Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Pardoner's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Pardoner's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Pardoner's Tale has 640 lines, and 6% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 61% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 33% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.09 strong matches and 2.82 weak matches.

Pardoner's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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10

Pardoner's Tale: 4

For I can al by rote that I telle.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

Al that I can anon now wol I telle.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 5

My theme is alwey oon, and ever was
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 97

Therfor my theme is yet, and ever was[continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 6

"Radix malorum est Cupiditas."
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 7

First I pronounce whennes that I come,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 99

[continues previous] Thus can I preche agayn that same vyce
14

Pardoner's Tale: 14

Bulles of popes and of cardinales,
11

Clerk's Tale: 688

The popes bulles, making mencioun
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 138

Of popes and of cardinales, [continues next]
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 139

And eek of love-lykinge.' [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 15

Of patriarkes, and bishoppes I shewe;
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 138

[continues previous] Of popes and of cardinales,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 139

[continues previous] And eek of love-lykinge.'
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 55

For to my foos my bille I dar not shewe, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 16

And in Latyn I speke a wordes fewe,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 640

Than wolde he speke no word but Latyn.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 641

A fewe termes hadde he, two or three,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 492

'And I shal tellen thee, in wordes fewe,
10

Melibee's Tale: 10

... of your doghter, al-be-it so that she perilously be wounded, we shullen do so ententif bisinesse fro day to night, that with the grace of god she shal be hool and sound as sone as is possible.' Almost right in the same wyse the phisiciens answerden, save that they seyden a fewe wordes more: 'That, right as maladyes been cured by hir contraries, right so shul men warisshe werre by vengeaunce.' His neighebores, ful of envye, his feyned freendes that semeden reconsiled, and his flatereres, maden semblant of weping, and empeireden and agreggeden muchel of this matere, in preising greetly Melibee of might, ...
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 56

[continues previous] Theffect of which seith thus, in wordes fewe:
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 901

But feffe him with a fewe wordes whyte [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1280

By alle right, and in a wordes fewe,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1281

I shal yow wel an heep of weyes shewe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 17

To saffron with my predicacioun,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 901

[continues previous] But feffe him with a fewe wordes whyte
14

Pardoner's Tale: 24

"Good men," seye I, "tak of my wordes kepe;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 32

Drinketh a draughte; tak kepe eek what I telle. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 449

'Brethren,' quod he, 'tak kepe what I seye;
14

Pardoner's Tale: 450

My wit is greet, though that I bourde and pleye.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 25

If that this boon be wasshe in any welle,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 33

[continues previous] If that the good-man, that the bestes oweth,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 31

Shal every sheep be hool, that of this welle
14

Pardoner's Tale: 35

Fastinge, drinken of this welle a draughte, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1516

To drinken of that welle a draughte [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 32

Drinketh a draughte; tak kepe eek what I telle.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 24

"Good men," seye I, "tak of my wordes kepe; [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 35

[continues previous] Fastinge, drinken of this welle a draughte,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 449

'Brethren,' quod he, 'tak kepe what I seye;
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1516

[continues previous] To drinken of that welle a draughte
11

Pardoner's Tale: 33

If that the good-man, that the bestes oweth,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 25

[continues previous] If that this boon be wasshe in any welle,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 35

Fastinge, drinken of this welle a draughte,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 31

Shal every sheep be hool, that of this welle
14

Pardoner's Tale: 32

Drinketh a draughte; tak kepe eek what I telle.
11

Legend of Thisbe: 102

With blody mouthe, of strangling of a beste, [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 103

To drinken of the welle, ther as she sat; [continues next]
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1516

To drinken of that welle a draughte
11

Pardoner's Tale: 36

As thilke holy Iewe our eldres taughte,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 103

[continues previous] To drinken of the welle, ther as she sat;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 39

For, though a man be falle in Ialous rage,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 899

But if a fool were in a Ialous rage,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 44

Heer is a miteyn eek, that ye may see.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 290

Heer may ye see wel, how that genterye
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 291

Is nat annexed to possessioun,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 45

He that his hond wol putte in this miteyn,
14

Franklin's Tale: 766

Wol holden him a lewed man in this, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 767

That he wol putte his wyf in Iupartye; [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 687

He putte his hond in, and took up a teyne [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

Of water, and in he putte his owene hond. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 764

And in his sleve (as ye biforn-hond [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3022

Unto that roser putte an hond.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3023

He was not sole, for ther was mo;
14

Pardoner's Tale: 46

He shal have multiplying of his greyn,
14

Franklin's Tale: 767

[continues previous] That he wol putte his wyf in Iupartye;
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 687

[continues previous] He putte his hond in, and took up a teyne
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

[continues previous] Of water, and in he putte his owene hond.
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 5590

An hundred [muwis] of whete greyn, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 47

Whan he hath sowen, be it whete or otes,
11

Summoner's Tale: 255

"A! yif that covent half a quarter otes!" [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 579

So that ye offre nobles or sterlinges, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 580

Or elles silver broches, spones, ringes. [continues next]
13

Parson's Prologue: 36

Whan I may sowen whete, if that me lest? [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 5590

[continues previous] An hundred [muwis] of whete greyn,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 5591

[continues previous] Though he be chapman or marchaunt,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 48

So that he offre pens, or elles grotes.
11

Summoner's Tale: 256

[continues previous] "A! yif that covent four and twenty grotes!"
14

Pardoner's Tale: 579

[continues previous] So that ye offre nobles or sterlinges,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 580

[continues previous] Or elles silver broches, spones, ringes.
11

Parson's Prologue: 36

[continues previous] Whan I may sowen whete, if that me lest?
14

Pardoner's Tale: 49

Good men and wommen, o thing warne I yow,
11

Friar's Tale: 215

But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape,
14

Clerk's Tale: 981

O thing biseke I yow and warne also,
14

Merchant's Tale: 171

But o thing warne I yow, my freendes dere,
10

Shipman's Tale: 264

Fare-wel, cosyn; god shilde yow fro care. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 265

If any thing ther be by day or night, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2009

And first of o thing warne I thee,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2010

That peyne and gret adversitee
10

Pardoner's Tale: 50

If any wight be in this chirche now,
10

Shipman's Tale: 265

[continues previous] If any thing ther be by day or night,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 51

That hath doon sinne horrible, that he
12

Parson's Tale: 56

Now comth wanhope, that is despeir of the mercy of god, that comth somtyme of to muche outrageous sorwe, and somtyme of to muche drede; imagininge that he hath doon so muche sinne, that it wol nat availlen him, though he wolde repenten him and forsake sinne: thurgh which despeir or drede he abaundoneth al his herte to every maner sinne, as seith seint Augustin. Which dampnable sinne, if that it continue un-to his ende, it is cleped sinning in the holy gost. This horrible sinne is so perilous, that he that is despeired, ther nis no felonye ne no sinne that he douteth for to do; as shewed wel by Iudas. Certes, aboven alle sinnes thanne is this sinne most displesant to Crist, and most adversarie. Soothly, he that despeireth him is lyk the coward champioun recreant, that seith creant withoute ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 86

... with a womman by force, or by hir owene assent; or if the womman, maugree hir heed, hath been afforced, or noon; this shal she telle; for coveitise, or for poverte, and if it was hir procuringe or noon; and swiche manere harneys. The seventhe circumstaunce is, in what manere he hath doon his sinne, or how that she hath suffred that folk han doon to hir. And the same shal the man telle pleynly, with alle circumstaunces; and whether he hath sinned with comune bordel-wommen, or noon; or doon his sinne in holy tymes, or noon; in fasting-tymes, or noon; or biforn his shrifte, or after his ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 100

Now again the shame that a man hath to shryven him, and namely, thise ypocrites that wolden been holden so parfite that they han no nede to shryven hem; agayns that shame, sholde a man thinke that, by wey of resoun, that he that hath nat been ashamed to doon foule thinges, certes him oghte nat been ashamed to do faire thinges, and that is confessiouns. A man sholde eek thinke, that god seeth and wool alle hise thoghtes and alle hise werkes; to him may no thing been hid ne covered. Men sholden eek remembren hem of the shame ... [continues next]
12

Legend of Philomela: 161

For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame, [continues next]
12

Legend of Philomela: 162

Doon so as Tereus, to lese his name, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 52

Dar nat, for shame, of it y-shriven be,
11

Parson's Tale: 56

[continues previous] Now comth wanhope, that is despeir of the mercy of god, that comth somtyme of to muche outrageous sorwe, and somtyme of to muche drede; imagininge that he hath doon so muche sinne, that it wol nat availlen him, though he wolde repenten him and forsake sinne: thurgh which despeir or drede he abaundoneth al his herte to every maner sinne, as seith seint Augustin. Which dampnable sinne, if that it continue un-to his ende, it is cleped sinning in the holy gost. This horrible sinne is ...
11

Parson's Tale: 85

[continues previous] ... this is for to sinne in herte, in mouth, and in dede, by thy fyve wittes, that been sighte, heringe, smellinge, tastinge or savouringe, and felinge. Now is it good to understonde that that agreggeth muchel every sinne. Thou shall considere what thou art that doost the sinne, whether thou be male or femele, yong or old, gentil or thral, free or servant, hool or syk, wedded or sengle, ordred or unordred, wys or fool, clerk or seculer; if she be of thy kinrede, bodily or goostly, or noon; if any of thy kinrede have sinned with hir or noon, and ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 100

[continues previous] Now again the shame that a man hath to shryven him, and namely, thise ypocrites that wolden been holden so parfite that they han no nede to shryven hem; agayns that shame, sholde a man thinke that, by wey of resoun, that he that hath nat been ashamed to doon foule thinges, certes him oghte nat been ashamed to do faire thinges, and that is confessiouns. A man sholde eek thinke, that god seeth and wool alle hise thoghtes and alle hise werkes; to him may no thing been hid ne covered. Men sholden eek remembren ...
12

Legend of Philomela: 161

[continues previous] For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 53

Or any womman, be she yong or old,
12

Friar's Tale: 317

For dette, which that thou owest me of old, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 85

[continues previous] ... this is for to sinne in herte, in mouth, and in dede, by thy fyve wittes, that been sighte, heringe, smellinge, tastinge or savouringe, and felinge. Now is it good to understonde that that agreggeth muchel every sinne. Thou shall considere what thou art that doost the sinne, whether thou be male or femele, yong or old, gentil or thral, free or servant, hool or syk, wedded or sengle, ordred or unordred, wys or fool, clerk or seculer; if she be of thy kinrede, bodily or goostly, or noon; if any of thy kinrede have sinned with hir or noon, and manye mo thinges.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3062

(Were he yong, or were he old) [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 54

That hath y-maad hir housbond cokewold,
12

Friar's Tale: 318

[continues previous] Whan that thou madest thyn housbond cokewold,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3063

[continues previous] Ageyn hir wille awey to bere
12

Pardoner's Tale: 61

By this gaude have I wonne, yeer by yeer,
12

Knight's Tale: 175

This passeth yeer by yeer, and day by day,
10

Franklin's Tale: 840

At certeyn dayes, yeer by yeer, to paye,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 64

And whan the lewed peple is doun y-set,
11

Clerk's Tale: 947

Whan that the peple gazed up and doun,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 65

I preche, so as ye han herd bifore,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 851

As ye han herd; what nedeth wordes mo? [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 783

As ye han herd, I can telle it no bettre, [continues next]
12

Summoner's Prologue: 6

Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 11

For pardee, ye han ofte tyme herd telle, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 491

As ye han herd biforn, ye woot wel what.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 737

And told him al as ye han herd bifore; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd; [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 865

And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore; [continues next]
15+

Physician's Tale: 229

And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore [continues next]
15+

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 508

To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
12

Prioress' Tale: 209

As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe, [continues next]
14

Melibee's Prologue: 38

Of proverbes, than ye han herd bifore,
11

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
15+

Melibee's Tale: 31

... harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that ...
12

Monk's Tale: 430

As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 218

As ye han herd the dede man devyse;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 106

To seen that flour, as ye han herd devyse.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 966

As ye han herd bifore, al he him tolde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 66

And telle an hundred false Iapes more.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 850

[continues previous] By forward and by composicioun,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 783

[continues previous] As ye han herd, I can telle it no bettre,
12

Summoner's Prologue: 6

[continues previous] Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye,
11

Summoner's Prologue: 11

[continues previous] For pardee, ye han ofte tyme herd telle,
14

Franklin's Tale: 737

[continues previous] And told him al as ye han herd bifore;
10

Franklin's Tale: 820

[continues previous] And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd,
14

Franklin's Tale: 865

[continues previous] And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore;
15+

Physician's Tale: 230

[continues previous] Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
12

Prioress' Tale: 209

[continues previous] As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
12

Monk's Tale: 430

[continues previous] As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde
13

Pardoner's Tale: 67

Than peyne I me to strecche forth the nekke,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 488

And strecche forth his nekke long and smal. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 68

And est and west upon the peple I bekke,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 488

[continues previous] And strecche forth his nekke long and smal.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

[continues previous] And eek he was of swich discrecioun,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 69

As doth a dowve sitting on a berne.
10

Miller's Tale: 72

As any swalwe sittinge on a berne. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 70

Myn hondes and my tonge goon so yerne,
10

Miller's Tale: 71

[continues previous] But of hir song, it was as loude and yerne
10

Pardoner's Tale: 71

That it is Ioye to see my bisinesse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 244

Have ever sithen doon my bisinesse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 245

To bringe thee to Ioye out of distresse; [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 72

Of avaryce and of swich cursednesse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 245

[continues previous] To bringe thee to Ioye out of distresse;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 73

Is al my preching, for to make hem free
11

Summoner's Tale: 8

Excited he the peple in his preching, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 9

To trentals, and to yeve, for goddes sake, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 74

To yeve her pens, and namely un-to me.
11

Summoner's Tale: 9

[continues previous] To trentals, and to yeve, for goddes sake,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 75

For my entente is nat but for to winne,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 103

From avaryce, and sore to repente.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 104

But that is nat my principal entente. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 105

I preche no-thing but for coveityse; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 445

To sclaundre yow is no-thing myn entente, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 446

But to correcten that is mis I mente. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 76

And no-thing for correccioun of sinne.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 105

[continues previous] I preche no-thing but for coveityse;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 445

[continues previous] To sclaundre yow is no-thing myn entente,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 77

I rekke never, whan that they ben beried,
12

Clerk's Tale: 1034

Now rekke I never to ben deed right here;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 79

For certes, many a predicacioun
11

Parson's Tale: 30

... and, for-as-muche as they dar nat openly withseye the comaundements of hir sovereyns, yet wol they seyn harm, and grucche, and murmure prively for verray despyt; whiche wordes men clepen the develes Pater-noster, though so be that the devel ne hadde nevere Pater-noster, but that lewed folk yeven it swich a name. Som tyme grucching comth of ire or prive hate, that norisseth rancour in herte, as afterward I shal declare. Thanne cometh eek bitternesse of herte; thurgh which bitternesse every good dede of his neighebor semeth to him bitter and unsavory. Thanne cometh discord, that unbindeth alle manere of frendshipe. ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 56

... deeth of Crist. Allas! what nedeth man thanne to been despeired, sith that his mercy so redy is and large? Axe and have. Thanne cometh Sompnolence, that is, sluggy slombringe, which maketh a man be hevy and dul, in body and in soule; and this sinne comth of Slouthe. And certes, the tyme that, by wey of resoun, men sholde nat slepe, that is by the morwe; but-if ther were cause resonable. For soothly, the morwe-tyde is most covenable, a man to seye his preyeres, and for to thinken on god, and for to honoure god, and to yeven almesse to ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5763

For oft good predicacioun [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 80

Comth ofte tyme of yvel entencioun;
11

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... they dar nat openly withseye the comaundements of hir sovereyns, yet wol they seyn harm, and grucche, and murmure prively for verray despyt; whiche wordes men clepen the develes Pater-noster, though so be that the devel ne hadde nevere Pater-noster, but that lewed folk yeven it swich a name. Som tyme grucching comth of ire or prive hate, that norisseth rancour in herte, as afterward I shal declare. Thanne cometh eek bitternesse of herte; thurgh which bitternesse every good dede of his neighebor semeth to him bitter and unsavory. Thanne cometh discord, that unbindeth alle manere of frendshipe. Thanne comth scorninge, as whan a ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 56

[continues previous] ... passion and of the deeth of Crist. Allas! what nedeth man thanne to been despeired, sith that his mercy so redy is and large? Axe and have. Thanne cometh Sompnolence, that is, sluggy slombringe, which maketh a man be hevy and dul, in body and in soule; and this sinne comth of Slouthe. And certes, the tyme that, by wey of resoun, men sholde nat slepe, that is by the morwe; but-if ther were cause resonable. For soothly, the morwe-tyde is most covenable, a man to seye his preyeres, and for to thinken on god, and for to honoure god, and to yeven almesse to the povre, ...
12

Parson's Tale: 76

... estaat of Innocence, to multiplye man-kinde to the service of god. And therfore is the brekinge ther-of more grevous. Of which brekinge comen false heires ofte tyme, that wrongfully occupyen folkes heritages. And therfore wol Crist putte hem out of the regne of hevene, that is heritage to gode folk. Of this brekinge comth eek ofte tyme, that folk unwar wedden or sinnen with hir owene kinrede; and namely thilke harlottes that haunten bordels of thise fool wommen, that mowe be lykned to a commune gonge, where-as men purgen hir ordure. What seye we eek of putours that liven by the horrible sinne of putrie, and constreyne ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 81

Som for plesaunce of folk and flaterye,
11

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... as they dar nat openly withseye the comaundements of hir sovereyns, yet wol they seyn harm, and grucche, and murmure prively for verray despyt; whiche wordes men clepen the develes Pater-noster, though so be that the devel ne hadde nevere Pater-noster, but that lewed folk yeven it swich a name. Som tyme grucching comth of ire or prive hate, that norisseth rancour in herte, as afterward I shal declare. Thanne cometh eek bitternesse of herte; thurgh which bitternesse every good dede of his neighebor semeth to him bitter and unsavory. Thanne cometh discord, that unbindeth alle manere of frendshipe. Thanne comth ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 82

To been avaunced by ipocrisye,
11

Parson's Tale: 80

... hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven ... [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 83

And som for veyne glorie, and som for hate.
10

Miller's Tale: 195

For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 196

And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 260

And som, for gentillesse and daliaunce;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 261

Som, for hir handes and hir armes smale;
11

Parson's Tale: 24

... that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, and to his goostly fader. Avauntour, is he that bosteth of the harm or of the bountee that he hath doon. Ipocrite, is he that hydeth to shewe him swiche as he is, and sheweth him swiche as he noght is. Despitous, is he that hath desdeyn of his neighebore, that is to seyn, of his evene-cristene, or hath despyt to doon that him oghte to do. Arrogant, is he that thinketh that he hath thilke bountees in him that he hath noght, or weneth that he sholde have hem by hise desertes; or elles he demeth that he be that he nis nat. Impudent, is he that for his pride hath no shame of hise sinnes. Swellinge of herte, is whan a man reioyseth him of harm that he hath doon. Insolent, is he that despyseth in his Iugement alle othere folk as to regard of his value, and of his conning, and of his speking, and of his bering. Elacion, is whan he ne may neither suffre to have maister ne felawe. Impacient, is he that wol nat been y-taught ne undernome of his vyce, and by stryf werreieth trouthe witingly, and deffendeth his folye. Contumax, is he that thurgh his indignacion is agayns everich auctoritee or power of hem that been hise sovereyns. Presumpcion, is whan a man undertaketh an empryse that him oghte nat do, or elles that he may nat do; and that is called Surquidrie. Irreverence, is whan men do nat honour thereas hem oghte to doon, and waiten to be reverenced. Pertinacie, is whan man deffendeth his folye, and trusteth to muchel in his owene wit. Veyne glorie, is for to have pompe and delyt in his temporel hynesse, and glorifie him in this worldly estaat. Ianglinge, is whan men speken to muche biforn folk, and clappen as a mille, and taken no kepe what they seye.
12

Parson's Tale: 69

But for-as-muche as som folk been unmesurable, men oghten eschue fool-largesse, that men clepen wast. Certes, he that is fool-large ne yeveth nat his catel, but he leseth his catel. Soothly, what thing that he yeveth for veyne glorie, as to minstrals and to folk, for to beren his renoun in the world, he hath sinne ther-of and noon almesse. Certes, he leseth foule his good, that ne seketh with the yifte of his good no-thing but sinne. He is lyk to an hors that seketh rather to drinken drovy or trouble water ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. ...
12

Parson's Tale: 90

... subtile wordes, to covere the more thy sinne; for thanne bigylestow thy-self and nat the preest; thou most tellen it pleynly, be it nevere so foul ne so horrible. Thou shalt eek shryve thee to a preest that is discreet to conseille thee, and eek thou shalt nat shryve thee for veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. ... [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 287

For god so wisly on my soule rewe, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5425

And fedith hem with glorie veyne,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5426

And worldly blisse noncerteyne. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 84

For, whan I dar non other weyes debate,
10

Miller's Tale: 195

[continues previous] For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse,
10

Miller's Tale: 196

[continues previous] And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse.
10

Parson's Tale: 69

[continues previous] But for-as-muche as som folk been unmesurable, men oghten eschue fool-largesse, that men clepen wast. Certes, he that is fool-large ne yeveth nat his catel, but he leseth his catel. Soothly, what thing that he yeveth for veyne glorie, as to minstrals and to folk, for to beren his renoun in the world, he hath sinne ther-of and noon almesse. Certes, he leseth foule his good, that ne seketh with the yifte of his good no-thing but sinne. He is lyk to an hors that seketh rather ...
12

Parson's Tale: 90

[continues previous] ... subtile wordes, to covere the more thy sinne; for thanne bigylestow thy-self and nat the preest; thou most tellen it pleynly, be it nevere so foul ne so horrible. Thou shalt eek shryve thee to a preest that is discreet to conseille thee, and eek thou shalt nat shryve thee for veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 131

to be, it ne may ben non other weyes thanne he knoweth it to be.
12

Hous of Fame 2: 76

'O god,' thoughte I, 'that madest kinde, [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 2: 77

Shal I non other weyes dye? [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 7

Ne may of hit non other weyes witen,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 7

Ne may of hit non other weyes witen,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 286

[continues previous] Ther ben non other mene weyes newe;
12

Anelida and Arcite: 287

[continues previous] For god so wisly on my soule rewe,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5427

[continues previous] Whan she hem settith on hir whele,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

He feleth other weyes, dar I leye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 772

Dar I non handle, for the crueltee,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 85

Than wol I stinge him with my tonge smerte
12

Hous of Fame 2: 76

[continues previous] 'O god,' thoughte I, 'that madest kinde,
13

Hous of Fame 2: 77

[continues previous] Shal I non other weyes dye?
13

Hous of Fame 2: 78

[continues previous] Wher Ioves wol me stellifye,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

[continues previous] He feleth other weyes, dar I leye,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1659

[continues previous] Than thilke tyme he first herde of it seye.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 86

In preching, so that he shal nat asterte
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And ... [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 87

To been defamed falsly, if that he
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, for ...
12

Parson's Tale: 87

... Crist and the sinnere, and the sinnere is the laste by wey of resoun, thanne sholde nat the sinnere sitte as heighe as his confessour, but knele biforn him or at his feet, but-if maladie destourbe it. For he shal nat taken kepe who sit there, but in whos place that he sitteth. A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord, and set him doun anon by the lord, men wolde holden him outrageous, and nat worthy so sone for to have remissioun ne mercy. The thridde signe is, how that thy shrift sholde be ful of teres, if ... [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 88

Hath trespased to my brethren or to me.
12

Parson's Tale: 87

[continues previous] ... sinnere is the laste by wey of resoun, thanne sholde nat the sinnere sitte as heighe as his confessour, but knele biforn him or at his feet, but-if maladie destourbe it. For he shal nat taken kepe who sit there, but in whos place that he sitteth. A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord, and set him doun anon by the lord, men wolde holden him outrageous, and nat worthy so sone for to have remissioun ne mercy. The thridde signe is, how that thy shrift sholde be ful of teres, if ...
12

Pardoner's Tale: 94

Of holynesse, to seme holy and trewe.
12

Knight's Tale: 142

But shortly for to telle is myn entente. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 41

Biheste is dette, and I wol holde fayn [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 92

But nathelees I see your trewe entente, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 93

And truste upon your wit, and have don ay; [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 644

And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 828

Ben humble subgit, trewe in myn entente, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 95

But shortly myn entente I wol devyse;
12

Knight's Tale: 142

[continues previous] But shortly for to telle is myn entente.
11

Knight's Tale: 558

To drugge and drawe, what so men wol devyse. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 559

And shortly of this matere for to seyn, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 40

[continues previous] To breke forward is not myn entente.
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 41

[continues previous] Biheste is dette, and I wol holde fayn
10

Clerk's Tale: 92

[continues previous] But nathelees I see your trewe entente,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 104

But that is nat my principal entente. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 105

I preche no-thing but for coveityse; [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 644

[continues previous] And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3906

Now wol I hool sette myn entente [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 828

[continues previous] Ben humble subgit, trewe in myn entente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 829

[continues previous] As I best can, to yow, lord, yeve ich al
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 96

I preche of no-thing but for coveityse.
11

Knight's Tale: 559

[continues previous] And shortly of this matere for to seyn,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 105

[continues previous] I preche no-thing but for coveityse; [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 106

[continues previous] Of this matere it oughte y-nogh suffyse.
11

Parlement of Foules: 644

[continues previous] And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.'
11

Parlement of Foules: 645

[continues previous] 'I graunte it you,' quod she; and right anoon
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3906

[continues previous] Now wol I hool sette myn entente
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 97

Therfor my theme is yet, and ever was
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 5

My theme is alwey oon, and ever was[continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 104

[continues previous] But that is nat my principal entente.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 98

"Radix malorum est cupiditas."
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 6

[continues previous] "Radix malorum est Cupiditas." [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 99

Thus can I preche agayn that same vyce
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 7

[continues previous] First I pronounce whennes that I come,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 101

But, though my-self be gilty in that sinne,
10

Parson's Tale: 45

Now comth the sinne of hem that sowen and maken discord amonges folk, which is a sinne that Crist hateth outrely; and no wonder is. For he deyde for to make concord. And more shame do they to Crist, than dide they that him crucifyede; for god loveth bettre, that frendshipe be amonges folk, than he dide his owene body, the which that he yaf for unitee. Therfore ... [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7517

And, sir, aboven al other sinne, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7518

In that art thou most gilty inne. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 102

Yet can I maken other folk to twinne
10

Parson's Tale: 45

[continues previous] Now comth the sinne of hem that sowen and maken discord amonges folk, which is a sinne that Crist hateth outrely; and no wonder is. For he deyde for to make concord. And more shame do they to Crist, than dide they that him crucifyede; for god loveth bettre, that frendshipe be amonges folk, than he dide his owene body, the which that ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7517

[continues previous] And, sir, aboven al other sinne,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 103

From avaryce, and sore to repente.
12

Friar's Tale: 331

And panne and al, but he wol him repente!' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 75

For my entente is nat but for to winne, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 104

But that is nat my principal entente.
12

Friar's Tale: 332

[continues previous] 'Nay, olde stot, that is nat myn entente,'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 75

[continues previous] For my entente is nat but for to winne, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 95

But shortly myn entente I wol devyse; [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 97

Therfor my theme is yet, and ever was — [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 105

I preche no-thing but for coveityse;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 75

[continues previous] For my entente is nat but for to winne,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 76

[continues previous] And no-thing for correccioun of sinne.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 95

[continues previous] But shortly myn entente I wol devyse; [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 96

[continues previous] I preche of no-thing but for coveityse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1096

That for hir gilt it oughte y-now suffyse. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 106

Of this matere it oughte y-nogh suffyse.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 96

[continues previous] I preche of no-thing but for coveityse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 396

So that, by right, it oughte y-now suffyse? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1096

[continues previous] That for hir gilt it oughte y-now suffyse. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 107

Than telle I hem ensamples many oon
12

Knight's Tale: 1181

Suffyceth oon ensample in stories olde, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1182

I may not rekne hem alle, thogh I wolde. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 179

For I shal telle ensamples mo than ten.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 171

And seiden her ensamples many oon.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 397

[continues previous] But I, that never felte in my servyse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1097

[continues previous] And if I mighte excuse hir any wyse,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 108

Of olde stories, longe tyme agoon:
12

Knight's Tale: 1181

[continues previous] Suffyceth oon ensample in stories olde, [continues next]
12

Prioress' Tale: 199

I sholde have deyed, ye, longe tyme agoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 722

And eek I knowe, of longe tyme agoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1325

As ye wel knowe how longe tyme agoon
12

Pardoner's Tale: 109

For lewed peple loven tales olde;
12

Knight's Tale: 1180

[continues previous] Who shal be slayn or elles deed for love.
11

Squire's Tale: 221

As lewed peple demeth comunly [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 110

Swich thinges can they wel reporte and holde.
11

Clerk's Tale: 465

In thinges grete, and eek swich folk wel can
10

Clerk's Tale: 466

Don execucioun on thinges badde.
11

Squire's Tale: 222

[continues previous] Of thinges that ben maad more subtilly
12

Pardoner's Tale: 111

What? trowe ye, the whyles I may preche,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 714

He moste preche, and wel affyle his tonge, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 133

Which I am wont to preche, for to winne. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 112

And winne gold and silver for I teche,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 714

[continues previous] He moste preche, and wel affyle his tonge,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 715

[continues previous] To winne silver, as he ful wel coude;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 133

[continues previous] Which I am wont to preche, for to winne.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 114

Nay, nay, I thoghte it never trewely!
11

Summoner's Tale: 4

To preche, and eek to begge, it is no doute. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 14

To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 15

And specially, from every shires ende
11

Summoner's Tale: 4

[continues previous] To preche, and eek to begge, it is no doute.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 27

Eek for to winne love in sondry ages,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 28

In sondry londes, sondry ben usages.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 29

And for-thy if it happe in any wyse,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 116

I wol not do no labour with myn hondes,
11

Prioress' Tale: 11

To telle a storie I wol do my labour;
11

Prioress' Tale: 12

Not that I may encresen hir honour;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 118

Because I wol nat beggen ydelly.
11

Miller's Prologue: 24

'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I; [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 25

For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.' [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 166

And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.' [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 119

I wol non of the apostles counterfete;
11

Miller's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] 'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I;
11

Miller's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde;
10

Merchant's Tale: 166

[continues previous] And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
11

Parson's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose.
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
12

Pardoner's Tale: 120

I wol have money, wolle, chese, and whete,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 238

Al were it bad of wolle and hewe. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 121

Al were it yeven of the povrest page,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 238

[continues previous] Al were it bad of wolle and hewe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 123

Al sholde hir children sterve for famyne.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 17

Preyen for speed, al sholde I therfor sterve, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 124

Nay! I wol drinke licour of the vyne,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 17

[continues previous] Preyen for speed, al sholde I therfor sterve,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 126

But herkneth, lordings, in conclusioun;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 245

But herkneth, lordings, o word, I yow preye, [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 127

Your lyking is that I shal telle a tale.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 732

For this ye knowen al-so wel as I, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 733

Who-so shal telle a tale after a man, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 833

Lat se now who shal telle the firste tale. [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 8

Lat see now who shal telle another tale: [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 49

Why artow angry with my tale now? [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 50

I have a wyf, pardee, as well as thou, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 6

Agayn your lust; a tale wol I telle. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 245

[continues previous] But herkneth, lordings, o word, I yow preye,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 246

[continues previous] That alle the sovereyn actes, dar I seye,
12

Shipman's Prologue: 23

My Ioly body shal a tale telle, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Prologue: 24

And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 13

For he shal telle a tale, by my fey! [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 128

Now, have I dronke a draughte of corny ale,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 384

Wel coude he knowe a draughte of London ale.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 732

[continues previous] For this ye knowen al-so wel as I,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 733

[continues previous] Who-so shal telle a tale after a man,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 833

[continues previous] Lat se now who shal telle the firste tale.
11

Miller's Prologue: 8

[continues previous] Lat see now who shal telle another tale:
10

Miller's Prologue: 49

[continues previous] Why artow angry with my tale now?
10

Miller's Prologue: 50

[continues previous] I have a wyf, pardee, as well as thou,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

[continues previous] Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
11

Squire's Tale: 6

[continues previous] Agayn your lust; a tale wol I telle.
11

Squire's Tale: 7

[continues previous] Have me excused if I speke amis,
12

Physician's Epilogue: 29

Or elles a draught of moyste and corny ale, [continues next]
12

Physician's Epilogue: 30

Or but I here anon a mery tale, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 13

[continues previous] For he shal telle a tale, by my fey!
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

[continues previous] For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 129

By god, I hope I shal yow telle a thing
11

Man of Law's Tale: 812

In point to spille, as I shal telle yow sone. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

[continues previous] Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn.
11

Merchant's Tale: 925

Beth to me trewe, and I shal telle yow why. [continues next]
12

Physician's Epilogue: 30

[continues previous] Or but I here anon a mery tale,
13

Shipman's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 19

I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 604

Com doun, and I shal telle yow what I mente. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.' [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 175

Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle. [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 176

Telle hem that I, Cecile, yow to hem sente, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 105

If men shal telle proprely a thing, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 63

natheles the thing that I shal telle thee yit ne sheweth nat lasse to [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

[continues previous] For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 150

As I shal telle yow echoon. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 151

First saw I the destruccioun [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 506

And seyde, 'by my trouthe, I shal yow telle. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 511

That it befel right as I shal yow telle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1127

And how they wroughte, I shal yow telle sone. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 847

But what he mente, I shal yow telle sone. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 130

That shal, by resoun, been at your lyking.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 812

[continues previous] In point to spille, as I shal telle yow sone.
11

Merchant's Tale: 925

[continues previous] Beth to me trewe, and I shal telle yow why.
13

Shipman's Prologue: 23

[continues previous] My Ioly body shal a tale telle,
13

Shipman's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle,
10

Melibee's Prologue: 20

[continues previous] That oghte lyken yow, as I suppose,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 604

[continues previous] Com doun, and I shal telle yow what I mente.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

[continues previous] I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.'
12

Second Nun's Tale: 175

[continues previous] Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle.
12

Second Nun's Tale: 176

[continues previous] Telle hem that I, Cecile, yow to hem sente,
10

Manciple's Tale: 105

[continues previous] If men shal telle proprely a thing,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 63

[continues previous] natheles the thing that I shal telle thee yit ne sheweth nat lasse to
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

[continues previous] For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse
11

Hous of Fame 1: 150

[continues previous] As I shal telle yow echoon.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3423

To be redressid at your lyking, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 506

[continues previous] And seyde, 'by my trouthe, I shal yow telle.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 511

[continues previous] That it befel right as I shal yow telle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 512

[continues previous] That Pandarus, that ever dide his might
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1127

[continues previous] And how they wroughte, I shal yow telle sone.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1128

[continues previous] Soth is, that whan they gonne first to mete,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 847

[continues previous] But what he mente, I shal yow telle sone.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 131

For, though myself be a ful vicious man,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3422

[continues previous] That I wol swere for evermo
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3423

[continues previous] To be redressid at your lyking,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 132

A moral tale yet I yow telle can,
11

Knight's Tale: 1194

As shortly as I can I wol me haste, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

To telle yow al the descripcioun. [continues next]
13

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
11

Shipman's Prologue: 23

My Ioly body shal a tale telle,
11

Shipman's Prologue: 24

And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle,
12

Monk's Prologue: 80

To telle yow a tale, or two, or three.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 4

This widwe, of which I telle yow my tale, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 43

He is ful Iocund also, dar I leye.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 44

Can he oght telle a mery tale or tweye,
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
10

Hous of Fame 2: 39

How high, I can not telle yow, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 40

For I cam up, I niste how. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 133

Which I am wont to preche, for to winne.
11

Knight's Tale: 1194

[continues previous] As shortly as I can I wol me haste,
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

[continues previous] To telle yow al the descripcioun.
13

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
10

Pardoner's Tale: 111

What? trowe ye, the whyles I may preche,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 112

And winne gold and silver for I teche,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 4

[continues previous] This widwe, of which I telle yow my tale,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 39

[continues previous] How high, I can not telle yow,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 40

[continues previous] For I cam up, I niste how.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 134

Now holde your pees, my tale I wol beginne.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 130

I prey yow holde your arguments in pees; [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 131

Saveth my lyf, and beeth noght recchelees [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 578

Thus hastou doon, and yet holde I my pees.'
14

Merchant's Tale: 732

He deme of al, for I wol holde my pees.
10

Merchant's Tale: 776

And in my tale forth I wol procede. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 135

In Flaundres whylom was a companye
11

Man of Law's Tale: 36

In Surrie whylom dwelte a companye [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 130

[continues previous] I prey yow holde your arguments in pees;
10

Merchant's Tale: 776

[continues previous] And in my tale forth I wol procede.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 136

Of yonge folk, that haunteden folye,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Of chapmen riche, and therto sadde and trewe,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 138

Wher-as, with harpes, lutes, and giternes,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 609

They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Prologue: 18

But for to pleye at dees, and to despende, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 19

And lese al that he hath, is his usage. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 506

And pleye at dees right at our owene wille.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 507

And thus acorded been thise shrewes tweye [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 139

They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 609

[continues previous] They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 610

[continues previous] They goon to bedde, as it was skile and right;
13

Franklin's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] But for to pleye at dees, and to despende, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] And lese al that he hath, is his usage. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 342

And spring-flood laste bothe night and day. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 343

And, but she vouche-sauf in swiche manere [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 505

[continues previous] Than may we bothe our lustes al fulfille, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 506

[continues previous] And pleye at dees right at our owene wille.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 507

[continues previous] And thus acorded been thise shrewes tweye [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 288

Though he sitte at his book bothe day and night, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 140

And ete also and drinken over hir might,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] But for to pleye at dees, and to despende,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] And lese al that he hath, is his usage.
11

Franklin's Tale: 342

[continues previous] And spring-flood laste bothe night and day.
11

Franklin's Tale: 343

[continues previous] And, but she vouche-sauf in swiche manere
14

Pardoner's Tale: 506

[continues previous] And pleye at dees right at our owene wille.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 507

[continues previous] And thus acorded been thise shrewes tweye
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 288

[continues previous] Though he sitte at his book bothe day and night,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 141

Thurgh which they doon the devel sacrifyse
12

Knight's Tale: 1422

Ther lakked noght to doon hir sacrifyse. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1423

Smoking the temple, ful of clothes faire, [continues next]
14

Anelida and Arcite: 355

And unto Mars avoweth sacrifyse [continues next]
14

Anelida and Arcite: 356

With-in the temple, with a sorowful chere, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 142

With-in that develes temple, in cursed wyse,
12

Knight's Tale: 1423

[continues previous] Smoking the temple, ful of clothes faire,
14

Anelida and Arcite: 356

[continues previous] With-in the temple, with a sorowful chere,
13

Anelida and Arcite: 357

[continues previous] That shapen was as ye shal after here.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 144

Hir othes been so grete and so dampnable,
10

Miller's Tale: 659

With othes grete he was so sworn adoun, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 67

... deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; whan thou, for ... [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 145

That it is grisly for to here hem swere;
10

Miller's Tale: 660

[continues previous] That he was holden wood in al the toun;
11

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 147

Hem thoughte Iewes rente him noght y-nough;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 949

It nedeth not no ferther for him sterte; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 148

And ech of hem at otheres sinne lough.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 370

And ech of us bicomen otheres brother,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 950

[continues previous] And ech of yow ese otheres sorwes smerte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1821

And in him-self he lough right at the wo [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1822

Of hem that wepten for his deeth so faste; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 149

And right anon than comen tombesteres
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 950

[continues previous] And ech of yow ese otheres sorwes smerte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1821

[continues previous] And in him-self he lough right at the wo
12

Pardoner's Tale: 152

Whiche been the verray develes officeres
12

Parson's Tale: 30

... privee, or bereth him on hond thing that is fals. Murmure eek is ofte amonges servaunts, that grucchen whan hir sovereyns bidden hem doon leveful thinges; and, for-as-muche as they dar nat openly withseye the comaundements of hir sovereyns, yet wol they seyn harm, and grucche, and murmure prively for verray despyt; whiche wordes men clepen the develes Pater-noster, though so be that the devel ne hadde nevere Pater-noster, but that lewed folk yeven it swich a name. Som tyme grucching comth of ire or prive hate, that norisseth rancour in herte, as afterward I shal declare. Thanne cometh eek bitternesse of herte; thurgh which bitternesse every good ...
12

Pardoner's Tale: 153

To kindle and blowe the fyr of lecherye,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 113

I am so used in the fyr to blowe, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 200

I blowe the fyr til that myn herte feynte.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 154

That is annexed un-to glotonye;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 114

[continues previous] That it hath chaunged my colour, I trowe.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 155

The holy writ take I to my witnesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 260

But god, that al wot, take I to witnesse, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 156

That luxurie is in wyn and dronkenesse.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 221

A lecherous thing is wyn, and dronkenesse
12

Pardoner's Tale: 222

Is ful of stryving and of wrecchednesse.
11

Manciple's Prologue: 44

I trowe that ye dronken han wyn ape, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 45

And that is whan men pleyen with a straw.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 261

[continues previous] That never I this for coveityse wroughte,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 157

Lo, how that dronken Loth, unkindely,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 44

[continues previous] I trowe that ye dronken han wyn ape,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And that is whan men pleyen with a straw.'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 159

So dronke he was, he niste what he wroghte.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 286

So glad he was, he niste what to seye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 299

For verray wo out of his wit he breyde.
11

Franklin's Tale: 300

He niste what he spak, but thus he seyde;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 349

So that, for wo, he niste what he mente;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1202

For when he saugh that she abood so longe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1203

He niste what he iuggen of it mighte,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 160

Herodes, (who-so wel the stories soghte),
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 639

And whan that he wel dronken hadde the wyn, [continues next]
12

Cook's Tale: 40

Up-on a day, whan he his paper soghte, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 161

Whan he of wyn was replet at his feste,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 639

[continues previous] And whan that he wel dronken hadde the wyn,
12

Cook's Tale: 40

[continues previous] Up-on a day, whan he his paper soghte,
12

Cook's Tale: 41

[continues previous] Of a proverbe that seith this same word,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 162

Right at his owene table he yaf his heste
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 74

A thing of which his maister yaf noon heste. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 163

To sleen the Baptist Iohn ful giltelees.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 75

[continues previous] The dart is set up for virginitee;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 164

Senek seith eek a good word doutelees;
13

Melibee's Tale: 40

... unto everichoon, but only unto Iuges and unto hem that han Iurisdicctioun upon the trespassours.] And yet seye I more, that right as a singuler persone sinneth in takinge vengeance of another man, right so sinneth the Iuge if he do no vengeance of hem that it han deserved. For Senek seith thus: "that maister," he seith, "is good that proveth shrewes." And as Cassidore seith: "A man dredeth to do outrages, whan he woot and knoweth that it displeseth to the Iuges and sovereyns." And another seith: "the Iuge that dredeth to do right, maketh men shrewes." And Seint Paule the apostle seith in his epistle, whan he ... [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 165

He seith, he can no difference finde
11

Merchant's Prologue: 11

Ther is a long and large difference [continues next]
13

Melibee's Tale: 40

[continues previous] ... everichoon, but only unto Iuges and unto hem that han Iurisdicctioun upon the trespassours.] And yet seye I more, that right as a singuler persone sinneth in takinge vengeance of another man, right so sinneth the Iuge if he do no vengeance of hem that it han deserved. For Senek seith thus: "that maister," he seith, "is good that proveth shrewes." And as Cassidore seith: "A man dredeth to do outrages, whan he woot and knoweth that it displeseth to the Iuges and sovereyns." And another seith: "the Iuge that dredeth to do right, maketh men shrewes." And Seint Paule the apostle seith in his epistle, ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 166

Bitwix a man that is out of his minde
11

Merchant's Prologue: 11

[continues previous] Ther is a long and large difference
11

Merchant's Prologue: 12

[continues previous] Bitwix Grisildis grete pacience
10

Pardoner's Tale: 167

And a man which that is dronkelewe,
10

Summoner's Tale: 335

Irous Cambyses was eek dronkelewe, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 289

Wher she be wys, or sobre, or dronkelewe, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 168

But that woodnesse, y-fallen in a shrewe,
10

Summoner's Tale: 336

[continues previous] And ay delyted him to been a shrewe.
10

Merchant's Tale: 290

[continues previous] Or proud, or elles other-weys a shrewe;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 170

O glotonye, ful of cursednesse,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 567

O cursed sinne, ful of cursednesse! [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 568

O traytours homicyde, o wikkednesse! [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 569

O glotonye, luxurie, and hasardrye! [continues next]
10

Former Age: 31

Allas! than sprong up al the cursednesse [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 171

O cause first of our confusioun,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 567

[continues previous] O cursed sinne, ful of cursednesse!
13

Pardoner's Tale: 568

[continues previous] O traytours homicyde, o wikkednesse!
13

Pardoner's Tale: 569

[continues previous] O glotonye, luxurie, and hasardrye!
10

Former Age: 32

[continues previous] Of covetyse, that first our sorwe broghte!
12

Pardoner's Tale: 173

Til Crist had boght us with his blood agayn!
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 718

That boghte us with his herte-blood agayn. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 404

For sith that verray hevene is boght so dere, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 405

With tribulacioun and greet penaunce, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 174

Lo, how dere, shortly for to sayn,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 466

Lest that hir housbond, shortly for to sayn,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 719

[continues previous] Lo, here expres of womman may ye finde,
11

Merchant's Tale: 404

[continues previous] For sith that verray hevene is boght so dere,
11

Merchant's Tale: 406

[continues previous] How sholde I thanne, that live in swich plesaunce
11

Pardoner's Tale: 175

Aboght was thilke cursed vileinye;
11

Parson's Tale: 67

... hath ful his wombe, he stinteth to strangle sheep. But soothly, the pilours and destroyours of goddes holy chirche ne do nat so; for they ne stinte nevere to pile. Now, as I have seyd, sith so is that sinne was first cause of thraldom, thanne is it thus; that thilke tyme that al this world was in sinne, thanne was al this world in thraldom and subieccioun. But certes, sith the tyme of grace cam, god ordeyned that som folk sholde be more heigh in estaat and in degree, and som folk more lowe, and that everich sholde be served in his estaat and in his ... [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 176

Corrupt was al this world for glotonye!
11

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... wombe, he stinteth to strangle sheep. But soothly, the pilours and destroyours of goddes holy chirche ne do nat so; for they ne stinte nevere to pile. Now, as I have seyd, sith so is that sinne was first cause of thraldom, thanne is it thus; that thilke tyme that al this world was in sinne, thanne was al this world in thraldom and subieccioun. But certes, sith the tyme of grace cam, god ordeyned that som folk sholde be more heigh in estaat and in degree, and som folk more lowe, and that everich sholde be served in his estaat and in his ...
12

Pardoner's Tale: 177

Adam our fader, and his wyf also,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 438

And made Adam fro paradys to go, [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 178

Fro Paradys to labour and to wo
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 437

[continues previous] Wommannes counseil broghte us first to wo,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 438

[continues previous] And made Adam fro paradys to go,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 179

Were driven for that vyce, it is no drede;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 689

But wel I woot, the mene of it no vyce is, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 690

For for to trusten sum wight is a preve [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 180

For whyl that Adam fasted, as I rede,
10

Monk's Tale: 589

Rede which that he was in Machabee, [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 146

But now to purpos; in the story I rede, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 690

[continues previous] For for to trusten sum wight is a preve
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1322

Of Troilus, whyl that he gan it rede, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1323

So as the wordes yave him hope or drede. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 181

He was in Paradys; and whan that he
10

Monk's Tale: 588

[continues previous] For swich another was ther noon as he.
10

Monk's Tale: 589

[continues previous] Rede which that he was in Machabee,
10

Monk's Tale: 590

[continues previous] And rede the proude wordes that he seyde,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 146

[continues previous] But now to purpos; in the story I rede,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 147

[continues previous] Whan he was goon, al this mischaunce is falle.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1322

[continues previous] Of Troilus, whyl that he gan it rede,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 184

O glotonye, on thee wel oghte us pleyne!
12

Clerk's Tale: 1094

Un-to a mortal man, wel more us oghte [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 27

Wel oghte us than on olde bokes leve,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 286

Is desolat, wel oghte ye to pleyne;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 185

O, wiste a man how many maladyes
12

Clerk's Tale: 1094

[continues previous] Un-to a mortal man, wel more us oghte
14

Pardoner's Tale: 187

He wolde been the more mesurable
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 437

Of his diete mesurable was he, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 188

Of his diete, sittinge at his table.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 437

[continues previous] Of his diete mesurable was he,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 438

[continues previous] For it was of no superfluitee,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 190

Maketh that, Est and West, and North and South,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 394

That power han tanoyen land and see,
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 395

'Bothe north and south, and also west and est,
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 850

Som-tyme West, som-tyme North and South,
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 851

And som-tyme Est, ful many a wery day,
11

Franklin's Tale: 145

For by this werk, south, north, ne west, ne eest,
13

Monk's Tale: 477

Both Est and West, South and Septemtrioun; [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 3: 590

And blew hit est, and west, and southe,
13

Hous of Fame 3: 591

And north, as loude as any thunder,
14

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 15

The wombe-side of thyn Astrolabie is also devyded with a longe croys in foure quarters from est to west, fro south to north, fro right syde to left syde, as is the bak-syde. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
15+

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 29

To knowe iustly the foure quarters of the world, as est, west, north, and sowth. Take the altitude of thy sonne whan thee list, and note wel the quarter of the world in which the sonne is for the tyme by the azimutz. Turne thanne thyn Astrolabie, and set the degree of the sonne in the almikanteras of his altitude, on thilke side that the sonne stant, as is the manere in taking of houres; and ley thy label on the degree of the sonne, and rikene how many degrees of the bordure ben by-twixe the lyne meridional and the point of thy label; and note wel that noumbre. Turne thanne a-gayn thyn Astrolabie, and set the point of thy gret rewle, ther thou takest thyne altitudes, up-on as many degrees in his bordure fro his meridional as was the point of thy label fro the lyne meridional on the wombe-syde. Tak thanne thyn Astrolabie with bothe handes sadly and slely, and lat the sonne shyne thorow bothe holes of thy rewle; and sleyly, in thilke shyninge, lat thyn Astrolabie couch adoun evene up-on a smothe grond, and thanne wol the verrey lyne meridional of thyn Astrolabie lye evene south, and the est lyne wole lye est, and the west lyne west, and north lyne north, so that thou werke softly and avisely in the couching; and thus hastow the 4 quarters of the firmament. And for the more declaracioun, lo here the figure.
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 33

... more to seyn but any tyme of the day tak the altitude of the sonne; and by the azimut in which he stondeth, maystou seen in which partie of the firmament he is. And in the same wyse maystou seen, by the night, of any sterre, whether the sterre sitte est or west or north, or any partie by-twene, after the name of the azimut in which is the sterre. And for the more declaracioun, lo here the figure.
14

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 38

... set ther a prikke. Take thanne a rewle, and draw a stryke, evene a-lyne fro the pin un-to the middel prikke; and tak ther thy lyne meridional for evere-mo, as in that same place. And yif thow drawe a cros-lyne over-thwart the compas, iustly over the lyne meridional, than hastow est and west and south; and, par consequence, than the nadir of the south lyne is the north lyne. And for more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 191

In erthe, in eir, in water men to-swinke
13

Monk's Tale: 476

[continues previous] This wyde world hadde in subieccioun,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 192

To gete a glotoun deyntee mete and drinke!
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 347

It snewed in his hous of mete and drinke, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 757

And mete and drinke this night wol I bringe [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 400

Wher mighte this womman mete and drinke have? [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 167

Of mete and drinke, and in hir foul delyt. [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 61

To fostre it tendrely with mete and drinke, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been in defaute of ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... that been corrupt; and this sinne men clepen pollucioun, that comth in foure maneres. Somtyme, of languissinge of body; for the humours been to ranke and habundaunt in the body of man. Somtyme of infermetee; for the feblesse of the vertu retentif, as phisik maketh mencioun. Som-tyme, for surfeet of mete and drinke. And somtyme of vileyns thoghtes, that been enclosed in mannes minde whan he goth to slepe; which may nat been with-oute sinne. For which men moste kepen hem wysely, or elles may men sinnen ful grevously. [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6755

May finde in trouthe for to swinke,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6756

And gete him clothes, mete, and drinke.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 193

Of this matere, o Paul, wel canstow trete,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 347

[continues previous] It snewed in his hous of mete and drinke,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 348

[continues previous] Of alle deyntees that men coude thinke.
11

Knight's Tale: 757

[continues previous] And mete and drinke this night wol I bringe
10

Man of Law's Tale: 400

[continues previous] Wher mighte this womman mete and drinke have?
10

Summoner's Tale: 167

[continues previous] Of mete and drinke, and in hir foul delyt.
10

Manciple's Tale: 62

[continues previous] Of alle deyntees that thou canst bithinke,
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been ...
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... hem that been corrupt; and this sinne men clepen pollucioun, that comth in foure maneres. Somtyme, of languissinge of body; for the humours been to ranke and habundaunt in the body of man. Somtyme of infermetee; for the feblesse of the vertu retentif, as phisik maketh mencioun. Som-tyme, for surfeet of mete and drinke. And somtyme of vileyns thoghtes, that been enclosed in mannes minde whan he goth to slepe; which may nat been with-oute sinne. For which men moste kepen hem wysely, or elles may men sinnen ful grevously.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 194

'Mete un-to wombe, and wombe eek un-to mete,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 194

'Mete un-to wombe, and wombe eek un-to mete,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 205

Of whiche the ende is deeth, wombe is her god.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 206

O wombe! O bely! O stinking cod, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 195

Shal god destroyen bothe,' as Paulus seith.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 205

[continues previous] Of whiche the ende is deeth, wombe is her god.'
10

Parson's Tale: 55

... Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour is a greet thing; for it maketh, as seith seint Bernard, the laborer to have stronge armes and harde sinwes; and Slouthe maketh hem feble and tendre. Thanne comth drede to biginne to werke any gode werkes; for certes, he that is enclyned to sinne, him thinketh it is so greet an empryse for to undertake to doon werkes ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 76

... hir soule fro Crist, and yeveth it to the devel. This is a fouler thefte, than for to breke a chirche and stele the chalice; for thise Avoutiers breken the temple of god spiritually, and stelen the vessel of grace, that is, the body and the soule, for which Crist shal destroyen hem, as seith Seint Paul. Soothly of this thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my ...
10

Pardoner's Tale: 196

Allas! a foul thing is it, by my feith,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 157

For it is ernest to me, by my feith; [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 55

[continues previous] ... therfore he shendeth al that he dooth. Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour is a greet thing; for it maketh, as seith seint Bernard, the laborer to have stronge armes and harde sinwes; and Slouthe maketh hem feble and tendre. Thanne comth drede to biginne to werke any gode werkes; for certes, he that is enclyned to sinne, him thinketh it is so greet an empryse for to undertake ...
10

Pardoner's Tale: 197

To seye this word, and fouler is the dede,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 157

[continues previous] For it is ernest to me, by my feith;
14

Pardoner's Tale: 203

I seye it now weping with pitous voys,
14

Man of Law's Tale: 351

She blesseth hir, and with ful pitous voys [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 412

That with a pitous voys so gan to crye [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 111

With pitous voys, and tendrely wepinge,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 422

With pitous voys, 'O lord, now youres is [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 204

That they been enemys of Cristes croys,
14

Man of Law's Tale: 352

[continues previous] Un-to the croys of Crist thus seyde she,
11

Squire's Tale: 412

[continues previous] That with a pitous voys so gan to crye
10

Squire's Tale: 413

[continues previous] That all the wode resouned of hir cry.
15+

Parson's Tale: 70

... to eten or to drinke. This sinne corrumped al this world, as is wel shewed in the sinne of Adam and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ofte seyd to yow, and now I seye it wepinge, that they been the enemys of the croys of Crist; of whiche the ende is deeth, and of whiche hir wombe is hir god, and hir glorie in confusioun of hem that so saveren erthely thinges.' He that is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 421

[continues previous] And to the god of love thus seyde he
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 205

Of whiche the ende is deeth, wombe is her god.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 194

'Mete un-to wombe, and wombe eek un-to mete, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 195

Shal god destroyen bothe,' as Paulus seith. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... richesses been y-buried, but that ye have hem in your might and in your weeldinge. For a wys man repreveth the avaricious man, and seith thus, in two vers: "wherto and why burieth a man hise goodes by his grete avarice, and knoweth wel that nedes moste he dye; for deeth is the ende of every man as in this present lyf." And for what cause or enchesoun Ioyneth he him or knitteth he him so faste un-to hise goodes, that alle his wittes mowen nat disseveren him or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, ...
15+

Parson's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... to drinke. This sinne corrumped al this world, as is wel shewed in the sinne of Adam and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ofte seyd to yow, and now I seye it wepinge, that they been the enemys of the croys of Crist; of whiche the ende is deeth, and of whiche hir wombe is hir god, and hir glorie in confusioun of hem that so saveren erthely thinges.' He that is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. This sinne hath ... [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 206

O wombe! O bely! O stinking cod,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 194

[continues previous] 'Mete un-to wombe, and wombe eek un-to mete,
12

Parson's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ofte seyd to yow, and now I seye it wepinge, that they been the enemys of the croys of Crist; of whiche the ende is deeth, and of whiche hir wombe is hir god, and hir glorie in confusioun of hem that so saveren erthely thinges.' He that is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 208

At either ende of thee foul is the soun.
11

Hous of Fame 2: 324

Of every speche, of every soun,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 325

Be hit either foul or fair,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 215

That may go thurgh the golet softe and swote;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 225

Upon the softe and swote grene gras [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 128

The medewe softe, swote, and grene,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 216

Of spicerye, of leef, and bark, and rote
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 225

[continues previous] Upon the softe and swote grene gras
10

Pardoner's Tale: 218

To make him yet a newer appetyt.
10

Manciple's Tale: 76

Swich appetyt hath he to ete a mous. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 219

But certes, he that haunteth swich delyces
10

Manciple's Tale: 75

[continues previous] And every deyntee that is in that hous, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 76

[continues previous] Swich appetyt hath he to ete a mous. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 220

Is deed, whyl that he liveth in tho vyces.
10

Manciple's Tale: 75

[continues previous] And every deyntee that is in that hous,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 221

A lecherous thing is wyn, and dronkenesse
12

Pardoner's Tale: 156

That luxurie is in wyn and dronkenesse. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 222

Is ful of stryving and of wrecchednesse.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 156

[continues previous] That luxurie is in wyn and dronkenesse.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 226

As though thou seydest ay 'Sampsoun, Sampsoun';
11

Pardoner's Tale: 244

And thanne wol he seye, 'Sampsoun, Sampsoun.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 227

And yet, god wot, Sampsoun drank never no wyn.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 244

[continues previous] And thanne wol he seye, 'Sampsoun, Sampsoun.'
11

Monk's Tale: 65

This Sampson never sicer drank ne wyn,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 22

No wyn ne drank she, neither whyt ne reed;
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 230

For dronkenesse is verray sepulture
15+

Parson's Tale: 70

... confusioun of hem that so saveren erthely thinges.' He that is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. This sinne hath manye speces. The firste is dronkenesse, that is the horrible sepulture of mannes resoun; and therfore, whan a man is dronken, he hath lost his resoun; and this is deedly sinne. But soothly, whan that a man is nat wont to strong drinke, and peraventure ne knoweth nat the strengthe of the drinke, or hath feblesse in his heed, or hath ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 882

For verray wo his wit is al aweye. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 231

Of mannes wit and his discrecioun.
10

Knight's Tale: 921

That lord hath litel of discrecioun, [continues next]
13

Manciple's Tale: 77

Lo, here hath lust his dominacioun, [continues next]
13

Manciple's Tale: 78

And appetyt flemeth discrecioun. [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... thinges.' He that is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. This sinne hath manye speces. The firste is dronkenesse, that is the horrible sepulture of mannes resoun; and therfore, whan a man is dronken, he hath lost his resoun; and this is deedly sinne. But soothly, whan that a man is nat wont to strong drinke, and peraventure ne knoweth nat the strengthe of the drinke, or hath feblesse in his heed, or hath travailed, thurgh which he ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 881

[continues previous] That may non erthely mannes tonge seye;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 882

[continues previous] For verray wo his wit is al aweye.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 232

In whom that drinke hath dominacioun,
10

Knight's Tale: 921

[continues previous] That lord hath litel of discrecioun, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 922

[continues previous] That in swich cas can no divisioun, [continues next]
13

Manciple's Tale: 77

[continues previous] Lo, here hath lust his dominacioun,
13

Manciple's Tale: 79

[continues previous] A she-wolf hath also a vileins kinde;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 233

He can no conseil kepe, it is no drede.
10

Knight's Tale: 922

[continues previous] That in swich cas can no divisioun,
12

Franklin's Tale: 884

As wel as any of yow, it is no drede! [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... king ful sore; and an hound wol holde the wilde boor." But nathelees, I sey nat thou shall be so coward that thou doute ther wher-as is no drede. The book seith: that "somme folk han greet lust to deceyve, but yet they dreden hem to be deceyved." Yet shaltou drede to been empoisoned, and kepe yow from the companye of scorneres. For the book seith: "with scorneres make no companye, but flee hir wordes as venim." [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 234

Now kepe yow fro the whyte and fro the rede,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 356

Me fro the feend, and fro his clawes kepe,
12

Franklin's Tale: 884

[continues previous] As wel as any of yow, it is no drede!
11

Pardoner's Tale: 234

Now kepe yow fro the whyte and fro the rede, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 235

And namely fro the whyte wyn of Lepe, [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne tak no companye by the weye of a straunge man, but-if so be that thou have knowe him of a lenger tyme. And if so be that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat the might of your adversarie so litel, that ye lete the keping of your persone for your presumpcioun; for every wys man dredeth his enemy. And Salomon seith: "weleful is he that of alle hath drede; for certes, he that thurgh the hardinesse of his herte and thurgh the hardinesse of him-self hath to greet presumpcioun, him shal yvel bityde." Thanne shul ye evermore countrewayte embusshements and alle espiaille. For Senek seith: that "the wyse man that dredeth harmes escheweth harmes; ne he ne falleth in-to perils, that perils escheweth." And al-be-it so that it seme that thou art in siker place, yet shaltow alwey do thy diligence in kepinge of thy persone; this is to seyn, ne be nat necligent to kepe thy persone, nat only fro thy gretteste enemys but fro thy leeste enemy. Senek seith: "a man that is wel avysed, he dredeth his leste enemy." Ovide seith: that "the litel wesele wol slee the grete bole and the wilde hert." And the book seith: "a litel thorn may prikke a greet king ful sore; and an hound wol holde the wilde boor." But nathelees, I sey nat thou shall be so coward that thou doute ther wher-as is no drede. The book seith: that "somme folk han greet lust to deceyve, but yet they dreden hem to be deceyved." Yet shaltou drede to been empoisoned, and kepe yow from the companye of scorneres. For the book seith: "with scorneres make no companye, but flee hir wordes as venim."
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1383

But it shal falle hem as I shal yow rede; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1384

They shul forgo the whyte and eke the rede, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1385

And live in wo, ther god yeve hem mischaunce, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 235

And namely fro the whyte wyn of Lepe,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 234

[continues previous] Now kepe yow fro the whyte and fro the rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1384

[continues previous] They shul forgo the whyte and eke the rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1385

[continues previous] And live in wo, ther god yeve hem mischaunce,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 236

That is to selle in Fish-strete or in Chepe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 241

And weneth that he be at hoom in Chepe, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 242

He is in Spayne, right at the toune of Lepe, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 24

Than the beste galoun wyn in Chepe.' [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 237

This wyn of Spayne crepeth subtilly
12

Pardoner's Tale: 242

[continues previous] He is in Spayne, right at the toune of Lepe, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Than the beste galoun wyn in Chepe.' [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 238

In othere wynes, growing faste by,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 241

[continues previous] And weneth that he be at hoom in Chepe,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 242

[continues previous] He is in Spayne, right at the toune of Lepe,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Than the beste galoun wyn in Chepe.'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 239

Of which ther ryseth swich fumositee,
12

Squire's Tale: 358

Ful were hir hedes of fumositee, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 359

That causeth dreem, of which ther nis no charge. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 240

That whan a man hath dronken draughtes three,
12

Squire's Tale: 359

[continues previous] That causeth dreem, of which ther nis no charge.
13

Parson's Tale: 70

... to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. This sinne hath manye speces. The firste is dronkenesse, that is the horrible sepulture of mannes resoun; and therfore, whan a man is dronken, he hath lost his resoun; and this is deedly sinne. But soothly, whan that a man is nat wont to strong drinke, and peraventure ne knoweth nat the strengthe of the drinke, or hath feblesse in his heed, or hath travailed, thurgh which he drinketh the more, al be he sodeynly caught ... [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 241

And weneth that he be at hoom in Chepe,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 236

That is to selle in Fish-strete or in Chepe. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 238

In othere wynes, growing faste by, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... is usaunt to this sinne of Glotonye, he ne may no sinne withstonde. He moot been in servage of alle vyces, for it is the develes hord ther he hydeth him and resteth. This sinne hath manye speces. The firste is dronkenesse, that is the horrible sepulture of mannes resoun; and therfore, whan a man is dronken, he hath lost his resoun; and this is deedly sinne. But soothly, whan that a man is nat wont to strong drinke, and peraventure ne knoweth nat the strengthe of the drinke, or hath feblesse in his heed, or hath travailed, thurgh which he ...
12

Pardoner's Tale: 242

He is in Spayne, right at the toune of Lepe,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 236

[continues previous] That is to selle in Fish-strete or in Chepe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 237

[continues previous] This wyn of Spayne crepeth subtilly
12

Pardoner's Tale: 238

[continues previous] In othere wynes, growing faste by,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 244

And thanne wol he seye, 'Sampsoun, Sampsoun.'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 857

Now lat us ryde, and herkneth what I seye.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 226

As though thou seydest ay 'Sampsoun, Sampsoun';
10

Pardoner's Tale: 227

And yet, god wot, Sampsoun drank never no wyn.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 245

But herkneth, lordings, o word, I yow preye,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 857

[continues previous] Now lat us ryde, and herkneth what I seye.'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 858

[continues previous] And with that word we riden forth our weye;
11

Clerk's Tale: 513

But o thing wol I preye yow of your grace,
11

Clerk's Tale: 1107

But o word, lordinges, herkneth er I go: —
12

Pardoner's Tale: 126

But herkneth, lordings, in conclusioun; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 127

Your lyking is that I shal telle a tale. [continues next]
12

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 582

Now, gode men, I pray yow herkneth alle! [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 457

And beth no-thing displesed, I yow preye,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 458

But in this cas herkneth what I shal seye.
13

Manciple's Tale: 205

Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1784

To speke, and in effect yow alle I preye, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 246

That alle the sovereyn actes, dar I seye,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 127

[continues previous] Your lyking is that I shal telle a tale.
12

Melibee's Prologue: 42

[continues previous] As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 582

[continues previous] Now, gode men, I pray yow herkneth alle!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1784

[continues previous] To speke, and in effect yow alle I preye,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 247

Of victories in the olde testament,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 308

In the olde testament, of Daniel,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6891

That is the olde testament, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 248

Thurgh verray god, that is omnipotent,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 423

As help me verray god omnipotent,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6891

[continues previous] That is the olde testament,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6892

[continues previous] For therby is the chaire ment —
14

Pardoner's Tale: 250

Loketh the Bible, and ther ye may it lere.
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 255

And over al this, avyseth yow right wel
10

Merchant's Tale: 310

Ye mowe, for me, right as yow lyketh do;
10

Merchant's Tale: 311

Avyseth yow, ye been a man of age,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1795

I mene folk that oughte it been of right.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1796

And over al this, so wel coude he devyse
11

Pardoner's Tale: 259

Of wyn-yeving to hem that han Iustyse.
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 2

That ye han seyd is right y-nough, y-wis, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 260

Na-more of this, for it may wel suffyse.
10

Reeve's Tale: 205

Lat see now if this place may suffyse, [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 206

Or make it roum with speche, as is youre gyse.' [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 634

'Na-more of this, for it is right y-nough;
12

Monk's Tale: 431

So smal, that wel unnethe it may suffyse, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 432

And therwith-al it was ful povre and badde. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 1

[continues previous] 'Ho!' quod the knight, 'good sir, na-more of this,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

So that it may your herte and myn suffyse; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1687

And fareth now wel, for tyme is that ye ryse.' [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 261

And now that I have spoke of glotonye,
10

Reeve's Tale: 205

[continues previous] Lat see now if this place may suffyse,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 569

O glotonye, luxurie, and hasardrye! [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 570

Thou blasphemour of Crist with vileinye [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 431

[continues previous] So smal, that wel unnethe it may suffyse,
12

Monk's Tale: 432

[continues previous] And therwith-al it was ful povre and badde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

[continues previous] So that it may your herte and myn suffyse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1687

[continues previous] And fareth now wel, for tyme is that ye ryse.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 262

Now wol I yow defenden hasardrye.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 569

[continues previous] O glotonye, luxurie, and hasardrye!
12

Pardoner's Tale: 263

Hasard is verray moder of lesinges,
12

Parson's Tale: 67

... is it honeste and leveful, that of habundaunce of this contree, that men helpe another contree that is more nedy. And therfore, ther mote been marchants to bringen fro that o contree to that other hire marchandyses. That other marchandise, that men haunten with fraude and trecherie and deceite, with lesinges and false othes, is cursed and dampnable. Espirituel marchandyse is proprely Symonye, that is, ententif desyr to byen thing espirituel, that is, thing that aperteneth to the seintuarie of god and to cure of the soule. This desyr, if so be that a man do his diligence to parfournen it, al-be-it that his desyr ... [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 264

And of deceite, and cursed forsweringes,
12

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... is suffisaunt to him-self, thanne is it honeste and leveful, that of habundaunce of this contree, that men helpe another contree that is more nedy. And therfore, ther mote been marchants to bringen fro that o contree to that other hire marchandyses. That other marchandise, that men haunten with fraude and trecherie and deceite, with lesinges and false othes, is cursed and dampnable. Espirituel marchandyse is proprely Symonye, that is, ententif desyr to byen thing espirituel, that is, thing that aperteneth to the seintuarie of god and to cure of the soule. This desyr, if so be that a man do his diligence to parfournen it, al-be-it that his desyr ne take ... [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 265

Blaspheme of Crist, manslaughtre, and wast also
13

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... strangleth hem. And therfore shul they nevere han part of the pasture of lambes, that is, the blisse of hevene. Now comth hasardrye with hise apurtenaunces, as tables and rafles; of which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word ... [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 266

Of catel and of tyme; and forthermo,
13

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... hem. And therfore shul they nevere han part of the pasture of lambes, that is, the blisse of hevene. Now comth hasardrye with hise apurtenaunces, as tables and rafles; of which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 269

And ever the hyër he is of estaat,
11

Parson's Tale: 53

... to wirche, as in heryinge and adouringe of god. Another estaat is the estaat of sinful men, in which estaat men been holden to laboure in preyinge to god for amendement of hir sinnes, and that he wole graunte hem to arysen out of hir sinnes. Another estaat is thestaat of grace, in which estaat he is holden to werkes of penitence; and certes, to alle thise thinges is Accidie enemy and contrarie. For he loveth no bisinesse at al. Now certes, this foule sinne Accidie is eek a ful greet enemy to the lyflode of the body; for it ne hath no purveaunce agayn temporel necessitee; for it forsleweth and ... [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 270

The more is he holden desolaat.
11

Parson's Tale: 53

[continues previous] ... and adouringe of god. Another estaat is the estaat of sinful men, in which estaat men been holden to laboure in preyinge to god for amendement of hir sinnes, and that he wole graunte hem to arysen out of hir sinnes. Another estaat is thestaat of grace, in which estaat he is holden to werkes of penitence; and certes, to alle thise thinges is Accidie enemy and contrarie. For he loveth no bisinesse at al. Now certes, this foule sinne Accidie is eek a ful greet enemy to the lyflode of the body; for it ne hath no purveaunce agayn temporel necessitee; for ...
10

Pardoner's Tale: 279

That alle the grettest that were of that lond,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 7

me,' quod she, 'to telle thing that is grettest of alle thinges that
11

Pardoner's Tale: 280

Pleyinge atte hasard he hem fond.
11

Prioress' Tale: 135

After hir litel child, but he cam noght; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 281

For which, as sone as it mighte be,
11

Clerk's Tale: 228

To doon at hoom, as sone as it may be, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 854

And voyden hir as sone as ever he mighte. [continues next]
12

Prioress' Tale: 136

[continues previous] For which, as sone as it was dayes light, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 282

He stal him hoom agayn to his contree,
11

Knight's Tale: 11

And broghte hir hoom with him in his contree [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 133

Of hir entente, and hoom agayn they wende. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 134

And heer-up-on he to his officeres [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 228

[continues previous] To doon at hoom, as sone as it may be,
11

Clerk's Tale: 854

[continues previous] And voyden hir as sone as ever he mighte.
11

Franklin's Tale: 72

Hoom with his wyf he gooth to his contree, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 73

Nat fer fro Penmark, ther his dwelling was, [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 135

[continues previous] After hir litel child, but he cam noght;
11

Legend of Ariadne: 137

And him avaunce at hoom in his contree, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 283

And seyde, 'ther wol I nat lese my name;
10

Knight's Tale: 11

[continues previous] And broghte hir hoom with him in his contree
11

Miller's Tale: 98

And seyde, 'I wol nat kisse thee, by my fey,
10

Friar's Tale: 141

Nere myn extorcioun, I mighte nat liven, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 142

Ne of swiche Iapes wol I nat be shriven. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 134

[continues previous] And heer-up-on he to his officeres
11

Franklin's Tale: 73

[continues previous] Nat fer fro Penmark, ther his dwelling was,
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.' [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 437

That, if that I wol save my degree, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 438

I may ne wol nat warne your requeste; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 447

If that I wolde save my degree, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 448

I may ne wol nat werne your requeste; [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 137

[continues previous] And him avaunce at hoom in his contree,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 284

Ne I wol nat take on me so greet defame,
10

Friar's Tale: 141

[continues previous] Nere myn extorcioun, I mighte nat liven,
10

Friar's Tale: 142

[continues previous] Ne of swiche Iapes wol I nat be shriven.
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 887

Ne never er now ne haddest knowen me.
10

Franklin's Tale: 888

For sire, I wol nat take a peny of thee
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 662

I ne wol nat been out of your presence,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 437

[continues previous] That, if that I wol save my degree,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 438

[continues previous] I may ne wol nat warne your requeste;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 448

[continues previous] I may ne wol nat werne your requeste;
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 285

Yow for to allye un-to none hasardours.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 288

Than I yow sholde to hasardours allye.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 289

For ye that been so glorious in honours
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 287

For, by my trouthe, me were lever dye,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 289

For ye that been so glorious in honours
11

Shipman's Tale: 182

Yet were me lever that I were unborn [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 183

Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileinye; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 711

And cast the place, in whiche he sholde dye [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 23

Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 621

That lever me were keyes for to bere, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 169

He hadde lever him-self to mordre, and dye [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 7

Of Love, that for my trouthe doth me dye. [continues next]
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 8

And when that I, by lengthe of certeyn yeres, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3326

Me were lever dye in the peyne, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6168

But me were lever my nekke atwo, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1034

For dredelees, me were lever dye [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

Than she of me ought elles understode [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 574

Me were lever a thousand-fold to dye.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 565

And me were lever deed than hir defame, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 567

Hir honour lever than my lyf to save! [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 288

Than I yow sholde to hasardours allye.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 285

Yow for to allye un-to none hasardours. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 182

[continues previous] Yet were me lever that I were unborn
11

Shipman's Tale: 183

[continues previous] Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileinye;
10

Monk's Tale: 711

[continues previous] And cast the place, in whiche he sholde dye
10

Monk's Tale: 712

[continues previous] With boydekins, as I shal yow devyse.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Than the beste galoun wyn in Chepe.'
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 622

[continues previous] Than walken in this wilde woode my clothes to tere.'
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 169

[continues previous] He hadde lever him-self to mordre, and dye
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 170

[continues previous] Than that men shulde a lover him espye: —
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 8

[continues previous] And when that I, by lengthe of certeyn yeres,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3327

[continues previous] Than Love to me-ward shulde arette
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6169

[continues previous] Than lete a purpose that I take,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

[continues previous] Than she of me ought elles understode
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 574

[continues previous] Me were lever a thousand-fold to dye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

[continues previous] Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1491

[continues previous] Yet sholde I bet enduren al my peyne.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 565

[continues previous] And me were lever deed than hir defame,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 566

[continues previous] As nolde god but-if I sholde have
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 567

[continues previous] Hir honour lever than my lyf to save!
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 289

For ye that been so glorious in honours
10

Knight's Tale: 1938

And if that ever ye shul been a wyf, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 285

[continues previous] Yow for to allye un-to none hasardours.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 287

For, by my trouthe, me were lever dye,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 290

Shul nat allyen yow with hasardours
10

Knight's Tale: 1938

[continues previous] And if that ever ye shul been a wyf,
10

Knight's Tale: 1939

[continues previous] Foryet nat Palamon, the gentil man.'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 292

This wyse philosophre thus seyde he.
12

Franklin's Tale: 857

This philosophre sobrely answerde,
12

Franklin's Tale: 858

And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde:
11

Pardoner's Tale: 296

For he hadde used hasard ther-biforn;
11

Shipman's Tale: 21

For which he hadde alday so greet repair [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 297

For which he heeld his glorie or his renoun
11

Shipman's Tale: 20

[continues previous] This noble Marchant heeld a worthy hous,
11

Shipman's Tale: 21

[continues previous] For which he hadde alday so greet repair
10

Pardoner's Tale: 300

Honeste y-nough to dryve the day awey.
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... places. He seith: "ne yeldeth nat harm for harm, ne wikked speche for wikked speche; but do wel to him that dooth thee harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 31

Now wol I speke of the remedie agayns this foule sinne of Envye. First, is the love of god principal, and loving of his neighebor as him-self; for soothly, that oon ne may nat been withoute that other. And truste wel, that in the name of thy neighebore thou shalt understonde the name of thy brother; ... [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 301

Now wol I speke of othes false and grete
11

Knight's Tale: 591

And in this blisse lete I now Arcite,
11

Knight's Tale: 592

And speke I wol of Palamon a lyte.
11

Merchant's Tale: 622

Now wol I speke of woful Damian,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... accordeth Seint Paul the apostle in manye places. He seith: "ne yeldeth nat harm for harm, ne wikked speche for wikked speche; but do wel to him that dooth thee harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that ...
10

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... that waiteth bothe night and day to accusen us alle. Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively if he may; and if he noght may, algate his wikked wil ne shal nat wante, as for to brennen his hous prively, or empoysone or sleen hise bestes, and semblable thinges.
11

Parson's Tale: 31

[continues previous] Now wol I speke of the remedie agayns this foule sinne of Envye. First, is the love of god principal, and loving of his neighebor as him-self; for soothly, that oon ne may nat been withoute that other. And truste wel, that in the name of thy neighebore thou shalt understonde the name of thy ...
11

Parson's Tale: 37

What seye we eek of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon ... [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 574

That thou reherce of al hir lyf the grete, [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 123

Now wol I speke of Mars, furious and wood;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 302

A word or two, as olde bokes trete.
10

Knight's Tale: 340

So wel they loved, as olde bokes seyn,
10

Knight's Tale: 605

The thridde night, (as olde bokes seyn,
11

Monk's Prologue: 86

As olde bokes maken us memorie, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 2

As olde bokes maken mencioun,
11

Parson's Tale: 37

[continues previous] What seye we eek of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible ...
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 575

[continues previous] After thise olde auctours listen to trete.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1478

Of which, as olde bokes tellen us,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1562

For whom, as olde bokes tellen us,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 303

Gret swering is a thing abhominable,
11

Monk's Prologue: 85

[continues previous] Tragedie is to seyn a certeyn storie,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 305

The heighe god forbad swering at al,
10

Clerk's Tale: 765

The heighe god take I for my witnesse, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 306

Witnesse on Mathew; but in special
10

Clerk's Tale: 765

[continues previous] The heighe god take I for my witnesse,
15+

Parson's Tale: 35

... by soule, herte, bones, and body. For certes, it semeth that ye thinke that the cursede Iewes ne dismembred nat y-nough the preciouse persone of Crist, but ye dismembre him more. And if so be that the lawe compelle yow to swere, thanne rule yow after the lawe of god in youre swering, as seith Ieremye quarto capitulo, 'Iurabis in veritate, in iudido et in iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled ... [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 307

Of swering seith the holy Ieremye,
15+

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... of Crist by soule, herte, bones, and body. For certes, it semeth that ye thinke that the cursede Iewes ne dismembred nat y-nough the preciouse persone of Crist, but ye dismembre him more. And if so be that the lawe compelle yow to swere, thanne rule yow after the lawe of god in youre swering, as seith Ieremye quarto capitulo, 'Iurabis in veritate, in iudido et in iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 308

'Thou shalt seye sooth thyn othes, and nat lye,
11

Parson's Tale: 37

What seye we eek of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1040

Therfore is thyn opinion sooth, y-wis. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1041

And I seye, though the cause of sooth of this [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 309

And swere in dome, and eek in rightwisnesse;'
12

Parson's Tale: 35

... persone of Crist, but ye dismembre him more. And if so be that the lawe compelle yow to swere, thanne rule yow after the lawe of god in youre swering, as seith Ieremye quarto capitulo, 'Iurabis in veritate, in iudido et in iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled lawefully to swere, the wounde shal nat departe from his hous whyl he useth swich unleveful swering. Thou shalt sweren eek ...
11

Parson's Tale: 37

[continues previous] What seye we eek of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1041

[continues previous] And I seye, though the cause of sooth of this
14

Pardoner's Tale: 312

Of heighe goddes hestes honurable,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 318

This knowen, that his hestes understondeth, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 313

How that the seconde heste of him is this —
12

Pardoner's Tale: 318

[continues previous] This knowen, that his hestes understondeth,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 319

[continues previous] How that the second heste of god is that.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 314

'Tak nat my name in ydel or amis.'
11

Parson's Tale: 35

... in doom, whan thou art constreyned by thy domesman to witnessen the trouthe. Eek thou shalt nat swere for envye ne for favour, ne for mede, but for rightwisnesse; for declaracioun of it to the worship of god and helping of thyne evene-cristene. And therfore, every man that taketh goddes name in ydel, or falsly swereth with his mouth, or elles taketh on him the name of Crist, to be called a Cristene man, and liveth agayns Cristes livinge and his techinge, alle they taken goddes name in ydel. Loke eek what seint Peter seith, Actuum quarto capitulo, 'Non est aliud nomen sub celo,' ...
14

Pardoner's Tale: 318

This knowen, that his hestes understondeth,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 312

Of heighe goddes hestes honurable, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 313

How that the seconde heste of him is this — [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 319

How that the second heste of god is that.
10

Miller's Tale: 308

Of certeyn thing that toucheth me and thee; [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 313

[continues previous] How that the seconde heste of him is this —
12

Pardoner's Tale: 320

And forther over, I wol thee telle al plat,
10

Miller's Tale: 308

[continues previous] Of certeyn thing that toucheth me and thee;
10

Miller's Tale: 309

[continues previous] I wol telle it non other man, certeyn.'
10

Reeve's Tale: 321

But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle,
12

Merchant's Tale: 385

And thanked god, that he mighte han hire al, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 481

Thy profit wol I telle thee anon.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 63

natheles the thing that I shal telle thee yit ne sheweth nat lasse to [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 93

I wol thee telle what I am,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 552

'But er I go, thus muche I wol thee telle, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4989

'Where Elde abit, I wol thee telle
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6774

For I wol speke, and telle it thee,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6775

Al shulde I dye, and be put doun,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 321

That vengeance shal nat parten from his hous,
12

Merchant's Tale: 386

[continues previous] That no wight of his blisse parten shal. [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 35

... iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled lawefully to swere, the wounde shal nat departe from his hous whyl he useth swich unleveful swering. Thou shalt sweren eek in doom, whan thou art constreyned by thy domesman to witnessen the trouthe. Eek thou shalt nat swere for envye ne for favour, ne for mede, but for rightwisnesse; for declaracioun of it to the worship of god and helping ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 63

[continues previous] natheles the thing that I shal telle thee yit ne sheweth nat lasse to
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

[continues previous] For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 553

[continues previous] Ne shal no trewe lover come in helle.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 322

That of his othes is to outrageous.
10

Merchant's Tale: 386

[continues previous] That no wight of his blisse parten shal.
11

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled lawefully to swere, the wounde shal nat departe from his hous whyl he useth swich unleveful swering. Thou shalt sweren eek in doom, whan thou art constreyned by thy domesman to witnessen the trouthe. Eek thou shalt nat swere for envye ne for favour, ne for mede, but for rightwisnesse; for declaracioun of it to the worship of god and ...
10

Pardoner's Tale: 327

This dagger shal thurgh-out thyn herte go' —
10

Legend of Lucretia: 114

This swerd through-out thyn herte shal I ryve.' [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 328

This fruyt cometh of the bicched bones two,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 114

[continues previous] This swerd through-out thyn herte shal I ryve.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 330

Now, for the love of Crist that for us dyde,
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 30

By heven king, that for us alle dyde,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 331

Leveth your othes, bothe grete and smale;
12

Miller's Tale: 640

The neighebores, bothe smale and grete,
11

Shipman's Tale: 105

Were al for-straught with houndes grete and smale. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

And telle forth my tale of the chanoun, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1033

She ne used no suche knakkes smale. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 332

But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
11

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 801

Ther is no tonge that it telle may.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 802

But now wol I un-to Custance go,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 194

As ever mote I drinken wyn or ale,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 828

Now wol I seye my tale, if ye wol here.'
11

Friar's Tale: 37

Thus seyde our host, 'and lat him telle his tale.
11

Friar's Tale: 38

Now telleth forth, thogh that the Somnour gale,
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I
12

Merchant's Tale: 776

And in my tale forth I wol procede.
12

Squire's Tale: 6

Agayn your lust; a tale wol I telle.
11

Shipman's Tale: 106

[continues previous] But dere nece, why be ye so pale?
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 554

Now wol I torne to my tale agayn: —
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

Al that I can anon now wol I telle.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 466

[continues previous] Therof no fors; I wol precede as now, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And telle forth my tale of the chanoun, [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
12

Parson's Prologue: 53

Biginne upon my tale, for whiche I preye [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 54

Telle your avys, I can no bettre seye. [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 225

Of this tale next before:
10

Book of the Duchesse: 226

And I wol telle yow wherfore;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1034

[continues previous] 'But wherfor that I telle my tale?
12

Parlement of Foules: 326

As worm, or thing of whiche I telle no tale; [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 333

Thise ryotoures three, of whiche I telle,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 388

The proudest of thise ryotoures three
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And telle forth my tale of the chanoun,
12

Parson's Prologue: 53

[continues previous] Biginne upon my tale, for whiche I preye
12

Parson's Prologue: 54

[continues previous] Telle your avys, I can no bettre seye.
12

Parlement of Foules: 326

[continues previous] As worm, or thing of whiche I telle no tale;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 200

'For ther have ye a layser for to telle.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 201

Quod Troilus, 'how longe shal I dwelle [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 334

Longe erst er pryme rong of any belle,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1615

He rong hem out a proces lyk a belle, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 201

[continues previous] Quod Troilus, 'how longe shal I dwelle
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 202

[continues previous] Er this be doon?' Quod he, 'whan thou mayst ryse,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 335

Were set hem in a taverne for to drinke;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1615

[continues previous] He rong hem out a proces lyk a belle,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 338

That oon of hem gan callen to his knave,
11

Miller's Tale: 245

Go up,' quod he un-to his knave anoon, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 339

'Go bet,' quod he, 'and axe redily,
11

Miller's Tale: 245

[continues previous] Go up,' quod he un-to his knave anoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 278

'Yes, yes,' quod he, 'and bet wole er I go;
14

Pardoner's Tale: 347

Ther cam a privee theef, men clepeth Deeth,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 425

Thou spak right now of thilke traitour Deeth, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 348

That in this contree al the peple sleeth,
10

Knight's Tale: 146

And dide with al the contree as him leste. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 426

[continues previous] That in this contree alle our frendes sleeth.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 349

And with his spere he smoot his herte a-two,
10

Knight's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Stille in that feeld he took al night his reste,
10

Knight's Tale: 146

[continues previous] And dide with al the contree as him leste.
13

Miller's Tale: 634

And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 635

And doun goth al; he fond neither to selle, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 159

Him thoughte his sorweful herte brast a-two; [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 160

His bowe he bente, and sette ther-inne a flo, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1728

That through myn eye unto myn herte [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1729

The takel smoot, and depe it wente. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 350

And wente his wey with-outen wordes mo.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 810

Tel me anon, with-outen wordes mo,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 811

And I wol erly shape me therfore.'
13

Miller's Tale: 222

And right anon, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 464

With-outen wordes mo, they goon to bedde
14

Miller's Tale: 633

[continues previous] He sit him up with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 634

[continues previous] And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 635

[continues previous] And doun goth al; he fond neither to selle, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 504

And wente his wey, ther god yeve him meschance!
12

Franklin's Prologue: 30

'Telle on thy tale with-outen wordes mo.' [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 544

And wente his wey, no lenger dorste he calle.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 702

'Of quik-silver, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 703

And do ther-with as ye han doon er this
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 743

He wente his wey, and with the coper cam,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 828

He wente his wey and never the preest him sy
11

Manciple's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Him thoughte his sorweful herte brast a-two;
11

Manciple's Tale: 160

[continues previous] His bowe he bente, and sette ther-inne a flo,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 191

And wente his wey, whan he had sayd.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 641

And forth, withoute wordes mo,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 642

In at the wiket wente I tho,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1729

[continues previous] The takel smoot, and depe it wente.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4666

And wente his wey, I niste where,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1062

And wente his wey, thenking on this matere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1405

To telle in short, with-outen wordes mo,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 234

To telle in short, with-oute wordes mo, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 235

This Pandarus, with-outen any lette, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 500

With-outen wordes mo, I wol be deed.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 764

For which, with-outen any wordes mo,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 351

He hath a thousand slayn this pestilence:
13

Miller's Tale: 223

[continues previous] This Nicholas no lenger wolde tarie,
12

Miller's Tale: 633

[continues previous] He sit him up with-outen wordes mo,
14

Miller's Tale: 634

[continues previous] And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] 'Gladly, sir host,' quod he, 'I wol obeye
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 701

[continues previous] Lat take another ounce,' quod he tho,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 235

[continues previous] This Pandarus, with-outen any lette,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 352

And, maister, er ye come in his presence,
11

Franklin's Tale: 895

Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 353

Me thinketh that it were necessarie
11

Franklin's Tale: 894

[continues previous] Which was the moste free, as thinketh yow?
11

Franklin's Tale: 895

[continues previous] Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 308

Me thinketh that it were a wonder dede.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 355

Beth redy for to mete him evermore.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4985

And Youthe is redy evermore
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4986

For to obey, for smerte of sore,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 356

Thus taughte me my dame, I sey na-more.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 575

I bar him on honde, he hadde enchanted me;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 576

My dame taughte me that soutiltee.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 577

And eek I seyde, I mette of him al night;
11

Friar's Tale: 307

So wisly help me out of care and sinne, [continues next]
11

Physician's Epilogue: 23

So mot I theen, thou art a propre man, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 74

What eyleth this love at me [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 213

But nathelees, thus taughte me my dame:
15+

Manciple's Tale: 214

'My sone, thenk on the crowe, a goddes name;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4787

Dame,' seyde I, 'I dar wel sey [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 357

'By seinte Marie,' seyde this taverner,
11

Friar's Tale: 306

[continues previous] 'Twelf pens,' quod she, 'now lady Seinte Marie
10

Merchant's Tale: 93

A wyf! a! Seinte Marie, benedicite!
14

Merchant's Tale: 654

Remembred him upon this Damian,
14

Merchant's Tale: 655

And seyde, 'Seinte Marie! how may this be,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1174

God bless us and his moder Seinte Marie!
11

Physician's Epilogue: 22

[continues previous] God blesse hem, and our lady seinte Marie!
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 73

[continues previous] 'O seinte Marie, benedicite!
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 74

[continues previous] What eyleth this love at me
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4787

[continues previous] Dame,' seyde I, 'I dar wel sey
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4788

[continues previous] Of this avaunt me wel I may
12

Pardoner's Tale: 363

Er that he dide a man a dishonour.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 834

A frere wol entremette him ever-mo. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 617

And so he dide, er that they wente a-twinne;
12

Parson's Tale: 70

... his wit. The thridde spece of Glotonye is, whan a man devoureth his mete, and hath no rightful manere of etinge. The fourthe is whan, thurgh the grete habundaunce of his mete, the humours in his body been destempred. The fifthe is, foryetelnesse by to muchel drinkinge; for which somtyme a man foryeteth er the morwe what he dide at even or on the night biforn.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 364

'Ye, goddes armes,' quod this ryotour,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 833

[continues previous] 'Lo!' quod the Somnour, 'goddes armes two!
10

Pardoner's Tale: 365

'Is it swich peril with him for to mete?
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5611

Though he have nought, his mete to by, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 366

I shal him seke by wey and eek by strete,
11

Knight's Tale: 1556

And eek to this avow I wol me binde: [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 235

Yeven by goddes message Makomete. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5611

[continues previous] Though he have nought, his mete to by,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5612

[continues previous] He shal bithinke him hastely,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 367

I make avow to goddes digne bones!
11

Knight's Tale: 1556

[continues previous] And eek to this avow I wol me binde:
10

Man of Law's Tale: 235

[continues previous] Yeven by goddes message Makomete.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 236

[continues previous] But oon avow to grete god I hete,
13

Shipman's Prologue: 13

Abydeth, for goddes digne passioun, [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 368

Herkneth, felawes, we three been al ones;
13

Shipman's Prologue: 12

[continues previous] 'How! good men,' quod our hoste, 'herkneth me;
13

Shipman's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] For we shal han a predicacioun;
10

Parlement of Foules: 607

Lat ech of hem be soleyn al hir lyve, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 369

Lat ech of us holde up his hond til other,
14

Knight's Tale: 274

Y-sworn ful depe, and ech of us til other, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1875

The gree as wel of o syde as of other, [continues next]
14

Friar's Tale: 230

As I am sworn, and ech of us til other [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 1012

We wil medle us ech with other, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 607

[continues previous] Lat ech of hem be soleyn al hir lyve,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 370

And ech of us bicomen otheres brother,
14

Knight's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Y-sworn ful depe, and ech of us til other, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1875

[continues previous] The gree as wel of o syde as of other, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1876

[continues previous] And either syde y-lyk, as otheres brother; [continues next]
14

Friar's Tale: 230

[continues previous] As I am sworn, and ech of us til other [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 148

And ech of hem at otheres sinne lough.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 1011

[continues previous] But be thyn owne sworen brother!
10

Hous of Fame 3: 1012

[continues previous] We wil medle us ech with other,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 950

And ech of yow ese otheres sorwes smerte, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 371

And we wol sleen this false traytour Deeth;
10

Knight's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Y-sworn ful depe, and ech of us til other,
10

Knight's Tale: 1876

[continues previous] And either syde y-lyk, as otheres brother;
10

Friar's Tale: 230

[continues previous] As I am sworn, and ech of us til other
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 950

[continues previous] And ech of yow ese otheres sorwes smerte,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 372

He shal be slayn, which that so many sleeth,
12

Reeve's Tale: 351

Who dorste be so bold to disparage [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 373

By goddes dignitee, er it be night.'
12

Reeve's Tale: 350

[continues previous] 'Thou shalt be deed, by goddes dignitee!
12

Reeve's Tale: 351

[continues previous] Who dorste be so bold to disparage
11

Shipman's Prologue: 7

Can moche good, by goddes dignitee!'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 428

To sende him drogges and his letuaries,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

For ech of hem made other for to winne;
10

Knight's Tale: 793

Everich of hem halp for to armen other, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 209

Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other
12

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
12

Merchant's Tale: 447

For whan they sawe it moste nedes be,
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure
11

Shipman's Tale: 142

And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste.
11

Monk's Tale: 287

They lived in Ioye and in felicitee;
11

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 15

is lakkinge to other, they ne han no power to bringen a good that [continues next]
10

Former Age: 52

But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce;
11

Parlement of Foules: 670

For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1618

Answerde of this ech worse of hem than other,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1619

And Poliphete they gonnen thus to warien,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 376

As though he were his owene y-boren brother.
10

Knight's Tale: 794

[continues previous] As freendly as he were his owne brother;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

[continues previous] they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 51

As though I were hir owene brother dere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 340

Ye, though he love hir as his owene lyf;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 382

'Deeth shal be deed, if that they may him hente.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1371

With-oute net, wher-with I shal him hente;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1372

And herkeneth how, if that ye wole assente.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 383

Whan they han goon nat fully half a myle,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 538

Than thou wolt goon a paas nat but a myle;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 384

Right as they wolde han troden over a style,
10

Monk's Tale: 103

Of swich thing as they wolde han secree fayn,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 385

An old man and a povre with hem mette.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 461

And in hir walk this blinde man they mette [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 462

Croked and old, with yën faste y-shette. [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 848

For out of doute this olde povre man [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 445

A yong clerk rominge by him-self they mette, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 446

Which that in Latin thriftily hem grette, [continues next]
13

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 117

And in his wey the messagere hem mette. [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 136

Anon-right as they with this lady mette; [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 7428

That beren hem ful mekely, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 7429

And humblely they with him mette. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 386

This olde man ful mekely hem grette,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 461

[continues previous] And in hir walk this blinde man they mette
12

Clerk's Tale: 246

He by the hond than took this olde man, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 848

[continues previous] For out of doute this olde povre man
11

Franklin's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Which that in Latin thriftily hem grette, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 439

And yow amende!' — thus seyde this olde man. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 53

And Eneas and Achates she grette, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 54

And thus she to hem spak, whan she hem mette. [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 135

[continues previous] How that the quene hit was, and faire her grette
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1588

And Troilus ful sobrely he grette, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 387

And seyde thus, 'now, lordes, god yow see!'
12

Clerk's Tale: 247

[continues previous] And seyde thus, whan he him hadde asyde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 447

[continues previous] And after that he seyde a wonder thing:
12

Pardoner's Tale: 439

[continues previous] And yow amende!' — thus seyde this olde man. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 440

[continues previous] And everich of thise ryotoures ran, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 446

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 447

Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 456

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 457

Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 54

[continues previous] And thus she to hem spak, whan she hem mette.
13

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 118

[continues previous] Ful cunningly thise lordes two he grette,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 119

[continues previous] And dide his message, axing hem anoon
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 137

[continues previous] And she took heed, and knew, by hir manere,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 7429

[continues previous] And humblely they with him mette.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1587

[continues previous] He com anoon, nought ones seyde he 'nay,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1588

[continues previous] And Troilus ful sobrely he grette,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 388

The proudest of thise ryotoures three
13

Pardoner's Tale: 333

Thise ryotoures three, of whiche I telle,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 440

[continues previous] And everich of thise ryotoures ran,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 446

[continues previous] And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 456

[continues previous] And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above
13

Pardoner's Tale: 390

Why artow al forwrapped save thy face?
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 111

Why artow so discoloured of thy face?' [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 391

Why livestow so longe in so greet age?'
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 111

[continues previous] Why artow so discoloured of thy face?'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 3: 18

Have I nat striven with ful greet stryf, in olde tyme, bifore the [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 3: 19

age of my Plato, ayeines the foolhardinesse of folye? And eek, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 392

This olde man gan loke in his visage,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 3: 18

[continues previous] Have I nat striven with ful greet stryf, in olde tyme, bifore the
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 294

She mighte loke in no visage
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 295

Of man or womman forth-right pleyn,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 393

And seyde thus, 'for I ne can nat finde
11

Franklin's Tale: 159

Though I ne can the causes nat y-knowe. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 121

Seyde he nat thus, ne do no fors of dremes? [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 236

Though I ne can nat sette hem in hir kinde; [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 138

Thanne seyde she thus: 'I ne scorne thee nat, ne pleye, ne
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 302

That in this world I trow men shal nat finde [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 19

Can I nat finde; and [fro] my sorwful herte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 916

That he yow nat biwopen thus ne finde,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 394

A man, though that I walked in-to Inde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Though I ne can the causes nat y-knowe.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 120

[continues previous] Lo Catoun, which that was so wys a man,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 236

[continues previous] Though I ne can nat sette hem in hir kinde;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 302

[continues previous] That in this world I trow men shal nat finde
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 303

[continues previous] A man that coude be so trewe and kinde,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 396

That wolde chaunge his youthe for myn age;
11

Knight's Tale: 2171

This is to seyn, in youthe or elles age, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 535

And took his herte in chaunge for myn for ay. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 397

And therfore moot I han myn age stille,
11

Knight's Tale: 2172

[continues previous] He moot ben deed, the king as shal a page;
11

Clerk's Tale: 65

In crepeth age alwey, as stille as stoon, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 535

[continues previous] And took his herte in chaunge for myn for ay.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 23

Til they comen to him ther he lay stille [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 723

But longe he lay as stille as he ded were; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 398

As longe time as it is goddes wille.
11

Clerk's Tale: 65

[continues previous] In crepeth age alwey, as stille as stoon,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 24

[continues previous] On his deth-bedde to abyde goddes wille.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 723

[continues previous] But longe he lay as stille as he ded were;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 399

Ne deeth, allas! ne wol nat han my lyf;
11

Knight's Tale: 1447

Desire to been a mayden al my lyf, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1448

Ne never wol I be no love ne wyf. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 920

Ne wol nat that the philosophres nevene [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 12

... thise foure thinges sholde have lordshipe over that other; as thus: god sholde have lordshipe over reson, and reson over sensualitee, and sensualitee over the body of man. But sothly, whan man sinneth, al this ordre or ordinance is turned up-so-doun. And therfore thanne, for-as-muche as the reson of man ne wol nat be subget ne obeisant to god, that is his lord by right, therfore leseth it the lordshipe that it sholde have over sensualitee, and eek over the body of man. And why? For sensualitee rebelleth thanne agayns reson; and by that wey leseth reson the lordshipe over sensualitee and over the body. For ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 4: 4

yif ye axen the deeth, it hasteth him of his owne wil; ne deeth
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 4: 5

ne tarieth nat his swifte hors. And the men that the serpent and
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1298

That shal ye finden in me al my lyf, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1299

Ne I wol not, certeyn, breken your defence; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 916

That he yow nat biwopen thus ne finde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 917

But ye wol han him wood out of his minde! [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 400

Thus walke I, lyk a restelees caityf,
11

Knight's Tale: 1448

[continues previous] Ne never wol I be no love ne wyf.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 919

[continues previous] Thanne conclude I thus; sith god of hevene
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1299

[continues previous] Ne I wol not, certeyn, breken your defence;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 916

[continues previous] That he yow nat biwopen thus ne finde,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 402

I knokke with my staf, bothe erly and late,
14

Cook's Tale: 37

Al were he snibbed bothe erly and late, [continues next]
14

Cook's Tale: 38

And somtyme lad with revel to Newgate; [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 403

And seye, "leve moder, leet me in!
14

Cook's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Al were he snibbed bothe erly and late,
14

Cook's Tale: 38

[continues previous] And somtyme lad with revel to Newgate;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 407

That in my chambre longe tyme hath be,
11

Merchant's Tale: 644

So longe hath Maius in hir chambre biden,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 410

For which ful pale and welked is my face.
11

Clerk's Tale: 284

For which she loked with ful pale face. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 411

But, sirs, to yow it is no curteisye
11

Clerk's Tale: 285

[continues previous] But shortly forth this tale for to chace,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 413

But he trespasse in worde, or elles in dede.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 741

Crist spak him-self ful brode in holy writ, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1037

Or til hir folk, in worde or dede, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1038

He were ful hardy, out of drede; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3505

And helpe in worde and in dede, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3572

Ye may not winnen in this dede. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 414

In holy writ ye may your-self wel rede,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 741

[continues previous] Crist spak him-self ful brode in holy writ,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 742

[continues previous] And wel ye woot, no vileinye is it.
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1037

[continues previous] Or til hir folk, in worde or dede,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3505

[continues previous] And helpe in worde and in dede,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3571

[continues previous] Voideth from him your ire, I rede;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3572

[continues previous] Ye may not winnen in this dede.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 415

"Agayns an old man, hoor upon his heed,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 784

But ye be merye, I wol yeve yow myn heed. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 416

Ye sholde aryse;" wherfor I yeve yow reed,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 784

[continues previous] But ye be merye, I wol yeve yow myn heed.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 420

And god be with yow, wher ye go or ryde.
11

Knight's Tale: 493

That other wher him list may ryde or go, [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1394

And on thyn auter, wher I ryde or go, [continues next]
13

Reeve's Tale: 318

But evermo, wher so I go or ryde, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 167

Or lyk an angel can I ryde or go. [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 234

Thomas! Thomas! so mote I ryde or go, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 306

Wher be ye, that I may nat with yow mete, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1326

Ye speke not with me, nor I with yow [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1327

In fourtenight; ne see yow go ne ryde. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1328

May ye not ten dayes thanne abyde, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 421

I moot go thider as I have to go.'
11

Knight's Tale: 493

[continues previous] That other wher him list may ryde or go,
14

Knight's Tale: 1394

[continues previous] And on thyn auter, wher I ryde or go,
13

Knight's Tale: 1395

[continues previous] I wol don sacrifice, and fyres bete.
13

Reeve's Tale: 318

[continues previous] But evermo, wher so I go or ryde,
13

Reeve's Tale: 319

[continues previous] I is thyn awen clerk, swa have I seel!'
10

Friar's Tale: 167

[continues previous] Or lyk an angel can I ryde or go.
10

Summoner's Tale: 234

[continues previous] Thomas! Thomas! so mote I ryde or go,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 306

[continues previous] Wher be ye, that I may nat with yow mete,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1327

[continues previous] In fourtenight; ne see yow go ne ryde.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 423

Seyde this other hasardour anon;
11

Summoner's Tale: 91

Seyde this man, 'and she wol come anon.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 424

'Thou partest nat so lightly, by seint Iohn!
11

Reeve's Tale: 179

They gete him nat so lightly, by my croun!'
11

Reeve's Tale: 207

'Now, Symond,' seyde Iohn, 'by seint Cutberd, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 208

Ay is thou mery, and this is faire answerd. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 164

'Now dame,' quod he, 'by god and by seint Iohn,
11

Summoner's Tale: 92

[continues previous] 'Ey, maister! wel-come be ye, by seint Iohn!'
11

Summoner's Tale: 544

A goune-cloth, by god and by Seint Iohn!'
14

Pardoner's Tale: 425

Thou spak right now of thilke traitour Deeth,
11

Reeve's Tale: 208

[continues previous] Ay is thou mery, and this is faire answerd.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 347

Ther cam a privee theef, men clepeth Deeth, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 180

And deeth and povert to my frendes alle; [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 426

That in this contree alle our frendes sleeth.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 348

[continues previous] That in this contree al the peple sleeth,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 180

[continues previous] And deeth and povert to my frendes alle;
11

Legend of Ariadne: 181

[continues previous] And that my spirit by nighte mote go
11

Pardoner's Tale: 427

Have heer my trouthe, as thou art his aspye,
11

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 270

Have heer my trouthe in al that ever I can.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 428

Tel wher he is, or thou shalt it abye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 141

For if thou do, thou shalt it dere abye;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 142

Thou sclaundrest me heer in this companye,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 430

For soothly thou art oon of his assent,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... lond, covered with the derknesse of deeth; to the lond of misese and of derknesse, where-as is the shadwe of deeth; where-as ther is noon ordre or ordinance, but grisly drede that evere shal laste.' Lo, here may ye seen that Iob preyde respyt a whyle, to biwepe and waille his trespas; for soothly oon day of respyt is bettre than al the tresor of the world. And for-as-muche as a man may acquiten him-self biforn god by penitence in this world, and nat by tresor, therfore sholde he preye to god to yeve him respyt a whyle, to biwepe and biwaillen his trespas. For certes, al ...
10

Pardoner's Tale: 431

To sleen us yonge folk, thou false theef!'
10

Friar's Tale: 40

This false theef, this Somnour, quod the Frere, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 432

'Now, sirs,' quod he, 'if that yow be so leef
10

Friar's Tale: 40

[continues previous] This false theef, this Somnour, quod the Frere,
12

Parlement of Foules: 541

Nay, sirs!' quod he, 'if that I dorste it seye,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 435

Under a tree, and ther he wol abyde;
10

Miller's Prologue: 24

'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I; [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 25

For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.' [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1035

Ioye of this world, for tyme wol nat abyde; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 166

And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde, [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 436

Nat for your boost he wol him no-thing hyde.
10

Miller's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] 'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I;
10

Miller's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.'
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1035

[continues previous] Ioye of this world, for tyme wol nat abyde;
13

Merchant's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde;
13

Merchant's Tale: 166

[continues previous] And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
12

Squire's Tale: 141

So openly, that ther shal no-thing hyde. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 437

See ye that ook? right ther ye shul him finde.
12

Squire's Tale: 141

[continues previous] So openly, that ther shal no-thing hyde.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 608

For quik or deed, right ther ye shul me finde; [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 3: 482

'In Trace ther ye shul him finde,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 483

And bid him bringe his clarioun,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 96

Yit, for al this, [now] witeth ye right wele,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 97

That ye ne shul me from your service dryve
12

Compleint to His Lady: 116

That, ther ever ye finde, whyl ye live, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 438

God save yow, that boghte agayn mankinde,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 609

[continues previous] In yow lyth al, to do me live or deye; —
12

Compleint to His Lady: 115

[continues previous] And this I wol beseche yow hertely,
12

Compleint to His Lady: 116

[continues previous] That, ther ever ye finde, whyl ye live,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 439

And yow amende!' — thus seyde this olde man.
14

Clerk's Tale: 246

He by the hond than took this olde man, [continues next]
14

Clerk's Tale: 247

And seyde thus, whan he him hadde asyde, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 22

Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 386

This olde man ful mekely hem grette, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 387

And seyde thus, 'now, lordes, god yow see!' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 211

Whan this was rad, than seyde this olde man,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 440

And everich of thise ryotoures ran,
10

Knight's Tale: 124

And in his host of chivalrye the flour, [continues next]
14

Clerk's Tale: 247

[continues previous] And seyde thus, whan he him hadde asyde,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 387

[continues previous] And seyde thus, 'now, lordes, god yow see!'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 388

[continues previous] The proudest of thise ryotoures three
13

Pardoner's Tale: 441

Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde
12

Knight's Tale: 125

[continues previous] Til that he cam to Thebes, and alighte
11

Miller's Tale: 170

Til he cam to the carpenteres hous
11

Miller's Tale: 636

Ne breed ne ale, til he cam to the celle
11

Summoner's Tale: 57

So longe he wente hous by hous, til he
11

Summoner's Tale: 58

Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be
11

Squire's Tale: 269

Til he cam to his chambre of parements,
11

Squire's Tale: 270

Ther as they sownen diverse instruments,
13

Squire's Tale: 605

And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste.
13

Squire's Tale: 606

Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste,
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 96

Til that ther cam a greet geaunt,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 444

No lenger thanne after Deeth they soughte,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 219

I governed hem so wel, after my lawe, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5497

And yit they wol not leve hem so, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5498

But in ech place where they go [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 445

But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 39

Of ech of hem, so as it semed me,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 219

[continues previous] I governed hem so wel, after my lawe,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 220

[continues previous] That ech of hem ful blisful was and fawe
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... of atyr likerousnesse and pryde. I sey nat that honestetee in clothinge of man or womman is uncovenable, but certes the superfluitee or disordinat scantitee of clothinge is reprevable. Also the sinne of aornement or of apparaille is in thinges that apertenen to rydinge, as in to manye delicat horses that been holden for delyt, that been so faire, fatte, and costlewe; and also to many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; in to curious harneys, as in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith ... [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature.
14

Legend of Dido: 300

That ech of hem was glad a-wey to flee.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5497

[continues previous] And yit they wol not leve hem so,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5498

[continues previous] But in ech place where they go
13

Pardoner's Tale: 446

For that the florins been so faire and brighte,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 511

The beautee of thise florins newe and brighte. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... of atyr likerousnesse and pryde. I sey nat that honestetee in clothinge of man or womman is uncovenable, but certes the superfluitee or disordinat scantitee of clothinge is reprevable. Also the sinne of aornement or of apparaille is in thinges that apertenen to rydinge, as in to manye delicat horses that been holden for delyt, that been so faire, fatte, and costlewe; and also to many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; in to curious harneys, as in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith by Zakarie the prophete, 'I ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 855

Bothe were they faire and brighte of hewe; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1184

Tho wesshen they, and sette hem doun and ete; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1185

And after noon ful sleyly Pandarus [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 686

They sette hem doun, and seyde as I shal telle. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 447

That doun they sette hem by this precious hord.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 510

[continues previous] Ful ofte in herte he rolleth up and doun
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 854

[continues previous] Gret love was atwixe hem two.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 855

[continues previous] Bothe were they faire and brighte of hewe;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1184

[continues previous] Tho wesshen they, and sette hem doun and ete;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 685

[continues previous] These wommen, whiche that in the cite dwelle, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 686

[continues previous] They sette hem doun, and seyde as I shal telle. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 448

The worste of hem he spake the firste word.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 685

[continues previous] These wommen, whiche that in the cite dwelle,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 449

'Brethren,' quod he, 'tak kepe what I seye;
11

Summoner's Tale: 193

Lest that they deyden; tak heed what I seye.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 24

"Good men," seye I, "tak of my wordes kepe; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 32

Drinketh a draughte; tak kepe eek what I telle.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
11

Manciple's Tale: 206

Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye:
10

Envoy to Bukton: 26

I sende you, tak kepe of hit, I rede: [continues next]
10

Envoy to Bukton: 27

Unwys is he that can no wele endure. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 121

I noot nought what ye wilne that I seye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 122

'I? what?' quod he, 'that ye han on him routhe,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 450

My wit is greet, though that I bourde and pleye.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 24

[continues previous] "Good men," seye I, "tak of my wordes kepe;
10

Envoy to Bukton: 27

[continues previous] Unwys is he that can no wele endure.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 451

This tresor hath fortune un-to us yiven,
10

Physician's Tale: 205

Moste by force his dere doghter yiven [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 452

In mirthe and Iolitee our lyf to liven,
10

Physician's Tale: 206

[continues previous] Un-to the Iuge, in lecherye to liven,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 616

That liven in lust and Iolitee. [continues next]
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 617

And now is Mirthe therin, to here [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 453

And lightly as it comth, so wol we spende.
12

Reeve's Tale: 351

Who dorste be so bold to disparage [continues next]
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 616

[continues previous] That liven in lust and Iolitee.
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 617

[continues previous] And now is Mirthe therin, to here
12

Pardoner's Tale: 454

Ey! goddes precious dignitee! who wende
12

Reeve's Tale: 350

[continues previous] 'Thou shalt be deed, by goddes dignitee!
12

Reeve's Tale: 351

[continues previous] Who dorste be so bold to disparage
14

Pardoner's Tale: 455

To-day, that we sholde han so fair a grace?
11

Knight's Tale: 1016

Whan Theseus hath doon so fair a grace? [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 171

Wol peynen him to stonden in your grace. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 172

But mighte me so fair a grace falle, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 456

But mighte this gold be caried fro this place
11

Knight's Tale: 1017

[continues previous] But doun on knees wente every maner wight,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 172

[continues previous] But mighte me so fair a grace falle,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 457

Hoom to myn hous, or elles un-to youres —
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 199

In which that they were bounden un-to me. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 245

If that I walke or pleye un-to his hous!
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 246

Thou comest hoom as dronken as a mous,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 96

Hoom to myn hous ful swiftly I me spedde;
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 200

Hoom to myn hous ful swiftly I me spedde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 688

Mistrusten alle, or elles alle leve; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 458

For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures —
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 199

[continues previous] In which that they were bounden un-to me.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

[continues previous] Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee!
11

Merchant's Tale: 1099

(For wel I woot that ye mistruste me)
10

Shipman's Tale: 173

And wel ye woot that wommen naturelly
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... doth a derk cloude bitwixe us and the sonne. 'Lond of misese': by-cause that ther been three maneres of defautes, agayn three thinges that folk of this world han in this present lyf, that is to seyn, honours, delyces, and richesses. Agayns honour, have they in helle shame and confusion. For wel ye woot that men clepen 'honour' the reverence that man doth to man; but in helle is noon honour ne reverence. For certes, na-more reverence shal be doon there to a king than to a knave. For which god seith by the prophete Ieremye: 'thilke folk that me despysen shul been in despyt.' ...
12

Legend of Dido: 436

For wel I woot that it is al in vain,
11

Against Women Unconstaunt: 19

If ye lese oon, ye can wel tweyn purchace;
11

Against Women Unconstaunt: 20

Al light for somer, ye woot wel what I mene,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 689

[continues previous] But wel I woot, the mene of it no vyce is,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 778

Now wherby that I telle yow al this?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 779

Ye woot your-self, as wel as any wight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 459

Than were we in heigh felicitee.
11

Knight's Tale: 408

We seken faste after felicitee, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 409

But we goon wrong ful often, trewely. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 460

But trewely, by daye it may nat be;
11

Knight's Tale: 409

[continues previous] But we goon wrong ful often, trewely.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 465

Wherfore I rede that cut among us alle
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6946

That ther be oon among us alle [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6947

That doth a good turn, out of drede, [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 466

Be drawe, and lat se wher the cut wol falle;
10

Friar's Tale: 300

'Yis,' quod this Somnour, 'pay anon, lat se, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 301

Twelf pens to me, and I wol thee acquyte. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 475

And bad hem drawe, and loke wher it wol falle; [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 476

And it fil on the yongeste of hem alle; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6946

[continues previous] That ther be oon among us alle
11

Pardoner's Tale: 467

And he that hath the cut with herte blythe
10

Knight's Tale: 1020

And thus with good hope and with herte blythe
10

Friar's Tale: 301

[continues previous] Twelf pens to me, and I wol thee acquyte.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 475

[continues previous] And bad hem drawe, and loke wher it wol falle;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 476

[continues previous] And it fil on the yongeste of hem alle;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 469

And bringe us breed and wyn ful prively.
11

Legend of Thisbe: 91

At night she stal awey ful prively [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 470

And two of us shul kepen subtilly
11

Pardoner's Tale: 497

And two of us shul strenger be than oon. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 20

... thanne, if that a man withstonde and weyve the firste entysinge of his flesh and of the feend, thanne is it no sinne; and if it so be that he do nat so, thanne feleth he anon a flambe of delyt. And thanne is it good to be war, and kepen him wel, or elles he wol falle anon in-to consentinge of sinne; and thanne wol he do it, if he may have tyme and place. And of this matere seith Moyses by the devel in this manere: 'the feend seith, I wole chace and pursue the man by wikked suggestion, ... [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 92

[continues previous] With her face y-wimpled subtilly;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 471

This tresor wel; and, if he wol nat tarie,
11

Physician's Tale: 168

And if that he wol seyn it is nat thus, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 496

[continues previous] 'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye,
11

Parson's Tale: 20

[continues previous] ... And thanne, if that a man withstonde and weyve the firste entysinge of his flesh and of the feend, thanne is it no sinne; and if it so be that he do nat so, thanne feleth he anon a flambe of delyt. And thanne is it good to be war, and kepen him wel, or elles he wol falle anon in-to consentinge of sinne; and thanne wol he do it, if he may have tyme and place. And of this matere seith Moyses by the devel in this manere: 'the feend seith, I wole chace and pursue the man by wikked suggestion, and I wole hente him by ...
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 247

For, who-so wol this aventure acheve,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 248

He may nat wel asterten, as I leve,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 472

Whan it is night, we wol this tresor carie
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 820

We been acorded to his Iugement. [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 168

[continues previous] And if that he wol seyn it is nat thus,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 473

By oon assent, wher-as us thinketh best.'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 779

And if yow lyketh alle, by oon assent,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 819

[continues previous] In heigh and lowe; and thus, by oon assent,
10

Summoner's Tale: 554

Than shal they knele doun, by oon assent, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 557

They seyden sothly, al by oon assent,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 346

And how ful graunted was, by oon assent, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 474

That oon of hem the cut broughte in his fest,
10

Summoner's Tale: 554

[continues previous] Than shal they knele doun, by oon assent,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 346

[continues previous] And how ful graunted was, by oon assent,
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 475

And bad hem drawe, and loke wher it wol falle;
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 466

Be drawe, and lat se wher the cut wol falle; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 467

And he that hath the cut with herte blythe [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 94

For he two pilers shook, and made hem falle, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6520

And therfore I wol drawe hem ner. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

[continues previous] But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 476

And it fil on the yongeste of hem alle;
14

Pardoner's Tale: 466

[continues previous] Be drawe, and lat se wher the cut wol falle;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And he that hath the cut with herte blythe
11

Monk's Tale: 94

[continues previous] For he two pilers shook, and made hem falle,
11

Monk's Tale: 95

[continues previous] And doun fil temple and al, and ther it lay,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6520

[continues previous] And therfore I wol drawe hem ner.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7343

They wente hem forth, alle in a route, [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 477

And forth toward the toun he wente anon.
11

Summoner's Tale: 145

Sone after that ye wente out of this toun.' [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 118

This mayde up-on a day wente in the toun
11

Physician's Tale: 119

Toward a temple, with hir moder dere,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 211

As sone as day he wente out of the toun.' [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7342

[continues previous] Whan they were armed, fers and fel,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7343

[continues previous] They wente hem forth, alle in a route,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 478

And al-so sone as that he was gon,
11

Summoner's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Sone after that ye wente out of this toun.'
12

Pardoner's Tale: 554

And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 293

And al-so sone as that she mighte espye [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 175

And took his logging as it wolde falle. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 176

That oon of hem was logged in a stalle, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 211

[continues previous] As sone as day he wente out of the toun.'
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 923

Turke bowes two hadde he. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 924

That oon of hem was of a tree [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1121

The stoon so cleer was and so bright, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1122

That, al-so sone as it was night, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1424

Ful pitously she wroot ayein, and seyde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1425

That al-so sone as that she might, y-wis, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 479

That oon of hem spak thus un-to that other,
11

Summoner's Tale: 313

That oon of hem cam hoom, that other noght.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 554

[continues previous] And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon,
10

Melibee's Tale: 10

'Sir,' quod he, 'as to us surgiens aperteneth, that we do to every wight the beste that we can, wher-as we been with-holde, and to our pacients that we do no damage; wherfore it happeth, many tyme and ofte, that whan twey men han everich wounded other, oon same surgien heleth hem bothe; wherefore un-to our art it is nat pertinent to norice werre, ne parties to supporte. But certes, as to the warisshinge of your doghter, al-be-it so that she perilously be wounded, we shullen do so ententif bisinesse fro day to night, that with the grace of god she shal be hool and ...
11

Monk's Tale: 293

[continues previous] And al-so sone as that she mighte espye
11

Monk's Tale: 294

[continues previous] That she was nat with childe with that dede,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 176

[continues previous] That oon of hem was logged in a stalle,
10

Parson's Tale: 33

... man y-quiked in his herte, thurgh which he wole harm to him that he hateth. For certes the herte of man, by eschaufinge and moevinge of his blood, wexeth so trouble, that he is out of alle Iugement of resoun. But ye shal understonde that Ire is in two maneres; that oon of hem is good, and that other is wikked. The gode Ire is by Ialousye of goodnesse, thurgh which a man is wrooth with wikkednesse and agayns wikkednesse; and therfore seith a wys man, that 'Ire is bet than pley.' This Ire is with debonairetee, and it is wrooth withouten bitternesse; nat wrooth agayns the man, but ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 924

[continues previous] That oon of hem was of a tree
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1122

[continues previous] That, al-so sone as it was night,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1425

[continues previous] That al-so sone as that she might, y-wis,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 480

'Thou knowest wel thou art my sworne brother,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 508

Quod Love, 'and that thou knowest wel, pardee,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 481

Thy profit wol I telle thee anon.
11

Knight's Tale: 315

To stonden in hir grace; namore shal I; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 317

That thou and I be dampned to prisoun [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 308

Of certeyn thing that toucheth me and thee;
10

Miller's Tale: 309

I wol telle it non other man, certeyn.'
12

Reeve's Tale: 321

But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 320

And forther over, I wol thee telle al plat,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 185

Anon I wol yow telle.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 209

The hostiler answered him anon, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

Al that I can anon now wol I telle. [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 189

'I wol thee quyte anon thy false tale! [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 93

I wol thee telle what I am,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 552

'But er I go, thus muche I wol thee telle,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4989

'Where Elde abit, I wol thee telle
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5187

That I [thee] for thy profit say.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5188

Yit wol I sey thee more, in fay;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 482

Thou woost wel that our felawe is agon;
12

Knight's Tale: 316

[continues previous] For wel thou woost thy-selven, verraily, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 317

[continues previous] That thou and I be dampned to prisoun [continues next]
12

Reeve's Tale: 322

[continues previous] Whan that thou wendest homward by the melle,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 496

'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 210

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sire, your felawe is agon, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

[continues previous] Al that I can anon now wol I telle.
11

Manciple's Prologue: 7

That wol awake our felawe heer bihinde? [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 190

[continues previous] Thou songe whylom lyk a nightingale;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 483

And heer is gold, and that ful greet plentee,
10

Knight's Tale: 317

[continues previous] That thou and I be dampned to prisoun
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 210

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sire, your felawe is agon,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 7

[continues previous] That wol awake our felawe heer bihinde?
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1401

Ther mighte men does and roes y-see,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1402

And of squirels ful greet plentee,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 490

What shal we doon, what shal we to him seye?'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 493

What we shal doon, and bringe it wel aboute.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 757

What shal I doon? to what fyn live I thus?
12

Pardoner's Tale: 491

'Shal it be conseil?' seyde the firste shrewe,
12

Friar's Tale: 126

'Now, by my trouthe, brother dere,' seyde he, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 493

[continues previous] What we shal doon, and bringe it wel aboute.'
13

Pardoner's Tale: 492

'And I shal tellen thee, in wordes fewe,
12

Friar's Tale: 127

[continues previous] 'As I shal tellen thee a feithful tale,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 16

And in Latyn I speke a wordes fewe,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1280

By alle right, and in a wordes fewe, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1281

I shal yow wel an heep of weyes shewe. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 493

What we shal doon, and bringe it wel aboute.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 490

What shal we doon, what shal we to him seye?'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 491

'Shal it be conseil?' seyde the firste shrewe,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 102

'I graunte wel,' quod I; 'ne no sother thing ne may ben [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 490

'I graunte wel,' quod Pandare, 'by my trouthe. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1275

Now that I shal wel bringen it aboute [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1280

[continues previous] By alle right, and in a wordes fewe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1281

[continues previous] I shal yow wel an heep of weyes shewe.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 494

'I graunte,' quod that other, 'out of doute,
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 31

[continues previous] 'Forsothe,' quod she, 'than nedeth ther som-what that every
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 101

[continues previous] yeven but o thing senglely of alle that men seken.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 102

[continues previous] 'I graunte wel,' quod I; 'ne no sother thing ne may ben
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 489

[continues previous] Ne shal I never on him han other routhe.' —
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 490

[continues previous] 'I graunte wel,' quod Pandare, 'by my trouthe.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1275

[continues previous] Now that I shal wel bringen it aboute
12

Pardoner's Tale: 495

That, by my trouthe, I wol thee nat biwreye.'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 765

For by my trouthe, if that I shal nat lye,
12

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
12

Miller's Tale: 98

And seyde, 'I wol nat kisse thee, by my fey,
11

Miller's Tale: 327

'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 328

I have y-founde in myn astrologye, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 118

'Biwreye me nat, thou water, with thy soun,' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 384

For, by my trouthe, I wol be to yow bothe,
10

Friar's Tale: 227

My trouthe wol I holde as in this cas.
10

Friar's Tale: 229

My trouthe wol I holde to my brother,
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
11

Monk's Prologue: 40

But, by my trouthe, I knowe nat your name,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 675

That I shal never-mo discoveren thee;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 676

Ne, by my trouthe, I kepe nat restreyne
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 677

Thee fro thy love, thogh that it were Eleyne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 995

And, by my trouthe, I have right now of thee [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1617

Or here my trouthe, I wol not live til morwe.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 496

'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye,
10

Knight's Tale: 316

For wel thou woost thy-selven, verraily,
11

Miller's Tale: 327

[continues previous] 'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 118

[continues previous] 'Biwreye me nat, thou water, with thy soun,'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 119

[continues previous] Quod she, 'to thee I telle it, and namo;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 471

This tresor wel; and, if he wol nat tarie, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 482

Thou woost wel that our felawe is agon;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 995

[continues previous] And, by my trouthe, I have right now of thee
11

Pardoner's Tale: 497

And two of us shul strenger be than oon.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 470

[continues previous] And two of us shul kepen subtilly
11

Pardoner's Tale: 498

Look whan that he is set, and right anoon
11

Parson's Tale: 66

Think eek, that of swich seed as cherles springeth, of swich seed springen lordes. As wel may the cherl be saved as the lord. The same deeth that taketh the cherl, swich deeth taketh the lord. Wherfore I rede, do right so with thy cherl, as thou woldest that thy lord dide with thee, if thou were in his plyt. Every sinful man is a cherl to sinne. I rede thee, certes, that thou, lord, werke in swiche wyse with thy cherles, that they rather love thee than drede. I woot ... [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 499

Arys, as though thou woldest with him pleye;
11

Parson's Tale: 66

[continues previous] Think eek, that of swich seed as cherles springeth, of swich seed springen lordes. As wel may the cherl be saved as the lord. The same deeth that taketh the cherl, swich deeth taketh the lord. Wherfore I rede, do right so with thy cherl, as thou woldest that thy lord dide with thee, if thou were in his plyt. Every sinful man is a cherl to sinne. I rede thee, certes, that thou, lord, werke in swiche wyse with thy cherles, that they rather love thee than drede. I woot wel ther is degree above degree, as ...
11

Pardoner's Tale: 500

And I shal ryve him thurgh the sydes tweye
11

Legend of Lucretia: 114

This swerd through-out thyn herte shal I ryve.'
11

Legend of Lucretia: 115

And ther-withal unto her throte he sterte,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 505

Than may we bothe our lustes al fulfille,
13

Franklin's Prologue: 19

And lese al that he hath, is his usage. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 139

They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 487

His lustes were al lawe in his decree, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 506

And pleye at dees right at our owene wille.'
13

Franklin's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] But for to pleye at dees, and to despende, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] And lese al that he hath, is his usage. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 138

[continues previous] Wher-as, with harpes, lutes, and giternes, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 139

[continues previous] They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 140

[continues previous] And ete also and drinken over hir might, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 486

[continues previous] To fisshe in Tybre, whan him liste pleye.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 507

And thus acorded been thise shrewes tweye
11

Miller's Tale: 115

And thus they been acorded and y-sworn [continues next]
13

Franklin's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] But for to pleye at dees, and to despende,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 138

[continues previous] Wher-as, with harpes, lutes, and giternes,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 139

[continues previous] They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 140

[continues previous] And ete also and drinken over hir might,
13

Legend of Ariadne: 142

And whan thise thinges been acorded thus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 370

And specheles thus been thise ilke tweye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 628

And thus he droof a day yet forth or tweye. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 508

To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 851

As ye han herd; what nedeth wordes mo?
11

Miller's Tale: 116

[continues previous] To wayte a tyme, as I have told biforn.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 783

As ye han herd, I can telle it no bettre,
11

Summoner's Prologue: 6

Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 7

As suffereth me I may my tale telle! [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 491

As ye han herd biforn, ye woot wel what.
11

Franklin's Tale: 737

And told him al as ye han herd bifore;
11

Franklin's Tale: 770

And whan that ye han herd the tale, demeth. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd;
11

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd,
11

Franklin's Tale: 865

And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore;
10

Physician's Tale: 229

And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore
10

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 65

I preche, so as ye han herd bifore,
11

Prioress' Tale: 209

As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
14

Melibee's Prologue: 41

And thogh I nat the same wordes seye
14

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of ...
11

Monk's Tale: 430

As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 217

That was arrayed in the same wyse
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 218

As ye han herd the dede man devyse;
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 546

Of metals, which ye han herd me reherce, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 547

Consumed and wasted han my reednesse. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 106

To seen that flour, as ye han herd devyse. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 107

Fair was this medew, as thoughte me overal; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 966

As ye han herd bifore, al he him tolde.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 111

But sin that ye han herd me som-what seye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 80

Ye han er this wel herd it me devyse; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 629

[continues previous] As ye have herd, swich lyf right gan he lede,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 509

This yongest, which that wente un-to the toun,
11

Summoner's Prologue: 6

[continues previous] Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 771

[continues previous] This squyer, which that highte Aurelius,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 546

[continues previous] Of metals, which ye han herd me reherce,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 107

[continues previous] Fair was this medew, as thoughte me overal;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 111

[continues previous] But sin that ye han herd me som-what seye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1782

And whan that he com rydinge in-to toun, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 80

[continues previous] Ye han er this wel herd it me devyse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1380

The moeble which that I have in this toun
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1381

Un-to my fader shal I take, and seye,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 510

Ful ofte in herte he rolleth up and doun
11

Knight's Tale: 1755

Ther stomblen stedes stronge, and doun goth al.