knight's Tale: 1094

[continues previous] Til they for wo ful ofte seyde 'allas!'
13

Miller's Tale: 416

Ful ofte he seith 'allas' and 'weylawey,'
13

Miller's Tale: 417

And to his wyf he tolde his privetee;
14

Miller's Tale: 563

But Absolon, that seith ful ofte, 'allas!
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

... But loke alwey that thy conseillours have thilke three condiciouns that I have seyd bifore; that is to seyn, that they be trewe, wyse, and of old experience. And werke nat alwey in every nede by oon counseillour allone; for somtyme bihoveth it to been conseilled by manye. For Salomon seith: "salvacioun of thinges is wher-as ther been manye conseillours." [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

[continues previous] This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

[continues previous] Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 689

For which ful ofte a day 'allas!' she seyde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 126

'Is ther no ship, of so manye as I see,
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... alwey that thy conseillours have thilke three condiciouns that I have seyd bifore; that is to seyn, that they be trewe, wyse, and of old experience. And werke nat alwey in every nede by oon counseillour allone; for somtyme bihoveth it to been conseilled by manye. For Salomon seith: "salvacioun of thinges is wher-as ther been manye conseillours."
14

Franklin's Tale: 127

Wol bringen hom my lord? than were myn herte
10

Knight's Tale: 1533

For thilke sorwe that was in thyn herte, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 479

'That pitee renneth sone in gentil herte, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 245

My guerdon is but bresting of myn herte; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 434

Than were my brother warisshed of his wo. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 435

Than moste she nedes holden hir biheste, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4612

To Bialacoil leve I myn herte [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 375

Myn herte cleve, al were my lyf eterne, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1140

That in this world ther nis so hard an herte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1501

So reweth on myn aspre peynes smerte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1574

Thus were al lost, y-wis, myn herte dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1421

And fare now wel, myn owene swete herte! [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 128

Al warisshed of his bittre peynes smerte.'
10

Knight's Tale: 1534

[continues previous] Have routhe as wel up-on my peynes smerte.
12

Squire's Tale: 480

[continues previous] Feling his similitude in peynes smerte,
14

Franklin's Tale: 245

[continues previous] My guerdon is but bresting of myn herte;
14

Franklin's Tale: 246

[continues previous] Madame, reweth upon my peynes smerte;
12

Franklin's Tale: 434

[continues previous] Than were my brother warisshed of his wo.
11

Franklin's Tale: 531

To bringen him out of his peynes smerte, [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 130

And therfor, swete, rewe on my peynes smerte, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4611

[continues previous] As lovers doon that felen smerte:
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4613

[continues previous] Al hool, withoute departing,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 374

[continues previous] And, if I lye, Achilles with his spere
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 375

[continues previous] Myn herte cleve, al were my lyf eterne,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 425

And, for thy part, thou shalt have oon of tho
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 426

To abrigge with thy bittre peynes smerte;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 427

Absence of hir shal dryve hir out of herte.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1141

[continues previous] That nolde han rewed on hir peynes smerte.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1501

[continues previous] So reweth on myn aspre peynes smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1574

[continues previous] Thus were al lost, y-wis, myn herte dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1420

[continues previous] Me from disese of alle peynes smerte;
13

Franklin's Tale: 129

Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke,
11

Knight's Tale: 1222

With bowe in honde, and arwes in a cas. [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 1223

Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 133

That on hir feet she mighte hir noght sustene. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 134

Than wolde she sitte adoun upon the grene, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 532

[continues previous] Or with a swerd that he wolde slitte his herte.
11

Compleint to His Lady: 129

[continues previous] That mighte yow offende in any tyme.
11

Compleint to His Lady: 130

[continues previous] And therfor, swete, rewe on my peynes smerte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 142

A thousand fold, and doun hir eyen caste; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 691

Wher-on she wolde apoynte hir at the laste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 783

Whan us is wo, but wepe and sitte and thinke; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

With that she gan hir eyen on him caste [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 130

And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke.
11

Knight's Tale: 1222

[continues previous] With bowe in honde, and arwes in a cas.
13

Knight's Tale: 1223

[continues previous] Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun,
10

Franklin's Tale: 133

[continues previous] That on hir feet she mighte hir noght sustene.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 25

that they han cast awey hir eyen fro the light of the sovereyn
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 142

[continues previous] A thousand fold, and doun hir eyen caste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 143

[continues previous] For never, sith the tyme that she was born,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

[continues previous] And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

[continues previous] Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 691

[continues previous] Wher-on she wolde apoynte hir at the laste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 783

[continues previous] Whan us is wo, but wepe and sitte and thinke;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen on him caste
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

[continues previous] And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

[continues previous] And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 131

But whan she saugh the grisly rokkes blake,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 140

But, lord, thise grisly feendly rokkes blake,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 165

Thise rokkes sleen myn herte for the fere.' [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 430

To mannes sighte, that alle the rokkes blake
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

For fere of blake beres, or boles blake, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1209

But whan he saugh she nolde hir terme holde,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 132

For verray fere so wolde hir herte quake,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 599

Hir thoughte hir cursed herte brast a-two; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 600

She wolde noght hir sone had do so; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 952

Unnethe up-on hir feet she mighte stonde. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 851

Or elles she mot han him as hir leste; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 852

She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste. [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Thise rokkes sleen myn herte for the fere.'
15+

Franklin's Tale: 166

[continues previous] Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous tere.
10

Franklin's Tale: 619

For verray fere unnethe may she go,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For fere of blake beres, or boles blake,
12

Hous of Fame 2: 96

Good herte, and not for fere quake.'
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1224

With hool herte I gan hir beseche [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1225

That she wolde be my lady swete; [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 628

And he hir that his herte hath on hir knet. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 133

That on hir feet she mighte hir noght sustene.
11

Knight's Tale: 1218

With smale houndes al aboute hir feet;
11

Knight's Tale: 1219

And undernethe hir feet she hadde a mone,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 62

I prey to god in honour hir sustene, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 63

And wolde she were of al Europe the quene. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 491

He woweth hir, but it availleth noght, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 492

She wolde do no sinne, by no weye; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 599

[continues previous] Hir thoughte hir cursed herte brast a-two; [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 600

[continues previous] She wolde noght hir sone had do so; [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 601

[continues previous] Hir thoughte a despit, that he sholde take [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 951

[continues previous] Whan that she wiste wherefor was that sonde.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 952

[continues previous] Unnethe up-on hir feet she mighte stonde.
10

Clerk's Tale: 357

That ech hir lovede that loked on hir face.
10

Clerk's Tale: 358

Noght only of Saluces in the toun
12

Merchant's Tale: 851

[continues previous] Or elles she mot han him as hir leste;
12

Merchant's Tale: 852

[continues previous] She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste.
10

Merchant's Tale: 853

[continues previous] Up-on that other syde Damian
10

Franklin's Tale: 129

Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 130

And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke. [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1224

[continues previous] With hool herte I gan hir beseche
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1225

[continues previous] That she wolde be my lady swete;
11

Parlement of Foules: 628

[continues previous] And he hir that his herte hath on hir knet.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 316

Nor do that thing that mighte hir ese; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 317

Nor she ne wolde hir sorowe slake, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

[continues previous] To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

[continues previous] And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese,
12

Franklin's Tale: 134

Than wolde she sitte adoun upon the grene,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 63

[continues previous] And wolde she were of al Europe the quene.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 492

[continues previous] She wolde do no sinne, by no weye;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 600

[continues previous] She wolde noght hir sone had do so;
10

Franklin's Tale: 129

[continues previous] Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 317

[continues previous] Nor she ne wolde hir sorowe slake,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1705

Downward a steyre, in-to an herber grene. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 135

And pitously in-to the see biholde,
13

Knight's Tale: 1061

Wroght on the wal, ful pitous to biholde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1704

[continues previous] And rominge outward, fast it gan biholde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1705

[continues previous] Downward a steyre, in-to an herber grene.
13

Franklin's Tale: 136

And seyn right thus, with sorweful sykes colde:
13

Knight's Tale: 1062

[continues previous] The broken slepes, and the sykes colde;
14

Franklin's Tale: 137

'Eterne god, that thurgh thy purveyaunce
11

Knight's Tale: 807

The purveyaunce, that God hath seyn biforn, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 526

O god, that at thy disposicioun [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 527

Ledest the fyn, by Iuste purveyaunce, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 138

Ledest the world by certein governaunce,
11

Knight's Tale: 806

[continues previous] That executeth in the world over-al
11

Knight's Tale: 807

[continues previous] The purveyaunce, that God hath seyn biforn,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 527

[continues previous] Ledest the fyn, by Iuste purveyaunce,
11

Franklin's Tale: 139

In ydel, as men seyn, ye no-thing make;
11

Franklin's Tale: 429

For with an apparence a clerk may make [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 140

But, lord, thise grisly feendly rokkes blake,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 131

But whan she saugh the grisly rokkes blake,
14

Franklin's Tale: 163

But wolde god that alle thise rokkes blake [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 430

[continues previous] To mannes sighte, that alle the rokkes blake [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 141

That semen rather a foul confusioun
14

Franklin's Tale: 163

[continues previous] But wolde god that alle thise rokkes blake
11

Franklin's Tale: 430

[continues previous] To mannes sighte, that alle the rokkes blake
13

Franklin's Tale: 145

For by this werk, south, north, ne west, ne eest,
10

Knight's Tale: 388

That ther nis erthe, water, fyr, ne eir, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 389

Ne creature, that of hem maked is, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 395

'Bothe north and south, and also west and est,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 850

Som-tyme West, som-tyme North and South,
12

Squire's Tale: 459

Or what may ben your help; for west nor eest [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 460

Ne sey I never er now no brid ne beest [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 190

Maketh that, Est and West, and North and South,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 366

Nis ther more wo, ne more rancour ne ire. [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 92

ne ther nis no man that ne wot wel that they ne [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 15

The wombe-side of thyn Astrolabie is also devyded with a longe croys in foure quarters from est to west, fro south to north, fro right syde to left syde, as is the bak-syde. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
14

Franklin's Tale: 146

Ther nis y-fostred man, ne brid, ne beest;
10

Knight's Tale: 388

[continues previous] That ther nis erthe, water, fyr, ne eir,
10

Knight's Tale: 389

[continues previous] Ne creature, that of hem maked is,
12

Merchant's Tale: 295

Ne man ne beest, swich as men coude devyse;
11

Merchant's Tale: 621

Be it of fish, or brid, or beest, or man. [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 460

[continues previous] Ne sey I never er now no brid ne beest [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 366

[continues previous] Nis ther more wo, ne more rancour ne ire.
11

Parson's Tale: 11

... for-as-muche as the gode werkes that men doon whyl they been in good lyf, been al mortified by sinne folwinge; and eek, sith that alle the gode werkes that men doon whyl they been in deedly synne, been outrely dede as for to have the lyf perdurable; wel may that man, that no good werke ne dooth, singe thilke newe Frenshe song: "Iay tout perdu mon temps et mon labour." For certes, sinne bireveth a man bothe goodnesse of nature and eek the goodnesse of grace. For soothly, the grace of the holy goost fareth lyk fyr, that may nat been ydel; for fyr faileth anoon ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 73

The felawes of Abstinence been Attemperaunce, that holdeth the mene in alle thinges: eek Shame, that eschueth alle deshonestee: Suffisance, that seketh no riche metes ne drinkes, ne dooth no fors of to outrageous apparailinge of mete. Mesure also, that restreyneth by resoun the deslavee appetyt of etinge: Sobrenesse also, that restreyneth the outrage of drinke: Sparinge also, that restreyneth the delicat ese to sitte longe at his mete and softely; wherfore som folk stonden of hir owene ... [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

[continues previous] she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 92

[continues previous] ne ther nis no man that ne wot wel that they ne
14

Franklin's Tale: 147

It dooth no good, to my wit, but anoyeth.
11

Merchant's Tale: 621

[continues previous] Be it of fish, or brid, or beest, or man.
14

Squire's Tale: 460

[continues previous] Ne sey I never er now no brid ne beest
10

Franklin's Tale: 154

Toward mankinde; but how than may it be [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 11

[continues previous] ... the gode werkes that men doon whyl they been in good lyf, been al mortified by sinne folwinge; and eek, sith that alle the gode werkes that men doon whyl they been in deedly synne, been outrely dede as for to have the lyf perdurable; wel may that man, that no good werke ne dooth, singe thilke newe Frenshe song: "Iay tout perdu mon temps et mon labour." For certes, sinne bireveth a man bothe goodnesse of nature and eek the goodnesse of grace. For soothly, the grace of the holy goost fareth lyk fyr, that may nat been ydel; for fyr faileth anoon as ...
11

Parson's Tale: 73

[continues previous] The felawes of Abstinence been Attemperaunce, that holdeth the mene in alle thinges: eek Shame, that eschueth alle deshonestee: Suffisance, that seketh no riche metes ne drinkes, ne dooth no fors of to outrageous apparailinge of mete. Mesure also, that restreyneth by resoun the deslavee appetyt of etinge: Sobrenesse also, that restreyneth the outrage of drinke: Sparinge also, that restreyneth the delicat ese to sitte longe at his mete and softely; wherfore som folk stonden of hir owene wil, to eten at the ...
10

Franklin's Tale: 148

See ye nat, lord, how mankinde it destroyeth?
10

Franklin's Tale: 154

[continues previous] Toward mankinde; but how than may it be
10

Franklin's Tale: 155

[continues previous] That ye swiche menes make it to destroyen,
11

Franklin's Tale: 149

An hundred thousand bodies of mankinde
11

Monk's Tale: 98

And eek three thousand bodies wer ther slayn [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 99

With falling of the grete temple of stoon. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 150

Han rokkes slayn, al be they nat in minde,
11

Monk's Tale: 98

[continues previous] And eek three thousand bodies wer ther slayn
11

Parson's Tale: 77

... the wikkede eschaufinges of the ordure of this sinne. And this is in two maneres, that is to seyn, chastitee in mariage, and chastitee of widwehode. Now shaltow understonde, that matrimoine is leefful assemblinge of man and of womman, that receyven by vertu of the sacrement the bond, thurgh which they may nat be departed in al hir lyf, that is to seyn, whyl that they liven bothe. This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. God maked it, as I have seyd, in paradys, and wolde him-self be born in mariage. And for to halwen mariage, he was at a weddinge, where-as he turned ... [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 151

Which mankinde is so fair part of thy werk
11

Parson's Tale: 77

[continues previous] ... restreyneth the wikkede eschaufinges of the ordure of this sinne. And this is in two maneres, that is to seyn, chastitee in mariage, and chastitee of widwehode. Now shaltow understonde, that matrimoine is leefful assemblinge of man and of womman, that receyven by vertu of the sacrement the bond, thurgh which they may nat be departed in al hir lyf, that is to seyn, whyl that they liven bothe. This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. God maked it, as I have seyd, in paradys, and wolde him-self be born in mariage. And for to halwen mariage, he ...
12

Legend of Philomela: 3

Eternally, or thou thy werk began, [continues next]
11

Legend of Philomela: 4

Why madest thou, unto the slaundre of man, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 152

That thou it madest lyk to thyn owene merk.
10

Friar's Tale: 318

Whan that thou madest thyn housbond cokewold,
11

Merchant's Tale: 55

Thy good to kepe, than thyn owene wyf. [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 31

... and of soule. And more-over, thou shalt love him in word, and in benigne amonestinge, and chastysinge; and conforten him in hise anoyes, and preye for him with al thyn herte. And in dede thou shall love him in swich wyse, that thou shalt doon to him in charitee as thou woldest that it were doon to thyn owene persone. And therfore, thou ne shalt doon him no damage in wikked word, ne harm in his body, ne in his catel, ne in his soule, by entysing of wikked ensample. Thou shalt nat desyren his wyf, ne none of hise thinges. Understond eek, that in the name of neighebor ...
12

Legend of Philomela: 3

[continues previous] Eternally, or thou thy werk began,
12

Legend of Philomela: 4

[continues previous] Why madest thou, unto the slaundre of man,
11

Franklin's Tale: 153

Than semed it ye hadde a greet chiertee
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 396

Wende that I hadde of him so greet chiertee.
11

Merchant's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Thy good to kepe, than thyn owene wyf.
10

Franklin's Tale: 154

Toward mankinde; but how than may it be
10

Franklin's Tale: 147

It dooth no good, to my wit, but anoyeth. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 148

See ye nat, lord, how mankinde it destroyeth? [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 572

Allas! mankinde, how may it bityde, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 155

That ye swiche menes make it to destroyen,
10

Franklin's Tale: 148

[continues previous] See ye nat, lord, how mankinde it destroyeth?
10

Pardoner's Tale: 573

[continues previous] That to thy creatour which that thee wroghte,
12

Franklin's Tale: 157

I wool wel clerkes wol seyn, as hem leste,
12

Summoner's Tale: 86

For lettre sleeth, so as we clerkes seyn.
12

Summoner's Tale: 87

Ther have I taught hem to be charitable,
10

Clerk's Tale: 877

As clerkes, whan hem list, can wel endyte,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 92

That that is overdoon, it wol nat preve
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 93

Aright, as clerkes seyn, it is a vyce.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 350

For, as men seyn, he can don craftily;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 351

Algate I wool wel he hath swich a name,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 88

As autours seyn; leveth hem if yow leste!
11

Franklin's Tale: 158

By arguments, that al is for the beste,
10

Friar's Tale: 198

And nat his body, and al is for the beste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1323

That is so heygh, that al ne can I telle! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1324

But sooth is, though I can not tellen al, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 159

Though I ne can the causes nat y-knowe.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 393

And seyde thus, 'for I ne can nat finde
11

Pardoner's Tale: 394

A man, though that I walked in-to Inde,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 236

Though I ne can nat sette hem in hir kinde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1323

[continues previous] That is so heygh, that al ne can I telle!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1324

[continues previous] But sooth is, though I can not tellen al,
14

Franklin's Tale: 163

But wolde god that alle thise rokkes blake
14

Franklin's Tale: 140

But, lord, thise grisly feendly rokkes blake,
14

Franklin's Tale: 141

That semen rather a foul confusioun
13

Franklin's Tale: 430

To mannes sighte, that alle the rokkes blake
11

Franklin's Tale: 540

That of Britaigne the rokkes were aweye, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 568

It semed that alle the rokkes were aweye. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 573

That voided were thise rokkes everichon, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 164

Were sonken in-to helle for his sake!
11

Franklin's Tale: 540

[continues previous] That of Britaigne the rokkes were aweye, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 541

[continues previous] Or elles they were sonken under grounde. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 568

[continues previous] It semed that alle the rokkes were aweye.
11

Franklin's Tale: 573

[continues previous] That voided were thise rokkes everichon, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 574

[continues previous] Doun to his maistres feet he fil anon, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 165

Thise rokkes sleen myn herte for the fere.'
11

Knight's Tale: 1486

But only for the fere thus hath she cryed, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?' [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 131

But whan she saugh the grisly rokkes blake, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 132

For verray fere so wolde hir herte quake, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 540

[continues previous] That of Britaigne the rokkes were aweye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 573

[continues previous] That voided were thise rokkes everichon,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 791

As Orpheus and Erudice his fere. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 792

Thus herte myn, for Antenor, allas! [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 166

Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous tere.
11

Knight's Tale: 1486

[continues previous] But only for the fere thus hath she cryed,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 439

In orisons, with many a bitter tere,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

[continues previous] So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

[continues previous] 'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?'
10

Summoner's Tale: 156

With many a tere trikling on my cheke,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 132

[continues previous] For verray fere so wolde hir herte quake,
10

Monk's Tale: 188

And yaf him wit; and than with many a tere
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 792

[continues previous] Thus herte myn, for Antenor, allas!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1181

And fer with-in the night, with many a tere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 167

Hir freendes sawe that it was no disport
12

Franklin's Tale: 112

Or elles hadde this sorwe hir herte slayn. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 113

Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1583

[continues previous] To hir he wroot yet ofte tyme al newe
11

Franklin's Tale: 168

To romen by the see, but disconfort;
11

Franklin's Tale: 113

[continues previous] Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake,
12

Franklin's Tale: 173

So on a day, right in the morwe-tyde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 981

And so bifel, that brighte morwe-tyde, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 982

That in that gardin, in the ferther syde, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 174

Un-to a gardin that was ther bisyde,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 447

A good Wyf was ther of bisyde Bathe, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 981

[continues previous] And so bifel, that brighte morwe-tyde, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 982

[continues previous] That in that gardin, in the ferther syde, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 183

That never was ther gardin of swich prys, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 175

In which that they had maad hir ordinaunce
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 446

[continues previous] Therfore he lovede gold in special.
12

Merchant's Tale: 982

[continues previous] That in that gardin, in the ferther syde,
10

Franklin's Tale: 183

[continues previous] That never was ther gardin of swich prys,
11

Franklin's Tale: 177

They goon and pleye hem al the longe day.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 609

They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 610

They goon to bedde, as it was skile and right;
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 70

With pottes ful of lym they goon to-gider;
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 71

And thus the longe day in fight they spende
10

Legend of Dido: 231

Of Troye; and al the longe day they tweye [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 178

And this was on the sixte morwe of May,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 108

And this was now the firste morwe of May
10

Legend of Dido: 231

[continues previous] Of Troye; and al the longe day they tweye
11

Franklin's Tale: 183

That never was ther gardin of swich prys,
10

Clerk's Tale: 887

He with him broghte, in swich pompe and richesse,
10

Clerk's Tale: 888

That never was ther seyn with mannes yë
10

Franklin's Tale: 174

Un-to a gardin that was ther bisyde,
10

Franklin's Tale: 175

In which that they had maad hir ordinaunce
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 481

In stede of hegge, was that gardin;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 482

Com never shepherde therin.
11

Franklin's Tale: 185

The odour of floures and the fresshe sighte
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 80

Was lyk an hound, and wolde han maad areste [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 81

Upon my body, and wolde han had me deed. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1845

Of the botoun the swote odour,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1846

And also see the fresshe colour;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1847

And that right gretly lyked me,
11

Franklin's Tale: 186

Wolde han maad any herte for to lighte
10

Merchant's Tale: 746

That hath an herte as hard as any stoon,
10

Merchant's Tale: 747

Which wolde han lete him sterven in the place
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 80

[continues previous] Was lyk an hound, and wolde han maad areste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 113

Ther-with his manly sorwe to biholde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 114

It mighte han maad an herte of stoon to rewe;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 634

Somwhat his woful herte for to lighte. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 187

That ever was born, but-if to gret siknesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 635

[continues previous] And whan he was from every mannes sighte,
11

Franklin's Tale: 188

Or to gret sorwe helde it in distresse;
11

Clerk's Tale: 621

And ever in oon so pacient was she, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 67

... bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; whan thou, for ire or for mede, or for envye, berest fals witnesse, or accusest him or excusest him by thy fals witnesse, or elles excusest thy-self falsly. Ware yow, questemongeres and notaries! Certes, for fals witnessing was Susanna in ful gret sorwe and peyne, and many another mo. The sinne of thefte is eek expres agayns goddes heste, and that in two maneres, corporel and espirituel. Corporel, as for to take thy neighebores catel agayn his wil, be it by force or by sleighte, be it by met or by mesure. By ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4893

Withoute any deth or distresse, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4894

It is so ful of wildenesse; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 189

So ful it was of beautee with plesaunce.
11

Clerk's Tale: 620

[continues previous] Hath hent hir sone, that ful was of beautee.
11

Clerk's Tale: 621

[continues previous] And ever in oon so pacient was she,
10

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; whan thou, for ire or for mede, or for envye, berest fals witnesse, or accusest him or excusest him by thy fals witnesse, or elles excusest thy-self falsly. Ware yow, questemongeres and notaries! Certes, for fals witnessing was Susanna in ful gret sorwe and peyne, and many another mo. The sinne of thefte is eek expres agayns goddes heste, and that in two maneres, corporel and espirituel. Corporel, as for to take thy neighebores catel agayn his wil, be it by force or by sleighte, be it by met or by ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4894

[continues previous] It is so ful of wildenesse;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4895

[continues previous] So ofte it doth shame or damage
12

Franklin's Tale: 190

At-after diner gonne they to daunce,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 609

They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 610

They goon to bedde, as it was skile and right; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 255

At-after diner daun Iohn sobrely
12

Franklin's Tale: 191

And singe also, save Dorigen allone,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 609

[continues previous] They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye.
10

Franklin's Tale: 192

Which made alwey hir compleint and hir mone;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 362

Al hir compleynt ne al hir mone, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 363

Certeyn, availeth hir not a stre. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 193

For she ne saugh him on the daunce go,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 362

[continues previous] Al hir compleynt ne al hir mone,
12

Franklin's Tale: 194

That was hir housbonde and hir love also.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 108

She nolde nat telle it for hir owene shame.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 109

But nathelees, hir thoughte that she dyde, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 14

To take him for hir housbonde and hir lord,
11

Monk's Tale: 322

So doughty was hir housbonde and eek she, [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 141

The night cam, and to bedde moste she gon [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 142

With hir housbonde, as ofte is the manere, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 195

But nathelees she moste a tyme abyde,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 109

[continues previous] But nathelees, hir thoughte that she dyde,
10

Monk's Tale: 322

[continues previous] So doughty was hir housbonde and eek she,
12

Second Nun's Tale: 141

[continues previous] The night cam, and to bedde moste she gon
11

Franklin's Tale: 198

Daunced a squyer biforen Dorigen,
11

Franklin's Tale: 759

And forth he cleped a squyer and a mayde: [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 760

'Goth forth anon with Dorigen,' he sayde, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 771

This squyer, which that highte Aurelius, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 772

On Dorigen that was so amorous, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 199

That fressher was and Iolyer of array,
11

Franklin's Tale: 759

[continues previous] And forth he cleped a squyer and a mayde:
11

Franklin's Tale: 771

[continues previous] This squyer, which that highte Aurelius,
11

Franklin's Tale: 772

[continues previous] On Dorigen that was so amorous,
10

Franklin's Tale: 200

As to my doom, than is the monthe of May.
10

Franklin's Prologue: 4

So feelingly thou spekest, sir, I allow the!
10

Franklin's Prologue: 5

As to my doom, there is non that is here
15+

Franklin's Tale: 201

He singeth, daunceth, passinge any man
12

Shipman's Tale: 161

Myn housbond is to me the worste man [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 15

Therto he was the semelieste man [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 202

That is, or was, sith that the world bigan.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

And many a seint, sith that the world bigan,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 163

But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 121

Was never wight, sith that the world bigan, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 122

That slow so many monstres as dide he. [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Therto he was the semelieste man [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is or was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

That never yit, sith that the world was newe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 445

That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 203

Ther-with he was, if men sholde him discryve,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
13

Monk's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Was never wight, sith that the world bigan,
14

Manciple's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is or was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

[continues previous] That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
12

Franklin's Tale: 205

Yong, strong, right vertuous, and riche and wys,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1162

For bothe wys folk and unwys [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1258

But wys and war, and vertuous,
12

Franklin's Tale: 206

And wel biloved, and holden in gret prys.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 46

So worthy is biloved be, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 47

That she wel oughte of prys and right, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1161

[continues previous] Gret loos hath Largesse, and gret prys;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1162

[continues previous] For bothe wys folk and unwys
13

Franklin's Tale: 207

And shortly, if the sothe I tellen shal,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 892

That, if I shortly tellen shal and plain,
13

Clerk's Tale: 704

But shortly if this storie I tellen shal, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 109

So faren we, if I shal seye the sothe.'
11

Manciple's Tale: 39

Save only, if the sothe that I shal sayn,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 47

[continues previous] That she wel oughte of prys and right,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 994

Her-after shal I tellen right
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 995

The sothe, and eek signifiaunce,
11

Franklin's Tale: 208

Unwiting of this Dorigen at al,
11

Clerk's Tale: 704

[continues previous] But shortly if this storie I tellen shal,
11

Clerk's Tale: 705

[continues previous] This markis writen hath in special
10

Franklin's Tale: 771

This squyer, which that highte Aurelius, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 772

On Dorigen that was so amorous, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 209

This lusty squyer, servant to Venus,
12

Franklin's Tale: 771

[continues previous] This squyer, which that highte Aurelius, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 210

Which that y-cleped was Aurelius,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 207

His palfrey was as broun as is a berye. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 127

The which that was y-cleped Absolon.
12

Franklin's Tale: 771

[continues previous] This squyer, which that highte Aurelius,
12

Franklin's Tale: 772

[continues previous] On Dorigen that was so amorous,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 129

Which that y-cleped was Valerian,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1132

His lust was muche in housholding. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 654

Which that y-cleped was Oënone,
11

Franklin's Tale: 211

Had loved hir best of any creature
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 206

[continues previous] A fat swan loved he best of any roost.
11

Merchant's Tale: 740

To love him best of any creature,
10

Franklin's Tale: 375

Er any foot he mighte on erthe goon; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 401

Ne wit ne pith in[with] hir holde [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 402

More than a child of two yeer olde. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1131

[continues previous] That she best loved of any thing;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1701

Yet love I best of any creature.
12

Franklin's Tale: 212

Two yeer and more, as was his aventure,
10

Franklin's Tale: 9

Telle hir his wo, his peyne, and his distresse. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 221

How that he dorste nat his sorwe telle, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 222

But languissheth, as a furie dooth in helle; [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 374

[continues previous] Two yeer and more lay wrecche Aurelius,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 402

[continues previous] More than a child of two yeer olde.
12

Franklin's Tale: 213

But never dorste he telle hir his grevaunce;
11

Franklin's Tale: 8

[continues previous] That wel unnethes dorste this knight, for drede,
11

Franklin's Tale: 9

[continues previous] Telle hir his wo, his peyne, and his distresse.
12

Franklin's Tale: 221

[continues previous] How that he dorste nat his sorwe telle,
12

Franklin's Tale: 222

[continues previous] But languissheth, as a furie dooth in helle;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1082

And after that, than gan he telle his wo; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1083

But that was endeles, with-outen ho; [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 214

With-outen coppe he drank al his penaunce.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1083

[continues previous] But that was endeles, with-outen ho;
12

Franklin's Tale: 216

Save in his songes somwhat wolde he wreye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 631

For which him lyked in his songes shewe [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 632

Thencheson of his wo, as he best mighte, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 217

His wo, as in a general compleyning;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 631

[continues previous] For which him lyked in his songes shewe
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 632

[continues previous] Thencheson of his wo, as he best mighte,
12

Franklin's Tale: 220

Songes, compleintes, roundels, virelayes,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 411

That highten Balades, Roundels, Virelayes; [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 423

That highten Balades, Roundels, Virelayes; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 221

How that he dorste nat his sorwe telle,
12

Franklin's Tale: 212

Two yeer and more, as was his aventure, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 213

But never dorste he telle hir his grevaunce; [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 224

For Narcisus, that dorste nat telle hir wo. [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 411

[continues previous] That highten Balades, Roundels, Virelayes;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 423

[continues previous] That highten Balades, Roundels, Virelayes;
15+

Franklin's Tale: 222

But languissheth, as a furie dooth in helle;
12

Franklin's Tale: 212

[continues previous] Two yeer and more, as was his aventure,
12

Franklin's Tale: 213

[continues previous] But never dorste he telle hir his grevaunce;
10

Franklin's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And dye he moste, he seyde, as dide Ekko [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 212

In furie, as dooth he, Ixion, in helle; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 213

And in this wyse he neigh til day soiorneth. [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 223

And dye he moste, he seyde, as dide Ekko
11

Knight's Tale: 1426

But how she dide hir ryte I dar nat telle, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 222

[continues previous] But languissheth, as a furie dooth in helle; [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 250

Til he hit hadde, him thoghte he moste dye;
10

Compleynt of Mars: 251

And whan that hit was his, than shulde he drye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1075

That love it made, or elles moste he dye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1076

And pitously gan mercy for to crye;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 211

[continues previous] To bedde he goth, and weyleth there and torneth
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 212

[continues previous] In furie, as dooth he, Ixion, in helle;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 213

[continues previous] And in this wyse he neigh til day soiorneth.
13

Franklin's Tale: 224

For Narcisus, that dorste nat telle hir wo.
11

Knight's Tale: 1426

[continues previous] But how she dide hir ryte I dar nat telle,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 972

I may nat telle hir wo un-til tomorwe,
13

Franklin's Tale: 8

That wel unnethes dorste this knight, for drede,
13

Franklin's Tale: 9

Telle hir his wo, his peyne, and his distresse.
10

Franklin's Tale: 221

[continues previous] How that he dorste nat his sorwe telle,
12

Franklin's Tale: 226

Ne dorste he nat to hir his wo biwreye;
10

Parson's Tale: 81

... manere of chastitee is virginitee, and it bihoveth that she be holy in herte and clene of body; thanne is she spouse to Iesu Crist, and she is the lyf of angeles. She is the preisinge of this world, and she is as thise martirs in egalitee; she hath in hir that tonge may nat telle ne herte thinke. Virginitee baar oure lord Iesu Crist, and virgin was him-selve. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 735

And Ecquo dyed for Narcisus
11

Book of the Duchesse: 736

Nolde nat love hir; and right thus
12

Franklin's Tale: 225

In other manere than ye here me seye,
12

Friar's Tale: 96

Seye that he was a somnour, for the name. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] ... thridde manere of chastitee is virginitee, and it bihoveth that she be holy in herte and clene of body; thanne is she spouse to Iesu Crist, and she is the lyf of angeles. She is the preisinge of this world, and she is as thise martirs in egalitee; she hath in hir that tonge may nat telle ne herte thinke. Virginitee baar oure lord Iesu Crist, and virgin was him-selve.
11

Parlement of Foules: 541

Nay, sirs!' quod he, 'if that I dorste it seye, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 542

Ye doon me wrong, my tale is not y-do! [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 226

Ne dorste he nat to hir his wo biwreye;
12

Friar's Tale: 95

[continues previous] He dorste nat, for verray filthe and shame,
12

Franklin's Tale: 224

For Narcisus, that dorste nat telle hir wo.
11

Parlement of Foules: 541

[continues previous] Nay, sirs!' quod he, 'if that I dorste it seye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 502

For whiche him thoughte he felte his herte blede.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 503

Ne of his wo ne dorste he not biginne
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 504

To tellen it, for al this world to winne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1370

And siker place his wo for to biwreye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 228

Ther yonge folk kepen hir observaunces,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 160

The folk of Troye hir observaunces olde,
14

Franklin's Tale: 229

It may wel be he loked on hir face
12

Clerk's Tale: 357

That ech hir lovede that loked on hir face. [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 507

At every time he loked on hir face; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 508

But in his herte he gan hir to manace, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1078

That ech him lovede that loked on his face.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1079

For he bicom the frendlyeste wight,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 274

And loked on hir in a besy wyse, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 230

In swich a wyse, as man that asketh grace;
10

Reeve's Tale: 362

That wiste no-thing of this nyce stryf; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 358

[continues previous] Noght only of Saluces in the toun
14

Merchant's Tale: 508

[continues previous] But in his herte he gan hir to manace,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1344

But I, that no-thing wiste of this, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 992

And conne it counseyl kepe in swich a wyse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 993

That no man shal the wyser of it be;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 274

[continues previous] And loked on hir in a besy wyse,
13

Franklin's Tale: 231

But no-thing wiste she of his entente.
10

Reeve's Tale: 362

[continues previous] That wiste no-thing of this nyce stryf;
10

Reeve's Tale: 363

[continues previous] For she was falle aslepe a lyte wight
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1344

[continues previous] But I, that no-thing wiste of this,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 125

To telle me the fyn of his entente;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 126

Yet wiste I never wel what that he mente.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1229

Whan she his trouthe and clene entente wiste.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 867

Answerde him tho; but, as of his entente, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 868

It semed not she wiste what he mente. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 232

Nathelees, it happed, er they thennes wente,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 617

And so he dide, er that they wente a-twinne; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 868

[continues previous] It semed not she wiste what he mente.
11

Franklin's Tale: 233

By-cause that he was hir neighebour,
10

Miller's Tale: 209

By-cause that he fer was from hir sighte, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 617

[continues previous] And so he dide, er that they wente a-twinne;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 618

[continues previous] Til he had torned him, coude he not blinne.
13

Franklin's Tale: 234

And was a man of worship and honour,
10

Miller's Tale: 209

[continues previous] By-cause that he fer was from hir sighte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 719

And they that hadde y-knowen hir of yore [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 720

Seye hir so wepe, and thoughte it kindenesse, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 235

And hadde y-knowen him of tyme yore,
12

Squire's Tale: 238

And fille in speche of Thelophus the king, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 719

[continues previous] And they that hadde y-knowen hir of yore [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 720

[continues previous] Seye hir so wepe, and thoughte it kindenesse, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 236

They fille in speche; and forth more and more
12

Squire's Tale: 238

[continues previous] And fille in speche of Thelophus the king,
10

Squire's Tale: 239

[continues previous] And of Achilles with his queynte spere,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 309

Everich air in other stereth
10

Hous of Fame 2: 310

More and more, and speche up bereth,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 719

[continues previous] And they that hadde y-knowen hir of yore
11

Franklin's Tale: 237

Un-to his purpos drough Aurelius,
10

Franklin's Tale: 460

Aurelius in his lyf saugh never noon. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 579

Wher-as he knew he sholde his lady see. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 580

And whan he saugh his tyme, anon-right he, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 238

And whan he saugh his tyme, he seyde thus:
13

Reeve's Tale: 138

Whan that he saugh his tyme, softely;
13

Reeve's Tale: 139

He loketh up and doun til he hath founde
11

Summoner's Tale: 502

'Madame,' quod he, 'by god I shal nat lye; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 614

And afterward, whan that he saugh his tyme, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 260

But after that in pley thus seyde she: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 280

And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 281

'Madame,' quod he, 'this were an inpossible! [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 460

[continues previous] Aurelius in his lyf saugh never noon.
10

Franklin's Tale: 461

[continues previous] He shewed him, er he wente to sopeer,
12

Franklin's Tale: 579

[continues previous] Wher-as he knew he sholde his lady see.
14

Franklin's Tale: 580

[continues previous] And whan he saugh his tyme, anon-right he,
12

Franklin's Tale: 797

For which in fewe wordes seyde he thus: [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 382

Til, atte laste, that this Marchant seyde, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 383

'By god,' quod he, 'I am a litel wrooth [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 5

... wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of god, shal warisshe and escape. And al were it so that ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 62

Thanne Dame Prudence, whan she saugh the gode wil of her housbonde, delibered and took avys in hir-self, thinkinge how she mighte bringe this nede un-to a good conclusioun and to a good ende. And whan she saugh hir tyme, she sente for thise adversaries to come un-to hir in-to a privee place, and shewed wysly un-to hem the grete goodes that comen of pees, and the grete harmes and perils that been in werre; and seyde to hem in a goodly manere, how that hem oughte have greet repentaunce ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 651

And whan this alkamistre saugh his tyme, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 652

'Rys up,' quod he, 'sir preest, and stondeth by me; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 52

A philosophre up-on a tyme, that wolde have beten his disciple for his grete trespas, for which he was greetly amoeved, and broghte a yerde to scourge the child; and whan this child saugh the yerde, he seyde to his maister, 'what thenke ye to do?' 'I wol bete thee,' quod the maister, 'for thy correccion.' 'For sothe,' quod the child, 'ye oghten first correcte youre-self, that han lost al youre pacience for the gilt of a child.' 'For sothe,' quod the maister al wepinge, 'thou seyst sooth; ...
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 432

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 446

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 442

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 456

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1531

For whan he saugh that he his wille
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1084

Than seyde he thus, 'god woot, that of this game, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 239

'Madame,' quod he, 'by god that this world made,
13

Summoner's Tale: 502

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'by god I shal nat lye;
11

Merchant's Tale: 614

[continues previous] And afterward, whan that he saugh his tyme,
10

Franklin's Tale: 261

[continues previous] 'Aurelie,' quod she, 'by heighe god above,
12

Franklin's Tale: 280

[continues previous] And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde:
12

Franklin's Tale: 281

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'this were an inpossible!
12

Franklin's Tale: 797

[continues previous] For which in fewe wordes seyde he thus:
12

Franklin's Tale: 798

[continues previous] 'Madame, seyth to your lord Arveragus,
13

Shipman's Tale: 382

[continues previous] Til, atte laste, that this Marchant seyde,
13

Shipman's Tale: 383

[continues previous] 'By god,' quod he, 'I am a litel wrooth
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

[continues previous] And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 652

[continues previous] 'Rys up,' quod he, 'sir preest, and stondeth by me;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 19

sholden doute that this world nis governed by god.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 20

'Certes,' quod I, 'ne yit ne doute I it naught, ne I nel never
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 446

[continues previous] And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 447

[continues previous] Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 442

[continues previous] The god of love answerde hir thus anoon,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 456

[continues previous] And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 457

[continues previous] Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1084

[continues previous] Than seyde he thus, 'god woot, that of this game,
11

Franklin's Tale: 240

So that I wiste it mighte your herte glade,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1277

And thus seyde he, 'now wolde god I wiste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1278

Myn herte swete, how I yow mighte plese! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1486

Yit were it so that I wiste outrely,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1487

That I, your humble servaunt and your knight,
11

Franklin's Tale: 241

I wolde, that day that your Arveragus
11

Franklin's Tale: 798

'Madame, seyth to your lord Arveragus, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 799

That sith I see his grete gentillesse [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1277

[continues previous] And thus seyde he, 'now wolde god I wiste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1278

[continues previous] Myn herte swete, how I yow mighte plese!
11

Franklin's Tale: 242

Wente over the see, that I, Aurelius,
11

Franklin's Tale: 799

[continues previous] That sith I see his grete gentillesse
10

Franklin's Tale: 243

Had went ther never I sholde have come agayn;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 670

I have no cause, I woot wel, for to sore [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 244

For wel I woot my service is in vayn.
11

Legend of Dido: 436

For wel I woot that it is al in vain,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 670

[continues previous] I have no cause, I woot wel, for to sore
15+

Franklin's Tale: 245

My guerdon is but bresting of myn herte;
11

Knight's Tale: 1533

For thilke sorwe that was in thyn herte, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 479

'That pitee renneth sone in gentil herte, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 127

Wol bringen hom my lord? than were myn herte [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 128

Al warisshed of his bittre peynes smerte.' [continues next]
12

Balade of Compleynt: 1

Compleyne ne coude, ne might myn herte never [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2846

Y-wis, he sit so nere myn herte. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1140

That in this world ther nis so hard an herte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1449

Dwel rather here, myn owene swete herte! [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1501

So reweth on myn aspre peynes smerte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1420

Me from disese of alle peynes smerte; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1421

And fare now wel, myn owene swete herte! [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 246

Madame, reweth upon my peynes smerte;
11

Knight's Tale: 1534

[continues previous] Have routhe as wel up-on my peynes smerte.
11

Squire's Tale: 480

[continues previous] Feling his similitude in peynes smerte,
14

Franklin's Tale: 128

[continues previous] Al warisshed of his bittre peynes smerte.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 531

To bringen him out of his peynes smerte, [continues next]
12

Balade of Compleynt: 2

[continues previous] My peynes halve, ne what torment I have,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 130

And therfor, swete, rewe on my peynes smerte,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 13

Or tellen any of my peynes smerte,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2845

[continues previous] To me it voidith al [my] smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1141

[continues previous] That nolde han rewed on hir peynes smerte.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1448

[continues previous] Yet, er that ye me cause so to smerte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1501

[continues previous] So reweth on myn aspre peynes smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1326

That ye me lafte in aspre peynes smerte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1420

[continues previous] Me from disese of alle peynes smerte;
11

Franklin's Tale: 247

For with a word ye may me sleen or save,
11

Franklin's Tale: 532

[continues previous] Or with a swerd that he wolde slitte his herte.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 288

As verily ye sleen me with the peyne;
11

Anelida and Arcite: 289

That may ye see unfeyned of myn hewe.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1952

Ye may do with me what ye wile,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1953

Save or spille, and also sloo;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1450

For trewely, myn owene lady dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1326

[continues previous] That ye me lafte in aspre peynes smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1327

[continues previous] Whan that ye wente, of which yet bote noon
11

Franklin's Tale: 248

Heer at your feet god wolde that I were grave!
11

Franklin's Tale: 587

That I moste dyen heer at your foot anon,
11

Franklin's Tale: 588

Noght wolde I telle how me is wo bigon;
13

Franklin's Tale: 250

Have mercy, swete, or ye wol do me deye!'
13

Parlement of Foules: 651

Ye gete no more, al-though ye do me deye.
13

Parlement of Foules: 652

I wol noght serven Venus ne Cupyde
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1410

But whether that ye do me live or deye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 252

'Is this your wil,' quod she, 'and sey ye thus?
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 56

'Certes,' quod she; 'and him nedede non help, yif he ne hadde [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 380

'Is that in ernest,' quod she; 'wil ye so?
10

Legend of Dido: 381

Have ye nat sworn to wyve me to take,
13

Franklin's Tale: 253

Never erst,' quod she, 'ne wiste I what ye mente.
11

Knight's Tale: 1485

For she ne wiste what it signifyed; [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 280

For never erst ne saugh she swich a sighte.
12

Merchant's Tale: 861

And privee signes, wiste he what she mente;
12

Merchant's Tale: 862

And she knew eek the fyn of his entente.
12

Squire's Tale: 399

For right anon she wiste what they mente
10

Squire's Tale: 522

That (save the feend) non wiste what he mente.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 56

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod she; 'and him nedede non help, yif he ne hadde
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 140

For-why I mette I wiste what they mente. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3047

That she ne wiste what to do.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1182

And seyde, 'ye were caught er that ye wiste;'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1183

'I vouche sauf,' quod he, 'do what yow liste.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1561

But god and Pandare wiste al what this mente. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 126

Yet wiste I never wel what that he mente.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 868

It semed not she wiste what he mente. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1693

But for despyt, and eek for that ye mente [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 254

But now, Aurelie, I knowe your entente,
11

Knight's Tale: 1486

[continues previous] But only for the fere thus hath she cryed,
10

Clerk's Tale: 739

Nought for your linage ne for your richesse;
10

Clerk's Tale: 740

But now knowe I in verray soothfastnesse
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 140

[continues previous] For-why I mette I wiste what they mente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1561

[continues previous] But god and Pandare wiste al what this mente.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 126

[continues previous] Yet wiste I never wel what that he mente.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 869

[continues previous] But natheles, this ilke Diomede
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1694

[continues previous] Al-outrely to shewen your entente!
15+

Franklin's Tale: 255

By thilke god that yaf me soule and lyf,
14

Summoner's Tale: 99

Thanked be god, that yow yaf soule and lyf, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 766

And also wisly he my soule glade — [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 767

I never heeld me lady ne maistresse, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 114

'Nay, cosin myn, it stant nat so with me.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 115

For, by that god that yaf me soule and lyf,
12

Melibee's Tale: 14

... certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And also, if I wolde werke by thy ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 134

'And I your borow, ne never shal, for me, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 256

Ne shal I never been untrewe wyf
11

Knight's Tale: 1448

Ne never wol I be no love ne wyf.
11

Miller's Tale: 325

Sey what thou wolt, I shal it never telle [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 326

To child ne wyf, by him that harwed helle!' [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 100

[continues previous] Yet saugh I nat this day so fair a wyf
11

Clerk's Tale: 306

And heer I swere that never willingly [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 307

In werk ne thoght I nil yow disobeye, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 767

[continues previous] I never heeld me lady ne maistresse,
12

Melibee's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And also, if I wolde werke by thy conseilling, certes my conseilling ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 134

[continues previous] 'And I your borow, ne never shal, for me,
14

Franklin's Tale: 257

In word ne werk, as fer as I have wit:
11

Miller's Tale: 326

[continues previous] To child ne wyf, by him that harwed helle!'
10

Clerk's Prologue: 24

And therfor wol I do yow obeisaunce, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 25

As fer as reson axeth, hardily. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 307

[continues previous] In werk ne thoght I nil yow disobeye,
12

Melibee's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And also, if I wolde werke ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 146

As fer as I have remembraunce.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 996

As fer as I have remembraunce:
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 997

I thonke it yow, as fer as I have wit, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 998

Al can I nought as muche as it were right; [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 258

I wol ben his to whom that I am knit;
10

Clerk's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] And therfor wol I do yow obeisaunce,
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 997

[continues previous] I thonke it yow, as fer as I have wit,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 998

[continues previous] Al can I nought as muche as it were right;
12

Franklin's Tale: 260

But after that in pley thus seyde she:
10

Franklin's Tale: 238

And whan he saugh his tyme, he seyde thus: [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 113

And seyde thus, 'ye, god wot al,' quod she; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 89

Allas!' quod she, 'for, by that god above, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 1: 14

Than seyde she thus: 'That felede I ful wel,' quod she, 'whan [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 160

Thanne seyde she thus: 'O my nory,' quod she, 'I have [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 27

Thanne seyde she thus: 'Certes,' quod she, 'that were a greet [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 647

Ful many oon hath she thus y-blent. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 648

She is pley of enchauntement, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 649

That semeth oon and is nat so, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 261

'Aurelie,' quod she, 'by heighe god above,
10

Franklin's Tale: 239

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'by god that this world made,
11

Shipman's Tale: 113

[continues previous] And seyde thus, 'ye, god wot al,' quod she;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 89

[continues previous] Allas!' quod she, 'for, by that god above,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 1: 14

[continues previous] Than seyde she thus: 'That felede I ful wel,' quod she, 'whan
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 160

[continues previous] Thanne seyde she thus: 'O my nory,' quod she, 'I have
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 27

[continues previous] Thanne seyde she thus: 'Certes,' quod she, 'that were a greet
11

Book of the Duchesse: 647

[continues previous] Ful many oon hath she thus y-blent.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 648

[continues previous] She is pley of enchauntement,
12

Franklin's Tale: 262

Yet wolde I graunte yow to been your love,
12

Melibee's Tale: 50

Whan Prudence hadde herd hir housbonde avanten him of his richesse and of his moneye, dispreisinge the power of hise adversaries, she spak, and seyde in this wyse: 'certes, dere sir, I graunte yow that ye been rich and mighty, and that the richesses been goode to hem that han wel y-geten hem and wel conne usen hem. For right as the body of a man may nat liven with-oute the soule, namore may it live with-outen temporel goodes. And by richesses may a man gete him grete freendes. And therfore seith Pamphilles: "if a net-herdes doghter," seith he, "be riche, she may chesen of a thousand men which she wol take to hir housbonde; for, of a thousand men, oon wol nat forsaken hir ne refusen hir." And this Pamphilles seith also: "if thou be right happy, that is to seyn, if thou be right riche, thou shalt find a greet nombre of felawes and freendes. And if thy fortune change that thou wexe povre, farewel freendshipe and felaweshipe; for thou shalt be allone with-outen any companye, but-if it be the companye of povre folk." And yet seith this Pamphilles moreover: that "they that been thralle and bonde of linage shullen been maad worthy and noble by the richesses." And right so as by richesses ther comen manye goodes, right so by poverte come ther manye harmes and yveles. For greet poverte constreyneth a man to do manye yveles. And therfore clepeth Cassidore poverte "the moder of ruine," that is to seyn, the moder of overthrowinge or fallinge doun. And therfore seith Piers Alfonce: "oon of the gretteste adversitees of this world is whan a free man, by kinde or by burthe, is constreyned by poverte to eten the almesse of his enemy." And the same seith Innocent in oon of hise bokes; he seith: that "sorweful and mishappy is the condicioun of a povre begger; for if he axe nat his mete, he dyeth for hunger; and if he axe, he dyeth for shame; and algates necessitee constreyneth him to axe." And therfore seith Salomon: that "bet it is to dye than for to have swich poverte." And as the same Salomon seith: "bettre it is to dye of bitter deeth than for to liven in swich wyse." By thise resons that I have seid un-to yow, and by manye othere resons that I coude seye, I graunte yow that richesses been goode to hem that geten hem wel, and to hem that wel usen tho richesses. And therfore wol I shewe yow how ye shul have yow, and how ye shul here yow in gaderinge of richesses, and in what manere ye shul usen hem. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 697

And eek on myn, if I hit graunte, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 698

Or do yow favour, yow to avaunte! [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6058

'Parfay,' seide Love, 'I graunte it yow; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6059

I wol wel holde him for my man; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 263

Sin I yow see so pitously complayne;
10

Melibee's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... seith Salomon: that "bet it is to dye than for to have swich poverte." And as the same Salomon seith: "bettre it is to dye of bitter deeth than for to liven in swich wyse." By thise resons that I have seid un-to yow, and by manye othere resons that I coude seye, I graunte yow that richesses been goode to hem that geten hem wel, and to hem that wel usen tho richesses. And therfore wol I shewe yow how ye shul have yow, and how ye shul here yow in gaderinge of richesses, and in what manere ye shul usen hem.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 697

[continues previous] And eek on myn, if I hit graunte,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 698

[continues previous] Or do yow favour, yow to avaunte!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6058

[continues previous] 'Parfay,' seide Love, 'I graunte it yow;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6059

[continues previous] I wol wel holde him for my man;
14

Franklin's Tale: 264

Loke what day that, endelong Britayne,
14

Franklin's Tale: 493

To remoeven alle the rokkes of Britayne, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 265

Ye remoeve alle the rokkes, stoon by stoon,
14

Franklin's Tale: 493

[continues previous] To remoeven alle the rokkes of Britayne,
11

Franklin's Tale: 267

I seye, whan ye han maad the coost so clene
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 257

For thee have I my nece, of vyces clene, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 258

So fully maad thy gentilesse triste, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 268

Of rokkes, that ther nis no stoon y-sene,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 776

To ryde by the weye doumb as a stoon; [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, it is ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 107

y-graunted and received, that is to seyn, that ther nis no free wille, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 257

[continues previous] For thee have I my nece, of vyces clene,
12

Franklin's Tale: 269

Than wol I love yow best of any man;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 777

[continues previous] And therfore wol I maken yow disport,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.' [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1078

Singeth, ful merier than the papeiay,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1079

'Yow love I best, and shal, and other noon.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 590

For that is best; I wol yow nat deceyve.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 108

[continues previous] than sheweth it wel, how greet destruccioun and how grete
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 537

More than my-self wol love yow to my laste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1002

I sey not therfore that I wol yow love,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1003

Ne I sey not nay, but in conclusioun,
12

Franklin's Tale: 270

Have heer my trouthe in al that ever I can.'
12

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

[continues previous] 'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 427

Have heer my trouthe, as thou art his aspye,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 55

'Whan I considere,' quod I, 'manye thinges, I see non other.' [continues next]
11

Merciles Beautè: 37

Sin I fro Love escaped am so fat, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 271

'Is ther non other grace in yow,' quod he.
11

Knight's Tale: 324

Ech man for him-self, ther is non other.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 168

For wel she seeth ther is non other ende.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 169

Allas! what wonder is it though she wepte,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 322

If this were livinge only and non other.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 323

But ther is better lyf in other place,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 821

I sholde be deed, ther were non other weye.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 822

'God it forbede!' quod the preest, 'what sey ye?'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 55

[continues previous] 'Whan I considere,' quod I, 'manye thinges, I see non other.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 56

[continues previous] 'Is ther any-thing thanne,' quod she, 'that, in as moche as it
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 28

Ther-as ther is non other assay by preve.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 62

To be devoured, for grace is ther non.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 63

And forth is lad this woful yonge knight
12

Legend of Hypermnestra: 104

She graunted him; ther was non other grace.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 180

Hit was for noght; ther herde him non.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 181

Awak!' quod he, 'who is, lyth there?'
11

Merciles Beautè: 36

[continues previous] For ever-mo; [ther] is non other mene.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 952

For wel he thoughte ther was non other grace.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1688

Was ther non other broche yow liste lete
12

Franklin's Tale: 272

'No, by that lord,' quod she, 'that maked me!
11

Knight's Tale: 1540

And wel I woot, er she me mercy hete, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 110

I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 253

Thou lovest me, I woot it wel, certeyn, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Prologue: 4

That wedded been, I trowe that it be so. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Prologue: 5

For, wel I woot, it fareth so with me. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1099

(For wel I woot that ye mistruste me) [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 29

I woot wel she wol do me slee som day [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 652

'Rys up,' quod he, 'sir preest, and stondeth by me; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 134

'Thanne,' quod she, 'for as mochel as thou hast knowen [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 436

For wel I woot that it is al in vain, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 652

I woot wel that it fareth thus by me [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

[continues previous] 'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

[continues previous] 'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1664

That secret is, and for the tounes prow.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

[continues previous] Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

[continues previous] 'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene;
13

Franklin's Tale: 273

For wel I woot that it shal never bityde.
11

Knight's Tale: 1540

[continues previous] And wel I woot, er she me mercy hete,
11

Miller's Tale: 110

[continues previous] I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
10

Miller's Tale: 264

A man woot litel what him shal bityde.
11

Clerk's Tale: 253

[continues previous] Thou lovest me, I woot it wel, certeyn,
12

Merchant's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] That wedded been, I trowe that it be so.
12

Merchant's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] For, wel I woot, it fareth so with me.
10

Merchant's Tale: 253

I never hem contraried, trewely;
10

Merchant's Tale: 254

I woot wel that my lord can more than I.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1099

[continues previous] (For wel I woot that ye mistruste me)
11

Franklin's Prologue: 36

Than woot I wel that it is good y-now.'
11

Monk's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] I woot wel she wol do me slee som day
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 183

That whyl I live, I shal it quyte never. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 653

[continues previous] And for I woot wel ingot have ye noon,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 134

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'for as mochel as thou hast knowen
12

Legend of Dido: 436

[continues previous] For wel I woot that it is al in vain,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 651

[continues previous] Thyn hevy charge; it shal the lasse dere.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 652

[continues previous] I woot wel that it fareth thus by me
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

[continues previous] He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1664

[continues previous] That secret is, and for the tounes prow.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 274

Lat swiche folies out of your herte slyde.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 184

[continues previous] Lat every man be war by me for ever!
12

Franklin's Tale: 275

What deyntee sholde a man han in his lyf
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 535

Or doon a thing that sholde han cost his lyf, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 276

For to go love another mannes wyf,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 536

[continues previous] To hir, and to another worthy wyf,
13

Franklin's Tale: 277

That hath hir body whan so that him lyketh?'
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 371

Now chese your-selven, whether that yow lyketh.' [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

This knight avyseth him and sore syketh, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 278

Aurelius ful ofte sore syketh;
12

Knight's Tale: 215

That he was born, ful ofte he seyde, 'alas!' [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 498

Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde 'allas,' [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

[continues previous] This knight avyseth him and sore syketh,
12

Franklin's Tale: 279

Wo was Aurelie, whan that he this herde,
12

Knight's Tale: 214

[continues previous] And to him-self compleyning of his wo;
12

Knight's Tale: 215

[continues previous] That he was born, ful ofte he seyde, 'alas!'
10

Knight's Tale: 497

[continues previous] Whan that Arcite to Thebes comen was,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 659

Wo was this king whan he this lettre had seyn,
12

Franklin's Tale: 294

He seeth he may nat fro his deeth asterte. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 858

And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde: [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 280

And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde:
12

Franklin's Tale: 238

And whan he saugh his tyme, he seyde thus: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 239

'Madame,' quod he, 'by god that this world made, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 293

[continues previous] He to his hous is goon with sorweful herte;
12

Franklin's Tale: 294

[continues previous] He seeth he may nat fro his deeth asterte.
11

Franklin's Tale: 498

Aurelius, with blisful herte anoon,
11

Franklin's Tale: 499

Answerde thus, 'fy on a thousand pound!
11

Franklin's Tale: 857

[continues previous] This philosophre sobrely answerde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 858

[continues previous] And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde:
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 390

[But] axeth mercy with a sorweful herte,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 391

And profreth him, right in his bare sherte,
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 432

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 442

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 281

'Madame,' quod he, 'this were an inpossible!
12

Franklin's Tale: 238

[continues previous] And whan he saugh his tyme, he seyde thus:
12

Franklin's Tale: 239

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'by god that this world made,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

[continues previous] And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame,
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 525

That, wiste he wel, an inpossible were.
11

Franklin's Tale: 284

Tho come hir othere freendes many oon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1442

What with hir othere freendes governaunce.'
15+

Franklin's Tale: 285

And in the aleyes romeden up and doun,
12

Lak of Stedfastnesse: 5

Ben no-thing lyk, for turned up so doun [continues next]
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1345

Wente up and doun ful many a wey, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 286

And no-thing wiste of this conclusioun,
11

Reeve's Tale: 362

That wiste no-thing of this nyce stryf;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 383

Ful is myn herte of revel and solas.' [continues next]
12

Lak of Stedfastnesse: 4

[continues previous] That word and deed, as in conclusioun,
12

Lak of Stedfastnesse: 5

[continues previous] Ben no-thing lyk, for turned up so doun
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1344

[continues previous] But I, that no-thing wiste of this,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1345

[continues previous] Wente up and doun ful many a wey,
13

Franklin's Tale: 287

But sodeinly bigonne revel newe
13

Clerk's Tale: 336

In revel, til the sonne gan descende. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 383

[continues previous] Ful is myn herte of revel and solas.'
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 384

[continues previous] But sodeinly him fil a sorweful cas;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 856

She semede lyk a rose newe [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 662

Fro man to man, and made this tale al newe, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 288

Til that the brighte sonne loste his hewe;
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 1

Our Hoste sey wel that the brighte sonne
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 2

The ark of his artificial day had ronne
11

Clerk's Tale: 335

[continues previous] Conveyed hir, and thus the day they spende
13

Clerk's Tale: 336

[continues previous] In revel, til the sonne gan descende.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 58

Whan that the brighte sonne gan to springe,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 373

Caste up his eyen to the brighte sonne,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 374

That in the signe of Taurus hadde y-ronne
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 162

But of his face I can nat seyn the hewe. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 163

For sekirly his face shoon so brighte, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 855

[continues previous] Bothe were they faire and brighte of hewe;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 441

That sixty tyme a day he loste his hewe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 442

So muche, day by day, his owene thought,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 663

[continues previous] How Calkas doughter, with hir brighte hewe,
10

Franklin's Tale: 289

For thorisonte hath reft the sonne his light;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 163

[continues previous] For sekirly his face shoon so brighte,
14

Franklin's Tale: 290

This is as muche to seye as it was night.
10

Squire's Tale: 107

Yet seye I this, as to commune entente,
10

Squire's Tale: 108

Thus muche amounteth al that ever he mente,
10

Squire's Tale: 163

Ther he is hurt: this is as muche to seyn,
10

Franklin's Tale: 742

'Nay, nay,' quod she, 'god help me so, as wis;
10

Franklin's Tale: 743

This is to muche, and it were goddes wille.'
14

Parson's Tale: 13

... And therfore seyde the aungel to Ioseph: 'thou shall clepen his name Iesus, that shal saven his peple of hir sinnes.' And heer-of seith seint Peter: 'ther is noon other name under hevene that is yeve to any man, by which a man may be saved, but only Iesus.' Nazarenus is as muche for to seye as 'florisshinge,' in which a man shal hope, that he that yeveth him remission of sinnes shal yeve him eek grace wel for to do. For in the flour is hope of fruit in tyme cominge; and in foryifnesse of sinnes hope of grace wel for to do. 'I was atte ...
12

Franklin's Tale: 291

And hoom they goon in Ioye and in solas,
12

Merchant's Tale: 29

And lede his lyf in Ioye and in solas, [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 81

In mochel mirthe, in Ioye and in solas.
12

Franklin's Tale: 292

Save only wrecche Aurelius, allas!
12

Merchant's Tale: 30

[continues previous] Wher-as thise bacheleres singe 'allas,'
12

Franklin's Tale: 293

He to his hous is goon with sorweful herte;
12

Franklin's Tale: 280

And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde: [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 497

Ne gladly for that somme he wolde nat goon. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 498

Aurelius, with blisful herte anoon, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 390

[But] axeth mercy with a sorweful herte, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 294

He seeth he may nat fro his deeth asterte.
12

Knight's Tale: 1947

Gan faillen, when the herte felte deeth, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 279

[continues previous] Wo was Aurelie, whan that he this herde,
12

Franklin's Tale: 280

[continues previous] And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde:
11

Franklin's Tale: 497

[continues previous] Ne gladly for that somme he wolde nat goon.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 389

[continues previous] And if so be he may him nat excuse,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 23

That from the deeth I may no wyse asterte; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1423

Herde al this thing devysen to and fro; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 295

Him semed that he felte his herte colde;
11

Knight's Tale: 716

This Palamoun, that thoughte that thurgh his herte
11

Knight's Tale: 717

He felte a cold swerd sodeynliche glyde,
12

Knight's Tale: 1947

[continues previous] Gan faillen, when the herte felte deeth,
12

Knight's Tale: 1948

[continues previous] Dusked his eyen two, and failled breeth.
11

Melibee's Tale: 9

And whan this folk togidre assembled weren, this Melibeus in sorweful wyse shewed hem his cas; and by the manere of his speche it semed that in herte he bar a cruel ire, redy to doon vengeaunce up-on hise foos, and sodeynly desired that the werre sholde biginne; but nathelees yet axed he hir conseil upon this matere. A surgien, by licence and assent of swiche as weren wyse, up roos and un-to Melibeus seyde as ye may here.
10

Compleint to His Lady: 23

[continues previous] That from the deeth I may no wyse asterte;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 502

For whiche him thoughte he felte his herte blede.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 503

Ne of his wo ne dorste he not biginne
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1304

And right for Ioye he felte his herte daunce;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1305

And Troilus he fond alone a-bedde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1069

But wel he felte aboute his herte crepe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1671

For which he felte his herte in Ioye flete;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1424

[continues previous] And verraylich him semed that he hadde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1692

As he that felte dethes cares colde. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 535

As frost, him thoughte, his herte gan to colde; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1659

Ful sodeinly his herte gan to colde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1660

As he that on the coler fond with-inne [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 296

Up to the hevene his handes he gan holde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1693

[continues previous] And to hir grace he gan him recomaunde;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 535

[continues previous] As frost, him thoughte, his herte gan to colde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1659

[continues previous] Ful sodeinly his herte gan to colde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1660

[continues previous] As he that on the coler fond with-inne
13

Franklin's Tale: 297

And on his knowes bare he sette him doun,
10

Knight's Tale: 682

Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 683

And sette him doun with-outen any more: [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 314

And doun the carpenter by him he sette. [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 537

This Absolon doun sette him on his knees, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 538

And seyde, 'I am a lord at alle degrees; [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 412

And doun anon he sette him on his knee. [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 76

This preyde he him to construe and declare [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 77

Ful ofte tyme upon his knowes bare. [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 78

His felaw, which that elder was than he, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

... sermon hem anoyeth. For Iesus Syrak seith: that "musik in wepinge is anoyous thing;" this is to seyn: as muche availleth to speken bifore folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."'
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 360

And on his toos he rometh up and doun, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 361

Him deyned not to sette his foot to grounde. [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 855

Gamelyn sette him doun in the Iustices seet, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 444

Go thanke now my lady heer,' quod he. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 445

I roos, and doun I sette me on my knee, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 454

Go thanke now my lady heer,' quod he. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 455

I roos, and doun I sette me on my knee, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 359

He doun up-on his beddes feet him sette, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 360

And first he gan to syke, and eft to grone, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1064

And sette him doun, and wroot right in this wyse. — [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1228

And doun she sette hir by him on a stoon [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1463

And sette him doun, and spak right in this wyse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

And doun upon his beddes syde him sette. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 686

They sette hem doun, and seyde as I shal telle. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 849

Welcomed him, and doun by hir him sette; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 850

And he was ethe y-nough to maken dwelle. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 298

And in his raving seyde his orisoun.
11

Knight's Tale: 598

That wood out of his wit he gooth for wo; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 683

[continues previous] And sette him doun with-outen any more:
10

Knight's Tale: 1514

Right thus to Mars he seyde his orisoun: [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 314

[continues previous] And doun the carpenter by him he sette.
13

Miller's Tale: 537

[continues previous] This Absolon doun sette him on his knees,
13

Miller's Tale: 538

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I am a lord at alle degrees;
13

Summoner's Tale: 412

[continues previous] And doun anon he sette him on his knee.
10

Prioress' Tale: 76

[continues previous] This preyde he him to construe and declare
10

Prioress' Tale: 77

[continues previous] Ful ofte tyme upon his knowes bare.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 360

[continues previous] And on his toos he rometh up and doun,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 361

[continues previous] Him deyned not to sette his foot to grounde.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 855

[continues previous] Gamelyn sette him doun in the Iustices seet,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 445

[continues previous] I roos, and doun I sette me on my knee,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 455

[continues previous] I roos, and doun I sette me on my knee,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 359

[continues previous] He doun up-on his beddes feet him sette,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 360

[continues previous] And first he gan to syke, and eft to grone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1064

[continues previous] And sette him doun, and wroot right in this wyse. —
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1228

[continues previous] And doun she sette hir by him on a stoon
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1463

[continues previous] And sette him doun, and spak right in this wyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

[continues previous] And doun upon his beddes syde him sette.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 357

For verray wo his wit was neigh aweye. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 686

[continues previous] They sette hem doun, and seyde as I shal telle.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 882

For verray wo his wit is al aweye. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 849

[continues previous] Welcomed him, and doun by hir him sette;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 850

[continues previous] And he was ethe y-nough to maken dwelle.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 299

For verray wo out of his wit he breyde.
13

Knight's Tale: 598

[continues previous] That wood out of his wit he gooth for wo; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1514

[continues previous] Right thus to Mars he seyde his orisoun:
11

Man of Law's Tale: 511

For verray wo hir wit was al aweye.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 159

So dronke he was, he niste what he wroghte. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 548

For fere almost out of his wit he breyde, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 549

And to his goddes pitously he preyde [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 230

Disposed wood out of his wit to breyde,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 348

Gan wel neigh wood out of his wit to breyde, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 349

So that, for wo, he niste what he mente; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 357

[continues previous] For verray wo his wit was neigh aweye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 882

[continues previous] For verray wo his wit is al aweye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 883

[continues previous] For which we han so sorwed, he and I,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1243

And for despyt, out of his slepe he breyde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1244

And loude he cryde on Pandarus, and seyde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1262

For which wel neigh out of my wit I breyde?
15+

Franklin's Tale: 300

He niste what he spak, but thus he seyde;
11

Knight's Tale: 95

With herte pitous, whan he herde hem speke. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 598

[continues previous] That wood out of his wit he gooth for wo;
11

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
11

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
11

Franklin's Tale: 624

But to hir-self she spak, and seyde thus, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 159

[continues previous] So dronke he was, he niste what he wroghte.
12

Monk's Tale: 548

[continues previous] For fere almost out of his wit he breyde,
13

Monk's Tale: 549

[continues previous] And to his goddes pitously he preyde
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 797

And to the chanoun thus he spak and seyde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 421

And to the god of love thus seyde he [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1012

But hotter wex his love, and thus he seyde, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 349

[continues previous] So that, for wo, he niste what he mente;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 350

[continues previous] But in a rees to Troilus he wente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 217

And to him-self right thus he spak, and seyde:
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1203

He niste what he iuggen of it mighte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1243

[continues previous] And for despyt, out of his slepe he breyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1244

[continues previous] And loude he cryde on Pandarus, and seyde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1730

But at the laste thus he spak, and seyde,
13

Franklin's Tale: 301

With pitous herte his pleynt hath he bigonne
11

Knight's Tale: 94

[continues previous] This gentil duk doun from his courser sterte
11

Knight's Tale: 95

[continues previous] With herte pitous, whan he herde hem speke.
13

Clerk's Tale: 41

That we with pitous herte un-to yow pleyne, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 625

[continues previous] With face pale and with ful sorweful chere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 422

[continues previous] With pitous voys, 'O lord, now youres is
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1013

[continues previous] With sobre chere, al-though his herte pleyde,
13

Franklin's Tale: 302

Un-to the goddes, and first un-to the sonne:
13

Clerk's Tale: 41

[continues previous] That we with pitous herte un-to yow pleyne,
11

Franklin's Tale: 303

He seyde, 'Appollo, god and governour
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 965

And on the morwe pulle it up as blyve, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 304

Of every plaunte, herbe, tree and flour,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 963

Eek wostow how it fareth of som servyse?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 964

[continues previous] As plaunte a tre or herbe, in sondry wyse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 965

[continues previous] And on the morwe pulle it up as blyve,
10

Franklin's Tale: 306

To ech of hem his tyme and his sesoun,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 174

And ech of hem goth to his hostelrye,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 175

And took his logging as it wolde falle.
11

Franklin's Tale: 307

As thyn herberwe chaungeth lowe or hye,
11

Manciple's Tale: 257

Wher-so thou come, amonges hye or lowe, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2201

Of hye or lowe, as ye may see,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2202

Or of what kinrede that he be.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 27

And hye or lowe, after a wight entendeth;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1199

Wol lete, and folowe hir spirit lowe or hye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 308

Lord Phebus, cast thy merciable yë
11

Manciple's Tale: 258

[continues previous] Kepe wel thy tonge, and thenk up-on the crowe.
13

Franklin's Tale: 310

Lo, lord! my lady hath my deeth y-sworn
13

Parson's Tale: 76

... thise Avoutiers breken the temple of god spiritually, and stelen the vessel of grace, that is, the body and the soule, for which Crist shal destroyen hem, as seith Seint Paul. Soothly of this thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1387

And if so be my gilt hath deeth deserved, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 311

With-oute gilt, but thy benignitee
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1387

[continues previous] And if so be my gilt hath deeth deserved,
11

Franklin's Tale: 313

For wel I woot, lord Phebus, if yow lest,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 772

The blisful martir quyte yow your mede. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 773

And wel I woot, as ye goon by the weye, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 830

And seyde; 'Lordinges, herkneth, if yow leste. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 831

Ye woot your forward, and I it yow recorde. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 594

Er ye me sleen by-cause that I yow love. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 595

For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight; [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 435

Nat that I trowe to geten yow again,
11

Legend of Dido: 436

For wel I woot that it is al in vain,
12

Franklin's Tale: 314

Ye may me helpen, save my lady, best.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 773

[continues previous] And wel I woot, as ye goon by the weye,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 831

[continues previous] Ye woot your forward, and I it yow recorde.
12

Clerk's Tale: 829

As voucheth sauf to yeve me, to my mede, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 595

[continues previous] For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight;
12

Complaint to My Mortal Foe: 23

My ladies herte in pitè folde and presse, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 315

Now voucheth sauf that I may yow devyse
11

Clerk's Tale: 828

[continues previous] Which that I broghte, and noght agayn I bere,
12

Clerk's Tale: 829

[continues previous] As voucheth sauf to yeve me, to my mede,
10

Merchant's Tale: 502

I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee; [continues next]
12

Complaint to My Mortal Foe: 22

[continues previous] So voucheth sauf, sith I, your man, wol dye,
13

Compleint to His Empty Purse: 7

Beth hevy ageyn, or elles mot I dye!
13

Compleint to His Empty Purse: 8

Now voucheth sauf this day, or hit be night,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1379

And how I mene, I shal it yow devyse. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 316

How that I may been holpe and in what wyse.
10

Merchant's Tale: 502

[continues previous] I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1379

[continues previous] And how I mene, I shal it yow devyse.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 317

Your blisful suster, Lucina the shene,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1591

Er Phebus suster, Lucina the shene, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1592

The Leoun passe out of this Ariete, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 318

That of the see is chief goddesse and quene,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1591

[continues previous] Er Phebus suster, Lucina the shene,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1592

[continues previous] The Leoun passe out of this Ariete,
10

Franklin's Tale: 320

Yet emperesse aboven him is she:
10

Clerk's Tale: 976

'Right wel,' quod she, 'my lord; for, in good fey, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 49

... by the eres." For right as he that taketh a straunge hound by the eres is outherwhyle biten with the hound, right in the same wyse is it resoun that he have harm, that by his inpacience medleth him of the noyse of another man, wher-as it aperteneth nat un-to him. But ye knowen wel that this dede, that is to seyn, my grief and my disese, toucheth me right ny. And therfore, though I be wroth and inpacient, it is no merveille. And savinge your grace, I can nat seen that it mighte greetly harme me though I toke vengeaunce; ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1369

Is old, and elde is ful of coveityse. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 321

Ye knowen wel, lord, that right as hir desyr
10

Clerk's Tale: 975

[continues previous] 'How lyketh thee my wyf and hir beautee?'
10

Clerk's Tale: 976

[continues previous] 'Right wel,' quod she, 'my lord; for, in good fey,
11

Melibee's Tale: 48

[continues previous] ... tarying or delay, for to defenden him and nat for to vengen him. And it bihoveth that a man putte swich attemperance in his defence, that men have no cause ne matere to repreven him that defendeth him of excesse and outrage; for elles were it agayn resoun. Pardee, ye knowen wel, that ye maken no defence as now for to defende yow, but for to venge yow; and so seweth it that ye han no wil to do your dede attemprely. And therfore, me thinketh that pacience is good. For Salomon seith: that "he that is nat pacient shal have greet harm."'
10

Melibee's Tale: 49

[continues previous] ... eres." For right as he that taketh a straunge hound by the eres is outherwhyle biten with the hound, right in the same wyse is it resoun that he have harm, that by his inpacience medleth him of the noyse of another man, wher-as it aperteneth nat un-to him. But ye knowen wel that this dede, that is to seyn, my grief and my disese, toucheth me right ny. And therfore, though I be wroth and inpacient, it is no merveille. And savinge your grace, I can nat seen that it mighte greetly harme me though I toke vengeaunce; for I am richer and more mighty than ...
10

Second Nun's Tale: 452

For ye, that knowen wel our innocence,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 453

For as muche as we doon a reverence
11

Hous of Fame 1: 326

Y-wis, my dere herte, ye
11

Hous of Fame 1: 327

Knowen ful wel that never yit,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 328

As fer-forth as I hadde wit,
11

Parlement of Foules: 393

The tercel egle, as that ye knowen wel,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1368

[continues previous] My fader, as ye knowen wel, pardee,
11

Franklin's Tale: 323

For which she folweth yow ful bisily,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 324

Right so the see desyreth naturelly
11

Second Nun's Tale: 341

[continues previous] Three persones may ther right wel be.'
15+

Franklin's Tale: 328

Do this miracle, or do myn herte breste
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?' [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 599

Yet wole I telle it, though myn herte breste;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 306

Flee forth out of myn herte, and lat it breste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 580

So wel-a-wey, why nil myn herte breste?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

Myn herte, which that is at point to breste. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1008

I may yow seen, or do myn herte breste.'
13

Franklin's Tale: 329

That now, next at this opposicioun,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

[continues previous] 'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?'
12

Franklin's Tale: 31

[continues previous] Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

[continues previous] Myn herte, which that is at point to breste.
12

Franklin's Tale: 330

Which in the signe shal be of the Leoun,
12

Knight's Tale: 1604

Whyl I dwelle in the signe of the leoun.
11

Knight's Tale: 1605

Myn is the ruine of the hye halles,
12

Franklin's Tale: 331

As preyeth hir so greet a flood to bringe,
12

Manciple's Tale: 128

And may nat doon so greet an harm as he,
12

Manciple's Tale: 129

Ne bringe a contree to so greet mescheef,
14

Franklin's Tale: 335

Than certes to my lady may I seye:
13

Franklin's Tale: 539

That she and every wight sholde wene and seye, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 610

But wel I woot the rokkes been aweye!' [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 336

"Holdeth your heste, the rokkes been aweye."
13

Franklin's Tale: 540

[continues previous] That of Britaigne the rokkes were aweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 568

It semed that alle the rokkes were aweye.
14

Franklin's Tale: 610

[continues previous] But wel I woot the rokkes been aweye!'
15+

Franklin's Tale: 338

Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye;
10

Franklin's Tale: 123

Seilinge hir cours, wher-as hem liste go;
10

Franklin's Tale: 124

But than was that a parcel of hir wo.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 339

I seye, preyeth your suster that she go [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 340

No faster cours than ye thise yeres two.
11

Franklin's Tale: 341

Than shal she been evene atte fulle alway,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 339

I seye, preyeth your suster that she go
15+

Franklin's Tale: 338

[continues previous] Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye; [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 340

No faster cours than ye thise yeres two.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 338

[continues previous] Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 341

Than shal she been evene atte fulle alway,
11

Franklin's Tale: 338

[continues previous] Preye hir she go no faster cours than ye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 342

And spring-flood laste bothe night and day.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 139

They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 140

And ete also and drinken over hir might, [continues next]