Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Monk's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Monk's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Monk's Tale has 776 lines, and 6% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 64% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 30% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.08 strong matches and 2.58 weak matches.

Monk's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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11

Monk's Tale: 1

I wol biwayle in maner of Tragedie
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 272

In-to miserie, in which I wol biwayle
11

Monk's Tale: 2

The harm of hem that stode in heigh degree,
11

Summoner's Tale: 308

To sette an irous man in heigh degree. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 534

In heigh degree, and emperour him calle. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 3

And fillen so that ther nas no remedie
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 604

Ther coude no man bringe him in arrerage. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 605

Ther nas baillif, ne herde, ne other hyne, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 791

Ther nas no good day, ne no saluing; [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1768

Ther nas no tygre in the vale of Galgopheye, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 241

Ther nas na more, hem nedede no dwale. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 309

[continues previous] Whilom ther was an irous potestat,
10

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
10

Squire's Tale: 14

That ther nas no-wher in no regioun
10

Squire's Tale: 15

So excellent a lord in alle thing;
10

Monk's Tale: 534

[continues previous] In heigh degree, and emperour him calle.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 29

Ther nas non of hem alle that herde him aright, [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 190

With al his folk, to doon what so hem leste. [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 191

Ther nas coursere wel y-brydled noon, [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 39

After his fader deeth, he bar him so
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 40

That ther nas noon that liste been his fo,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1270

Sin that ther is no remedie in this cas,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1271

That bet were it I with myn hondes tweyne
12

Monk's Tale: 4

To bringe hem out of hir adversitee;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 604

[continues previous] Ther coude no man bringe him in arrerage.
12

Knight's Tale: 790

[continues previous] As fer as everich of hem other knewe.
12

Knight's Tale: 1767

[continues previous] Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
11

Reeve's Tale: 241

[continues previous] Ther nas na more, hem nedede no dwale.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 28

[continues previous] For thurgh goddes wille deth draweth me to grounde.'
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 29

[continues previous] Ther nas non of hem alle that herde him aright,
11

Legend of Dido: 190

[continues previous] With al his folk, to doon what so hem leste.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2827

To bringe hem out of wo and were,
14

Monk's Tale: 5

For certein, whan that fortune list to flee,
14

Monk's Tale: 150

Beth war, for whan that fortune list to glose,
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 901

And so schal we alle may ther no man flee: [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 902

God bringe us to the Ioye that ever schal be! [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 6

Ther may no man the cours of hir withholde;
10

Squire's Tale: 183

Ther may no man out of the place it dryve
10

Monk's Tale: 734

No man ne truste up-on hir favour longe, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, but evere the more fleshly kinredes ... [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 901

[continues previous] And so schal we alle may ther no man flee:
10

Monk's Tale: 7

Lat no man truste on blind prosperitee;
10

Monk's Tale: 734

[continues previous] No man ne truste up-on hir favour longe,
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, but evere the more ...
12

Monk's Tale: 10

And nat a man, at him I wol biginne;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 42

And at a knight than wol I first biginne.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 43

A Knight ther was, and that a worthy man,
12

Melibee's Tale: 24

... been sprongen. And whan ye han examined your conseil as I have seyd, and which partie is the bettre and more profitable, and hast approved it by manye wyse folk and olde; thanne shaltou considere, if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende. For certes, resoun wol nat that any man sholde biginne a thing, but-if he mighte parfourne it as him oghte. Ne no wight sholde take up-on hym so hevy a charge that he mighte nat bere it. For the proverbe seith: "he that to muche embraceth, distreyneth litel." And Catoun seith: "assay to do swich thing as thou hast power to ...
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7171

But now at erst I wol biginne
12

Monk's Tale: 12

From heigh degree yet fel he for his sinne
12

Parson's Tale: 11

The fourthe point, that oghte maken a man to have contricion, is the sorweful remembrance of the good that he hath left to doon here in erthe; and eek the good that he hath lorn. Soothly, the gode werkes that he hath left, outher they been the gode werkes that he wroghte er he fel in-to deedly sinne, or elles the gode werkes that he wroghte while he lay in sinne. Soothly, the gode werkes, that he dide biforn that he fil in sinne, been al mortified and astoned and dulled by the ofte sinning. The othere gode werkes, that he wroghte whyl he lay in deedly sinne, ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 27

... manere of folk been the flyes that folwen the hony, or elles the houndes that folwen the careyne. Swiche forseyde folk stranglen spiritually hir lordshipes; for which thus seith David the prophete, 'wikked deeth mote come up-on thilke lordshipes, and god yeve that they mote descenden in-to helle al doun; for in hir houses been iniquitees and shrewednesses,' and nat god of hevene. And certes, but-if they doon amendement, right as god yaf his benison to Laban by the service of Iacob, and to Pharao by the service of Joseph, right so god wol yeve his malison to swiche lordshipes as ... [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 13

Doun in-to helle, wher he yet is inne.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 365

In helle wher that he is lord and sire,
12

Parson's Tale: 11

[continues previous] ... maken a man to have contricion, is the sorweful remembrance of the good that he hath left to doon here in erthe; and eek the good that he hath lorn. Soothly, the gode werkes that he hath left, outher they been the gode werkes that he wroghte er he fel in-to deedly sinne, or elles the gode werkes that he wroghte while he lay in sinne. Soothly, the gode werkes, that he dide biforn that he fil in sinne, been al mortified and astoned and dulled by the ofte sinning. The othere gode werkes, that he wroghte whyl he lay in ...
12

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... manere of deceites. Thilke manere of folk been the flyes that folwen the hony, or elles the houndes that folwen the careyne. Swiche forseyde folk stranglen spiritually hir lordshipes; for which thus seith David the prophete, 'wikked deeth mote come up-on thilke lordshipes, and god yeve that they mote descenden in-to helle al doun; for in hir houses been iniquitees and shrewednesses,' and nat god of hevene. And certes, but-if they doon amendement, right as god yaf his benison to Laban by the service of Iacob, and to Pharao by the service of Joseph, right so god wol yeve his malison to swiche lordshipes ...
14

Monk's Tale: 16

Out of miserie, in which that thou art falle.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 271

But wrecche of wrecches, out of honour falle
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 272

In-to miserie, in which I wol biwayle
11

Monk's Tale: 18

With goddes owene finger wroght was he,
11

Summoner's Tale: 181

Receyved he the lawe that was writen
11

Summoner's Tale: 182

With goddes finger; and Elie, wel ye witen,
15+

Monk's Tale: 29

Was never swich another as was he,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 61

Nas never swich another as is she;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 15

Therwith he was, to speke as of linage, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 588

For swich another was ther noon as he.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 205

Which that so wel corven was
10

Hous of Fame 3: 206

That never swich another nas;
15+

Monk's Tale: 30

To speke of strengthe, and therwith hardinesse;
13

Clerk's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Bothe of his lordes and of his commune. [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Therwith he was, to speke as of linage, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... the more be we in peril to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of his gentrye is ful greet folye; for ofte tyme the gentrye of the body binimeth the gentrye of the soule; and eek we ben alle of o fader and of o moder; and alle ...
11

Legend of Thisbe: 187

For love shal yive me strengthe and hardinesse [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 31

But to his wyves tolde he his secree,
11

Clerk's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Bothe of his lordes and of his commune.
11

Clerk's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Therwith he was, to speke as of linage,
13

Monk's Tale: 558

Were no despyt y-doon, for his defame. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 559

Him-self he slow, he coude no better reed, [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 188

[continues previous] To make my wounde large y-nogh, I gesse.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5256

Of sich oon as I tolde thee?
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5257

For whan he woot his secree thought,
13

Monk's Tale: 32

Through which he slow him-self, for wrecchednesse.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 716

Was al mankinde broght to wrecchednesse,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 717

For which that Iesu Crist him-self was slayn,
13

Monk's Tale: 558

[continues previous] Were no despyt y-doon, for his defame.
13

Monk's Tale: 559

[continues previous] Him-self he slow, he coude no better reed,
13

Book of the Duchesse: 738

And for Dalida dyed Sampson, [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 739

That slow him-self with a pilere. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 33

Sampson, this noble almighty champioun,
12

Monk's Tale: 62

O noble almighty Sampson, leef and dere,
13

Book of the Duchesse: 738

[continues previous] And for Dalida dyed Sampson,
12

Monk's Tale: 34

Withouten wepen save his hondes tweye,
12

Monk's Tale: 362

Of Rome cam in-to his hondes tweye, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 35

He slow and al to-rente the leoun,
12

Monk's Tale: 363

[continues previous] He shoop up-on this queen to do vengeaunce,
12

Monk's Tale: 36

Toward his wedding walking by the weye.
12

Legend of Dido: 22

And by the weye his wyf Creusa he lees. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 37

His false wyf coude him so plese and preye
12

Legend of Dido: 22

[continues previous] And by the weye his wyf Creusa he lees.
14

Monk's Tale: 41

Three hundred foxes took Sampson for ire,
14

Monk's Tale: 43

And sette the foxes tayles alle on fire, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 44

For he on every tayl had knit a brond; [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 42

And alle hir tayles he togider bond,
14

Monk's Tale: 43

[continues previous] And sette the foxes tayles alle on fire, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 43

And sette the foxes tayles alle on fire,
14

Monk's Tale: 41

Three hundred foxes took Sampson for ire, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 42

[continues previous] And alle hir tayles he togider bond, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 44

For he on every tayl had knit a brond;
14

Monk's Tale: 41

[continues previous] Three hundred foxes took Sampson for ire,
12

Monk's Tale: 46

And alle hir oliveres and vynes eek.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1470

She made up frete hir corn and vynes alle.
12

Monk's Tale: 47

A thousand men he slow eek with his hond,
11

Monk's Tale: 390

Thou were bitrayed, and lad un-to his tente,
12

Monk's Tale: 391

Wher-as he with his owene hond slow thee,
11

Monk's Tale: 50

Was wel my lorn, for which he gan to preye
11

Prioress' Tale: 73

But on a day his felaw gan he preye [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 555

And to thise cherles two he gan to preye
13

Monk's Tale: 51

That god wolde on his peyne han som pitee,
11

Prioress' Tale: 73

[continues previous] But on a day his felaw gan he preye
10

Parson's Tale: 42

... in mannes herte. For certes, unnethes may a man pleynly been accorded with him that hath him openly revyled and repreved in disclaundre. This is a ful grisly sinne, as Crist seith in the gospel. And tak kepe now, that he that repreveth his neighebor, outher he repreveth him by som harm of peyne that he hath on his body, as 'mesel,' 'croked harlot,' or by som sinne that he dooth. Now if he repreve him by harm of peyne, thanne turneth the repreve to Iesu Crist; for peyne is sent by the rightwys sonde of god, and by his suffrance, be it meselrie, or maheym, or maladye. And ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 167

folk, ne submittede some of hem, that is to seyn, that it ne enclynede [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 168

som Iuge to han pitee or compassioun? For al-thogh I hadde ben [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6731

Han of his mischeef som pitee, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 52

And sende him drinke, or elles moste he deye;
10

Shipman's Tale: 186

Lene me this somme, or elles moot I deye. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 70

After Avarice comth Glotonye, which is expres eek agayn the comandement of god. Glotonye is unmesurable appetyt to ete or to drinke, or elles to doon y-nogh to the unmesurable appetyt and desordeynce coveityse to eten or to drinke. This sinne corrumped al this world, as is wel shewed in the sinne of Adam and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 168

[continues previous] som Iuge to han pitee or compassioun? For al-thogh I hadde ben
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6732

[continues previous] And suffren him also, that he
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1075

That love it made, or elles moste he dye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1076

And pitously gan mercy for to crye; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 53

And of this asses cheke, that was dreye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 186

[continues previous] Lene me this somme, or elles moot I deye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1076

[continues previous] And pitously gan mercy for to crye;
13

Monk's Tale: 57

By verray force, at Gazan, on a night,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 32

By verray force he rafte hir maydenheed; [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 58

Maugree Philistiens of that citee,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 31

[continues previous] Of whiche mayde anon, maugree hir heed,
11

Monk's Tale: 60

And on his bak y-caried hem hath he
11

Summoner's Tale: 48

And what men yaf hem, leyde it on his bak. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 49

And whan that he was out at dore anon, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 61

Hye on an hille, that men mighte hem see.
10

Summoner's Tale: 48

[continues previous] And what men yaf hem, leyde it on his bak.
13

Shipman's Tale: 210

And bad the cokes that they sholde hem hye,
13

Shipman's Tale: 211

So that men mighte dyne, and that anon.
12

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 62

O noble almighty Sampson, leef and dere,
12

Monk's Tale: 33

Sampson, this noble almighty champioun,
11

Monk's Tale: 85

O noble Sampson, strongest of mankinde,
12

Monk's Tale: 288

[continues previous] For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
12

Monk's Tale: 289

[continues previous] Save o thing, that she never wolde assente
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 914

For un-to Crist it is so leef and dere [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 23

thou bigunne rather to be leef and dere than forto ben a neighbour; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 63

Had thou nat told to wommen thy secree,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 915

[continues previous] That he wol nat that it discovered be,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 23

[continues previous] thou bigunne rather to be leef and dere than forto ben a neighbour;
12

Monk's Tale: 64

In al this worlde ne hadde been thy pere!
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1150

For al this worlde telle hir my thoght, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1151

Ne I wolde have wratthed hir, trewly. [continues next]
12

Compleint to His Empty Purse: 11

That of yelownesse hadde never pere. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 65

This Sampson never sicer drank ne wyn,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 227

And yet, god wot, Sampsoun drank never no wyn.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 22

No wyn ne drank she, neither whyt ne reed; [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1150

[continues previous] For al this worlde telle hir my thoght,
12

Compleint to His Empty Purse: 11

[continues previous] That of yelownesse hadde never pere.
15+

Monk's Tale: 66

Ne on his heed cam rasour noon ne shere,
13

Knight's Tale: 1558

That never yet ne felte offensioun [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 1559

Of rasour nor of shere, I wol thee yive, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 21

[continues previous] Napoplexye shente nat hir heed;
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 22

[continues previous] No wyn ne drank she, neither whyt ne reed;
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6196

How high that ever his heed he shere
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 6197

With rasour whetted never so kene,
13

Monk's Tale: 67

By precept of the messager divyn,
13

Knight's Tale: 1559

[continues previous] Of rasour nor of shere, I wol thee yive,
12

Monk's Tale: 69

And fully twenty winter, yeer by yere,
12

Knight's Tale: 345

And hadde him knowe at Thebes yeer by yere; [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 346

And fynally, at requeste and preyere [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 346

And from hir birthe knewe hir yeer by yere,
11

Prioress' Tale: 46

That lerned in that scole yeer by yere
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 471

Thou shalt, whyl that thou livest, yeer by yere, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 481

Thou shalt, whyl that thou livest, yeer by yere, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 73

And been her trewe lover yeer by yere!
11

Balade of Compleynt: 21

Sith I yow serve, and so wil yeer by yere.
11

Parlement of Foules: 236

That was hir office alwey, yeer by yere[continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 674

As yeer by yere was alwey hir usaunce
12

Monk's Tale: 70

He hadde of Israel the governaunce.
12

Knight's Tale: 345

[continues previous] And hadde him knowe at Thebes yeer by yere;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 472

[continues previous] The moste party of thy lyve spende
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 482

[continues previous] The moste party of thy tyme spende
10

Parlement of Foules: 237

[continues previous] And on the temple, of doves whyte and faire
10

Monk's Tale: 71

But sone shal he wepen many a tere,
10

Monk's Tale: 188

And yaf him wit; and than with many a tere [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 189

He thanked god, and ever his lyf in fere [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 72

For wommen shal him bringen to meschaunce!
10

Monk's Tale: 188

[continues previous] And yaf him wit; and than with many a tere
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 46

putten forth, I shal shewe thee the wey that shal bringen thee [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 73

Un-to his lemman Dalida he tolde
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 721

Tho redde he me how Sampson loste his heres, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 722

Slepinge, his lemman kitte hem with hir sheres; [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 47

[continues previous] ayein un-to thyn hous. And I shal ficchen fetheres in thy thought,
12

Monk's Tale: 74

That in his heres al his strengthe lay,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 721

[continues previous] Tho redde he me how Sampson loste his heres,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 722

[continues previous] Slepinge, his lemman kitte hem with hir sheres;
10

Monk's Tale: 77

She made to clippe or shere his heer awey, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 78

And made his fo-men al his craft espyen; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 75

And falsly to his fo-men she him solde.
10

Monk's Tale: 77

[continues previous] She made to clippe or shere his heer awey,
11

Monk's Tale: 78

[continues previous] And made his fo-men al his craft espyen;
11

Monk's Tale: 79

[continues previous] And whan that they him fonde in this array,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 452

Al-though [that] she hir clothes solde, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 453

And though she shulde anhonged be; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 76

And sleping in hir barme up-on a day
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 45

Whan that she saugh hir tyme, up-on a day: [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 757

And whan she saugh hir time, up-on a day, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 451

[continues previous] That not a peny hadde in wolde,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 452

[continues previous] Al-though [that] she hir clothes solde,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 453

[continues previous] And though she shulde anhonged be;
12

Monk's Tale: 77

She made to clippe or shere his heer awey,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 45

[continues previous] Whan that she saugh hir tyme, up-on a day:
12

Merchant's Tale: 757

[continues previous] And whan she saugh hir time, up-on a day,
12

Merchant's Tale: 758

[continues previous] To visite this Damian goth May,
10

Monk's Tale: 74

That in his heres al his strengthe lay, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 75

And falsly to his fo-men she him solde. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 78

And made his fo-men al his craft espyen;
11

Monk's Tale: 74

[continues previous] That in his heres al his strengthe lay, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 75

[continues previous] And falsly to his fo-men she him solde. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 79

And whan that they him fonde in this array,
11

Monk's Tale: 75

[continues previous] And falsly to his fo-men she him solde.
11

Monk's Tale: 85

O noble Sampson, strongest of mankinde,
11

Monk's Tale: 62

O noble almighty Sampson, leef and dere,
15+

Monk's Tale: 87

Now maystow wepen with thyn yën blinde,
15+

Second Nun's Tale: 504

Sin that thou seest nat with thyn yën blinde. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 88

Sith thou fro wele art falle in wrecchednesse.
15+

Second Nun's Tale: 504

[continues previous] Sin that thou seest nat with thyn yën blinde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 381

In wrecchednesse, in filthe, and in vermyne, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 89

Thende of this caytif was as I shal seye;
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 221

To whiche thing shortly answere I shal; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 382

[continues previous] Caytif to cruel king Agamenoun;
10

Monk's Tale: 90

His fo-men made a feste upon a day,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

[continues previous] I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al,
10

Monk's Tale: 91

And made him as hir fool bifore hem pleye,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat the might of your adversarie so litel, that ye lete the keping of your persone for your presumpcioun; for every wys man ... [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 92

And this was in a temple of greet array.
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat the might of your adversarie so litel, that ye lete the keping of your persone for your presumpcioun; for every wys ...
11

Parson's Tale: 30

... to the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the bountee of his neighebore. The ... [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
10

Knight's Tale: 1407

But atte laste the statue of Venus shook,
10

Cook's Tale: 39

But atte laste his maister him bithoghte,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

But atte laste, with muchel care and wo,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
11

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
11

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
10

Clerk's Tale: 491

But atte laste speken she bigan,
10

Clerk's Tale: 971

But atte laste, whan that thise lordes wende
10

Merchant's Tale: 228

But atte laste, shortly for to seyn,
11

Merchant's Tale: 837

But atte laste, after a monthe or tweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
10

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
11

Monk's Tale: 366

He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 360

But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn,
12

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... Envye is Ioye of other mannes harm; and that is proprely lyk to the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the ... [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 636

But atte laste hit was on-lofte.
10

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1530

That atte laste he starf for wo. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1531

For whan he saugh that he his wille [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 94

For he two pilers shook, and made hem falle,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 475

And bad hem drawe, and loke wher it wol falle; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 476

And it fil on the yongeste of hem alle; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 366

[continues previous] He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente,
11

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... of Envye is Ioye of other mannes harm; and that is proprely lyk to the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The ...
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1530

[continues previous] That atte laste he starf for wo.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1531

[continues previous] For whan he saugh that he his wille
11

Monk's Tale: 95

And doun fil temple and al, and ther it lay,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 476

[continues previous] And it fil on the yongeste of hem alle;
10

Monk's Tale: 96

And slow him-self, and eek his fo-men alle.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 4: 3

and with whyte perles, algates yit throf he hateful to alle folk: [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 97

This is to seyn, the princes everichoon,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 4: 4

[continues previous] this is to seyn, that al was he behated of alle folk. Yit this
11

Monk's Tale: 98

And eek three thousand bodies wer ther slayn
11

Franklin's Tale: 149

An hundred thousand bodies of mankinde [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 150

Han rokkes slayn, al be they nat in minde, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 99

With falling of the grete temple of stoon.
10

Squire's Tale: 652

I wol na-more as now speke of hir ring, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 149

[continues previous] An hundred thousand bodies of mankinde
15+

Monk's Tale: 100

Of Sampson now wol I na-more seyn.
11

Summoner's Tale: 365

His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 652

[continues previous] I wol na-more as now speke of hir ring,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 205

Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 101

Beth war by this ensample old and playn
11

Summoner's Tale: 366

[continues previous] Beth war therfor with lordes how ye pleye.
13

Physician's Tale: 97

Beth war that by ensample of your livinge, [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 205

[continues previous] Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 206

[continues previous] Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye:
14

Monk's Tale: 102

That no men telle hir conseil til hir wyves
14

Franklin's Tale: 15

Of swich lordshipe as men han over hir wyves; [continues next]
13

Physician's Tale: 97

[continues previous] Beth war that by ensample of your livinge,
14

Monk's Tale: 103

Of swich thing as they wolde han secree fayn,
11

Clerk's Tale: 224

She wolde fayn han seyn som of that sighte. [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Of swich lordshipe as men han over hir wyves;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 384

Right as they wolde han troden over a style,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 758

I wolde fayn han had a fame,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 655

He wolde han hyed hir to bedde fayn, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 104

If that it touche hir limmes or hir lyves.
11

Clerk's Tale: 223

[continues previous] The markis sholde wedde, and, if she mighte,
11

Clerk's Tale: 224

[continues previous] She wolde fayn han seyn som of that sighte.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 958

I knew on hir non other lak
10

Book of the Duchesse: 959

That al hir limmes nere sewing,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 655

[continues previous] He wolde han hyed hir to bedde fayn,
12

Monk's Tale: 106

Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 318

For his science, and for his heigh renoun [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 319

Of fees and robes hadde he many oon. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 124

What for his strengthe, and for his heigh bountee, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 125

And every reaume wente he for to see. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 564

As in his tyme, ne gretter of renoun, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 645

He wan by strengthe, or for his hye renoun [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... encheson of the siknesse of oure soule; for god woot, the flesh is a ful greet enemy to the soule: and therfore, the more that the body is hool, the more be we in peril to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 43

preysinge and laude, as men singen in victories. Tho yave thou [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 51

That in his tyme was of greet renoun, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 107

For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 318

[continues previous] For his science, and for his heigh renoun
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 319

[continues previous] Of fees and robes hadde he many oon.
11

Merchant's Tale: 977

To gladen every flour with his warmnesse. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 978

He was that tyme in Geminis, as I gesse, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 13

[continues previous] Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
12

Monk's Tale: 124

[continues previous] What for his strengthe, and for his heigh bountee,
13

Monk's Tale: 507

For of moralitee he was the flour, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 508

As in his tyme, but-if bokes lye; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 564

[continues previous] As in his tyme, ne gretter of renoun,
11

Monk's Tale: 645

[continues previous] He wan by strengthe, or for his hye renoun
10

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... ful lightly, and eek it is ful ofte encheson of the siknesse of oure soule; for god woot, the flesh is a ful greet enemy to the soule: and therfore, the more that the body is hool, the more be we in peril to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 43

[continues previous] preysinge and laude, as men singen in victories. Tho yave thou
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 22

fro the cruel lyoun, that is to seyn, he slowh the lyoun and [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 23

rafte him his skin. He smoot the briddes that highten Arpyes [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 51

[continues previous] That in his tyme was of greet renoun,
11

Monk's Tale: 108

He slow, and rafte the skin of the leoun;
11

Merchant's Tale: 978

[continues previous] He was that tyme in Geminis, as I gesse,
11

Monk's Tale: 507

[continues previous] For of moralitee he was the flour,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 22

[continues previous] fro the cruel lyoun, that is to seyn, he slowh the lyoun and [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 23

[continues previous] rafte him his skin. He smoot the briddes that highten Arpyes [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 124

He seigh the steppes brode of a leoun, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 109

He of Centauros leyde the boost adoun;
11

Monk's Tale: 647

The pryde of man and beste he leyde adoun, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 648

Wher-so he cam, un-to the worldes ende. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 22

[continues previous] fro the cruel lyoun, that is to seyn, he slowh the lyoun and [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 23

[continues previous] rafte him his skin. He smoot the briddes that highten Arpyes [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 123

[continues previous] And in the sonde, as he beheld adoun, [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 124

[continues previous] He seigh the steppes brode of a leoun, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1034

That alle hir sykes sore adoun he leyde. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1035

And fynally, the sothe for to seyne, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 110

He Arpies slow, the cruel briddes felle;
11

Monk's Tale: 647

[continues previous] The pryde of man and beste he leyde adoun,
11

Monk's Tale: 648

[continues previous] Wher-so he cam, un-to the worldes ende.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 23

[continues previous] rafte him his skin. He smoot the briddes that highten Arpyes [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 124

[continues previous] He seigh the steppes brode of a leoun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1034

[continues previous] That alle hir sykes sore adoun he leyde.
15+

Monk's Tale: 111

He golden apples rafte of the dragoun;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 23

[continues previous] rafte him his skin. He smoot the briddes that highten Arpyes [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 24

[continues previous] with certein arwes. He ravisshede apples fro the wakinge dragoun, [continues next]
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 25

and his hand was the more hevy for the goldene metal. [continues next]
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 26

He drow Cerberus, the hound of helle, by his treble cheyne. He, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 112

He drow out Cerberus, the hound of helle:
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 12: 22

Cerberus, the porter of helle, with his three hevedes, was caught [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 24

[continues previous] with certein arwes. He ravisshede apples fro the wakinge dragoun, [continues next]
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 25

[continues previous] and his hand was the more hevy for the goldene metal. [continues next]
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 26

[continues previous] He drow Cerberus, the hound of helle, by his treble cheyne. He, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 113

He slow the cruel tyrant Busirus,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 12: 22

[continues previous] Cerberus, the porter of helle, with his three hevedes, was caught
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 25

[continues previous] and his hand was the more hevy for the goldene metal.
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 26

[continues previous] He drow Cerberus, the hound of helle, by his treble cheyne. He,
11

Monk's Tale: 114

And made his hors to frete him, flesh and boon;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 28

cruel hors; this is to seyn, that Hercules slowh Diomedes, and made
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 29

his hors to freten him. And he, Hercules, slowh Ydra the serpent,
15+

Monk's Tale: 116

Of Achelois two hornes, he brak oon;
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 34

bole; and Hercules brak of oon of his hornes, and he, for shame, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 117

And he slow Cacus in a cave of stoon;
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 34

[continues previous] bole; and Hercules brak of oon of his hornes, and he, for shame,
12

Hous of Fame 1: 70

That dwelleth in a cave of stoon
11

Hous of Fame 1: 71

Upon a streem that comth fro Lete,
13

Hous of Fame 3: 494

And found wher, in a cave of stoon,
13

Hous of Fame 3: 495

In a contree that highte Trace,
10

Monk's Tale: 118

He slow the geaunt Antheus the stronge;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1477

This boor he slow, and hir the heed he sente; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 119

He slow the grisly boor, and that anoon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1477

[continues previous] This boor he slow, and hir the heed he sente;
11

Monk's Tale: 120

And bar the heven on his nekke longe.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 237

Of yeddinges he bar utterly the prys. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 238

His nekke whyt was as the flour-de-lys; [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 121

Was never wight, sith that the world bigan,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 238

[continues previous] His nekke whyt was as the flour-de-lys;
12

Knight's Tale: 1244

That never, sithen that the world bigan, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

And many a seint, sith that the world bigan, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 202

That is, or was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 203

Ther-with he was, if men sholde him discryve, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 162

That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 163

But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 16

That is or was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

That never yit, sith that the world was newe, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 445

That never yit, sith that the world was newe, [continues next]
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 3

That in this world was never wight so wo [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 122

That slow so many monstres as dide he.
12

Knight's Tale: 1244

[continues previous] That never, sithen that the world bigan,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

[continues previous] And many a seint, sith that the world bigan,
14

Franklin's Tale: 202

[continues previous] That is, or was, sith that the world bigan.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Monk's Tale: 475

Yet he, as telleth us Swetonius, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 644

This wyde world, as in conclusioun, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 645

He wan by strengthe, or for his hye renoun [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is or was, sith that the world bigan.
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

[continues previous] That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 445

[continues previous] That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 3

[continues previous] That in this world was never wight so wo
12

Monk's Tale: 123

Thurgh-out this wyde world his name ran,
11

Monk's Tale: 476

[continues previous] This wyde world hadde in subieccioun,
12

Monk's Tale: 643

[continues previous] Hath herd somwhat or al of his fortune. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 644

[continues previous] This wyde world, as in conclusioun, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 124

What for his strengthe, and for his heigh bountee,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 318

For his science, and for his heigh renoun
12

Monk's Tale: 106

Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 107

For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 643

[continues previous] Hath herd somwhat or al of his fortune.
11

Monk's Tale: 125

And every reaume wente he for to see.
11

Monk's Tale: 106

[continues previous] Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun;
12

Monk's Tale: 126

He was so strong that no man mighte him lette;
11

Knight's Tale: 659

Was in a bush, that no man mighte him see,
11

Shipman's Tale: 86

And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 545

And forthy lette him no man, god forbede,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1219

He so defet was, that no maner man
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1220

Unnethe mighte him knowe ther he wente;
10

Monk's Tale: 130

That highte Dianira, fresh as May;
10

Merchant's Tale: 651

In halle sit this Ianuarie, and May [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 652

As fresh as is the brighte someres day. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 131

And, as thise clerkes maken mencioun,
10

Merchant's Tale: 651

[continues previous] In halle sit this Ianuarie, and May
10

Merchant's Tale: 652

[continues previous] As fresh as is the brighte someres day.
11

Merchant's Tale: 728

(For alle thing hath tyme, as seyn thise clerkes) [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 132

She hath him sent a sherte fresh and gay.
11

Merchant's Tale: 728

[continues previous] (For alle thing hath tyme, as seyn thise clerkes)
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 148

A breech and eek a sherte; [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 149

And next his sherte an aketoun, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 150

And over that an habergeoun [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 133

Allas! this sherte, allas and weylaway!
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 148

[continues previous] A breech and eek a sherte;
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 149

[continues previous] And next his sherte an aketoun,
12

Monk's Tale: 135

That, er that he had wered it half a day,
11

Miller's Tale: 443

Suffysinge right y-nogh as for a day.
11

Miller's Tale: 444

But er that he had maad al this array,
12

Monk's Tale: 483

That ilke cloth, that he had wered o day,
11

Monk's Tale: 484

After that tyme he nolde it never see.
11

Monk's Tale: 137

But nathelees somme clerkes hir excusen
11

Squire's Tale: 253

But nathelees, somme seyden that it was
11

Monk's Tale: 140

But on his bak this sherte he wered al naked,
11

Parson's Tale: 19

... man, who shal delivere me fro the prisoun of my caytif body?' And seint Ierome, whan he longe tyme hadde woned in desert, where-as he hadde no companye but of wilde bestes, where-as he ne hadde no mete but herbes and water to his drinke, ne no bed but the naked erthe, for which his flesh was blak as an Ethiopen for hete and ny destroyed for cold, yet seyde he: that 'the brenninge of lecherie boiled in al his body.' Wherfore I woot wel sikerly, that they been deceyved that seyn, that they ne be nat tempted in hir body. ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5446

Into hir very naked sherte!
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5447

Herte and al, so hole they yeve,
11

Monk's Tale: 141

Til that his flesh was for the venim blaked.
11

Parson's Tale: 19

[continues previous] ... caytif man, who shal delivere me fro the prisoun of my caytif body?' And seint Ierome, whan he longe tyme hadde woned in desert, where-as he hadde no companye but of wilde bestes, where-as he ne hadde no mete but herbes and water to his drinke, ne no bed but the naked erthe, for which his flesh was blak as an Ethiopen for hete and ny destroyed for cold, yet seyde he: that 'the brenninge of lecherie boiled in al his body.' Wherfore I woot wel sikerly, that they been deceyved that seyn, that they ne be nat tempted in hir body. Witnesse on Seint Iame the Apostel, ...
10

Monk's Tale: 142

And whan he sey noon other remedye,
10

Knight's Tale: 416

I nam but deed; ther nis no remedye.'
10

Knight's Tale: 417

Up-on that other syde Palamon,
10

Knight's Tale: 418

Whan that he wiste Arcite was agon,
11

Monk's Tale: 144

For with no venim deyned him to dye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1532

She chees for him to dye and go to helle, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 145

Thus starf this worthy mighty Hercules;
11

Monk's Tale: 465

Him-self, despeired, eek for hunger starf;
11

Monk's Tale: 466

Thus ended is this mighty Erl of Pyse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1533

[continues previous] And starf anoon, as us the bokes telle.'
12

Monk's Tale: 147

For him that folweth al this world of prees,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 767

Toward the ship; hir folweth al the prees,
11

Monk's Tale: 148

Er he be war, is ofte y-leyd ful lowe.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 345

Povert ful ofte, whan a man is lowe, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 441

May al the boost of it be leyd ful lowe.' [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 442

'Ful wrongfully bigonne thou,' quod he, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 149

Ful wys is he that can him-selven knowe.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 345

[continues previous] Povert ful ofte, whan a man is lowe,
11

Clerk's Tale: 472

Ye ben so wys that ful wel knowe ye
11

Clerk's Tale: 473

That lordes hestes mowe nat been y-feyned;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 441

[continues previous] May al the boost of it be leyd ful lowe.'
10

Second Nun's Tale: 442

[continues previous] 'Ful wrongfully bigonne thou,' quod he,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5379

But he amende him of that vyce,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5380

And knowe him-silf, he is not wys.
14

Monk's Tale: 150

Beth war, for whan that fortune list to glose,
10

Merchant's Tale: 852

She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 853

Up-on that other syde Damian [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 5

For certein, whan that fortune list to flee,
10

Monk's Tale: 151

Than wayteth she hir man to overthrowe
10

Merchant's Tale: 851

[continues previous] Or elles she mot han him as hir leste;
10

Merchant's Tale: 852

[continues previous] She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste.
11

Monk's Tale: 157

He twyes wan Ierusalem the citee;
11

Knight's Tale: 131

And by assaut he wan the citee after, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 158

The vessel of the temple he with him ladde.
11

Knight's Tale: 131

[continues previous] And by assaut he wan the citee after,
12

Monk's Tale: 164

Amonges othere Daniel was oon,
12

Clerk's Tale: 31

And oon of hem, that wysest was of lore, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 413

Right so, lo! fareth it amonges us; [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 5

Among his sones alle ther was oon [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 165

That was the wysest child of everichoon;
12

Clerk's Tale: 31

[continues previous] And oon of hem, that wysest was of lore,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 414

[continues previous] He that semeth the wysest, by Iesus!
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 6

[continues previous] That aldermost he lovede of everichoon. [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 7

And whan this child was born, this Danao [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 166

For he the dremes of the king expouned,
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 6

[continues previous] That aldermost he lovede of everichoon.
12

Monk's Tale: 167

Wher-as in Chaldey clerk ne was ther noon
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1130

For windowe on the wal ne was ther noon,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 62

That in this world ne was ther noon it liche. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

Ne ther was noon to teche me; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 946

But iren was ther noon ne steel; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 947

For al was gold, men mighte it see,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3046

With sondry folk assailed was, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3047

That she ne wiste what to do. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 367

And peril was it noon to thee by-wreye, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 168

That wiste to what fyn his dremes souned.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 415

[continues previous] To speke of phisik and of surgerye;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 452

[continues previous] That to the offring bifore hir sholde goon;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

[continues previous] Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted
12

Squire's Tale: 62

[continues previous] That in this world ne was ther noon it liche.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

[continues previous] Ne ther was noon to teche me;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 945

[continues previous] And sharpe for to kerven weel.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3047

[continues previous] That she ne wiste what to do.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 367

[continues previous] And peril was it noon to thee by-wreye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 368

[continues previous] That wiste I wel; but tel me, if thee liste,
13

Monk's Tale: 170

Sixty cubytes long, and seven in brede,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 722

Wepen bothe yonge and olde in al that place, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 171

To which image bothe yonge and olde
12

Man of Law's Tale: 319

In general, ye! bothe yonge and olde. [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 722

[continues previous] Wepen bothe yonge and olde in al that place, [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 289

Now litheth, and lesteneth bothe yonge and olde, [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 290

And ye schul heere gamen of Gamelyn the bolde. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 130

Kepte hir estat, and bothe of yonge and olde [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 131

Ful wel beloved, and wel men of hir tolde. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 172

Comaunded he to loute, and have in drede;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 319

[continues previous] In general, ye! bothe yonge and olde.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 320

[continues previous] Here may men feste and royaltee biholde,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 722

[continues previous] Wepen bothe yonge and olde in al that place,
12

Parson's Tale: 22

... For, as seith seint Augustin: 'if a man love god in swiche manere, that al that evere he doth is in the love of god, and for the love of god verraily, for he brenneth in the love of god: loke, how muche that a drope of water that falleth in a fourneys ful of fyr anoyeth or greveth, so muche anoyeth a venial sinne un-to a man that is parfit in the love of Iesu Crist.' Men may also refreyne venial sinne by receyvinge worthily of the precious body of Iesu Crist; by receyving eek of holy water; by almesdede; ... [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 289

[continues previous] Now litheth, and lesteneth bothe yonge and olde,
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 290

[continues previous] And ye schul heere gamen of Gamelyn the bolde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 130

[continues previous] Kepte hir estat, and bothe of yonge and olde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 131

[continues previous] Ful wel beloved, and wel men of hir tolde.
14

Monk's Tale: 173

Or in a fourneys ful of flambes rede
12

Second Nun's Tale: 515

'Brenne hir right in a bath of flambes rede.' [continues next]
14

Parson's Tale: 22

[continues previous] ... For, as seith seint Augustin: 'if a man love god in swiche manere, that al that evere he doth is in the love of god, and for the love of god verraily, for he brenneth in the love of god: loke, how muche that a drope of water that falleth in a fourneys ful of fyr anoyeth or greveth, so muche anoyeth a venial sinne un-to a man that is parfit in the love of Iesu Crist.' Men may also refreyne venial sinne by receyvinge worthily of the precious body of Iesu Crist; by receyving eek of holy water; by almesdede; by general confession of Confiteor at masse ...
12

Monk's Tale: 174

He shal be brent, that wolde noght obeye.
11

Monk's Tale: 289

Save o thing, that she never wolde assente [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 290

By no wey, that he sholde by hir lye [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 324

That never shal be lost, ne drede thee noght, [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 516

[continues previous] And as he bad, right so was doon in dede;
11

Monk's Tale: 175

But never wolde assente to that dede
11

Monk's Tale: 289

[continues previous] Save o thing, that she never wolde assente
10

Monk's Tale: 290

[continues previous] By no wey, that he sholde by hir lye
10

Second Nun's Tale: 324

[continues previous] That never shal be lost, ne drede thee noght,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5897

And yit men seide it was my dede;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5898

But I come never in that stede; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 176

Daniel, ne his yonge felawes tweye.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 518

With which he mighte sleen his felawes tweye;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5899

[continues previous] Ne me ne lykith, so mote I thee,
13

Monk's Tale: 178

He wende that god, that sit in magestee,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 826

I prey to god that sit in magestee,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1339

Now god that sit in magestee
12

Monk's Tale: 179

Ne mighte him nat bireve of his estaat:
12

Parson's Tale: 67

... ther they byen thralles, whan they han turned hem to the feith, they maken hir thralles free out of thraldom. And therfore, certes, the lord oweth to his man that the man oweth to his lord. The Pope calleth him-self servant of the servaunts of god; but for-as-muche as the estaat of holy chirche ne mighte nat han be, ne the commune profit mighte nat han be kept, ne pees and reste in erthe, but-if god hadde ordeyned that som men hadde hyer degree and som men lower: therfore was sovereyntee ordeyned to kepe and mayntene and deffenden hir underlinges or hir subgets in resoun, as ferforth ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 19

hete; that is to seyn, alle the poeples in the south. But yit ne [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 20

mighte nat al his hye power torne the woodnesse of this wikked [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 82

'Certes,' quod I, 'al-outrely it ne mighte nat availen him.'
11

Monk's Tale: 180

But sodeynly he loste his dignitee,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 19

[continues previous] hete; that is to seyn, alle the poeples in the south. But yit ne
10

Monk's Tale: 183

In reyn with wilde bestes walked he,
10

Parson's Tale: 19

... famine, in thurst, in cold and clothlees, and ones stoned almost to the deeth) yet seyde he: 'allas! I, caytif man, who shal delivere me fro the prisoun of my caytif body?' And seint Ierome, whan he longe tyme hadde woned in desert, where-as he hadde no companye but of wilde bestes, where-as he ne hadde no mete but herbes and water to his drinke, ne no bed but the naked erthe, for which his flesh was blak as an Ethiopen for hete and ny destroyed for cold, yet seyde he: that 'the brenninge of lecherie boiled in al his body.' Wherfore I woot ...
10

Legend of Ariadne: 313

'Meker than ye finde I the bestes wilde!'
10

Legend of Ariadne: 314

Hadde he nat sinne, that her thus begylde?
11

Monk's Tale: 188

And yaf him wit; and than with many a tere
10

Man of Law's Tale: 439

In orisons, with many a bitter tere,
11

Summoner's Tale: 156

With many a tere trikling on my cheke,
10

Franklin's Tale: 166

Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous tere.
10

Monk's Tale: 71

But sone shal he wepen many a tere, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 72

For wommen shal him bringen to meschaunce! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1181

And fer with-in the night, with many a tere,
13

Monk's Tale: 189

He thanked god, and ever his lyf in fere
13

Merchant's Tale: 384

To lede in ese and holinesse his lyf.
13

Merchant's Tale: 385

And thanked god, that he mighte han hire al,
10

Monk's Tale: 71

[continues previous] But sone shal he wepen many a tere,
11

Monk's Tale: 190

Was he to doon amis, or more trespace;
11

Franklin's Tale: 55

Causeth ful ofte to doon amis or speken.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1036

But who-so durste to hir trespace, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1037

Or til hir folk, in worde or dede, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 191

And, til that tyme he leyd was on his bere,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1037

[continues previous] Or til hir folk, in worde or dede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1183

As men don hem that shul be leyd on bere. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 192

He knew that god was ful of might and grace.
11

Monk's Tale: 608

But of his purpos he was let ful sone. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 609

God for his manace him so sore smoot [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1183

[continues previous] As men don hem that shul be leyd on bere.
11

Monk's Tale: 193

His sone, which that highte Balthasar,
11

Monk's Tale: 608

[continues previous] But of his purpos he was let ful sone.
11

Monk's Tale: 194

That heeld the regne after his fader day,
11

Clerk's Tale: 1080

In reste and pees, after his fader day; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 195

He by his fader coude nought be war,
11

Clerk's Tale: 1080

[continues previous] In reste and pees, after his fader day;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1629

My fader nought, for al his queynte pley. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1630

And by my thrift, my wending out of Troye [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 196

For proud he was of herte and of array;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1054

He was a lechour and an ydolastre; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1055

And in his elde he verray god forsook. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1629

[continues previous] My fader nought, for al his queynte pley.
11

Monk's Tale: 197

And eek an ydolastre was he ay.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1054

[continues previous] He was a lechour and an ydolastre;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1055

[continues previous] And in his elde he verray god forsook.
10

Monk's Tale: 198

His hye estaat assured him in pryde.
10

Monk's Tale: 530

The hye pryde of Nero to cheryce; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 708

That ever hadde of his hye estaat envye,
10

Monk's Tale: 199

But fortune caste him doun, and ther he lay,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 15

And sodeynly he plighte his hors aboute. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 529

[continues previous] Now fil it so that fortune list no lenger
10

Monk's Tale: 200

And sodeynly his regne gan divyde.
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] It was ten of the clokke, he gan conclude,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 15

[continues previous] And sodeynly he plighte his hors aboute.
11

Monk's Tale: 201

A feste he made un-to his lordes alle
11

Merchant's Tale: 374

And alderfirst he bad hem alle a bone, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 202

Up-on a tyme, and bad hem blythe be,
11

Merchant's Tale: 374

[continues previous] And alderfirst he bad hem alle a bone,
10

Monk's Tale: 203

And than his officeres gan he calle —
10

Franklin's Tale: 760

'Goth forth anon with Dorigen,' he sayde, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 204

'Goth, bringeth forth the vessels,' [tho] quod he,
10

Franklin's Tale: 760

[continues previous] 'Goth forth anon with Dorigen,' he sayde,
10

Franklin's Tale: 761

[continues previous] 'And bringeth hir to swich a place anon.'
11

Monk's Tale: 209

His wyf, his lordes, and his concubynes
11

Parson's Tale: 76

... for to breke a chirche and stele the chalice; for thise Avoutiers breken the temple of god spiritually, and stelen the vessel of grace, that is, the body and the soule, for which Crist shal destroyen hem, as seith Seint Paul. Soothly of this thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 677

She wol ben his, whyl that hir lyf may laste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 678

And thus she brenneth bothe in love and drede, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 210

Ay dronken, whyl hir appetytes laste,
12

Monk's Tale: 328

Ay whyl that Odenakes dayes laste.
12

Monk's Tale: 329

Hir batailes, who-so list hem for to rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 677

[continues previous] She wol ben his, whyl that hir lyf may laste.
10

Monk's Tale: 211

Out of thise noble vessels sundry wynes;
10

Monk's Tale: 238

Dronke of the same vessels sondry wynes, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 212

And on a wal this king his yën caste,
12

Clerk's Tale: 181

His yën caste on hir, but in sad wyse
10

Clerk's Tale: 612

The constance of his wyf, he caste adoun [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 613

His yën two, and wondreth that she may [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 239

[continues previous] And heriest false goddes cursedly;
11

Legend of Thisbe: 180

On her he caste his hevy deedly yën [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 181

And doun again, and yeldeth up the gost. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 213

And sey an hond armlees, that wroot ful faste,
10

Clerk's Tale: 613

[continues previous] His yën two, and wondreth that she may
10

Shipman's Tale: 85

For which ful faste his countour-dore he shette; [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 181

[continues previous] And doun again, and yeldeth up the gost.
13

Monk's Tale: 214

For fere of which he quook and syked sore.
10

Summoner's Prologue: 39

Un-to his body agayn, and he awook;
12

Summoner's Prologue: 40

But natheles, for fere yet he quook,
10

Shipman's Tale: 85

[continues previous] For which ful faste his countour-dore he shette;
10

Shipman's Tale: 86

[continues previous] And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette
13

Legend of Dido: 298

With hevenes fyr, that hit so sore agaste [continues next]
12

Legend of Philomela: 90

And quook for fere, pale and pitously,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1641

For sithen [have] I sore syked, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 972

That she him kiste, al-though she syked sore; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 973

And bad him sitte a-doun with-outen more. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 716

Wenden, that she wepte and syked sore
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 738

Thanne hadde I now not syked half so sore. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 215

This hond, that Balthasar so sore agaste,
15+

Monk's Tale: 241

This hand was sent from god, that on the walle [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 298

[continues previous] With hevenes fyr, that hit so sore agaste [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 299

[continues previous] This noble quene, and also her meynee, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1641

[continues previous] For sithen [have] I sore syked,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1642

[continues previous] That mirour hath me now entryked.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 972

[continues previous] That she him kiste, al-though she syked sore;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 738

[continues previous] Thanne hadde I now not syked half so sore.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 739

[continues previous] Who mighte have seyd, that I had doon a-mis
15+

Monk's Tale: 216

Wroot Mane, techel, phares, and na-more.
15+

Monk's Tale: 242

[continues previous] Wroot mane, techel, phares, truste me; [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 299

[continues previous] This noble quene, and also her meynee,
15+

Monk's Tale: 217

In al that lond magicien was noon
13

Clerk's Tale: 377

In al that lond, that she ne coude apese, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 241

[continues previous] This hand was sent from god, that on the walle
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 35

Of which Eson this Iasoun geten was, [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 36

That, in his tyme, in al that lond, ther nas [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 218

That coude expoune what this lettre mente;
13

Clerk's Tale: 377

[continues previous] In al that lond, that she ne coude apese,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 36

[continues previous] That, in his tyme, in al that lond, ther nas
12

Monk's Tale: 220

And seyde, 'king, god to thy fader lente
12

Monk's Tale: 392

Succeding in thy regne and in thy rente. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 221

Glorie and honour, regne, tresour, rente:
12

Monk's Tale: 392

[continues previous] Succeding in thy regne and in thy rente.
13

Monk's Tale: 227

And eet hey as a beste in weet and drye,
13

Reeve's Tale: 187

Wery and weet, as beste is in the reyn,
11

Monk's Tale: 230

Over every regne and every creature;
11

Knight's Tale: 1517

And hast in every regne and every lond [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 231

And thanne had god of him compassioun,
10

Knight's Tale: 1517

[continues previous] And hast in every regne and every lond
11

Monk's Tale: 232

And him restored his regne and his figure.
11

Monk's Tale: 252

She bereth awey his regne and his richesse, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 253

And eek his freendes, bothe more and lesse; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 233

Eek thou, that art his sone, art proud also,
11

Monk's Tale: 253

[continues previous] And eek his freendes, bothe more and lesse;
12

Parson's Tale: 15

... delivereth the soule fro the peyne of helle, and fro the companye of the devel, and fro the servage of sinne, and restoreth it to alle godes espirituels, and to the companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to ... [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 234

And knowest alle thise thinges verraily,
10

Melibee's Tale: 24

... conseillours, if resoun accorde therto; and eek, if thy might may atteine ther-to; and if the more part and the bettre part of thy conseillours acorde ther-to, or no. Thanne shaltou considere what thing shal folwe of that conseilling; as hate, pees, werre, grace, profit, or damage; and manye othere thinges. And in alle thise thinges thou shalt chese the beste, and weyve alle othere thinges. Thanne shaltow considere of what rote is engendred the matere of thy conseil, and what fruit it may conceyve and engendre. Thou shalt eek considere alle thise causes, fro whennes they been sprongen. And whan ye han examined your conseil ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... fro the peyne of helle, and fro the companye of the devel, and fro the servage of sinne, and restoreth it to alle godes espirituels, and to the companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to the service of Iesu Crist, and ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... it springeth of inpacience agayns god, and somtyme agayns man. Agayns god it is, whan a man gruccheth agayn the peynes of helle, or agayns poverte, or los of catel, or agayn reyn or tempest; or elles gruccheth that shrewes han prosperitee, or elles for that goode men han adversitee. And alle thise thinges sholde men suffre paciently, for they comen by the rightful Iugement and ordinance of god. Som-tyme comth grucching of avarice; as Iudas grucched agayns the Magdaleyne, whan she enoynte the heved of oure lord Iesu Crist with hir precious oynement. This maner murmure is swich as whan man gruccheth of ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 53

... sinful men, in which estaat men been holden to laboure in preyinge to god for amendement of hir sinnes, and that he wole graunte hem to arysen out of hir sinnes. Another estaat is thestaat of grace, in which estaat he is holden to werkes of penitence; and certes, to alle thise thinges is Accidie enemy and contrarie. For he loveth no bisinesse at al. Now certes, this foule sinne Accidie is eek a ful greet enemy to the lyflode of the body; for it ne hath no purveaunce agayn temporel necessitee; for it forsleweth and forsluggeth, and destroyeth alle goodes tem-poreles by ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 86

... sinned with comune bordel-wommen, or noon; or doon his sinne in holy tymes, or noon; in fasting-tymes, or noon; or biforn his shrifte, or after his latter shrifte; and hath, per-aventure, broken ther-fore his penance enioyned; by whos help and whos conseil; by sorcerie or craft; al moste be told. Alle thise thinges, after that they been grete or smale, engreggen the conscience of man. And eek the preest that is thy Iuge, may the bettre been avysed of his Iugement in yevinge of thy penaunce, and that is after thy contricioun. For understond wel, that after tyme that a man hath defouled ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 46

body semeth yeven delyt. In alle thise thinges it semeth only
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 93

to geten alle thise thinges to-gider?'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 119

thinges, it were for to witen whether that alle thise thinges maken
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 134

soverein delyt. Conclusio. What seyst thou thanne of alle thise
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 135

thinges, that is to seyn, suffisaunce, power, and this othre thinges;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 142

'Yif alle thise thinges,' quod she, 'weren membres to felicitee,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 146

'Certes,' quod I, 'it hath wel ben shewed heer-biforn, that alle
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 147

thise thinges ben alle o thing.'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 1

Boece. 'I assente me,' quod I; 'for alle thise thinges ben
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 20

but-yif alle thise thinges ben alle oon same thing, they ne han nat [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 67

governeth alle thinges by the keye of his goodnesse, and alle thise [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 68

same thinges, as I have taught thee, hasten hem by naturel [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 184

cleer that the power ne the mowinge of shrewes nis no power; and [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 185

of alle thise thinges it sheweth wel, that the goode folke ben certeinly [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 235

And art rebel to god, and art his fo.
10

Melibee's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... if resoun accorde therto; and eek, if thy might may atteine ther-to; and if the more part and the bettre part of thy conseillours acorde ther-to, or no. Thanne shaltou considere what thing shal folwe of that conseilling; as hate, pees, werre, grace, profit, or damage; and manye othere thinges. And in alle thise thinges thou shalt chese the beste, and weyve alle othere thinges. Thanne shaltow considere of what rote is engendred the matere of thy conseil, and what fruit it may conceyve and engendre. Thou shalt eek considere alle thise causes, fro whennes they been sprongen. And whan ye ...
10

Parson's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... fro the peyne of helle, and fro the companye of the devel, and fro the servage of sinne, and restoreth it to alle godes espirituels, and to the companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to the service of ...
10

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... it springeth of inpacience agayns god, and somtyme agayns man. Agayns god it is, whan a man gruccheth agayn the peynes of helle, or agayns poverte, or los of catel, or agayn reyn or tempest; or elles gruccheth that shrewes han prosperitee, or elles for that goode men han adversitee. And alle thise thinges sholde men suffre paciently, for they comen by the rightful Iugement and ordinance of god. Som-tyme comth grucching of avarice; as Iudas grucched agayns the Magdaleyne, whan she enoynte the heved of oure lord Iesu Crist with hir precious oynement. This maner murmure is swich as whan ...
10

Parson's Tale: 53

[continues previous] ... the estaat of sinful men, in which estaat men been holden to laboure in preyinge to god for amendement of hir sinnes, and that he wole graunte hem to arysen out of hir sinnes. Another estaat is thestaat of grace, in which estaat he is holden to werkes of penitence; and certes, to alle thise thinges is Accidie enemy and contrarie. For he loveth no bisinesse at al. Now certes, this foule sinne Accidie is eek a ful greet enemy to the lyflode of the body; for it ne hath no purveaunce agayn temporel necessitee; for it forsleweth and forsluggeth, and destroyeth alle goodes tem-poreles by reccheleesnesse.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 19

[continues previous] power, and reverence, and noblesse, and mirthe; and forsothe,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 67

[continues previous] governeth alle thinges by the keye of his goodnesse, and alle thise
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 184

[continues previous] cleer that the power ne the mowinge of shrewes nis no power; and
10

Monk's Tale: 236

Thou drank eek of his vessels boldely;
10

Legend of Ariadne: 267

And took his wyf, and eek her suster free, [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 268

And eek the gayler, and with hem alle three [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 237

Thy wyf eek and thy wenches sinfully
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 210

But-if thy wyf I were, and eek thy love.'
10

Legend of Ariadne: 267

[continues previous] And took his wyf, and eek her suster free,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 268

[continues previous] And eek the gayler, and with hem alle three
10

Monk's Tale: 238

Dronke of the same vessels sondry wynes,
10

Monk's Tale: 211

Out of thise noble vessels sundry wynes; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 239

And heriest false goddes cursedly;
10

Monk's Tale: 212

[continues previous] And on a wal this king his yën caste,
11

Monk's Tale: 240

Therfor to thee y-shapen ful gret pyne is.
11

Knight's Tale: 466

But wel I woot, that in this world gret pyne is. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 241

This hand was sent from god, that on the walle
11

Knight's Tale: 466

[continues previous] But wel I woot, that in this world gret pyne is.
15+

Monk's Tale: 215

This hond, that Balthasar so sore agaste, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 217

In al that lond magicien was noon [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 242

Wroot mane, techel, phares, truste me;
15+

Monk's Tale: 216

[continues previous] Wroot Mane, techel, phares, and na-more.
12

Monk's Tale: 249

Lordinges, ensample heer-by may ye take
12

Merchant's Tale: 86

Heer may ye se, and heer-by may ye preve, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 250

How that in lordshipe is no sikernesse;
12

Merchant's Tale: 87

[continues previous] That wyf is mannes help and his confort,
11

Monk's Tale: 252

She bereth awey his regne and his richesse,
11

Monk's Tale: 232

And him restored his regne and his figure. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 253

And eek his freendes, bothe more and lesse;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 78

Been we y-lymed, bothe more and lesse. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

And somme seyn, how that we loven best [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 264

And al his handwerk, bothe more and lesse! [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 820

That thou deceyvest bothe more and lesse! [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 232

[continues previous] And him restored his regne and his figure.
11

Monk's Tale: 233

[continues previous] Eek thou, that art his sone, art proud also,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2214

Goodly of word, and resonable
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2215

Bothe to lesse and eek to mar.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2216

And whan thou comest ther men ar,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7068

Engyns, bothe more and lesse, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 254

For what man that hath freendes thurgh fortune,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

[continues previous] And somme seyn, how that we loven best
12

Friar's Tale: 265

[continues previous] That was wel twight, myn owene lyard boy!
11

Merchant's Tale: 820

[continues previous] That thou deceyvest bothe more and lesse!
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 49

fortune maketh freendes, contrarious fortune maketh hem [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7067

[continues previous] And thanne, that he wolde updresse
14

Monk's Tale: 255

Mishap wol make hem enemys, I gesse:
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 49

[continues previous] fortune maketh freendes, contrarious fortune maketh hem
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 50

[continues previous] enemys. And what pestilence is more mighty for to anoye a
15+

Monk's Tale: 256

This proverbe is ful sooth and ful commune.
15+

Miller's Tale: 205

Ful sooth is this proverbe, it is no lye,
14

Reeve's Tale: 399

And therfore this proverbe is seyd ful sooth,
15+

Melibee's Tale: 12

... folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."'
13

Melibee's Tale: 18

... of richesse, the more he desyreth. And sir, ye moste also dryve out of your herte hastifnesse; for certes, ye ne may nat deme for the beste a sodeyn thought that falleth in youre herte, but ye moste avyse yow on it ful ofte. For as ye herde biforn, the commune proverbe is this, that "he that sone demeth, sone repenteth."
11

Monk's Tale: 257

Cenobia, of Palimerie quene,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 351

Whan that Anelida this woful quene [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 352

Hath of hir hande writen in this wyse, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 258

As writen Persiens of hir noblesse,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 352

[continues previous] Hath of hir hande writen in this wyse,
10

Monk's Tale: 259

So worthy was in armes and so kene,
10

Monk's Tale: 277

With any yong man, were he never so wight; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 278

Ther mighte no-thing in hir armes stonde. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 260

That no wight passed hir in hardinesse,
10

Monk's Tale: 277

[continues previous] With any yong man, were he never so wight;
10

Monk's Tale: 278

[continues previous] Ther mighte no-thing in hir armes stonde.
11

Monk's Tale: 261

Ne in linage, ne in other gentillesse.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 253

But for ye speken of swich gentillesse [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4974

Or repreef of her linage, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 262

Of kinges blode of Perse is she descended;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 253

[continues previous] But for ye speken of swich gentillesse
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 254

[continues previous] As is descended out of old richesse,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4975

[continues previous] Losse of membre, sheding of blode,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4976

Perel of deth, or losse of good.
12

Monk's Tale: 264

But of hir shape she mighte nat been amended.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 243

It wol nat been amended never mo!
11

Merchant's Tale: 362

Him thoughte his chois mighte nat ben amended.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 38

Thanne crew he, that it mighte nat ben amended.
12

Anelida and Arcite: 84

In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 265

From hir childhede I finde that she fledde
12

Anelida and Arcite: 84

[continues previous] In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended.
11

Monk's Tale: 268

With arwes brode that she to hem sente.
10

Legend of Dido: 171

She many a beste to the shippes sente, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 172

And with the wyn she gan hem to presente; [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 88

Anon she sente bothe eest and west [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 269

She was so swift that she anon hem hente,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 370

Hem hente; and whan he forth the seintes ladde, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 172

[continues previous] And with the wyn she gan hem to presente;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 87

[continues previous] For him she loved alderbest.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 88

[continues previous] Anon she sente bothe eest and west
11

Monk's Tale: 270

And whan that she was elder, she wolde kille
11

Second Nun's Tale: 370

[continues previous] Hem hente; and whan he forth the seintes ladde,
11

Legend of Dido: 425

And seide, that she wolde sacrifye.
11

Legend of Dido: 426

And, whan she mighte her tyme wel espye,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 135

That wel unnethe of mete took she keep;
10

Anelida and Arcite: 136

And whan that she was to hir reste broght,
11

Monk's Tale: 271

Leouns, lepardes, and beres al to-rente,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 395

The tyme, that hath al in welde [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 272

And in hir armes welde hem at hir wille.
13

Knight's Tale: 1529

And haddest hir in armes at thy wille,
11

Monk's Tale: 278

Ther mighte no-thing in hir armes stonde. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 279

She kepte hir maydenhod from every wight, [continues next]
15+

Legend of Dido: 294

These hertes wilde, and han hem at hir wille. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 395

[continues previous] The tyme, that hath al in welde
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 396

[continues previous] To elden folk, had maad hir elde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 190

Hir fader hath hir in his armes nome, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 273

She dorste wilde beestes dennes seke,
11

Monk's Tale: 279

[continues previous] She kepte hir maydenhod from every wight,
15+

Legend of Dido: 294

[continues previous] These hertes wilde, and han hem at hir wille.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 189

[continues previous] As seyde she, and from hir hors she alighte.
11

Monk's Tale: 274

And rennen in the montaignes al the night,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 10

That slepen al the night with open yë, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 275

And slepen under a bush, and she coude eke
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 10

[continues previous] That slepen al the night with open yë,
13

Monk's Tale: 277

With any yong man, were he never so wight;
11

Knight's Tale: 1987

Right so ther livede never man,' he seyde, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 184

And eek hir vertu, passing any wight
12

Clerk's Tale: 185

Of so yong age, as wel in chere as dede.
12

Franklin's Prologue: 21

Than to comune with any gentil wight [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 22

Ther he mighte lerne gentillesse aright.' — [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 664

Fro which image wolde she never go. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 665

No wight ne mighte hir handes of it arace, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 259

So worthy was in armes and so kene, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 260

That no wight passed hir in hardinesse, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1107

Were my sorwes never so smerte. [continues next]
13

Compleynt of Venus: 35

Ther doth no wight no-thing so resonable, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1050

Thanne were I deed, ther mighte it no-thing weyve.' [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 278

Ther mighte no-thing in hir armes stonde.
11

Knight's Tale: 1987

[continues previous] Right so ther livede never man,' he seyde,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 952

Unnethe up-on hir feet she mighte stonde. [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 172

And made hir bed ful harde and no-thing softe; [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 173

And ay she kepte hir fadres lyf on-lofte [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 22

[continues previous] Ther he mighte lerne gentillesse aright.' —
11

Franklin's Tale: 665

[continues previous] No wight ne mighte hir handes of it arace,
10

Monk's Tale: 259

[continues previous] So worthy was in armes and so kene,
10

Monk's Tale: 260

[continues previous] That no wight passed hir in hardinesse,
11

Monk's Tale: 272

And in hir armes welde hem at hir wille. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 654

Save wyn and wommen, no-thing mighte aswage
11

Monk's Tale: 655

His hye entente in armes and labour;
11

Anelida and Arcite: 84

In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended. [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1106

[continues previous] Me thoghte no-thing mighte me greve,
13

Compleynt of Venus: 34

[continues previous] She wolde al knowe through hir espying;
13

Compleynt of Venus: 35

[continues previous] Ther doth no wight no-thing so resonable,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1050

[continues previous] Thanne were I deed, ther mighte it no-thing weyve.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1218

And he bigan to glade hir as he mighte; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1219

Took hir in armes two, and kiste hir ofte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 190

Hir fader hath hir in his armes nome, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 279

She kepte hir maydenhod from every wight,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 952

[continues previous] Unnethe up-on hir feet she mighte stonde.
12

Clerk's Tale: 173

[continues previous] And ay she kepte hir fadres lyf on-lofte
10

Clerk's Tale: 538

And whos child that it was he bad hir hyde
10

Clerk's Tale: 539

From every wight, for oght that may bityde.
11

Monk's Tale: 272

[continues previous] And in hir armes welde hem at hir wille.
11

Monk's Tale: 273

[continues previous] She dorste wilde beestes dennes seke,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 83

[continues previous] And shortly, if she shal be comprehended,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 84

[continues previous] In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 446

I wol not been untrewe for no wight; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1218

[continues previous] And he bigan to glade hir as he mighte;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1219

[continues previous] Took hir in armes two, and kiste hir ofte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 189

[continues previous] As seyde she, and from hir hors she alighte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 190

[continues previous] Hir fader hath hir in his armes nome,
12

Monk's Tale: 280

To no man deigned hir for to be bonde.
11

Miller's Tale: 104

That she hir love him graunted atte laste, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 105

And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 490

Consenting hir to that the markis lyked. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 970

So wel, that no man coude hir prys amende. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 228

But atte laste, shortly for to seyn, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 836

Soul as the turtle that lost hath hir make. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 44

... comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 366

He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 367

And fettred hir, and eek hir children tweye, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 359

How many wondres Iesus for hem wroghte; [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 360

But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 446

[continues previous] I wol not been untrewe for no wight;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 447

[continues previous] But as hir man I wol ay live and sterve,
12

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
10

Knight's Tale: 1407

But atte laste the statue of Venus shook,
11

Miller's Tale: 104

[continues previous] That she hir love him graunted atte laste,
11

Miller's Tale: 105

[continues previous] And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent,
10

Cook's Tale: 39

But atte laste his maister him bithoghte,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

But atte laste, with muchel care and wo,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
10

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
11

Clerk's Tale: 490

[continues previous] Consenting hir to that the markis lyked. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 491

[continues previous] But atte laste speken she bigan, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 970

[continues previous] So wel, that no man coude hir prys amende.
11

Clerk's Tale: 971

[continues previous] But atte laste, whan that thise lordes wende
12

Merchant's Tale: 228

[continues previous] But atte laste, shortly for to seyn,
12

Merchant's Tale: 836

[continues previous] Soul as the turtle that lost hath hir make.
12

Merchant's Tale: 837

[continues previous] But atte laste, after a monthe or tweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
11

Melibee's Tale: 44

[continues previous] ... comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes.
10

Melibee's Tale: 45

[continues previous] But lat us now putte, that ye have leve to venge yow. I seye ye been nat of might and power as now to venge yow. For if ye wole maken comparisoun un-to the might of your adversaries, ye shul finde in manye thinges, that I have shewed yow er this, ...
10

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
12

Monk's Tale: 366

[continues previous] He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente,
11

Monk's Tale: 367

[continues previous] And fettred hir, and eek hir children tweye,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 360

[continues previous] But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn,
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the ...
10

Hous of Fame 3: 636

But atte laste hit was on-lofte.
10

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
11

Monk's Tale: 282

To Odenake, a prince of that contree,
11

Clerk's Tale: 380

If gentil men, or othere of hir contree [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 490

[continues previous] Consenting hir to that the markis lyked.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 7

so that she was ful of so greet age, that men ne wolde nat trowen, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 283

Al were it so that she hem longe taried;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 225

Ye wyse wyves, that can understonde. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 226

Thus shul ye speke and bere hem wrong on honde; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 381

[continues previous] Were wrothe, she wolde bringen hem atoon;
11

Clerk's Tale: 382

So wyse and rype wordes hadde she,
11

Melibee's Tale: 5

... saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of god, shal warisshe and escape. And al were it so that she right now were deed, ye ne oghte nat as for hir deeth your-self to destroye. Senek seith: "the wise man shal nat take to greet disconfort for the deeth of his children, but certes he sholde suffren it in pacience, as wel as he abydeth the deeth of his owene ...
10

Parson's Tale: 12

... men yaven him, of the foule mowes, and of the repreves that men to him seyden; of the nayles with whiche he was nailed to the croys, and of al the remenant of his passion that he suffred for my sinnes, and no-thing for his gilt.' And ye shul understonde, that in mannes sinne is every manere of ordre or ordinance turned up-so-doun. For it is sooth, that god, and reson, and sensualitee, and the body of man been so ordeyned, that everich of thise foure thinges sholde have lordshipe over that other; as thus: god sholde have lordshipe over reson, ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 24

And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 42

... dronkelewe harlot,' and so forth; thanne aperteneth that to the reioysinge of the devel, that evere hath Ioye that men doon sinne. And certes, chydinge may nat come but out of a vileyns herte. For after the habundance of the herte speketh the mouth ful ofte. And ye shul understonde that loke, by any wey, whan any man shal chastyse another, that he be war from chydinge or reprevinge. For trewely, but he be war, he may ful lightly quiken the fyr of angre and of wratthe, which that he sholde quenche, and per-aventure sleeth him which that he mighte chastyse ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 67

... alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 93

Now as to speken of bodily peyne, it stant in preyeres, in wakinges, in fastinges, in vertuouse techinges of orisouns. And ye shul understonde, that orisouns or preyeres is for to seyn a pilous wil of herte, that redresseth it in god and expresseth it by word outward, to remoeven harmes and to han thinges espirituel and durable, and somtyme temporel thinges; of whiche orisouns, certes, in the orisoun of the Pater-noster, hath Iesu Crist ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 6

[continues previous] vigour and strengthe that it ne mighte nat ben empted; al were it
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 7

[continues previous] so that she was ful of so greet age, that men ne wolde nat trowen,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 12

Fortune, and how she useth ful flateringe familaritee with hem
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 13

that she enforceth to bigyle; so longe, til that she confounde
10

Parlement of Foules: 606

I recche not how longe that ye stryve; [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 607

Lat ech of hem be soleyn al hir lyve, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 284

And ye shul understonde how that he
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 225

[continues previous] Ye wyse wyves, that can understonde.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 226

[continues previous] Thus shul ye speke and bere hem wrong on honde;
10

Clerk's Tale: 288

'Grisilde,' he seyde, 'ye shul wel understonde
13

Melibee's Tale: 31

... over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne kept suffisantly withouten ...
11

Parson's Tale: 3

And now, sith I have declared yow what thing is Penitence, now shul ye understonde that ther been three accions of Penitence. The firste accion of Penitence is, that a man be baptized after that he hath sinned. Seint Augustin seith: 'but he be penitent for his olde sinful lyf, he may nat biginne the newe clene lif.' For certes, if he be baptized withouten penitence ...
11

Parson's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... of the buffettes that men yaven him, of the foule mowes, and of the repreves that men to him seyden; of the nayles with whiche he was nailed to the croys, and of al the remenant of his passion that he suffred for my sinnes, and no-thing for his gilt.' And ye shul understonde, that in mannes sinne is every manere of ordre or ordinance turned up-so-doun. For it is sooth, that god, and reson, and sensualitee, and the body of man been so ordeyned, that everich of thise foure thinges sholde have lordshipe over that other; as thus: god sholde have lordshipe over reson, ...
10

Parson's Tale: 16

The seconde partie of Penitence is Confession, that is signe of contricion. Now shul ye understonde what is Confession, and whether it oghte nedes be doon or noon, and whiche thinges been covenable to verray Confession.
11

Parson's Tale: 24

[continues previous] And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, and to his goostly ...
10

Parson's Tale: 29

Now sith that so is, that ye han understonde what is pryde, and whiche been the speces of it, and whennes pride sourdeth and springeth; now shul ye understonde which is the remedie agayns the sinne of pryde, and that is, humilitee or mekenesse. That is a vertu, thurgh which a man hath verray knoweleche of him-self, and holdeth of him-self no prys ne deyntee as in regard of hise desertes, consideringe evere his freletee. Now been ther three ...
11

Parson's Tale: 42

[continues previous] ... as, 'thou holour,' 'thou dronkelewe harlot,' and so forth; thanne aperteneth that to the reioysinge of the devel, that evere hath Ioye that men doon sinne. And certes, chydinge may nat come but out of a vileyns herte. For after the habundance of the herte speketh the mouth ful ofte. And ye shul understonde that loke, by any wey, whan any man shal chastyse another, that he be war from chydinge or reprevinge. For trewely, but he be war, he may ful lightly quiken the fyr of angre and of wratthe, which that he sholde quenche, and per-aventure sleeth him which that he mighte chastyse ...
11

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; whan thou, for ire or ...
11

Parson's Tale: 68

[continues previous] Now shul ye understonde, that the relevinge of Avarice is misericorde, and pitee largely taken. And men mighten axe, why that misericorde and pitee is relevinge of Avarice? Certes, the avaricious man sheweth no pitee ne misericorde to the nedeful man; for he delyteth him in the kepinge of his tresor, and nat in the ...
11

Parson's Tale: 93

[continues previous] Now as to speken of bodily peyne, it stant in preyeres, in wakinges, in fastinges, in vertuouse techinges of orisouns. And ye shul understonde, that orisouns or preyeres is for to seyn a pilous wil of herte, that redresseth it in god and expresseth it by word outward, to remoeven harmes and to han thinges espirituel and durable, and somtyme temporel thinges; of whiche orisouns, certes, in the orisoun of the Pater-noster, hath Iesu Crist ...
10

Parlement of Foules: 606

[continues previous] I recche not how longe that ye stryve;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle,
12

Monk's Tale: 287

They lived in Ioye and in felicitee;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 428

To sende him drogges and his letuaries, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 57

And ech of hem hadde wyves mo than two; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 210

In meschief, as a suster shal the brother; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ... [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 361

And lived in Ioye y-nogh; what wolde ye more?
12

Parlement of Foules: 669

A! lord! the blisse and Ioye that they make! [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 670

For ech of hem gan other in winges take, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 671

And with hir nekkes ech gan other winde, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 428

[continues previous] To sende him drogges and his letuaries,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

[continues previous] For ech of hem made other for to winne;
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 57

[continues previous] And ech of hem hadde wyves mo than two;
11

Merchant's Tale: 209

[continues previous] Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
12

Merchant's Tale: 447

[continues previous] For whan they sawe it moste nedes be,
10

Franklin's Tale: 698

As dide Demociones doghter dere, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 375

[continues previous] To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

[continues previous] And ech of hem gan other for tassure
11

Shipman's Tale: 42

[continues previous] Of bretherhede, whyl that hir lyf may dure.
11

Shipman's Tale: 142

And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste.
12

Monk's Tale: 61

Hye on an hille, that men mighte hem see. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 62

O noble almighty Sampson, leef and dere, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 16

That ech of hem hadde his part as it mighte falle.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
10

Former Age: 52

But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce;
12

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1618

Answerde of this ech worse of hem than other,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1619

And Poliphete they gonnen thus to warien,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she. [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 289

Save o thing, that she never wolde assente
14

Clerk's Tale: 32

Or elles that the lord best wolde assente [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 699

[continues previous] By-cause that she wolde nat defouled be.
10

Franklin's Tale: 700

O Cedasus! it is ful greet pitee,
12

Monk's Tale: 62

[continues previous] O noble almighty Sampson, leef and dere,
11

Monk's Tale: 174

He shal be brent, that wolde noght obeye. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 175

But never wolde assente to that dede [continues next]
13

Legend of Lucretia: 167

That wolde she nat suffre, by no wey. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1630

It were good, if that ye wolde assente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1631

She tolde hir-self him al this, er she wente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

[continues previous] 'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 646

[continues previous] Sin that yow list, it skile is to be so;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

[continues previous] Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she.
14

Monk's Tale: 290

By no wey, that he sholde by hir lye
11

Man of Law's Tale: 986

She preyde him eek, he sholde by no weye
11

Man of Law's Tale: 987

Un-to hir fader no word of hir seye.
12

Clerk's Tale: 32

[continues previous] Or elles that the lord best wolde assente
14

Clerk's Tale: 33

[continues previous] That he sholde telle him what his peple mente,
10

Monk's Tale: 174

[continues previous] He shal be brent, that wolde noght obeye.
10

Monk's Tale: 175

[continues previous] But never wolde assente to that dede
13

Legend of Lucretia: 167

[continues previous] That wolde she nat suffre, by no wey.
11

Monk's Tale: 291

But ones, for it was hir pleyn entente
11

Man of Law's Tale: 226

Espyëd hath hir sones pleyn entente,
14

Monk's Tale: 293

And al-so sone as that she mighte espye
12

Reeve's Tale: 275

Til he so ny was, er she mighte espye, [continues next]
12

Reeve's Tale: 276

That it had been to late for to crye, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 478

And al-so sone as that he was gon, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 479

That oon of hem spak thus un-to that other, [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 159

And that she mighte nat so faste go, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1121

The stoon so cleer was and so bright, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1122

That, al-so sone as it was night, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1123

Men mighte seen to go, for nede, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 511

She wolde come as sone as ever she mighte. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1424

Ful pitously she wroot ayein, and seyde, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1425

That al-so sone as that she might, y-wis, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1426

She wolde come, and mende al that was mis. [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 294

That she was nat with childe with that dede,
12

Reeve's Tale: 275

[continues previous] Til he so ny was, er she mighte espye,
12

Reeve's Tale: 276

[continues previous] That it had been to late for to crye,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 335

Hath with hir frendes doon this cursed dede, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 555

Er she with childe was; but, as god wolde, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 479

[continues previous] That oon of hem spak thus un-to that other,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 463

That she wolde suffre him no-thing for to paye [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 167

That wolde she nat suffre, by no wey. [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 158

[continues previous] For, whan she saw that goon awey was he,
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 159

[continues previous] And that she mighte nat so faste go,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1122

[continues previous] That, al-so sone as it was night,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 511

[continues previous] She wolde come as sone as ever she mighte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1424

[continues previous] Ful pitously she wroot ayein, and seyde,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1425

[continues previous] That al-so sone as that she might, y-wis,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1426

[continues previous] She wolde come, and mende al that was mis.
13

Monk's Tale: 295

Than wolde she suffre him doon his fantasye
11

Man of Law's Tale: 335

[continues previous] Hath with hir frendes doon this cursed dede,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 336

[continues previous] For she hir-self wolde al the contree lede.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 411

Til he had maad his raunson un-to me;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 412

Than wolde I suffre him do his nycetee.
11

Clerk's Tale: 555

[continues previous] Er she with childe was; but, as god wolde,
13

Monk's Tale: 300

Than wolde she ones suffre him do the same.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 463

[continues previous] That she wolde suffre him no-thing for to paye
11

Legend of Lucretia: 167

[continues previous] That wolde she nat suffre, by no wey.
13

Monk's Tale: 297

And if she were with childe at thilke cast,
13

Legend of Ariadne: 65

And in a prison, fetered, cast is he [continues next]
13

Legend of Ariadne: 66

Til thilke tyme he sholde y-freten be. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 298

Na-more sholde he pleyen thilke game
13

Legend of Ariadne: 65

[continues previous] And in a prison, fetered, cast is he [continues next]
13

Legend of Ariadne: 66

[continues previous] Til thilke tyme he sholde y-freten be. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 299

Til fully fourty dayes weren past;
13

Legend of Ariadne: 66

[continues previous] Til thilke tyme he sholde y-freten be.
13

Monk's Tale: 300

Than wolde she ones suffre him do the same.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 412

Than wolde I suffre him do his nycetee.
13

Monk's Tale: 295

Than wolde she suffre him doon his fantasye
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 463

That she wolde suffre him no-thing for to paye
11

Monk's Tale: 302

He gat na-more of hir, for thus she seyde,
10

Reeve's Tale: 42

Algate they wolde hir wyves wenden so. [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 43

And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 498

And thus she seyde in hir benigne voys, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 498

And, with a syk, right thus she seyde hir wille. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1293

'For playnly hir entente,' as seyde she, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1294

Was for to love him unwist, if she mighte, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 303

'It was to wyves lecherye and shame
10

Reeve's Tale: 42

[continues previous] Algate they wolde hir wyves wenden so.
10

Reeve's Tale: 43

[continues previous] And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich,
10

Clerk's Tale: 497

[continues previous] And lulled it, and after gan it blisse.
10

Squire's Tale: 499

[continues previous] 'Ther I was bred (allas! that harde day!)
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1294

[continues previous] Was for to love him unwist, if she mighte,
11

Monk's Tale: 305

Two sones by this Odenake hadde she,
11

Squire's Tale: 28

This noble king, this Tartre Cambinskan
11

Squire's Tale: 29

Hadde two sones on Elpheta his wyf,
12

Monk's Tale: 311

Ne more labour mighte in werre endure,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 312

Was noon, thogh al this world men sholde seke.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

[continues previous] In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
11

Friar's Tale: 308

This wyde world thogh that I sholde winne,
11

Clerk's Tale: 720

In riche array, this mayden for to gyde; [continues next]
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 176

That in this world, thogh that men wolde seke, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 177

Half hir beautee shulde men nat finde [continues next]
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 244

That in this world, thogh that men wolde seke, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 245

Half hir beautee shulde men nat finde [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 313

Hir riche array ne mighte nat be told
11

Clerk's Tale: 720

[continues previous] In riche array, this mayden for to gyde;
11

Clerk's Tale: 721

[continues previous] Hir yonge brother ryding hir bisyde.
11

Merchant's Tale: 455

Or for to herknen of hir riche array.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 50

certes, thilke prescience ne mighte nat be signe of thing that nis
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 177

[continues previous] Half hir beautee shulde men nat finde
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 245

[continues previous] Half hir beautee shulde men nat finde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1197

As wel as I have told hir hevinesse. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 314

As wel in vessel as in hir clothing;
10

Clerk's Tale: 320

To handle hir clothes wher-in she was clad. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 375

Corouned was she, as after hir degree, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 376

And ful of perree charged hir clothing. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 220

Al in an old torn courtepy, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 237

Of clothing, er she boughte hir newe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1196

[continues previous] After myn auctor, tellen hir gladnesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1197

[continues previous] As wel as I have told hir hevinesse.
13

Monk's Tale: 315

She was al clad in perree and in gold,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 441

In sangwin and in pers he clad was al, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 344

"And noght in tressed heer and gay perree, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 320

[continues previous] To handle hir clothes wher-in she was clad.
11

Monk's Tale: 376

[continues previous] And ful of perree charged hir clothing.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 218

And therto she was lene and megre.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 219

[continues previous] And she was clad ful povrely,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 220

[continues previous] Al in an old torn courtepy,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 237

[continues previous] Of clothing, er she boughte hir newe,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 238

[continues previous] Al were it bad of wolle and hewe.
11

Monk's Tale: 316

And eek she lafte noght, for noon hunting,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 441

[continues previous] In sangwin and in pers he clad was al,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 344

[continues previous] "And noght in tressed heer and gay perree,
12

Monk's Tale: 318

Whan that she leyser hadde, and for to entende
11

Knight's Tale: 330

If that I hadde leyser for to seye; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 107

Whan that she may hir leyser wel espye.
12

Parlement of Foules: 487

Who- [so] that hadde leyser and cunning [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 488

For to reherse hir chere and hir speking; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 462

Gret leyser hadde she to quake.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 463

And she was put, that I of talke,
12

Monk's Tale: 319

To lernen bokes was al hir lyking,
11

Knight's Tale: 330

[continues previous] If that I hadde leyser for to seye;
11

Knight's Tale: 331

[continues previous] But to theffect. It happed on a day,
12

Parlement of Foules: 488

[continues previous] For to reherse hir chere and hir speking;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6343

Right as it cometh to hir lyking, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6344

I fulfille al hir desiring. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 320

How she in vertu mighte hir lyf dispende.
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 266

Save only she, ne mighte his lyf assure. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6343

[continues previous] Right as it cometh to hir lyking,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6344

[continues previous] I fulfille al hir desiring.
14

Monk's Tale: 321

And, shortly of this storie for to trete,
11

Parson's Tale: 80

... wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente ... [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 575

After thise olde auctours listen to trete. [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 576

For who-so shal so many a storie telle, [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 267

[continues previous] And shortly, to the point right for to go,
12

Legend of Lucretia: 13

And in what wyse, I wol but shortly trete,
12

Legend of Lucretia: 14

And of this thing I touche but the grete.
14

Monk's Tale: 322

So doughty was hir housbonde and eek she,
10

Reeve's Tale: 42

Algate they wolde hir wyves wenden so.
10

Reeve's Tale: 43

And eek, for she was somdel smoterlich,
11

Franklin's Tale: 194

That was hir housbonde and hir love also.
10

Franklin's Tale: 195

But nathelees she moste a tyme abyde,
11

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] ... eschue the embracinges of man, and desyren the embracinge of Iesu Crist. Thise been tho that han been wyves and han forgoon hir housbondes, and eek wommen that han doon lecherie and been releeved by Penitence. And certes, if that a wyf coude kepen hir al chaast by licence of hir housbonde, so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite. Thise manere wommen that observen chastitee moste be clene in herte as well as in body and in thoght, and mesurable in clothinge and in contenaunce; and been abstinent in etinge and drinkinge, in spekinge, and ... [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 576

[continues previous] For who-so shal so many a storie telle,
10

Monk's Tale: 323

That they conquered many regnes grete
10

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] ... of man, and desyren the embracinge of Iesu Crist. Thise been tho that han been wyves and han forgoon hir housbondes, and eek wommen that han doon lecherie and been releeved by Penitence. And certes, if that a wyf coude kepen hir al chaast by licence of hir housbonde, so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite. Thise manere wommen that observen chastitee moste be clene in herte as well as in body and in thoght, and mesurable in clothinge and in contenaunce; and been abstinent in etinge and drinkinge, in spekinge, ...
11

Monk's Tale: 325

Apertenaunt un-to the magestee
11

Monk's Tale: 686

And un-to Rome made hem tributarie; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 326

Of Rome, and with strong hond helde hem ful faste;
11

Monk's Tale: 685

[continues previous] By strengthe of hond, or elles by tretee,
11

Monk's Tale: 686

[continues previous] And un-to Rome made hem tributarie;
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... a free bole is y-nough for al a toun, right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun y-nough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree. Thise preestes, as seith the book, ne conne nat the misterie of preesthode to the peple, ne god ne knowe they nat; they ne helde hem nat apayd, as seith the book, of soden flesh that was to hem offred, but they toke by force the flesh that is rawe. Certes, so thise shrewes ne holden hem nat apayed of rosted flesh and sode flesh, with which the peple fedden hem in greet reverence, but they ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 161

Ful faste he caste how al this mighte stonde. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 674

On Troilus y-set so wonder faste, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 327

Ne never mighte hir fo-men doon hem flee,
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... as a free bole is y-nough for al a toun, right so is a wikked preest corrupcioun y-nough for al a parisshe, or for al a contree. Thise preestes, as seith the book, ne conne nat the misterie of preesthode to the peple, ne god ne knowe they nat; they ne helde hem nat apayd, as seith the book, of soden flesh that was to hem offred, but they toke by force the flesh that is rawe. Certes, so thise shrewes ne holden hem nat apayed of rosted flesh and sode flesh, with which the peple fedden hem in greet reverence, ...
12

Legend of Dido: 316

For ever-mo, whyl that hem laste lyf. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 139

And under eft, gan hem to wheelen bothe [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 140

After hir cours, ay whyl they were wrothe. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 160

[continues previous] He mighte best theschaunge of hir withstonde;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 675

[continues previous] That al this world ne mighte hir love unbinde,
12

Monk's Tale: 328

Ay whyl that Odenakes dayes laste.
12

Monk's Tale: 210

Ay dronken, whyl hir appetytes laste, [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 316

[continues previous] For ever-mo, whyl that hem laste lyf.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 140

[continues previous] After hir cours, ay whyl they were wrothe. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 315

And eft on hir, whyl that servyse laste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 677

She wol ben his, whyl that hir lyf may laste. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 329

Hir batailes, who-so list hem for to rede,
12

Monk's Tale: 210

[continues previous] Ay dronken, whyl hir appetytes laste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 140

[continues previous] After hir cours, ay whyl they were wrothe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 315

[continues previous] And eft on hir, whyl that servyse laste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 677

[continues previous] She wol ben his, whyl that hir lyf may laste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1770

His worthy dedes, who-so list hem here,
10

Monk's Tale: 330

Agayn Sapor the king and othere mo,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 448

But eek for othere mo; ye woot wel how [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 877

The king, with othere lordes, for the beste, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 331

And how that al this proces fil in dede,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 448

[continues previous] But eek for othere mo; ye woot wel how
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 449

[continues previous] That, among Cristes apostelles twelve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

[continues previous] 'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how
12

Monk's Tale: 333

And after of hir meschief and hir wo,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 185

How he hir soughte, and how hir gost [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1509

And of Argyves wepinge and hir wo; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1510

And how the town was brent she tolde eek tho. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 334

How that she was biseged and y-take,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 184

[continues previous] That deed, [but] noot I how, she was;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 185

[continues previous] How he hir soughte, and how hir gost
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1510

[continues previous] And how the town was brent she tolde eek tho.
11

Monk's Tale: 339

Agayn hir foos she faught so cruelly,
11

Squire's Tale: 422

For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 26

'I nas nat deceived,' quod she, 'that ther ne faileth somwhat, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 340

That ther nas king ne prince in al that londe
12

Miller's Prologue: 2

In al the route nas ther yong ne old
12

Miller's Prologue: 3

That he ne seyde it was a noble storie,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 223

Ther nas but hevinesse and muche sorwe;
13

Clerk's Tale: 376

Ther nas discord, rancour, ne hevinesse [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 377

In al that lond, that she ne coude apese, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 423

[continues previous] For ther nas never yet no man on lyve —
10

Franklin's Tale: 654

But was ther noon of al that companye
10

Franklin's Tale: 655

That she nas slayn, and with a good entente
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

[continues previous] In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave,
10

Shipman's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 26

[continues previous] 'I nas nat deceived,' quod she, 'that ther ne faileth somwhat,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 36

That, in his tyme, in al that lond, ther nas
10

Parlement of Foules: 306

Ne ther nas foul that cometh of engendrure,
10

Parlement of Foules: 307

That they ne were prest in hir presence,
11

Monk's Tale: 341

That he nas glad, if that he grace fonde,
10

Clerk's Tale: 377

[continues previous] In al that lond, that she ne coude apese,
11

Merchant's Tale: 834

Ne wolde he that she were love ne wyf, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 342

That she ne wolde up-on his lond werreye;
11

Merchant's Tale: 833

[continues previous] For neither after his deeth, nor in his lyf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 834

[continues previous] Ne wolde he that she were love ne wyf,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 692

If it so were hir eem ne wolde cesse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 693

For Troilus, up-on hir for to presse. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 343

With hir they made alliaunce by bonde
13

Compleynt unto Pitè: 42

Confedred bothe by bonde and alliaunce. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 692

[continues previous] If it so were hir eem ne wolde cesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 693

[continues previous] For Troilus, up-on hir for to presse.
13

Monk's Tale: 344

To been in pees, and lete hir ryde and pleye.
10

Monk's Tale: 687

And sitthe of Rome the emperour was he, [continues next]
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 41

[continues previous] Wisdom, Estaat, [and] Dreed, and Governaunce,
13

Compleynt unto Pitè: 42

[continues previous] Confedred bothe by bonde and alliaunce.
11

Monk's Tale: 345

The emperour of Rome, Claudius,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 58

'Our Emperour of Rome, god him see, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 687

[continues previous] And sitthe of Rome the emperour was he, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 346

Ne him bifore, the Romayn Galien,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 58

[continues previous] 'Our Emperour of Rome, god him see,
10

Monk's Tale: 687

[continues previous] And sitthe of Rome the emperour was he,
13

Monk's Tale: 348

Ne noon Ermyn, ne noon Egipcien,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 348

Ne noon Ermyn, ne noon Egipcien, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 349

Ne Surrien, ne noon Arabien, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 349

Ne Surrien, ne noon Arabien,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 337

[continues previous] Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 348

[continues previous] Ne noon Ermyn, ne noon Egipcien,
13

Monk's Tale: 349

[continues previous] Ne Surrien, ne noon Arabien,
12

Monk's Tale: 350

Within the feld that dorste with hir fighte
10

Reeve's Tale: 38

That with hir dorste rage or ones pleye,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 336

[continues previous] For she hir-self wolde al the contree lede.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 337

[continues previous] Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted
12

Monk's Tale: 351

Lest that she wolde hem with hir hondes slen,
12

Parson's Tale: 76

... devel power, as seyde the aungel Raphael to Thobie; for in hir assemblinge they putten Iesu Crist out of hir herte, and yeven hem-self to alle ordure. The fourthe spece is, the assemblee of hem that been of hire kinrede, or of hem that been of oon affinitee, or elles with hem with whiche hir fadres or hir kinrede han deled in the sinne of lecherie; this sinne maketh hem lyk to houndes, that taken no kepe to kinrede. And certes, parentele is in two maneres, outher goostly or fleshly; goostly, as for to delen with hise godsibbes. For right so as he that engendreth a child is ... [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 352

Or with hir meynee putten hem to flighte.
10

Squire's Tale: 391

Nat but with fyve or six of hir meynee; [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... devel power, as seyde the aungel Raphael to Thobie; for in hir assemblinge they putten Iesu Crist out of hir herte, and yeven hem-self to alle ordure. The fourthe spece is, the assemblee of hem that been of hire kinrede, or of hem that been of oon affinitee, or elles with hem with whiche hir fadres or hir kinrede han deled in the sinne of lecherie; this sinne maketh hem lyk to houndes, that taken no kepe to kinrede. And certes, parentele is in two maneres, outher goostly or fleshly; goostly, as for to delen with hise godsibbes. For right so as he that engendreth a child is ...
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 33

to usen hir strengthe, they reioysen hem to putten under hem [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 353

In kinges habit wente hir sones two,
10

Squire's Tale: 392

[continues previous] And in a trench, forth in the park, goth she.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 34

[continues previous] the sovereyne kinges, whiche that poeple with-outen noumbre
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1021

Whan that Criseyde un-to hir bedde wente [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1022

In-with hir fadres faire brighte tente. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 354

As heires of hir fadres regnes alle,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 31

Of regnes; ye ben fadres of tydinges [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1021

[continues previous] Whan that Criseyde un-to hir bedde wente
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1022

[continues previous] In-with hir fadres faire brighte tente.
11

Monk's Tale: 355

And Hermanno, and Thymalaö
11

Man of Law's Tale: 32

[continues previous] And tales, bothe of pees and of debat.
10

Monk's Tale: 357

But ay fortune hath in hir hony galle;
10

Anelida and Arcite: 352

Hath of hir hande writen in this wyse, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 358

This mighty quene may no whyl endure.
10

Anelida and Arcite: 351

[continues previous] Whan that Anelida this woful quene
10

Anelida and Arcite: 352

[continues previous] Hath of hir hande writen in this wyse,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3280

The Ioye may eek no whyl endure; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 359

Fortune out of hir regne made hir falle
10

Book of the Duchesse: 71

That brak hir mast, and made it falle, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 72

And clefte hir ship, and dreinte hem alle, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3279

[continues previous] The peyne is hard, out of mesure,
10

Monk's Tale: 360

To wrecchednesse and to misaventure.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 71

[continues previous] That brak hir mast, and made it falle,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 72

[continues previous] And clefte hir ship, and dreinte hem alle,
12

Monk's Tale: 362

Of Rome cam in-to his hondes tweye,
12

Monk's Tale: 34

Withouten wepen save his hondes tweye, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 363

He shoop up-on this queen to do vengeaunce,
12

Monk's Tale: 35

[continues previous] He slow and al to-rente the leoun,
12

Monk's Tale: 365

Toward Cenobie, and, shortly for to seye,
12

Squire's Tale: 603

That shal ete with a feend," thus herde I seye. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 953

And shortly, al the sothe for to seye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1009

But in effect, and shortly for to seye,
12

Monk's Tale: 366

He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente,
12

Miller's Tale: 104

That she hir love him graunted atte laste, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 105

And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 604

[continues previous] So atte laste he moste forth his weye,
12

Melibee's Tale: 44

... correcteth nat the sinnere comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
11

Monk's Tale: 94

For he two pilers shook, and made hem falle,
12

Monk's Tale: 280

To no man deigned hir for to be bonde. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 924

Til at the laste the dede sleep hir hente. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 925

And, as she sleep, anoon-right tho hir mette, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 953

[continues previous] And shortly, al the sothe for to seye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 954

[continues previous] He was so fallen in despeyr that day,
12

Monk's Tale: 367

And fettred hir, and eek hir children tweye,
12

Miller's Tale: 104

[continues previous] That she hir love him graunted atte laste,
12

Miller's Tale: 105

[continues previous] And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent,
12

Melibee's Tale: 44

[continues previous] ... correcteth nat the sinnere comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes.
11

Monk's Tale: 280

[continues previous] To no man deigned hir for to be bonde.
11

Monk's Tale: 281

[continues previous] But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 924

[continues previous] Til at the laste the dede sleep hir hente.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 925

[continues previous] And, as she sleep, anoon-right tho hir mette,
12

Monk's Tale: 368

And wan the lond, and hoom to Rome he wente.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 760

And after soper pleyen he bigan, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 761

And spak of mirthe amonges othere thinges, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 785

He made a gardin, walled al with stoon; [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 369

Amonges othere thinges that he wan,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 760

[continues previous] And after soper pleyen he bigan,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 761

[continues previous] And spak of mirthe amonges othere thinges,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 762

[continues previous] Whan that we hadde maad our rekeninges;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 84

The wondres that they mighte seen or here. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 85

Amonges othere thinges, specially [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 96

Ovyde, amonges othere thinges smale,
12

Merchant's Tale: 784

[continues previous] Amonges othere of his honest thinges,
12

Merchant's Tale: 785

[continues previous] He made a gardin, walled al with stoon;
11

Monk's Tale: 370

Hir char, that was with gold wrought and perree,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 84

[continues previous] The wondres that they mighte seen or here.
12

Monk's Tale: 372

Hath with him lad, for that men sholde it see.
12

Merchant's Tale: 907

That he sholde go biforen with his cliket: [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 872

As though men sholde han lad him in-to helle,
12

Monk's Tale: 373

Biforen his triumphe walketh she
12

Merchant's Tale: 907

[continues previous] That he sholde go biforen with his cliket: [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 374

With gilte cheynes on hir nekke hanging;
12

Merchant's Tale: 907

[continues previous] That he sholde go biforen with his cliket:
11

Physician's Tale: 232

And with that word she both hir armes layde [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 233

About his nekke, as she was wont to do: [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 20

he empted of light of his thought; and his nekke is pressed with
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 2: 21

hevy cheynes; and bereth his chere enclyned adoun for the grete
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 230

His gilte heer was corouned with a sonne, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 551

Hir nekke was of good fasoun [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 375

Corouned was she, as after hir degree,
11

Physician's Tale: 52

To seme wys; but after hir degree [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 53

She spak, and alle hir wordes more and lesse [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 232

[continues previous] And with that word she both hir armes layde
11

Physician's Tale: 233

[continues previous] About his nekke, as she was wont to do:
11

Monk's Tale: 314

As wel in vessel as in hir clothing; [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 229

[continues previous] The fresshest sin the world was first bigonne.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 230

[continues previous] His gilte heer was corouned with a sonne,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 550

[continues previous] A clove chin eek hadde she.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 551

[continues previous] Hir nekke was of good fasoun
11

Monk's Tale: 376

And ful of perree charged hir clothing.
11

Physician's Tale: 53

[continues previous] She spak, and alle hir wordes more and lesse
11

Monk's Tale: 314

[continues previous] As wel in vessel as in hir clothing;
11

Monk's Tale: 315

[continues previous] She was al clad in perree and in gold,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 236

Wolde have ful greet necessitee [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 237

Of clothing, er she boughte hir newe, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 377

Allas, fortune! she that whylom was
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 1: 5

the other. Text. She, cruel Fortune, casteth adoun kinges [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 1: 6

that whylom weren y-drad; and she, deceivable, enhaunseth up [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 237

[continues previous] Of clothing, er she boughte hir newe,
13

Monk's Tale: 378

Dredful to kinges and to emperoures,
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 1: 5

[continues previous] the other. Text. She, cruel Fortune, casteth adoun kinges
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 1: 6

[continues previous] that whylom weren y-drad; and she, deceivable, enhaunseth up
14

Monk's Tale: 382

Shal on hir heed now were a vitremyte;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 457

That on a Sonday were upon hir heed.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 458

Hir hosen weren of fyn scarlet reed,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

And on hir heed she hadde a crown. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3202

Hir semede wel an high persoun; [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 383

And she that bar the ceptre ful of floures
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 29

[continues previous] forseide woman bar smale bokes in hir right hand, and in hir left
14

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 31

[continues previous] And whan she say thise poetical Muses aprochen aboute my
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3201

[continues previous] And on hir heed she hadde a crown.
12

Monk's Tale: 385

O noble, o worthy Petro, glorie of Spayne,
12

Monk's Tale: 401

O worthy Petro, king of Cypre, also,
11

Monk's Tale: 389

And after, at a sege, by subtiltee,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 538

That can an hundred fold more subtiltee! [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 390

Thou were bitrayed, and lad un-to his tente,
11

Monk's Tale: 47

A thousand men he slow eek with his hond, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 539

[continues previous] He hath bitrayed folkes many tyme;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 540

Of his falshede it dulleth me to ryme.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

Of water, and in he putte his owene hond. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 764

And in his sleve (as ye biforn-hond [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 391

Wher-as he with his owene hond slow thee,
12

Monk's Tale: 47

[continues previous] A thousand men he slow eek with his hond,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

[continues previous] Of water, and in he putte his owene hond. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 392

Succeding in thy regne and in thy rente.
12

Monk's Tale: 220

And seyde, 'king, god to thy fader lente
12

Monk's Tale: 221

Glorie and honour, regne, tresour, rente:
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

[continues previous] Of water, and in he putte his owene hond.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 764

[continues previous] And in his sleve (as ye biforn-hond
12

Monk's Tale: 397

Noght Charles Oliver, that ay took hede
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4295

Of Bialacoil she took ay hede, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4296

That ever he liveth in wo and drede. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 464

His wyse goost took ay of al swich hede, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 398

Of trouthe and honour, but of Armorike
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4295

[continues previous] Of Bialacoil she took ay hede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 464

[continues previous] His wyse goost took ay of al swich hede,
12

Monk's Tale: 401

O worthy Petro, king of Cypre, also,
12

Monk's Tale: 385

O noble, o worthy Petro, glorie of Spayne,
11

Monk's Tale: 667

That first was king in Grece the contree. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 668

O worthy gentil Alisaundre, allas! [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 402

That Alisaundre wan by heigh maistrye,
11

Monk's Tale: 668

[continues previous] O worthy gentil Alisaundre, allas!
11

Monk's Tale: 406

They in thy bedde han slayn thee by the morwe.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 755

That he was deed, er it were by the morwe; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 756

And thus algates housbondes han sorwe. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 850

Now, sith hir wheel by no wey may soiorne, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 407

Thus can fortune hir wheel governe and gye,
11

Knight's Tale: 67

Thanked be Fortune, and hir false wheel, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 756

[continues previous] And thus algates housbondes han sorwe.
12

Shipman's Tale: 96

Which as hir list she may governe and gye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 849

[continues previous] Than cessed she Fortune anoon to be:
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 850

[continues previous] Now, sith hir wheel by no wey may soiorne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 246

And have it brought to swich plyt as thou wost, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 408

And out of Ioye bringe men to sorwe.
11

Knight's Tale: 67

[continues previous] Thanked be Fortune, and hir false wheel,
12

Shipman's Tale: 96

[continues previous] Which as hir list she may governe and gye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 245

[continues previous] To bringe thee to Ioye out of distresse; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 246

[continues previous] And have it brought to swich plyt as thou wost, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1445

To reste bringe out of this cruel sorwe, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 409

Of Melan grete Barnabo Viscounte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 245

[continues previous] To bringe thee to Ioye out of distresse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1445

[continues previous] To reste bringe out of this cruel sorwe,
10

Monk's Tale: 411

Why sholde I nat thyn infortune acounte,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 45

'Why sholde I nat remembre that?' quod I.
11

Monk's Tale: 412

Sith in estaat thou clombe were so hye?
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3911

Lecherye hath clombe so hye, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 413

Thy brother sone, that was thy double allye,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3912

[continues previous] That almost blered is myn ye;
12

Monk's Tale: 416

But why, ne how, noot I that thou were slawe.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 280

Noot I nat why, ne what mischaunce it eyled,
10

Manciple's Prologue: 23

Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 409

If harme agree me, wher-to pleyne I thenne?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 410

I noot, ne why unwery that I feynte.
12

Monk's Tale: 417

Of the erl Hugelyn of Pyse the langour
12

Monk's Tale: 466

Thus ended is this mighty Erl of Pyse;
15+

Monk's Tale: 418

Ther may no tonge telle for pitee;
14

Man of Law's Tale: 801

Ther is no tonge that it telle may. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 97

Ther may no tonge telle, or herte thinke.
12

Prioress' Tale: 24

Ther may no tonge expresse in no science;
11

Prioress' Tale: 25

For som-tyme, lady, er men praye to thee,
12

Legend of Cleopatra: 91

That ther nis tonge noon that may hit telle. [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 72

Whan they be met, ther may no tunge telle, [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 73

Ther is no more, but unto bed they go, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 419

But litel out of Pyse stant a tour,
14

Man of Law's Tale: 802

[continues previous] But now wol I un-to Custance go,
12

Legend of Cleopatra: 92

[continues previous] But on the morwe she wol no lenger dwelle,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 73

[continues previous] Ther is no more, but unto bed they go,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3944

In middis shal I make a tour [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 420

In whiche tour in prisoun put was he,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3944

[continues previous] In middis shal I make a tour
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3945

[continues previous] To putte Bialacoil in prisoun,
13

Monk's Tale: 421

And with him been his litel children three.
13

Monk's Tale: 441

His yonge sone, that three yeer was of age, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 422

The eldeste scarsly fyf yeer was of age.
11

Miller's Tale: 37

Of eightetene yeer she was of age. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 680

Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 724

Hir brother, which that seven yeer was of age, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 177

I wol no womman thritty yeer of age, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 441

[continues previous] His yonge sone, that three yeer was of age, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 423

Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee
11

Miller's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Of eightetene yeer she was of age.
11

Miller's Tale: 38

[continues previous] Ialous he was, and heeld hir narwe in cage,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 724

[continues previous] Hir brother, which that seven yeer was of age,
11

Merchant's Tale: 178

[continues previous] It is but bene-straw and greet forage.
11

Monk's Tale: 441

[continues previous] His yonge sone, that three yeer was of age,
12

Monk's Tale: 425

Dampned was he to deye in that prisoun,
10

Knight's Tale: 317

That thou and I be dampned to prisoun
12

Knight's Tale: 484

Perpetuelly is dampned to prisoun,
12

Knight's Tale: 485

In cheynes and in fettres to ben deed;
10

Monk's Tale: 426

For Roger, which that bisshop was of Pyse,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 670

A bokeler hadde he maad him of a cake. [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 427

Hadde on him maad a fals suggestioun,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 670

[continues previous] A bokeler hadde he maad him of a cake.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 671

[continues previous] With him ther rood a gentil Pardoner
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 3873

He hath you maad, thurgh flatering, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 3874

On Bialacoil a fals lesing. [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 428

Thurgh which the peple gan upon him ryse,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 3873

[continues previous] He hath you maad, thurgh flatering,
14

Monk's Tale: 429

And putten him to prisoun in swich wyse
10

Squire's Tale: 241

Right in swich wyse as men may with the swerd [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 208

This antem verraily in my deyinge, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 73

Thanne the wyseste of hem three answerde for hem alle, and seyde: 'sire,' quod he, 'we knowen wel, that we been unworthy to comen un-to the court of so greet a lord and so worthy as ye been. For we han so greetly mistaken us, and han offended and agilt in swich a wyse agayn your heigh lordshipe, that trewely we han deserved the deeth. But yet, for the grete goodnesse and debonairetee that all the world witnesseth of your persone, we submitten us to the excellence and benignitee of your gracious lordshipe, and been redy to obeie to alle your comandements; bisekinge yow, ... [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 217

That was arrayed in the same wyse [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 93

And thanked him in swich wyse as he coude. [continues next]
13

Legend of Phyllis: 65

Therfor I passe shortly in this wyse; [continues next]
13

Legend of Phyllis: 67

In the betraising of fair Adriane, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1546

But al for nought, he held forth ay the wyse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 629

As ye have herd, swich lyf right gan he lede, [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 430

As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 850

By forward and by composicioun,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 851

As ye han herd; what nedeth wordes mo?
11

Man of Law's Tale: 782

And pleynly al the maner he him tolde
11

Man of Law's Tale: 783

As ye han herd, I can telle it no bettre,
11

Summoner's Tale: 490

Tel me your grief:' and he anon him tolde,
11

Summoner's Tale: 491

As ye han herd biforn, ye woot wel what.
10

Squire's Tale: 241

[continues previous] Right in swich wyse as men may with the swerd
11

Franklin's Tale: 737

And told him al as ye han herd bifore;
11

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd;
10

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd,
11

Franklin's Tale: 865

And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore;
11

Physician's Tale: 229

And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore
11

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 65

I preche, so as ye han herd bifore,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 66

And telle an hundred false Iapes more.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 508

To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
12

Prioress' Tale: 209

[continues previous] As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
11

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 73

[continues previous] Thanne the wyseste of hem three answerde for hem alle, and seyde: 'sire,' quod he, 'we knowen wel, that we been unworthy to comen un-to the court of so greet a lord and so worthy as ye been. For we han so greetly mistaken us, and han offended and agilt in swich a wyse agayn your heigh lordshipe, that trewely we han deserved the deeth. But yet, for the grete goodnesse and debonairetee that all the world witnesseth of your persone, we submitten us to the excellence and benignitee of your gracious lordshipe, and been redy to obeie to ...
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 218

[continues previous] As ye han herd the dede man devyse;
12

Manciple's Prologue: 93

[continues previous] And thanked him in swich wyse as he coude.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 106

To seen that flour, as ye han herd devyse.
13

Legend of Phyllis: 66

[continues previous] Ye han wel herd of Theseus devyse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 966

As ye han herd bifore, al he him tolde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1547

[continues previous] That ye han herd Pandare er this devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 629

[continues previous] As ye have herd, swich lyf right gan he lede,
12

Monk's Tale: 431

So smal, that wel unnethe it may suffyse,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 260

Na-more of this, for it may wel suffyse. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 261

And now that I have spoke of glotonye, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 35

... is him-self gilty; or despyseth god and alle hise halwes, as doon thise cursede hasardours in diverse contrees. This cursed sinne doon they, whan they felen in hir hertes ful wikkedly of god and of hise halwes. Also, whan they treten unreverently the sacrement of the auter, thilke sinne is so greet, that unnethe may it been relesed, but that the mercy of god passeth alle hise werkes; it is so greet and he so benigne. Thanne comth of Ire attry angre; whan a man is sharply amonested in his shrifte to forleten his sinne, than wole he be angry and answeren hokerly and angrily, and ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 106

which naturel help of intencioun goth awey biforn hem, and is so [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 107

greet that unnethe it may ben overcome? Consider thanne how [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1033

With pietee so wel repressed is,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1034

That it unnethe dooth or seyth amis,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

So that it may your herte and myn suffyse; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 31

That wel unnethe it seen was in his chere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 398

We shal ther-with so foryete or oppresse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 399

That wel unnethe it doon shal us duresse.
12

Monk's Tale: 432

And therwith-al it was ful povre and badde.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 260

[continues previous] Na-more of this, for it may wel suffyse.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 261

[continues previous] And now that I have spoke of glotonye,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 106

[continues previous] which naturel help of intencioun goth awey biforn hem, and is so
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

[continues previous] So that it may your herte and myn suffyse;
10

Monk's Tale: 434

Whan that his mete wont was to be broght,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 103

Whan every night was to his reste broght,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 45

Whan that a man was broght in his presence,
11

Monk's Tale: 435

The gayler shette the dores of the tour.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 285

And lat men shette the dores and go thenne;
11

Monk's Tale: 542

The faster shette they the dores alle; [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 436

He herde it wel,but he spak right noght,
11

Monk's Tale: 541

[continues previous] He knokked faste, and ay, the more he cryed,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 749

He semed freendly to hem that knewe him noght, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 750

But he was feendly bothe in herte and thoght. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 503

And grette him, but he spak noght, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 504

But argued with his owne thoght, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 510

Made him that he ne herde me noght;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 511

For he had wel nigh lost his minde,
11

Monk's Tale: 437

And in his herte anon ther fil a thoght,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 750

[continues previous] But he was feendly bothe in herte and thoght.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 502

[continues previous] I wente and stood right at his fete,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 503

[continues previous] And grette him, but he spak noght,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 504

[continues previous] But argued with his owne thoght,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1086

Ther-with the sorwe so his herte shette, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1087

That from his eyen fil ther not a tere, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 438

That they for hunger wolde doon him dyen.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1093

That she may dyen, but she of it have.' [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 27

'And yif thou see a wight,' quod she, 'that hath doon that he [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 28

wolde doon, thou nilt nat douten that he ne hath had power to [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1087

[continues previous] That from his eyen fil ther not a tere,
14

Monk's Tale: 439

'Allas!' quod he, 'allas! that I was wroght!'
13

Miller's Tale: 567

Allas!' quod he, 'allas! I ne hadde y-bleynt!'
11

Merchant's Tale: 1094

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'that I ne had heer a knave
14

Merchant's Tale: 1095

That coude climbe; allas! allas!' quod he,
14

Merchant's Tale: 1096

'That I am blind.' 'Ye, sir, no fors,' quod she:
14

Franklin's Tale: 830

Curseth the tyme that ever he was born:
14

Franklin's Tale: 831

'Allas,' quod he, 'allas! that I bihighte
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 598

And whan the fox saugh that he was y-gon,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 599

'Allas!' quod he, 'O Chauntecleer, allas!
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 600

I have to yow,' quod he, 'y-doon trespas,
13

Manciple's Tale: 169

Allas! that I was wroght! why nere I deed?
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 27

[continues previous] 'And yif thou see a wight,' quod she, 'that hath doon that he
12

Legend of Cleopatra: 79

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born! [continues next]
12

Legend of Thisbe: 128

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born! [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 104

'Allas! that I was born,' quod Eneas,
14

Legend of Ariadne: 302

'Allas!' quod she, 'that ever I was wroght!
13

Legend of Ariadne: 303

I am betrayed!' and her heer to-rente,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1103

Ful fayn,' quod she; 'allas! that I was born!'
13

Monk's Tale: 440

Therwith the teres fillen from his yën.
13

Second Nun's Tale: 190

The teres from his yën leet he falle — [continues next]
12

Legend of Cleopatra: 79

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
12

Legend of Thisbe: 128

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 750

Therwith the teres from hir eyen two
13

Monk's Tale: 441

His yonge sone, that three yeer was of age,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 603

Sin that his lord was twenty yeer of age;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 680

Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age,
11

Clerk's Tale: 724

Hir brother, which that seven yeer was of age,
11

Prioress' Tale: 50

Among thise children was a widwes sone,
11

Prioress' Tale: 51

A litel clergeon, seven yeer of age,
11

Prioress' Tale: 52

That day by day to scole was his wone,
13

Monk's Tale: 421

And with him been his litel children three.
13

Monk's Tale: 422

The eldeste scarsly fyf yeer was of age.
11

Monk's Tale: 423

Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee
13

Second Nun's Tale: 190

[continues previous] The teres from his yën leet he falle —
11

Monk's Tale: 444

Is ther no morsel breed that ye do kepe?
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 130

Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 131

That no drope ne fille up-on hir brest.
11

Monk's Tale: 448

Ther is no thing, save breed, that me were lever.'
11

Monk's Tale: 445

I am so hungry that I may nat slepe,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 3

I may nat slepe wel nigh noght;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 4

I have so many an ydel thoght
11

Compleint to His Lady: 92

For wel I wot, allas! that may nat be;
11

Compleint to His Lady: 93

I am so litel worthy, and ye so good.
11

Monk's Tale: 448

Ther is no thing, save breed, that me were lever.'
11

Monk's Tale: 444

Is ther no morsel breed that ye do kepe?
11

Monk's Tale: 449

Thus day by day this child bigan to crye,
11

Squire's Tale: 630

And with that word this faucon gan to crye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 961

Fro day to day, til this day, by the morwe, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 450

Til in his fadres barme adoun it lay,
11

Squire's Tale: 631

[continues previous] And swowned eft in Canaceës barme.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 961

[continues previous] Fro day to day, til this day, by the morwe,
12

Monk's Tale: 451

And seyde, 'far-wel, fader, I moot dye,'
12

Physician's Tale: 235

And seyde, 'gode fader, shal I dye? [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 452

And kiste his fader, and deyde the same day.
12

Physician's Tale: 235

[continues previous] And seyde, 'gode fader, shal I dye?
11

Monk's Tale: 453

And whan the woful fader deed it sey,
11

Monk's Tale: 459

And seyde, 'fader, do nat so, allas! [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 454

For wo his armes two he gan to byte,
10

Miller's Tale: 302

Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas! [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 559

And on his lippe he gan for anger byte; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 560

And to him-self he seyde, 'I shal thee quyte!' [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1085

Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde! [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 458

[continues previous] That he his armes gnow, and nat for wo,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 827

And with that thought he gan ful sore syke, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 911

Thise wordes seyd, she on hir armes two [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 912

Fil gruf, and gan to wepe pitously. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 30

He gan his wo ful manly for to hyde,
13

Monk's Tale: 455

And seyde, 'allas, fortune! and weylaway!
11

Knight's Tale: 67

Thanked be Fortune, and hir false wheel, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
13

Miller's Tale: 560

[continues previous] And to him-self he seyde, 'I shal thee quyte!'
11

Merchant's Tale: 1084

[continues previous] This fresshe May, that is so bright and shene,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1085

[continues previous] Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 828

[continues previous] And seyde, 'allas! what is me best to do?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 912

[continues previous] Fil gruf, and gan to wepe pitously.
12

Monk's Tale: 456

Thy false wheel my wo al may I wyte!'
11

Knight's Tale: 67

[continues previous] Thanked be Fortune, and hir false wheel,
12

Monk's Tale: 680

The whiche two of al this wo I wyte?
11

Monk's Tale: 457

His children wende that it for hunger was
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 395

Yet tikled it his herte, for that he [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 396

Wende that I hadde of him so greet chiertee. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 458

That he his armes gnow, and nat for wo,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 395

[continues previous] Yet tikled it his herte, for that he
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 396

[continues previous] Wende that I hadde of him so greet chiertee.
11

Monk's Tale: 454

For wo his armes two he gan to byte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 582

This Pandare, that neigh malt for wo and routhe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 409

And seyde, 'allas, for wo! why nere I deed? [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 459

And seyde, 'fader, do nat so, allas!
11

Monk's Tale: 453

[continues previous] And whan the woful fader deed it sey,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 582

[continues previous] This Pandare, that neigh malt for wo and routhe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 583

[continues previous] Ful often seyde, 'allas! what may this be?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 409

[continues previous] And seyde, 'allas, for wo! why nere I deed?
12

Monk's Tale: 460

But rather eet the flesh upon us two;
12

Monk's Tale: 461

Our flesh thou yaf us, tak our flesh us fro [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 462

And eet y-nough:' right thus they to him seyde, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 461

Our flesh thou yaf us, tak our flesh us fro
12

Monk's Tale: 460

[continues previous] But rather eet the flesh upon us two; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 461

[continues previous] Our flesh thou yaf us, tak our flesh us fro [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 462

And eet y-nough:' right thus they to him seyde,
12

Knight's Tale: 2128

And after that right thus he seyde his wille. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 460

[continues previous] But rather eet the flesh upon us two;
12

Monk's Tale: 463

And after that, with-in a day or two,
12

Knight's Tale: 2128

[continues previous] And after that right thus he seyde his wille.
11

Monk's Tale: 464

They leyde hem in his lappe adoun, and deyde.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 560

And he hem leyde fayre and wel adoun,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 561

And bad the servant coles for to bringe,
11

Monk's Tale: 465

Him-self, despeired, eek for hunger starf;
11

Monk's Tale: 145

Thus starf this worthy mighty Hercules; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 466

Thus ended is this mighty Erl of Pyse;
11

Monk's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Thus starf this worthy mighty Hercules;
12

Monk's Tale: 417

Of the erl Hugelyn of Pyse the langour
15+

Monk's Tale: 468

Of this Tragedie it oghte y-nough suffyse.
10

Merchant's Tale: 296

But nathelees, it oghte y-nough suffise [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 100

'Nece,' quod he, 'it oghte y-nough suffyse [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 469

Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 125

The remenant of the tale if ye wol here, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 269

Wel can the wyse poete of Florence, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 296

[continues previous] But nathelees, it oghte y-nough suffise
15+

Shipman's Tale: 100

[continues previous] 'Nece,' quod he, 'it oghte y-nough suffyse
15+

Monk's Tale: 470

Redeth the grete poete of Itaille,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

[continues previous] Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Wel can the wyse poete of Florence, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 33

Enlumined al Itaille of poetrye, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 409

The grete poete, daun Lucan,
15+

Monk's Tale: 471

That highte Dant, for he can al devyse
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Wel can the wyse poete of Florence,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 270

[continues previous] That highte Dant, speken in this sentence;
10

Clerk's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Highte this clerk, whos rethoryke sweete
10

Clerk's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] Enlumined al Itaille of poetrye,
13

Physician's Tale: 149

Whan shapen was al hir conspiracye [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 472

Fro point to point, nat o word wol he faille.
13

Physician's Tale: 150

[continues previous] Fro point to point, how that his lecherye
10

Shipman's Tale: 188

Pardee, I wol nat faille yow my thankes, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 248

Of silver in thy purs shaltow nat faille.' [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 249

And with that word his countour-dore he shette, [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 263

The peril of this cas, fro point to point,
11

Monk's Tale: 473

Al-though that Nero were as vicious
10

Shipman's Tale: 189

[continues previous] If that yow list to doon that I yow praye.
11

Shipman's Tale: 249

[continues previous] And with that word his countour-dore he shette,
11

Manciple's Tale: 118

Men leyn that oon as lowe as lyth that other. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 474

As any feend that lyth ful lowe adoun,
12

Knight's Tale: 1165

Under the wheel ful lowe he lay adoun. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1223

Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun,
11

Manciple's Tale: 118

[continues previous] Men leyn that oon as lowe as lyth that other.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3402

To him I knelid lowe adoun,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3403

Ful meke of port, and simple of chere,
12

Monk's Tale: 475

Yet he, as telleth us Swetonius,
12

Knight's Tale: 1165

[continues previous] Under the wheel ful lowe he lay adoun.
11

Monk's Tale: 122

That slow so many monstres as dide he. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 644

This wyde world, as in conclusioun, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 645

He wan by strengthe, or for his hye renoun [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 476

This wyde world hadde in subieccioun,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 191

In erthe, in eir, in water men to-swinke [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 123

[continues previous] Thurgh-out this wyde world his name ran,
12

Monk's Tale: 644

[continues previous] This wyde world, as in conclusioun,
10

Parson's Tale: 67

... pilours and destroyours of goddes holy chirche ne do nat so; for they ne stinte nevere to pile. Now, as I have seyd, sith so is that sinne was first cause of thraldom, thanne is it thus; that thilke tyme that al this world was in sinne, thanne was al this world in thraldom and subieccioun. But certes, sith the tyme of grace cam, god ordeyned that som folk sholde be more heigh in estaat and in degree, and som folk more lowe, and that everich sholde be served in his estaat and in his degree. And therfore, in somme contrees ther they byen thralles, whan ... [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 15

The wombe-side of thyn Astrolabie is also devyded with a longe croys in foure quarters from est to west, fro south to north, fro right syde to left syde, as is the bak-syde. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 477

Both Est and West, South and Septemtrioun;
10

Knight's Tale: 1303

Couched with perles whyte and rounde and grete. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 395

'Bothe north and south, and also west and est,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 850

Som-tyme West, som-tyme North and South,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 851

And som-tyme Est, ful many a wery day,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 190

[continues previous] Maketh that, Est and West, and North and South,
10

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... goddes holy chirche ne do nat so; for they ne stinte nevere to pile. Now, as I have seyd, sith so is that sinne was first cause of thraldom, thanne is it thus; that thilke tyme that al this world was in sinne, thanne was al this world in thraldom and subieccioun. But certes, sith the tyme of grace cam, god ordeyned that som folk sholde be more heigh in estaat and in degree, and som folk more lowe, and that everich sholde be served in his estaat and in his degree. And therfore, in somme contrees ther they byen thralles, ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 15

[continues previous] The wombe-side of thyn Astrolabie is also devyded with a longe croys in foure quarters from est to west, fro south to north, fro right syde to left syde, as is the bak-syde. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
13

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 38

... set ther a prikke. Take thanne a rewle, and draw a stryke, evene a-lyne fro the pin un-to the middel prikke; and tak ther thy lyne meridional for evere-mo, as in that same place. And yif thow drawe a cros-lyne over-thwart the compas, iustly over the lyne meridional, than hastow est and west and south; and, par consequence, than the nadir of the south lyne is the north lyne. And for more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
12

Monk's Tale: 478

Of rubies, saphires, and of perles whyte
10

Knight's Tale: 1301

Cam ryding lyk the god of armes, Mars.
10

Knight's Tale: 1302

[continues previous] His cote-armure was of cloth of Tars, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1303

[continues previous] Couched with perles whyte and rounde and grete. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 4: 2

kembde him and aparailede him with faire purpres of Tirie, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 4: 3

and with whyte perles, algates yit throf he hateful to alle folk: [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 8: 10

is most plentivous of whyte perles, and knowen which water
11

Monk's Tale: 479

Were alle his clothes brouded up and doun;
11

Knight's Tale: 1303

[continues previous] Couched with perles whyte and rounde and grete.
11

Knight's Tale: 1304

[continues previous] His sadel was of brend gold newe y-bete;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 4: 3

[continues previous] and with whyte perles, algates yit throf he hateful to alle folk:
12

Monk's Tale: 483

That ilke cloth, that he had wered o day,
12

Monk's Tale: 135

That, er that he had wered it half a day, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 234

To weren ofte that ilke cloth;
11

Monk's Tale: 484

After that tyme he nolde it never see.
11

Monk's Tale: 135

[continues previous] That, er that he had wered it half a day,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1084

Of stones clere and bright to see. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 485

Nettes of gold-thred hadde he gret plentee
12

Reeve's Tale: 7

Pypen he coude and fisshe, and nettes bete, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 486

To fisshe in Tybre, whan him liste pleye.
12

Reeve's Tale: 7

[continues previous] Pypen he coude and fisshe, and nettes bete,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 506

And pleye at dees right at our owene wille.' [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 961

'Therto she coude so wel pleye,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 962

Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 343

For who-so sorweful is in herte
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 344

Him liste not to pleye ne sterte,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1084

[continues previous] Of stones clere and bright to see.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 917

And I al prest to fecche him whan yow liste.' [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 487

His lustes were al lawe in his decree,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 505

[continues previous] Than may we bothe our lustes al fulfille,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 917

[continues previous] And I al prest to fecche him whan yow liste.'
10

Monk's Tale: 488

For fortune as his freend him wolde obeye.
10

A. B. C.: 170

That so fer-forth his fader wolde obeye
10

A. B. C.: 171

That him ne roughte no-thing to be slayn;
13

Monk's Tale: 491

To here how men wolde wepe and crye;
11

Melibee's Tale: 3

Whan Melibeus retourned was in-to his hous, and saugh al this meschief, he, lyk a mad man, rendinge his clothes, gan to wepe and crye. [continues next]
12

Former Age: 61

Allas, allas! now may men wepe and crye! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 806

Thou mayst allone here wepe and crye and knele; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1286

And she for sorwe ginneth wepe and crye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1287

And kisseth him, ther he lyth on the grounde; [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 492

And slow his brother, and by his sister lay.
11

Melibee's Tale: 3

[continues previous] Whan Melibeus retourned was in-to his hous, and saugh al this meschief, he, lyk a mad man, rendinge his clothes, gan to wepe and crye.
11

Melibee's Tale: 4

[continues previous] Prudence his wyf, as ferforth as she dorste, bisoghte him of his weping for to stinte; but nat for-thy he gan to crye and wepen ever lenger the more.
12

Former Age: 61

[continues previous] Allas, allas! now may men wepe and crye!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 806

[continues previous] Thou mayst allone here wepe and crye and knele;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1287

[continues previous] And kisseth him, ther he lyth on the grounde;
11

Monk's Tale: 494

For he hir wombe slitte, to biholde
11

Knight's Tale: 443

So woodly, that he lyk was to biholde [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 495

Wher he conceyved was; so weilawey!
11

Knight's Tale: 443

[continues previous] So woodly, that he lyk was to biholde [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 496

That he so litel of his moder tolde!
11

Knight's Tale: 443

[continues previous] So woodly, that he lyk was to biholde
10

Monk's Tale: 497

No tere out of his yën for that sighte
10

Squire's Tale: 395

But nathelees, it was so fair a sighte [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 498

Ne cam, but seyde, 'a fair womman was she.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 784

"A fair womman, but she be chaast also,
12

Squire's Tale: 199

But evermore hir moste wonder was, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 200

How that it coude goon, and was of bras; [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 395

[continues previous] But nathelees, it was so fair a sighte
12

Anelida and Arcite: 147

And falsed fair Anelida the quene. [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 148

But never-the-les, gret wonder was hit noon [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 981

And that doth me to han so gret a wonder, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 982

That ye wol scornen any womman so. [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 499

Gret wonder is, how that he coude or mighte
12

Squire's Tale: 199

[continues previous] But evermore hir moste wonder was,
12

Squire's Tale: 200

[continues previous] How that it coude goon, and was of bras;
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 8

he was so hard-herted that he mighte ben domes-man or Iuge of [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 148

[continues previous] But never-the-les, gret wonder was hit noon
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 981

[continues previous] And that doth me to han so gret a wonder,
15+

Monk's Tale: 500

Be domesman of hir dede beautee.
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 8

[continues previous] he was so hard-herted that he mighte ben domes-man or Iuge of
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 6: 9

[continues previous] hir dede beautee. And natheles, yit governede this Nero by
10

Monk's Tale: 504

Allas! to depe wol the venim wade!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5022

In vanitee to droune and wade. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 505

In youthe a maister hadde this emperour,
11

Monk's Tale: 521

This Nero hadde eek of acustumaunce
11

Monk's Tale: 522

In youthe ageyn his maister for to ryse,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5021

[continues previous] Fro which go bakward Youthe [hir] made, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 506

To teche him letterure and curteisye,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5022

[continues previous] In vanitee to droune and wade.
13

Monk's Tale: 507

For of moralitee he was the flour,
11

Merchant's Tale: 977

To gladen every flour with his warmnesse. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 978

He was that tyme in Geminis, as I gesse, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 107

For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 108

He slow, and rafte the skin of the leoun; [continues next]
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 31

He was, of persone and of gentilesse, [continues next]