Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Shipman's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Shipman's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Shipman's Tale has 434 lines, and 15% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 67% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 18% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.28 strong matches and 5.21 weak matches.

Shipman's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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15+

Shipman's Tale: 1

A marchant whylom dwelled at Seint Denys,
11

Miller's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford [continues next]
10

Cook's Tale: 1

A prentis whylom dwelled in our citee,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 307

The Sonday next this Marchant was agon, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 308

To Seint Denys y-comen is daun Iohn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 326

To Seint Denys he gan for to repaire, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 2

That riche was, for which men helde him wys;
11

Miller's Tale: 1

[continues previous] Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford
11

Miller's Tale: 2

[continues previous] A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 307

[continues previous] The Sonday next this Marchant was agon,
11

Shipman's Tale: 325

[continues previous] This marchant, whan that ended was the faire,
11

Shipman's Tale: 4

And compaignable and revelous was she,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 51

Curteys she was, discreet, and debonaire,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 52

And compaignable, and bar hir-self so faire,
12

Shipman's Tale: 5

Which is a thing that causeth more dispence
12

Parson's Tale: 30

... harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the bountee of his neighebore. The fourthe ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 260

And leyde on him al the dispence, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 6

Than worth is al the chere and reverence
12

Knight's Tale: 1336

To esen hem, and doon hem al honour, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 529

Doth to his maister chere and reverence, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 530

And preyeth him to doon his diligence [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the bountee of his neighebore. The fourthe spece of bakbyting is this; that if men ...
11

Hous of Fame 1: 259

[continues previous] And dide him al the reverence,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 260

[continues previous] And leyde on him al the dispence,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 82

To bokes olde and doon hem reverence, [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 98

To olde stories, and doon hem reverence, [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 99

And that men mosten more thing beleve [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 7

That men hem doon at festes and at daunces;
10

Knight's Tale: 1073

Festes, instruments, caroles, daunces, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1074

Lust and array, and alle the circumstaunces [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1336

[continues previous] To esen hem, and doon hem al honour,
12

Knight's Tale: 1337

[continues previous] That yet men weneth that no mannes wit
11

Squire's Tale: 283

Who coude telle yow the forme of daunces, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 284

So uncouthe and so fresshe contenaunces, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 530

[continues previous] And preyeth him to doon his diligence
15+

Physician's Tale: 65

As is at festes, revels, and at daunces, [continues next]
14

Physician's Tale: 66

That been occasions of daliaunces. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 71

doon hem, ne han no necessitee that men doon hem, eek tho
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 82

[continues previous] To bokes olde and doon hem reverence,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 83

[continues previous] Is for men shulde autoritees beleve,
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 98

[continues previous] To olde stories, and doon hem reverence,
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 99

[continues previous] And that men mosten more thing beleve
15+

Legend of Dido: 346

And waiten her at festes and at daunces, [continues next]
15+

Legend of Dido: 347

And when she goth to temple and hoom ageyn, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 8

Swiche salutaciouns and contenaunces
10

Knight's Tale: 1074

[continues previous] Lust and array, and alle the circumstaunces
11

Squire's Tale: 284

[continues previous] So uncouthe and so fresshe contenaunces,
14

Physician's Tale: 65

[continues previous] As is at festes, revels, and at daunces,
12

Parson's Tale: 101

... shryven him; and, as he seith, him semeth thanne tymely y-nough to come to shrifte. Another is, surquidrie that he hath in Cristes mercy. Agayns the firste vyce, he shal thinke, that oure lyf is in no sikernesse; and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure, and passen as a shadwe on the wal. And, as seith seint Gregorie, that it aperteneth to the grete rightwisnesse of god, that nevere shal the peyne stinte of hem that nevere wolde withdrawen hem fro sinne, hir thankes, but ay continue in sinne; for thilke perpetuel wil to do sinne shul they han perpetuel peyne. [continues next]
15+

Legend of Dido: 346

[continues previous] And waiten her at festes and at daunces,
15+

Legend of Dido: 347

[continues previous] And when she goth to temple and hoom ageyn,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 9

Passen as dooth a shadwe up-on the wal.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 71

That passen as a shadwe upon a wal. [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 101

[continues previous] ... him; and, as he seith, him semeth thanne tymely y-nough to come to shrifte. Another is, surquidrie that he hath in Cristes mercy. Agayns the firste vyce, he shal thinke, that oure lyf is in no sikernesse; and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure, and passen as a shadwe on the wal. And, as seith seint Gregorie, that it aperteneth to the grete rightwisnesse of god, that nevere shal the peyne stinte of hem that nevere wolde withdrawen hem fro sinne, hir thankes, but ay continue in sinne; for thilke perpetuel wil to do sinne shul they han perpetuel peyne.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 10

But wo is him that payen moot for al;
10

Merchant's Tale: 71

[continues previous] That passen as a shadwe upon a wal.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 72

[continues previous] But dredelees, if pleynly speke I shal,
11

Shipman's Tale: 17

But thinketh it is wasted and y-lost,
11

Shipman's Tale: 18

Than moot another payen for our cost,
11

Shipman's Tale: 15

And if that he noght may, par-aventure,
11

Summoner's Tale: 40

Or elles what yow list, we may nat chese; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 16

Or elles, list no swich dispence endure,
11

Summoner's Tale: 40

[continues previous] Or elles what yow list, we may nat chese;
11

Shipman's Tale: 17

But thinketh it is wasted and y-lost,
11

Shipman's Tale: 10

But wo is him that payen moot for al; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 18

Than moot another payen for our cost,
11

Shipman's Tale: 10

[continues previous] But wo is him that payen moot for al;
11

Shipman's Tale: 20

This noble Marchant heeld a worthy hous,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 297

For which he heeld his glorie or his renoun [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 281

This noble marchant gentilly anon
11

Shipman's Tale: 21

For which he hadde alday so greet repair
11

Pardoner's Tale: 296

[continues previous] For he hadde used hasard ther-biforn;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 297

[continues previous] For which he heeld his glorie or his renoun
11

Shipman's Tale: 23

That wonder is; but herkneth to my tale.
11

Miller's Prologue: 69

Turne over the leef, and chese another tale; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 95

Witnesse on Myda; wol ye here the tale? [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 24

Amonges alle his gestes, grete and smale,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 164

That was hir chapeleyne, and Preestes three. [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 70

[continues previous] For he shal finde y-nowe, grete and smale,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 96

[continues previous] Ovyde, amonges othere thinges smale,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 49

Ther springen herbes grete and smale, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 472

Tolde alle his gestes that Gamelyn was wood; [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 473

And Gamelyn stood stille and answerde nought, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 25

Ther was a monk, a fair man and a bold,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 164

[continues previous] That was hir chapeleyne, and Preestes three.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 165

[continues previous] A Monk ther was, a fair for the maistrye,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 600

He was, I trowe, a twenty winter old, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 601

And I was fourty, if I shal seye sooth; [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 49

[continues previous] Ther springen herbes grete and smale,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 471

[continues previous] The false knight his brother ther that he stood,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 472

[continues previous] Tolde alle his gestes that Gamelyn was wood;
14

Shipman's Tale: 26

I trowe of thritty winter he was old,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 600

[continues previous] He was, I trowe, a twenty winter old,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 601

[continues previous] And I was fourty, if I shal seye sooth;
11

Shipman's Tale: 29

Aqueinted was so with the gode man,
11

Shipman's Tale: 161

Myn housbond is to me the worste man [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 162

That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 30

Sith that hir firste knoweliche bigan,
12

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 163

[continues previous] But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 31

That in his hous as famulier was he
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 215

Ful wel biloved and famulier was he
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 216

With frankeleyns over-al in his contree,
12

Clerk's Tale: 899

Receyved be to-morwe as royally [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 900

As it possible is in myn hous to be. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
12

Shipman's Tale: 32

As it possible is any freend to be.
12

Clerk's Tale: 899

[continues previous] Receyved be to-morwe as royally
12

Clerk's Tale: 900

[continues previous] As it possible is in myn hous to be.
11

Shipman's Tale: 33

And for as muchel as this gode man
11

Shipman's Tale: 124

This monk bigan up-on this wyf to stare, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 61

... Magnanimitee, that is to seyn, greet corage. For certes, ther bihoveth greet corage agains Accidie, lest that it ne swolwe the soule by the sinne of sorwe, or destroye it by wanhope. This vertu maketh folk to undertake harde thinges and grevouse thinges, by hir owene wil, wysely and resonably. And for as muchel as the devel fighteth agayns a man more by queyntise and by sleighte than by strengthe, therfore men shal withstonden him by wit and by resoun and by discrecioun. Thanne arn ther the vertues of feith, and hope in god and in hise seintes, to acheve and acomplice the gode werkes ...
12

Shipman's Tale: 34

And eek this monk, of which that I bigan,
12

Shipman's Tale: 123

[continues previous] So ful am I of drede and eek of care.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 124

[continues previous] This monk bigan up-on this wyf to stare,
11

Shipman's Tale: 37

And he again, he seith nat ones nay,
11

Merchant's Tale: 101

She seith not ones 'nay,' whan he seith 'ye.'
13

Shipman's Tale: 38

But was as glad ther-of as fowel of day;
13

Shipman's Tale: 50

For which they were as glad of his coming [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 51

As fowel is fayn, whan that the sonne up-ryseth. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 39

For to his herte it was a greet plesaunce.
15+

Clerk's Tale: 616

But to his herte it was ful greet plesaunce.
13

Shipman's Tale: 50

[continues previous] For which they were as glad of his coming
11

Parson's Tale: 33

... chaceth the holy goost out of mannes soule, and wasteth and destroyeth the lyknesse of god, that is to seyn, the vertu that is in mannes soule; and put in him the lyknesse of the devel, and binimeth the man fro god that is his rightful lord. This Ire is a ful greet plesaunce to the devel; for it is the develes fourneys, that is eschaufed with the fyr of helle. For certes, right so as fyr is more mighty to destroyen erthely thinges than any other element, right so Ire is mighty to destroyen alle spirituel thinges. Loke how that fyr of smale gledes, that been almost dede ...
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1092

Whan my herte wolde yerne
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1093

To love, it was a greet empryse.
10

Shipman's Tale: 40

Thus been they knit with eterne alliaunce,
10

Parlement of Foules: 671

And with hir nekkes ech gan other winde, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 428

To sende him drogges and his letuaries, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

For ech of hem made other for to winne; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 91

Was for to love hir whyl his lyf may dure. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 209

Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 447

For whan they sawe it moste nedes be, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
12

Shipman's Tale: 142

And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 287

They lived in Ioye and in felicitee; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
10

Former Age: 52

But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce; [continues next]
15+

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take, [continues next]
14

Parlement of Foules: 671

[continues previous] And with hir nekkes ech gan other winde, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 536

The deeth, for I, whyl that my lyf may laste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1618

Answerde of this ech worse of hem than other, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1619

And Poliphete they gonnen thus to warien, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1249

For pitously ech other gan biholde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1623

For trewely, whyl that my lyf may dure, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 42

Of bretherhede, whyl that hir lyf may dure.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

[continues previous] For ech of hem made other for to winne;
11

Knight's Tale: 502

That is, or shal, whyl that the world may dure.
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

[continues previous] Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
10

Knight's Tale: 1912

Sin that my lyf may no lenger dure.
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 91

[continues previous] Was for to love hir whyl his lyf may dure. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 980

Hath seyn or shal, whyl that the world may dure.
15+

Clerk's Tale: 110

To worshipe hir, whyl that hir lyf may dure, [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 769

And ever shal, whyl that my lyf may dure,
10

Merchant's Tale: 209

[continues previous] Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other
13

Merchant's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
12

Shipman's Tale: 142

[continues previous] And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste.
11

Monk's Tale: 288

[continues previous] For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 831

We wiln stande with thee whyl that we may dure,
11

Amorous Compleint: 54

Hath wrought or shal, whyl that the world may dure,
10

Amorous Compleint: 55

Why that she lefte pite so behinde?
10

Former Age: 52

[continues previous] But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce;
13

Parlement of Foules: 642

And moot be youres whyl my lyf may dure;
10

Parlement of Foules: 669

[continues previous] A! lord! the blisse and Ioye that they make!
13

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 468

And he to be hir man, whyl he may dure;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 469

Lo, here his lyf, and from the deeth his cure!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 536

[continues previous] The deeth, for I, whyl that my lyf may laste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1618

[continues previous] Answerde of this ech worse of hem than other,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 677

She wol ben his, whyl that hir lyf may laste.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 153

God help me so, whyl that my lyf may dure,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 833

That is, or shal, whyl that the world may dure.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1623

[continues previous] For trewely, whyl that my lyf may dure,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1624

[continues previous] As for a freend, ye may in me assure.
12

Shipman's Tale: 43

Free was daun Iohn, and namely of dispence,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 91

[continues previous] Was for to love hir whyl his lyf may dure.
12

Clerk's Tale: 111

[continues previous] In word and werk, bothe here and everywhere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 68

Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 88

And thus he sit til it was passed pryme. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 89

Daun Iohn was risen in the morwe also, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 90

And in the gardin walketh to and fro, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn.
11

Shipman's Tale: 313

And shortly to the point right for to gon,
11

Shipman's Tale: 44

As in that hous; and ful of diligence
11

Merchant's Tale: 319

This is to seyn, to doon hir ful plesaunce. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 68

[continues previous] Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 89

[continues previous] Daun Iohn was risen in the morwe also,
11

Melibee's Tale: 30

... that the surgiens and phisiciens han seyd yow in your conseil discreetly, as hem oughte; and in hir speche seyden ful wysly, that to the office of hem aperteneth to doon to every wight honour and profit, and no wight for to anoye; and, after hir craft, to doon greet diligence un-to the cure of hem whiche that they han in hir governaunce. And sir, right as they han answered wysly and discreetly, right so rede I that they been heighly and sovereynly guerdoned for hir noble speche; and eek for they sholde do the more ententif bisinesse in the curacioun of your doghter dere. ... [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 70

... matere as it is aboven expressed and declared; and preyden hem that they wolde yeven hir avys and conseil, what best were to doon in this nede. And whan Melibees freendes hadde taken hir avys and deliberacioun of the forseide matere, and hadden examined it by greet bisinesse and greet diligence, they yave ful conseil for to have pees and reste; and that Melibee sholde receyve with good herte hise adversaries to foryifnesse and mercy. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 45

To doon plesaunce, and also greet costage.
11

Merchant's Tale: 319

[continues previous] This is to seyn, to doon hir ful plesaunce.
11

Melibee's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... speken in this matere. I sey yow, that the surgiens and phisiciens han seyd yow in your conseil discreetly, as hem oughte; and in hir speche seyden ful wysly, that to the office of hem aperteneth to doon to every wight honour and profit, and no wight for to anoye; and, after hir craft, to doon greet diligence un-to the cure of hem whiche that they han in hir governaunce. And sir, right as they han answered wysly and discreetly, right so rede I that they been heighly and sovereynly guerdoned for hir noble speche; and eek for they sholde do the more ententif bisinesse in the ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... al this matere as it is aboven expressed and declared; and preyden hem that they wolde yeven hir avys and conseil, what best were to doon in this nede. And whan Melibees freendes hadde taken hir avys and deliberacioun of the forseide matere, and hadden examined it by greet bisinesse and greet diligence, they yave ful conseil for to have pees and reste; and that Melibee sholde receyve with good herte hise adversaries to foryifnesse and mercy.
12

Shipman's Tale: 47

In al that hous; but, after hir degree,
12

Knight's Tale: 1877

And yaf hem yiftes after hir degree, [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 52

To seme wys; but after hir degree
11

Prioress' Tale: 134

This povre widwe awaiteth al that night [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 135

After hir litel child, but he cam noght; [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 48

He yaf the lord, and sitthe al his meynee,
12

Knight's Tale: 1877

[continues previous] And yaf hem yiftes after hir degree,
12

Knight's Tale: 1878

[continues previous] And fully heeld a feste dayes three;
11

Prioress' Tale: 135

[continues previous] After hir litel child, but he cam noght;
15+

Shipman's Tale: 50

For which they were as glad of his coming
13

Knight's Tale: 1578

Arcite anon un-to his inne is fare, [continues next]
15+

Knight's Tale: 1579

As fayn as fowel is of the brighte sonne. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 38

But was as glad ther-of as fowel of day; [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 39

For to his herte it was a greet plesaunce. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 51

As fowel is fayn, whan that the sonne up-ryseth.
14

Knight's Tale: 1578

[continues previous] Arcite anon un-to his inne is fare,
15+

Knight's Tale: 1579

[continues previous] As fayn as fowel is of the brighte sonne.
13

Shipman's Tale: 38

[continues previous] But was as glad ther-of as fowel of day;
11

Shipman's Tale: 52

Na more of this as now, for it suffyseth.
11

Miller's Tale: 213

And so bifel it on a Saterday, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 53

But so bifel, this marchant on a day
13

Miller's Tale: 85

Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas,
13

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 213

[continues previous] And so bifel it on a Saterday,
11

Miller's Tale: 214

[continues previous] This carpenter was goon til Osenay;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 907

And so bifel that, in a day or two,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 908

This senatour is to king Alla go
13

Friar's Tale: 77

And so bifel, that ones on a day
13

Friar's Tale: 78

This Somnour, ever waiting on his pray,
13

Summoner's Tale: 5

And so bifel, that on a day this frere
13

Physician's Tale: 160

And so bifel sone after, on a day,
13

Physician's Tale: 161

This false Iuge, as telleth us the storie,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 61

So shoop it, that him fil that day a tene [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 54

Shoop him to make redy his array
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 61

[continues previous] So shoop it, that him fil that day a tene
11

Shipman's Tale: 57

For which he hath to Paris sent anon
11

Shipman's Tale: 281

This noble marchant gentilly anon [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 293

Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 331

To paye twenty thousand sheeld anon.
10

Shipman's Tale: 332

For which this marchant is to Paris gon,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 729

Anon ther yede a messager to that goode knight, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 58

A messager, and preyed hath daun Iohn
10

Shipman's Tale: 221

Ne be ye nat ashamed that daun Iohn [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 282

[continues previous] Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 294

[continues previous] And prively he took hem to daun Iohn. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 297

They drinke, and speke, and rome a whyle and pleye, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 298

Til that daun Iohn rydeth to his abbeye. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 308

To Seint Denys y-comen is daun Iohn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 313

And shortly to the point right for to gon, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 314

This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 319

Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 322

Hath of daun Iohn right no suspecioun.
10

Shipman's Tale: 323

And forth he rydeth hoom to his abbeye,
11

Shipman's Tale: 337

Un-to daun Iohn he gooth him first, to pleye; [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 348

And thanne he sholde been in Ioye and reste. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 349

Daun Iohn answerde, 'certes, I am fayn [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 387

Bitwixen me and my cosyn daun Iohn. [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 729

[continues previous] Anon ther yede a messager to that goode knight,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 59

That he sholde come to Seint Denys to pleye
11

Merchant's Tale: 891

Thurgh egging of his wyf, him for to pleye [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 151

I clepe him so, by Seint Denys of Fraunce, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 152

To have the more cause of aqueintaunce [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 221

[continues previous] Ne be ye nat ashamed that daun Iohn
10

Shipman's Tale: 294

[continues previous] And prively he took hem to daun Iohn.
11

Shipman's Tale: 298

[continues previous] Til that daun Iohn rydeth to his abbeye.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 308

[continues previous] To Seint Denys y-comen is daun Iohn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

[continues previous] For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn.
13

Shipman's Tale: 315

[continues previous] That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night
10

Shipman's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way,
11

Shipman's Tale: 325

This marchant, whan that ended was the faire,
12

Shipman's Tale: 326

To Seint Denys he gan for to repaire, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 337

[continues previous] Un-to daun Iohn he gooth him first, to pleye;
12

Shipman's Tale: 348

[continues previous] And thanne he sholde been in Ioye and reste.
12

Shipman's Tale: 388

[continues previous] Ye sholde han warned me, er I had gon,
11

Melibee's Tale: 2

Upon a day bifel, that he for his desport is went in-to the feeldes him to pleye. His wyf and eek his doghter hath he left inwith his hous, of which the dores weren fast y-shette. Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and betten his wyf, and wounded his doghter ... [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 60

With him and with his wyf a day or tweye,
10

Miller's Tale: 225

Bothe mete and drinke for a day or tweye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 891

[continues previous] Thurgh egging of his wyf, him for to pleye
11

Merchant's Tale: 892

[continues previous] In his gardin, and no wight but they tweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 729

Thus pleyned Dorigene a day or tweye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 74

This marchant and this monk, a day or tweye.
10

Shipman's Tale: 75

The thridde day, this marchant up aryseth,
11

Shipman's Tale: 151

[continues previous] I clepe him so, by Seint Denys of Fraunce,
11

Shipman's Tale: 309

[continues previous] With crowne and berd all fresh and newe y-shave.
11

Shipman's Tale: 327

[continues previous] And with his wyf he maketh feste and chere,
11

Melibee's Tale: 2

[continues previous] Upon a day bifel, that he for his desport is went in-to the feeldes him to pleye. His wyf and eek his doghter hath he left inwith his hous, of which the dores weren fast y-shette. Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and betten his wyf, and wounded his doghter with fyve mortal woundes in ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1413

And doon my reed with-inne a day or tweye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 628

And thus he droof a day yet forth or tweye. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 61

Er he to Brugges wente, in alle wyse.
10

Knight's Tale: 1055

Hath Theseus don wroght in noble wyse. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 23

Al be it told som-tyme in sondry wyse [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 669

He took the chalk, and shoop it in the wyse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1414

[continues previous] I wol to yow oblige me to deye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 628

[continues previous] And thus he droof a day yet forth or tweye.
13

Shipman's Tale: 62

This noble monk, of which I yow devyse,
11

Knight's Tale: 932

Of everich herte, as that him list devyse. [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1055

[continues previous] Hath Theseus don wroght in noble wyse.
10

Knight's Tale: 1056

[continues previous] But yet hadde I foryeten to devyse
13

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 670

[continues previous] Of an ingot, as I shal yow devyse.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 202

This balade, which that I shal yow devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 435

And al the whyl which that I yow devyse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 436

This was his lyf; with al his fulle might, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1143

Whan she swich othes as hir list devyse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 259

To half this wo, which that I yow devyse.
13

Shipman's Tale: 63

Hath of his abbot, as him list, licence,
11

Knight's Tale: 932

[continues previous] Of everich herte, as that him list devyse.
13

Shipman's Tale: 192

[continues previous] That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 436

[continues previous] This was his lyf; with al his fulle might,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1143

[continues previous] Whan she swich othes as hir list devyse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1144

[continues previous] Hadde of him take, hir thoughte tho no fere,
14

Shipman's Tale: 64

By-cause he was a man of heigh prudence,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 77

Sin that thy lord is of so heigh prudence,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 78

By-cause of which men sholde him reverence,
10

Shipman's Tale: 65

And eek an officer, out for to ryde,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 292

And seyde, his wyf was comen, out of doute, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 293

And preyde hir for to ryde agayn the quene, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 66

To seen hir graunges and hir bernes wyde;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 293

[continues previous] And preyde hir for to ryde agayn the quene,
11

Shipman's Tale: 67

And un-to Seint Denys he comth anon.
11

Shipman's Tale: 326

To Seint Denys he gan for to repaire, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 327

And with his wyf he maketh feste and chere,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 68

Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 43

Free was daun Iohn, and namely of dispence,
11

Shipman's Tale: 44

As in that hous; and ful of diligence
15+

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 158

'My dere love,' quod she, 'o my daun Iohn, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 282

Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 312

For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 325

[continues previous] This marchant, whan that ended was the faire,
10

Shipman's Tale: 387

Bitwixen me and my cosyn daun Iohn.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 69

Our dere cosin, ful of curteisye?
15+

Shipman's Tale: 98

[continues previous] 'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'My dere love,' quod she, 'o my daun Iohn,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Ful lief were me this conseil for to hyde,
13

Shipman's Tale: 282

[continues previous] Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn,
13

Shipman's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn,
10

Shipman's Tale: 70

With him broghte he a Iubbe of Malvesye,
10

Clerk's Tale: 886

Was couth eek, that a newe markisesse [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 887

He with him broghte, in swich pompe and richesse, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 71

And eek another, ful of fyn Vernage,
10

Clerk's Tale: 886

[continues previous] Was couth eek, that a newe markisesse
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 143

Of gingebreed that was ful fyn, [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 144

And lycorys, and eek comyn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 72

And volatyl, as ay was his usage.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 144

[continues previous] And lycorys, and eek comyn,
10

Former Age: 4

Which that the feldes yave hem by usage; [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 73

And thus I lete hem ete and drinke and pleye,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 312

And thus in merthe and Ioye I lete hem dwelle.
14

Man of Law's Tale: 609

They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 295

They ete and drinke; and whan this hadde an ende, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 371

And thus in Ioye and blisse I lete hem dwelle,
11

Shipman's Tale: 296

Savinge this marchant and daun Iohn allone. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 297

They drinke, and speke, and rome a whyle and pleye, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 20

Only to slepe, and for to ete and drinke,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 21

And to devouren al that othere swinke.
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 680

And bad hem ete and drinke and that of the beste. [continues next]
12

Legend of Philomela: 154

In armes everich of hem other taketh,
12

Legend of Philomela: 155

And thus I lete hem in hir sorwe dwelle.
10

Former Age: 3

[continues previous] They helde hem payed of fruites, that they ete,
10

Former Age: 4

[continues previous] Which that the feldes yave hem by usage;
14

Shipman's Tale: 74

This marchant and this monk, a day or tweye.
10

Miller's Tale: 225

Bothe mete and drinke for a day or tweye, [continues next]
14

Man of Law's Tale: 609

[continues previous] They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye.
12

Squire's Tale: 295

[continues previous] They ete and drinke; and whan this hadde an ende,
10

Franklin's Tale: 729

Thus pleyned Dorigene a day or tweye, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 60

With him and with his wyf a day or tweye, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 296

[continues previous] Savinge this marchant and daun Iohn allone.
11

Shipman's Tale: 297

[continues previous] They drinke, and speke, and rome a whyle and pleye,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 680

[continues previous] And bad hem ete and drinke and that of the beste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1413

And doon my reed with-inne a day or tweye, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 75

The thridde day, this marchant up aryseth,
10

Miller's Tale: 225

[continues previous] Bothe mete and drinke for a day or tweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 729

[continues previous] Thus pleyned Dorigene a day or tweye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 60

[continues previous] With him and with his wyf a day or tweye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1413

[continues previous] And doon my reed with-inne a day or tweye,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 85

For which ful faste his countour-dore he shette;
10

Knight's Tale: 1565

And eek the dores, clatereden ful faste, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1566

Of which Arcita som-what him agaste. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 313

This Nicholas his dore faste shette, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 672

At whiche book he lough alwey ful faste. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 26

Wel ny alle othere cures leet he slyde, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 27

And eek he nolde, and that was worst of alle, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 249

And with that word his countour-dore he shette, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 213

And sey an hond armlees, that wroot ful faste, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 214

For fere of which he quook and syked sore. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 86

And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette
10

Knight's Tale: 1565

[continues previous] And eek the dores, clatereden ful faste,
10

Miller's Tale: 314

[continues previous] And doun the carpenter by him he sette.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 986

She preyde him eek, he sholde by no weye
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 672

[continues previous] At whiche book he lough alwey ful faste.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 673

[continues previous] And eek ther was som-tyme a clerk at Rome,
11

Clerk's Tale: 26

[continues previous] Wel ny alle othere cures leet he slyde,
11

Clerk's Tale: 27

[continues previous] And eek he nolde, and that was worst of alle,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 249

[continues previous] And with that word his countour-dore he shette,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 250

[continues previous] And doun he gooth, no lenger wolde he lette,
11

Monk's Tale: 126

He was so strong that no man mighte him lette;
10

Monk's Tale: 214

[continues previous] For fere of which he quook and syked sore.
11

Manciple's Tale: 55

That no man sholde han put him from hir grace. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7383

He nolde lette, for man on lyve,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7384

That he ne wolde hir ofte shryve.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 545

And forthy lette him no man, god forbede,
12

Shipman's Tale: 87

Of his accountes, for the mene tyme;
11

Manciple's Tale: 54

[continues previous] And for his manhede and his governaunce,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 680

This longe tyme he dryveth forth right thus, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 88

And thus he sit til it was passed pryme.
11

Squire's Tale: 360

They slepen til that it was pryme large, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 43

Free was daun Iohn, and namely of dispence, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 298

Til that daun Iohn rydeth to his abbeye. [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 319

Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 401

And in a bed of wortes stille he lay,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 402

Til it was passed undern of the day,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1095

And faste he swoor, that it was passed pryme, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1096

And gan to Iape, and seyde, 'y-wis, myn herte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 680

[continues previous] This longe tyme he dryveth forth right thus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 681

[continues previous] Til fully passed was the nynthe night;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 682

And ay bi-syde him was this Pandarus,
14

Shipman's Tale: 89

Daun Iohn was risen in the morwe also,
11

Squire's Tale: 360

[continues previous] They slepen til that it was pryme large,
11

Shipman's Tale: 43

[continues previous] Free was daun Iohn, and namely of dispence, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 44

[continues previous] As in that hous; and ful of diligence [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 298

[continues previous] Til that daun Iohn rydeth to his abbeye.
12

Shipman's Tale: 299

[continues previous] The morwe cam, and forth this marchant rydeth
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 313

And shortly to the point right for to gon, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1095

[continues previous] And faste he swoor, that it was passed pryme,
11

Shipman's Tale: 90

And in the gardin walketh to and fro,
11

Knight's Tale: 241

Yond in the gardin romen to and fro, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 43

[continues previous] Free was daun Iohn, and namely of dispence,
10

Shipman's Tale: 313

[continues previous] And shortly to the point right for to gon,
11

Shipman's Tale: 91

And hath his thinges seyd ful curteisly.
11

Knight's Tale: 241

[continues previous] Yond in the gardin romen to and fro,
10

Shipman's Tale: 93

In-to the gardin, ther he walketh softe,
10

Monk's Tale: 551

For drede of this, him thoughte that he deyde, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 552

And ran in-to a gardin, him to hyde. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 94

And him saleweth, as she hath don ofte.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 5

Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 552

[continues previous] And ran in-to a gardin, him to hyde.
11

Shipman's Tale: 95

A mayde child cam in hir companye,
11

Knight's Tale: 1092

For as hir list the world than may she gye. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 4

[continues previous] The elf-queen, with hir Ioly companye,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 5

[continues previous] Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede;
15+

Shipman's Tale: 96

Which as hir list she may governe and gye,
15+

Knight's Tale: 1092

[continues previous] For as hir list the world than may she gye.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 380

'Thanne have I gete of yow maistrye,' quod she,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 381

'Sin I may chese, and governe as me lest?'
12

Monk's Tale: 407

Thus can fortune hir wheel governe and gye,
12

Monk's Tale: 408

And out of Ioye bringe men to sorwe.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 840

For, as hir list, she pleyeth with free and bonde.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 373

That, as him list, may al this world governe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 374

And, if I lye, Achilles with his spere
10

Shipman's Tale: 97

For yet under the yerde was the mayde.
10

Physician's Tale: 129

'This mayde shal be myn, for any man.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 840

[continues previous] For, as hir list, she pleyeth with free and bonde.'
15+

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
15+

Knight's Tale: 223

And seyde, 'Cosin myn, what eyleth thee, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 376

O dere cosin Palamon,' quod he,
10

Miller's Tale: 315

He seyde, 'Iohn, myn hoste lief and dere,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1124

And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow? [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 128

[continues previous] And to him-self ful prively he sayde,
10

Physician's Tale: 129

[continues previous] 'This mayde shal be myn, for any man.'
15+

Shipman's Tale: 68

Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 69

Our dere cosin, ful of curteisye?
15+

Shipman's Tale: 158

'My dere love,' quod she, 'o my daun Iohn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 279

And fare-now wel, myn owene cosin dere,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 282

Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn,
10

Shipman's Tale: 363

Grete wel our dame, myn owene nece swete,
10

Shipman's Tale: 364

And fare-wel, dere cosin, til we mete!'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 192

And seyde, 'O dere doughter myn, wel-come!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 193

She seyde eek, she was fayn with him to mete,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 99

'What eyleth yow so rathe for to ryse?'
15+

Knight's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And seyde, 'Cosin myn, what eyleth thee,
11

Knight's Tale: 224

[continues previous] That art so pale and deedly on to see?
13

Miller's Tale: 581

'What, Absolon! for Cristes swete tree,
15+

Miller's Tale: 582

Why ryse ye so rathe, ey, benedicite!
15+

Miller's Tale: 583

What eyleth yow? som gay gerl, god it woot,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone?
10

Merchant's Tale: 1123

[continues previous] 'O stronge lady store, what dostow?'
11

Merchant's Tale: 1124

[continues previous] And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow?
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 70

What eyleth yow, to grone in this manere?
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 211

[continues previous] 'What eyleth yow to be thus wery sone, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 100

'Nece,' quod he, 'it oghte y-nough suffyse
10

Merchant's Tale: 296

But nathelees, it oghte y-nough suffise
15+

Monk's Tale: 468

Of this Tragedie it oghte y-nough suffyse.
15+

Monk's Tale: 469

Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

[continues previous] 'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 752

'My dere nece,' quod he, 'it am I;
13

Shipman's Tale: 105

Were al for-straught with houndes grete and smale.
13

Knight's Tale: 1218

With smale houndes al aboute hir feet;
12

Knight's Tale: 1219

And undernethe hir feet she hadde a mone,
10

Reeve's Tale: 403

Save al this companye grete and smale!
11

Pardoner's Tale: 331

Leveth your othes, bothe grete and smale; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 106

But dere nece, why be ye so pale?
11

Pardoner's Tale: 332

[continues previous] But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
10

Shipman's Tale: 107

I trowe certes that our gode man
10

Shipman's Tale: 161

Myn housbond is to me the worste man [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 42

as it semeth. And eek certes I trowe, that this be gretly to
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 75

necessitee. For certes, I ne trowe nat that any man wolde seyn
12

Shipman's Tale: 108

Hath yow laboured sith the night bigan,
11

Summoner's Tale: 74

'How han ye fare sith that March bigan? [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 75

I saugh yow noght this fourtenight or more.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 163

But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 109

That yow were nede to resten hastily?'
11

Summoner's Tale: 74

[continues previous] 'How han ye fare sith that March bigan?
11

Summoner's Tale: 75

[continues previous] I saugh yow noght this fourtenight or more.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Melibee's Tale: 35

Now sir, as to the thridde point; wher-as your olde and wise conseillours seyden, that yow ne oghte nat sodeynly ne hastily proceden in this nede, but that yow oghte purveyen and apparaillen yow in this caas with greet diligence and greet deliberacioun; trewely, I trowe that they seyden right wysly and right sooth. For Tullius seith, "in every nede, er thou biginne it, apparaille thee with greet diligence." Thanne seye I, that in vengeance-taking, in werre, in bataille, ... [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 110

And with that word he lough ful merily,
11

Melibee's Tale: 35

[continues previous] Now sir, as to the thridde point; wher-as your olde and wise conseillours seyden, that yow ne oghte nat sodeynly ne hastily proceden in this nede, but that yow oghte purveyen and apparaillen yow in this caas with greet diligence and greet deliberacioun; trewely, I trowe that they seyden right wysly and right sooth. For Tullius seith, "in every nede, er thou biginne it, apparaille thee with greet diligence." Thanne seye I, that in vengeance-taking, in werre, in ...
15+

Shipman's Tale: 111

And of his owene thought he wex al reed.
13

Clerk's Tale: 261

That reed he wex, abayst, and al quaking
12

Clerk's Tale: 262

He stood unnethes seyde he wordes mo,
11

Parlement of Foules: 583

The turtel seyde, and wex for shame al reed; [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 584

Thogh that his lady ever-more be straunge, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 867

For he was hit, and wex al reed for shame; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 652

For of hir owene thought she wex al reed, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1256

'Nay, nay,' quod she, and wex as reed as rose. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1257

With that he gan hir humbly to saluwe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 82

But lord, so he wex sodeinliche reed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 83

And sire, his lesson, that he wende conne,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1570

With the shete, and wex for shame al reed; [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 112

This faire wyf gan for to shake hir heed,
11

Shipman's Tale: 313

And shortly to the point right for to gon,
11

Shipman's Tale: 314

This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn,
11

Parlement of Foules: 583

[continues previous] The turtel seyde, and wex for shame al reed;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 867

[continues previous] For he was hit, and wex al reed for shame;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 869

And with that word he gan him for to shake, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 870

And seyde, 'theef, thou shalt hir name telle.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 653

[continues previous] Remembringe hir right thus, 'lo, this is he
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 657

Gan in hir heed to pulle, and that as faste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1129

And took it nought, but al hir humble chere [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1130

Gan for to chaunge, and seyde, 'scrit ne bille, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1142

This Pandarus gan on hir for to stare, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1257

[continues previous] With that he gan hir humbly to saluwe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1570

[continues previous] With the shete, and wex for shame al reed;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1571

[continues previous] And Pandarus gan under for to prye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 113

And seyde thus, 'ye, god wot al,' quod she;
12

Knight's Tale: 423

'Allas!' quod he, 'Arcita, cosin myn, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 424

Of al our stryf, God woot, the fruyt is thyn. [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 257

'Nay,' quod the devel, 'god wot, never a deel; [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 333

Quod this Somnour, 'for to repente me, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 260

But after that in pley thus seyde she:
11

Franklin's Tale: 261

'Aurelie,' quod she, 'by heighe god above,
10

Shipman's Tale: 147

With myn housbonde, al be he your cosyn.' [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 148

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'by god and seint Martyn, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 870

[continues previous] And seyde, 'theef, thou shalt hir name telle.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 657

[continues previous] Gan in hir heed to pulle, and that as faste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1130

[continues previous] Gan for to chaunge, and seyde, 'scrit ne bille,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1143

[continues previous] And seyde, 'now is this the grettest wonder
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

[continues previous] Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 498

Nay, nay, god wot, nought worth is al thy reed, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 114

'Nay, cosin myn, it stant nat so with me.
12

Knight's Tale: 423

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'Arcita, cosin myn,
11

Friar's Tale: 257

[continues previous] 'Nay,' quod the devel, 'god wot, never a deel;
10

Friar's Tale: 332

[continues previous] 'Nay, olde stot, that is nat myn entente,'
13

Franklin's Tale: 255

By thilke god that yaf me soule and lyf, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 120

'Dar I nat telle how that it stant with me. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 147

[continues previous] With myn housbonde, al be he your cosyn.'
10

Shipman's Tale: 148

[continues previous] 'Nay,' quod this monk, 'by god and seint Martyn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 498

[continues previous] Nay, nay, god wot, nought worth is al thy reed,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

[continues previous] 'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 115

For, by that god that yaf me soule and lyf,
14

Summoner's Tale: 99

Thanked be god, that yow yaf soule and lyf,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 255

[continues previous] By thilke god that yaf me soule and lyf,
12

Shipman's Tale: 120

[continues previous] 'Dar I nat telle how that it stant with me.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4889

For Youthe set bothe man and wyf [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4890

In al perel of soule and lyf; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4891

And perel is, but men have grace, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 116

In al the reme of France is ther no wyf
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4890

[continues previous] In al perel of soule and lyf;
11

Shipman's Tale: 117

That lasse lust hath to that sory pley.
11

Amorous Compleint: 24

I may wel singe, 'in sory tyme I spende [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 118

For I may singe "allas" and "weylawey,
10

Knight's Tale: 365

He seyde, 'Allas that day that I was born! [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 212

For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.'
12

Miller's Tale: 213

And so bifel it on a Saterday,
12

Miller's Tale: 528

'Allas,' quod Absolon, 'and weylawey! [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 202

This knight answerde, 'allas! and weylawey! [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 203

I woot right wel that swich was my biheste. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 104

'Allas! that I was born,' quod Eneas, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 385

That I was born! allas! what shal I do?' [continues next]
11

Amorous Compleint: 24

[continues previous] I may wel singe, 'in sory tyme I spende
11

Book of the Duchesse: 686

My blisse; allas! that I was born! [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4104

For him ful oft I singe 'allas!' [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4105

For I ne may nought, thurgh his ire, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1422

'Myn hertes lyf, my trist and my plesaunce, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1423

That I was born, allas! what me is wo, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 689

For which ful ofte a day 'allas!' she seyde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 690

'That I was born! Wel may myn herte longe [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 700

That I was born, so weylawey the tyde! [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 701

And if that I me putte in Iupartye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1275

Pandare answerde and seyde, 'allas the whyle [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 119

That I was born," but to no wight,' quod she,
10

Knight's Tale: 365

[continues previous] He seyde, 'Allas that day that I was born!
14

Knight's Tale: 1426

But how she dide hir ryte I dar nat telle, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1427

But it be any thing in general; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 529

[continues previous] That trewe love was ever so yvel biset!
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 203

[continues previous] I woot right wel that swich was my biheste.
12

Merchant's Tale: 719

How that he wroghte, I dar nat to yow telle; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 622

But why it was, to no wight tolde she;
11

Monk's Prologue: 33

For she is big in armes, by my feith, [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 107

I am no worse gadeling ne no worse wight,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 108

But born of a lady and geten of a knight.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 45

'Why sholde I nat remembre that?' quod I. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?' [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 145

'That is sooth,' quod I.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 79

'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that a wight be mighty to moeve and [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 474

'For me list hit noght,' quod she;
11

Hous of Fame 3: 475

'No wight shal speke of yow, y-wis,
10

Legend of Dido: 103

[continues previous] How Troye and al the lond destroyed was.
10

Legend of Dido: 104

[continues previous] 'Allas! that I was born,' quod Eneas,
10

Legend of Dido: 385

[continues previous] That I was born! allas! what shal I do?'
11

Book of the Duchesse: 686

[continues previous] My blisse; allas! that I was born!
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1298

'Sir,' quod I, 'wher is she now?' [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4104

[continues previous] For him ful oft I singe 'allas!'
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4105

[continues previous] For I ne may nought, thurgh his ire,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1423

[continues previous] That I was born, allas! what me is wo,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 690

[continues previous] 'That I was born! Wel may myn herte longe
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 700

[continues previous] That I was born, so weylawey the tyde!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 701

[continues previous] And if that I me putte in Iupartye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1276

[continues previous] That I was born; have I not seyd er this,
14

Shipman's Tale: 120

'Dar I nat telle how that it stant with me.
14

Knight's Tale: 1426

[continues previous] But how she dide hir ryte I dar nat telle,
12

Knight's Tale: 1427

[continues previous] But it be any thing in general;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante,
12

Merchant's Tale: 719

[continues previous] How that he wroghte, I dar nat to yow telle;
12

Shipman's Tale: 114

'Nay, cosin myn, it stant nat so with me.
12

Shipman's Tale: 115

For, by that god that yaf me soule and lyf,
11

Monk's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Al be it that I dar nat hir withstonde,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 45

[continues previous] 'Why sholde I nat remembre that?' quod I.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

[continues previous] 'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 70

any thing, yit dwelleth thanne a nede that mighte be fulfild. I
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 71

holde me stille, and telle nat how that litel thing suffiseth to
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 79

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that a wight be mighty to moeve and
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1297

[continues previous] So wel, I can nat telle how.'
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1298

[continues previous] 'Sir,' quod I, 'wher is she now?'
10

Shipman's Tale: 121

Wherfore I thinke out of this land to wende,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1340

That ech from other wende been biraft, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1341

Or elles, lo, this was hir moste fere, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 122

Or elles of my-self to make an ende,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 854

To make an ende of al hir hevinesse.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2918

Of al this harm to make an ende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1341

[continues previous] Or elles, lo, this was hir moste fere,
12

Shipman's Tale: 123

So ful am I of drede and eek of care.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 34

And eek this monk, of which that I bigan, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 124

This monk bigan up-on this wyf to stare,
11

Shipman's Tale: 33

[continues previous] And for as muchel as this gode man
12

Shipman's Tale: 34

[continues previous] And eek this monk, of which that I bigan,
11

Parson's Tale: 76

... under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is the filthe thurgh which they breken the comandement of god, and defoulen the auctour of matrimoine, that is Crist. For certes, in-so-muche as the sacrement of mariage is so noble and so digne, so muche is it gretter sinne for ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 408

And she bigan to breste a-wepe anoon. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1142

This Pandarus gan on hir for to stare, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1143

And seyde, 'now is this the grettest wonder [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 125

And seyde, 'allas, my nece, god forbede
11

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is the filthe thurgh which they breken the comandement of god, and defoulen the auctour of matrimoine, that is Crist. For certes, in-so-muche as the sacrement of mariage is so noble and so digne, so muche is it gretter ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 409

[continues previous] And seyde, 'allas, for wo! why nere I deed?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1143

[continues previous] And seyde, 'now is this the grettest wonder
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1100

And seyde, 'nece, but ye helpe us now, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1101

Allas, your owne Troilus is lorn!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1557

Seyde, 'al this night so reyned it, allas! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1558

That al my drede is that ye, nece swete, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 126

That ye, for any sorwe or any drede,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1100

[continues previous] And seyde, 'nece, but ye helpe us now,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1558

[continues previous] That al my drede is that ye, nece swete,
13

Shipman's Tale: 127

Fordo your-self; but telleth me your grief;
13

Book of the Duchesse: 555

And telleth me of your sorwes smerte, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 128

Paraventure I may, in your meschief,
13

Book of the Duchesse: 555

[continues previous] And telleth me of your sorwes smerte,
13

Book of the Duchesse: 556

[continues previous] Paraventure hit may ese your herte,
10

Shipman's Tale: 129

Conseille or helpe, and therfore telleth me
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 817

And as ye love me, kepeth it secree; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 130

Al your anoy, for it shal been secree;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 817

[continues previous] And as ye love me, kepeth it secree;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 818

[continues previous] For, and men knewe al my subtilitee,
12

Shipman's Tale: 132

That never in my lyf, for lief ne looth,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 926

'So vertuous a livere in my lyf, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 927

Ne saugh I never as she, ne herde of mo [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 322

Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf;
11

Friar's Tale: 323

Ne never I nas but of my body trewe!
10

Second Nun's Tale: 228

Ne never-mo ne shal they roten be, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 193

Ne never in al thy lyf ne shaltou speke. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 476

Good ne harm, ne that ne this.' [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 272

Upon the goddes, that he, for leef ne looth, [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 273

Ne sholde her never falsen, night ne day, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 133

Ne shal I of no conseil yow biwreye.'
11

Man of Law's Tale: 927

[continues previous] Ne saugh I never as she, ne herde of mo
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... bettre than Iaspre? Wisdom. And what is bettre than wisdom? Womman. And what is bettre than a good womman? No-thing." And sir, by manye of othre resons may ye seen, that manye wommen been goode, and hir conseils goode and profitable. And therfore sir, if ye wol triste to my conseil, I shal restore yow your doghter hool and sound. And eek I wol do to yow so muche, that ye shul have honour in this cause.'
10

Second Nun's Tale: 227

[continues previous] 'Fro Paradys to yow have I hem broght,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 228

[continues previous] Ne never-mo ne shal they roten be,
11

Manciple's Tale: 193

[continues previous] Ne never in al thy lyf ne shaltou speke.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 475

[continues previous] 'No wight shal speke of yow, y-wis,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 476

[continues previous] Good ne harm, ne that ne this.'
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 272

[continues previous] Upon the goddes, that he, for leef ne looth,
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 273

[continues previous] Ne sholde her never falsen, night ne day,
12

Shipman's Tale: 134

'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye;
11

Summoner's Tale: 497

'How that me thinketh?' quod she; 'so god me speede, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 498

I seye, a cherl hath doon a cherles dede. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 88

'Avoy!' quod she, 'fy on yow, hertelees! [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 89

Allas!' quod she, 'for, by that god above, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 452

That giltlees were? by yow I seye the same. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 119

Philosophie. 'O my norie,' quod she, 'by this opinioun I [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 120

seye that thou art blisful, yif thou putte this ther-to that I [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 830

Shortly, what shal I more seye? [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 121

I noot nought what ye wilne that I seye.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 135

By god and by this porthors, I yow swere,
11

Summoner's Tale: 497

[continues previous] 'How that me thinketh?' quod she; 'so god me speede,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 89

[continues previous] Allas!' quod she, 'for, by that god above,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 452

[continues previous] That giltlees were? by yow I seye the same.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 119

[continues previous] Philosophie. 'O my norie,' quod she, 'by this opinioun I
12

Anelida and Arcite: 264

¶ But for I shewed yow, Arcite, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 830

[continues previous] Shortly, what shal I more seye?
10

Book of the Duchesse: 831

[continues previous] By god, and by his halwes twelve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

[continues previous] 'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1541

And this on every god celestial
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1542

I swere it yow, and eek on eche goddesse,
13

Shipman's Tale: 136

Though men me wolde al in-to peces tere,
13

Monk's Tale: 672

And yit for thee ne weep she never a tere! [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 265

[continues previous] Al that men wolde to me wryte,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1023

But-if men wolde upon hir lye; [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1024

Ne sende men in-to Walakye, [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 87

And yit I wolde beseche yow of no more [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1441

And but ye come at day set in-to Troye, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 137

Ne shal I never, for to goon to helle,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 181

Un-to your grace, for I shal to Surryë,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 182

Ne shal I never seen yow more with yë.
13

Monk's Tale: 672

[continues previous] And yit for thee ne weep she never a tere!
13

Monk's Tale: 673

[continues previous] Who shal me yeven teres to compleyne
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 108

wold it, that is to seyn, the savacioun of the senat, ne I shal never
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 109

leten to wilne it, and that I confesse and am aknowe; but the
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 502

And eek to goon to helle, rather than he,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 514

And eek to goon to helle, rather than he,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1024

[continues previous] Ne sende men in-to Walakye,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 86

[continues previous] That bet loved is noon, ne never shal;
11

Compleint to His Lady: 87

[continues previous] And yit I wolde beseche yow of no more
12

Parlement of Foules: 439

For never, for no wo, ne shal I lette
12

Parlement of Foules: 440

To serven hir, how fer so that she wende;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3414

Yit shal I never, for Ioy ne smerte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1707

And, for the sonne him hasteth thus to ryse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1708

Ne shal I never doon him sacrifyse!'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1442

[continues previous] Ne shal I never have hele, honour, ne Ioye.
11

Shipman's Tale: 138

Biwreye a word of thing that ye me telle,
11

Knight's Tale: 1495

But un-to which of hem I may nat telle. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 92

And nat biwreye thing that men us telle.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 93

But that tale is nat worth a rake-stele;
11

Shipman's Tale: 139

Nat for no cosinage ne alliance,
11

Knight's Tale: 1495

[continues previous] But un-to which of hem I may nat telle.
11

Knight's Tale: 1496

[continues previous] Farwel, for I ne may no lenger dwelle.
11

Shipman's Tale: 141

Thus been they sworn, and heer-upon they kiste,
11

Merchant's Tale: 447

For whan they sawe it moste nedes be, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... and despysen everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 15

is lakkinge to other, they ne han no power to bringen a good that [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 669

A! lord! the blisse and Ioye that they make! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1619

And Poliphete they gonnen thus to warien, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 142

And ech of hem tolde other what hem liste.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

For ech of hem made other for to winne;
11

Knight's Tale: 1767

Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye.
11

Merchant's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
12

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure
12

Shipman's Tale: 42

Of bretherhede, whyl that hir lyf may dure.
11

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
11

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... kinrede, and chyden and despysen everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

[continues previous] they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 15

[continues previous] is lakkinge to other, they ne han no power to bringen a good that
10

Former Age: 52

But ech of hem wolde other wel cheryce;
11

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1618

[continues previous] Answerde of this ech worse of hem than other,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1619

[continues previous] And Poliphete they gonnen thus to warien,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1313

Of swich gladnesse, if that hem liste pleye! [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 143

'Cosin,' quod she, 'if that I hadde a space,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1313

[continues previous] Of swich gladnesse, if that hem liste pleye!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1314

[continues previous] I can no more, but thus thise ilke tweye
14

Shipman's Tale: 145

Than wolde I telle a legende of my lyf,
11

Miller's Prologue: 32

Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye; [continues next]
14

Miller's Prologue: 33

For I wol telle a legende and a lyf [continues next]
14

Miller's Prologue: 34

Bothe of a Carpenter, and of his wyf, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 146

What I have suffred sith I was a wyf
11

Miller's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye;
13

Miller's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] For I wol telle a legende and a lyf
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 533

To hir biwreyed I my conseil al. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 534

For had myn housbonde pissed on a wal, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 80

... eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente of engendrure of children ... [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 147

With myn housbonde, al be he your cosyn.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 533

[continues previous] To hir biwreyed I my conseil al.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 534

[continues previous] For had myn housbonde pissed on a wal,
10

Shipman's Tale: 113

And seyde thus, 'ye, god wot al,' quod she; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 114

'Nay, cosin myn, it stant nat so with me. [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 36

My lord the Monk,' quod he, 'be mery of chere; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 286

Nay, nay, god woot, al be he monk or frere, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste ...
13

Shipman's Tale: 148

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'by god and seint Martyn,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn! [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 164

'Now dame,' quod he, 'by god and by seint Iohn, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 386

'Nay,' quod the syke man, 'by Seint Simoun!
11

Summoner's Tale: 544

A goune-cloth, by god and by Seint Iohn!' [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 545

'My lord,' quod he, 'whan that the weder is fair, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 113

[continues previous] And seyde thus, 'ye, god wot al,' quod she;
10

Shipman's Tale: 114

[continues previous] 'Nay, cosin myn, it stant nat so with me.
10

Monk's Prologue: 35

[continues previous] But lat us passe awey fro this matere.
10

Monk's Prologue: 36

[continues previous] My lord the Monk,' quod he, 'be mery of chere;
13

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 40

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'I have no lust to pleye;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 286

[continues previous] Nay, nay, god woot, al be he monk or frere,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 225

Whyles he was on lyve by seint Martyn! [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 149

He is na more cosin un-to me
11

Man of Law's Tale: 921

[continues previous] 'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn!
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 164

[continues previous] 'Now dame,' quod he, 'by god and by seint Iohn,
11

Summoner's Tale: 545

[continues previous] 'My lord,' quod he, 'whan that the weder is fair,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 225

[continues previous] Whyles he was on lyve by seint Martyn!
11

Shipman's Tale: 151

I clepe him so, by Seint Denys of Fraunce,
11

Shipman's Tale: 59

That he sholde come to Seint Denys to pleye [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 60

With him and with his wyf a day or tweye, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 152

To have the more cause of aqueintaunce
11

Shipman's Tale: 59

[continues previous] That he sholde come to Seint Denys to pleye
10

Shipman's Tale: 153

Of yow, which I have loved specially
10

Melibee's Tale: 60

Thanne dame Prudence discovered al hir wil to him, and seyde, 'I conseille yow,' quod she, 'aboven alle thinges, that ye make pees bitwene god and yow; and beth reconsiled un-to him and to his grace. For as I have seyd yow heer-biforn, god hath suffred yow to have this tribulacioun and disese for your sinnes. And if ye do as I sey yow, ... [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 154

Aboven alle wommen sikerly;
11

Melibee's Tale: 11

... that in tyme cominge been possible to fallen for this same cause; and eek by resoun of the grete richesse and power of the parties bothe; for the whiche resouns it were a ful greet peril to erren in this matere. Wherfore, Melibeus, this is our sentence: we conseille yow aboven alle thing, that right anon thou do thy diligence in kepinge of thy propre persone, in swich a wyse that thou ne wante noon espye ne wacche, thy body for to save. And after that we conseille, that in thyn hous thou sette suffisant garnisoun, so that they may as wel ... [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 60

[continues previous] Thanne dame Prudence discovered al hir wil to him, and seyde, 'I conseille yow,' quod she, 'aboven alle thinges, that ye make pees bitwene god and yow; and beth reconsiled un-to him and to his grace. For as I have seyd yow heer-biforn, god hath suffred yow to have this tribulacioun and disese for your sinnes. And if ye do as I sey yow, god wol sende your ... [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 155

This swere I yow on my professioun.
12

Summoner's Tale: 427

This shaltou swere on thy professioun,
12

Summoner's Tale: 429

'I swere it,' quod this frere, 'upon my feith!'
11

Melibee's Tale: 11

[continues previous] ... eek by resoun of the grete damages that in tyme cominge been possible to fallen for this same cause; and eek by resoun of the grete richesse and power of the parties bothe; for the whiche resouns it were a ful greet peril to erren in this matere. Wherfore, Melibeus, this is our sentence: we conseille yow aboven alle thing, that right anon thou do thy diligence in kepinge of thy propre persone, in swich a wyse that thou ne wante noon espye ne wacche, thy body for to save. And after that we conseille, that in thyn hous thou sette suffisant garnisoun, so that they may ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 60

[continues previous] Thanne dame Prudence discovered al hir wil to him, and seyde, 'I conseille yow,' quod she, 'aboven alle thinges, that ye make pees bitwene god and yow; and beth reconsiled un-to him and to his grace. For as I have seyd yow heer-biforn, god hath suffred yow to have this tribulacioun and disese for your sinnes. And if ye do as I sey yow, ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1541

And this on every god celestial
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1542

I swere it yow, and eek on eche goddesse,
13

Shipman's Tale: 156

Telleth your grief, lest that he come adoun,
13

Parson's Prologue: 72

But hasteth yow, the sonne wol adoun; [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 157

And hasteth yow, and gooth your wey anon.'
11

Summoner's Tale: 115

'Now, by your leve, o dere sir,' quod she, [continues next]
12

Parson's Prologue: 71

[continues previous] 'Telleth,' quod he, 'your meditacioun.
13

Parson's Prologue: 72

[continues previous] But hasteth yow, the sonne wol adoun;
13

Parson's Prologue: 73

[continues previous] Beth fructuous, and that in litel space,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 158

'My dere love,' quod she, 'o my daun Iohn,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 760

O mercy, dere Constable!' quod she;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 761

'As lat my litel child dwelle heer with thee;
11

Summoner's Tale: 115

[continues previous] 'Now, by your leve, o dere sir,' quod she,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 68

Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 69

Our dere cosin, ful of curteisye? [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
11

Shipman's Tale: 282

Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 312

For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 314

This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 387

Bitwixen me and my cosyn daun Iohn. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 159

Ful lief were me this conseil for to hyde,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 124

Yet out it moot, we can no conseil hyde; [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 69

[continues previous] Our dere cosin, ful of curteisye?
11

Shipman's Tale: 283

[continues previous] Now sikerly this is a smal requeste;
12

Shipman's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

[continues previous] For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn.
10

Shipman's Tale: 314

[continues previous] This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn,
10

Shipman's Tale: 315

[continues previous] That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night
11

Shipman's Tale: 387

[continues previous] Bitwixen me and my cosyn daun Iohn.
10

Shipman's Tale: 388

[continues previous] Ye sholde han warned me, er I had gon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1325

That for the beste, our conseil for to hyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1326

Ye speke not with me, nor I with yow
14

Shipman's Tale: 160

But out it moot, I may namore abyde.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 123

[continues previous] Heer may ye se, thogh we a tyme abyde,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 124

[continues previous] Yet out it moot, we can no conseil hyde;
12

Shipman's Tale: 161

Myn housbond is to me the worste man
11

Knight's Tale: 1243

And sikerly, ther trowed many a man [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 201

He singeth, daunceth, passinge any man [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 29

Aqueinted was so with the gode man, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 107

I trowe certes that our gode man [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 15

Therto he was the semelieste man [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 579

Y-worthe worste of alle wightes, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 162

That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Knight's Tale: 1244

[continues previous] That never, sithen that the world bigan,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

And many a seint, sith that the world bigan, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 141

Yet lived they ever in parfit chastitee. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 850

For ever he demed, sith that it bigan,
11

Clerk's Tale: 851

That whan the lord fulfild had his corage,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 202

[continues previous] That is, or was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 203

Ther-with he was, if men sholde him discryve, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 29

[continues previous] Aqueinted was so with the gode man, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 30

[continues previous] Sith that hir firste knoweliche bigan, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 31

That in his hous as famulier was he [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 108

[continues previous] Hath yow laboured sith the night bigan, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 109

That yow were nede to resten hastily?' [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 121

Was never wight, sith that the world bigan, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 122

That slow so many monstres as dide he. [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is or was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

That never yit, sith that the world was newe, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 445

That never yit, sith that the world was newe, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 578

[continues previous] Of alle blisse that was ever maked,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 163

But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

[continues previous] And many a seint, sith that the world bigan,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1071

I am a king, it sit me noght to lye.' [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 202

[continues previous] That is, or was, sith that the world bigan.
12

Shipman's Tale: 30

[continues previous] Sith that hir firste knoweliche bigan,
12

Shipman's Tale: 108

[continues previous] Hath yow laboured sith the night bigan,
15+

Monk's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Was never wight, sith that the world bigan,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That is or was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 435

[continues previous] That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 445

[continues previous] That never yit, sith that the world was newe,
11

Shipman's Tale: 164

To tellen no wight of our privetee,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1071

[continues previous] I am a king, it sit me noght to lye.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 165

Neither a bedde, ne in non other place;
11

Knight's Tale: 277

Neither of us in love to hindren other,
11

Knight's Tale: 278

Ne in non other cas, my leve brother;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 119

Ne in non other wey, save mariage.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 184

god is set in thilke same good, and in non other place.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2911

They dreden neither wind ne reyn,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2912

Ne [yit] non other maner peyn.
13

Shipman's Tale: 166

God shilde I sholde it tellen, for his grace!
13

Merchant's Prologue: 19

As for the more part, I sey nat alle.
13

Merchant's Prologue: 20

God shilde that it sholde so bifalle!
11

Parson's Tale: 79

... of the rib of Adam, for womman sholde be felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 167

A wyf ne shal nat seyn of hir housbonde
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 376

Thou seyst, that right as wormes shende a tree,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 377

Right so a wyf destroyeth hir housbonde;
11

Parson's Tale: 79

[continues previous] ... Adam, for womman sholde be felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede.
12

Parson's Tale: 96

And thou shalt understanden eek, that god ordeyned fastinge; and to fastinge appertenen foure thinges. Largenesse to povre folk, gladnesse of herte espirituel, nat to been angry ne anoyed, ne grucche for he fasteth; and also resonable houre for to ete by mesure; that is for to seyn, a man shal nat ete in untyme, ne sitte the lenger at his table to ete for he fasteth.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 477

That al hir lyf ne doon nat but assayen [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 487

That al hir lyf ne doon nat but assayen [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 168

But al honour, as I can understonde;
10

Clerk's Tale: 747

Consenteth it, that dar I undertake; [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 748

And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 477

[continues previous] That al hir lyf ne doon nat but assayen
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 487

[continues previous] That al hir lyf ne doon nat but assayen
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1220

Theffect, as fer as I can understonde:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here: [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 999

As helpe me Pallas with hir heres clere, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 169

Save un-to yow thus muche I tellen shal;
10

Knight's Tale: 201

Of whiche I tolde yow, and tellen shal)
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

As help me god, I shal thee never smyte; [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 127

'As I shal tellen thee a feithful tale, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 747

[continues previous] Consenteth it, that dar I undertake;
11

Clerk's Tale: 748

[continues previous] And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye,
11

Melibee's Prologue: 24

Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 25

As thus; ye woot that every evangelist, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 175

Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 88

God help me so, for he shal never thee! [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 799

And as I may deserve it un-to yow, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 800

What shal this receit coste? telleth now!' [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 349

Than mighte hit be, as I yow tellen shal; [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 238

Why I have told this story, and tellen shal.
10

Legend of Dido: 239

Thus I beginne; hit fil, upon a night,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 701

From hennesforth how that I wroughte, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 702

I shal you tellen, as me thoughte. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1290

Sin god hath wrought me for I shal yow serve, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1291

As thus I mene, that ye wol be my stere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 735

And thus she wroughte, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

[continues previous] And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here: [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 170

As help me god, he is noght worth at al
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

[continues previous] As help me god, I shal thee never smyte;
10

Friar's Tale: 127

[continues previous] 'As I shal tellen thee a feithful tale,
10

Melibee's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse.
11

Melibee's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] As thus; ye woot that every evangelist,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

[continues previous] I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.'
11

Second Nun's Tale: 175

[continues previous] Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 88

[continues previous] God help me so, for he shal never thee!
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 799

[continues previous] And as I may deserve it un-to yow,
11

Parson's Tale: 29

... ne deyntee as in regard of hise desertes, consideringe evere his freletee. Now been ther three maneres of humilitee; as humilitee in herte, and another humilitee in his mouth; the thridde in hise werkes. The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres: that oon is, whan a man holdeth him-self as noght worth biforn god of hevene. Another is, whan he ne despyseth noon other man. The thridde is, whan he rekketh nat thogh men holde him noght worth. The ferthe is, whan he nis nat sory of his humiliacion. Also, the humilitee of mouth is in foure thinges: in attempree speche, and in humblesse of speche, and whan ...
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 349

[continues previous] Than mighte hit be, as I yow tellen shal;
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 23

That al the world he sette at no value. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 702

[continues previous] I shal you tellen, as me thoughte.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1290

[continues previous] Sin god hath wrought me for I shal yow serve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1291

[continues previous] As thus I mene, that ye wol be my stere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 735

[continues previous] And thus she wroughte, as I shal yow devyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 999

[continues previous] As helpe me Pallas with hir heres clere,
10

Shipman's Tale: 171

In no degree the value of a flye.
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 23

[continues previous] That al the world he sette at no value.
12

Shipman's Tale: 173

And wel ye woot that wommen naturelly
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 182

'Wommen desyren to have sovereyntee [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 278

If gentillesse were planted naturelly [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 458

For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures —
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

... lordshipe and maistrie of his persone, men wolden nat be conseilled so ofte. For soothly, thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... a derk cloude bitwixe us and the sonne. 'Lond of misese': by-cause that ther been three maneres of defautes, agayn three thinges that folk of this world han in this present lyf, that is to seyn, honours, delyces, and richesses. Agayns honour, have they in helle shame and confusion. For wel ye woot that men clepen 'honour' the reverence that man doth to man; but in helle is noon honour ne reverence. For certes, na-more reverence shal be doon there to a king than to a knave. For which god seith by the prophete Ieremye: 'thilke folk that me despysen shul been in despyt.' ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe,
12

Shipman's Tale: 174

Desyren thinges sixe, as wel as I.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 182

[continues previous] 'Wommen desyren to have sovereyntee
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 183

[continues previous] As wel over hir housbond as hir love,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 277

[continues previous] Eek every wight wot this as wel as I,
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... of his persone, men wolden nat be conseilled so ofte. For soothly, thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and ...
11

Parson's Tale: 80

... that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek ... [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 175

They wolde that hir housbondes sholde be
14

Squire's Tale: 19

And ther-to be was hardy, wys, and riche, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 93

We alle desyren, if it mighte be, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 94

To han housbondes hardy, wyse, and free, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... a womman that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente of engendrure of children to the service of god, for certes that is the ...
15+

Shipman's Tale: 176

Hardy, and wyse, and riche, and ther-to free,
14

Squire's Tale: 19

[continues previous] And ther-to be was hardy, wys, and riche, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 20

[continues previous] Pitous and Iust, and ever-more y-liche [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 94

[continues previous] To han housbondes hardy, wyse, and free, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 95

[continues previous] And secree, and no nigard, ne no fool, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 177

And buxom to his wyf, and fresh a-bedde.
13

Squire's Tale: 19

[continues previous] And ther-to be was hardy, wys, and riche,
12

Squire's Tale: 20

[continues previous] Pitous and Iust, and ever-more y-liche
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 94

[continues previous] To han housbondes hardy, wyse, and free,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 95

[continues previous] And secree, and no nigard, ne no fool,
12

Shipman's Tale: 178

But, by that ilke lord that for us bledde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1236

For, by that ilke lord that made me,
12

Shipman's Tale: 180

A Sonday next, I moste nedes paye
11

Merchant's Tale: 1061

I am a womman, nedes moot I speke, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 435

Than moste she nedes holden hir biheste, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 201

For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 181

An hundred frankes, or elles am I lorn.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1061

[continues previous] I am a womman, nedes moot I speke,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1062

[continues previous] Or elles swelle til myn herte breke.
12

Franklin's Tale: 436

[continues previous] Or elles he shal shame hir atte leste.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 201

[continues previous] For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 271

An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye,
11

Shipman's Tale: 389

That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 591

Or elles were him lever, soule and bones, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 182

Yet were me lever that I were unborn
13

Merchant's Tale: 194

Yet were me lever houndes had me eten, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 195

Than that myn heritage sholde falle [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 794

That fro his lust yet were him lever abyde [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 287

For, by my trouthe, me were lever dye, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 288

Than I yow sholde to hasardours allye. [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 23

Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 10

It were me lever that it were for shame; but it semeth me that [continues next]
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 37

For yet me were wel lever for to sterve [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1034

For dredelees, me were lever dye [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

Than she of me ought elles understode [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 591

[continues previous] Or elles were him lever, soule and bones,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1491

Yet sholde I bet enduren al my peyne.' [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 183

Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileinye;
11

Merchant's Tale: 194

[continues previous] Yet were me lever houndes had me eten,
13

Merchant's Tale: 195

[continues previous] Than that myn heritage sholde falle
10

Franklin's Tale: 794

[continues previous] That fro his lust yet were him lever abyde
10

Franklin's Tale: 795

[continues previous] Than doon so heigh a cherlish wrecchednesse
11

Pardoner's Tale: 287

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, me were lever dye,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 288

[continues previous] Than I yow sholde to hasardours allye.
12

Manciple's Prologue: 23

[continues previous] Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe
12

Manciple's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Than the beste galoun wyn in Chepe.'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 10

[continues previous] It were me lever that it were for shame; but it semeth me that
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 37

[continues previous] For yet me were wel lever for to sterve
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 38

[continues previous] Than in my herte for to make an horde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1034

[continues previous] For dredelees, me were lever dye
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

[continues previous] Than she of me ought elles understode
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

[continues previous] Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne,
11

Shipman's Tale: 184

And if myn housbond eek it mighte espye,
11

Miller's Tale: 107

Whan that she may hir leyser wel espye.
11

Miller's Tale: 108

'Myn housbond is so ful of Ialousye,
11

Friar's Tale: 141

Nere myn extorcioun, I mighte nat liven, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 185

I nere but lost, and therfore I yow preye
11

Friar's Tale: 119

'Now, brother,' quod this Somnour, 'I yow preye, [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 140

[continues previous] No maner conscience of that have I;
11

Friar's Tale: 141

[continues previous] Nere myn extorcioun, I mighte nat liven,
11

Clerk's Tale: 107

That charge up-on my bak I wol endure;
11

Clerk's Tale: 108

But I yow preye, and charge up-on your lyf,
12

Shipman's Tale: 186

Lene me this somme, or elles moot I deye.
11

Friar's Tale: 119

[continues previous] 'Now, brother,' quod this Somnour, 'I yow preye,
11

Friar's Tale: 120

[continues previous] Teche me, whyl that we ryden by the weye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1061

I am a womman, nedes moot I speke, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1062

Or elles swelle til myn herte breke. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 49

Lerneth to suffre, or elles, so moot I goon,
12

Monk's Prologue: 26

And out at dore anon I moot me dighte, [continues next]
12

Monk's Prologue: 27

Or elles I am but lost, but-if that I [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 52

And sende him drinke, or elles moste he deye;
10

Monk's Tale: 53

And of this asses cheke, that was dreye,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 187

As I have seid, of shames deeth I deye! [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 188

And mercy, lady! I can nat elles seye!' [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 187

Daun Iohn, I seye, lene me thise hundred frankes;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1061

[continues previous] I am a womman, nedes moot I speke,
14

Shipman's Tale: 201

For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.' [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 270

I wolde prey yow; for to lene me
14

Shipman's Tale: 271

An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 292

After my might ful fayn wolde I yow plese.' [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 293

Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 314

This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 315

That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night
10

Shipman's Tale: 402

'Marie, I defye the false monk, daun Iohn!
10

Shipman's Tale: 403

I kepe nat of hise tokenes never a deel;
11

Monk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] And out at dore anon I moot me dighte,
11

Monk's Prologue: 27

[continues previous] Or elles I am but lost, but-if that I
11

Legend of Ariadne: 188

[continues previous] And mercy, lady! I can nat elles seye!'
15+

Shipman's Tale: 188

Pardee, I wol nat faille yow my thankes,
11

Summoner's Tale: 106

I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 107

I wol with Thomas speke a litel throwe. [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 201

[continues previous] For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.'
15+

Shipman's Tale: 292

[continues previous] After my might ful fayn wolde I yow plese.'
11

Prioress' Tale: 124

Mordre wol out, certein, it wol nat faille,
11

Monk's Prologue: 81

And if yow list to herkne hiderward, [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 82

I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 472

Fro point to point, nat o word wol he faille. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

I wol yow teche pleynly the manere, [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1632

For-thy, with al myn herte I yow beseke, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1633

If that yow list don ought for my preyere, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 189

If that yow list to doon that I yow praye.
10

Knight's Tale: 1392

That, if yow list, I shal wel have my love,
11

Summoner's Tale: 106

[continues previous] I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve,
10

Summoner's Tale: 252

To praye for yow ben insufficient? [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 253

Thomas, that Iape nis nat worth a myte; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 190

For at a certein day I wol yow paye, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 191

And doon to yow what plesance and servyce
11

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
12

Monk's Prologue: 81

[continues previous] And if yow list to herkne hiderward,
12

Monk's Prologue: 82

[continues previous] I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward;
10

Monk's Tale: 473

[continues previous] Al-though that Nero were as vicious
10

Second Nun's Tale: 170

'If that yow list, the angel shul ye see,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

[continues previous] I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 37

For which I seye, if that yow list to here
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose.
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1632

[continues previous] For-thy, with al myn herte I yow beseke, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1633

[continues previous] If that yow list don ought for my preyere, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 190

For at a certein day I wol yow paye,
10

Summoner's Tale: 252

[continues previous] To praye for yow ben insufficient?
10

Shipman's Tale: 189

[continues previous] If that yow list to doon that I yow praye. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 413

Ye han mo slakker dettours than am I! [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 414

For I wol paye yow wel and redily [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 415

Fro day to day; and, if so be I faille, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 424

By god, I wol nat paye yow but a-bedde. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

[continues previous] I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 22

And certein, or I ferther pace, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 23

I wol yow al the shap devyse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1633

[continues previous] If that yow list don ought for my preyere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 921

And bet to serven yow wol doon his might. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 191

And doon to yow what plesance and servyce
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 376

Cheseth your-self, which may be most plesance, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 377

And most honour to yow and me also. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 979

And so hope I that he wol to yow sende [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 980

Plesance y-nogh un-to your lyves ende. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 189

[continues previous] If that yow list to doon that I yow praye. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 414

[continues previous] For I wol paye yow wel and redily
11

Shipman's Tale: 415

[continues previous] Fro day to day; and, if so be I faille,
11

Shipman's Tale: 423

[continues previous] Ye shal my Ioly body have to wedde;
11

Shipman's Tale: 424

[continues previous] By god, I wol nat paye yow but a-bedde.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

[continues previous] I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

[continues previous] I wol yow teche pleynly the manere,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 22

[continues previous] And certein, or I ferther pace,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 921

[continues previous] And bet to serven yow wol doon his might.
13

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 34

To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 376

[continues previous] Cheseth your-self, which may be most plesance,
11

Clerk's Tale: 49

And ye, my lord, to doon right as yow leste.
11

Clerk's Tale: 597

Right as yow list; axeth no reed at me.
10

Clerk's Tale: 979

[continues previous] And so hope I that he wol to yow sende
11

Merchant's Tale: 572

And they han doon right as he wol devyse. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 62

This noble monk, of which I yow devyse,
13

Shipman's Tale: 63

Hath of his abbot, as him list, licence,
11

Shipman's Tale: 189

[continues previous] If that yow list to doon that I yow praye.
11

Shipman's Tale: 268

It shal be doon, right as ye wol devyse.
11

Shipman's Tale: 286

Take what yow list, god shilde that ye spare. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 93

Swich vois, right as yow list, to laughe or pleyne.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 152

Construeth that as yow list, I do no cure. [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 156

And for my sustenance yit wol I swinke, [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 157

Right as yow list, that Minos ne no wight — [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 120

And al thonour that men may doon yow have,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 121

As ferforth as your fader dwelled here,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 852

Right as thy-selven list, wol doon by thee,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 136

And I to han, right as yow list, comfort, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 204

With that Eleyne and also Deiphebus [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 238

In his woodnesse, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 239

Right as the wilde bole biginneth springe [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 193

And but I do, god take on me vengeance
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 34

[continues previous] To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 35

[continues previous] But natheles, whyl I have tyme and space,
11

Merchant's Tale: 572

[continues previous] And they han doon right as he wol devyse.
11

Merchant's Tale: 573

[continues previous] Men drinken, and the travers drawe anon;
11

Shipman's Tale: 285

[continues previous] And nat only my gold, but my chaffare;
11

Shipman's Tale: 286

[continues previous] Take what yow list, god shilde that ye spare.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 152

[continues previous] Construeth that as yow list, I do no cure.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 153

[continues previous] And tho that hadde doon unkindenesse —
11

Legend of Ariadne: 156

[continues previous] And for my sustenance yit wol I swinke,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 136

[continues previous] And I to han, right as yow list, comfort,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

[continues previous] This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 204

[continues previous] With that Eleyne and also Deiphebus
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 238

[continues previous] In his woodnesse, as I shal yow devyse.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 195

This gentil monk answerde in this manere;
11

Friar's Tale: 40

This false theef, this Somnour, quod the Frere, [continues next]
15+

Friar's Tale: 327

Up-on hir knees, he seyde in this manere, [continues next]
15+

Friar's Tale: 329

Is this your wil in ernest, that ye seye?' [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 276

Right in this wyse to Placebo answerde: [continues next]
15+

Physician's Epilogue: 16

This is a pitous tale for to here. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 54

After that Dame Prudence hadde spoken in this manere, Melibee answerde and seyde, 'I see wel, dame Prudence, that by your faire wordes and by your resons that ye han shewed me, that the werre lyketh yow no-thing; but I have nat yet herd your conseil, how I shal do in this nede.'
11

Second Nun's Tale: 321

This lyf to lese, myn owene dere brother, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 322

If this were livinge only and non other. [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 334

Ne seydestow right now in this manere, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 639

Right verraily, in this manere [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 193

For which this Adriane in this manere
11

Legend of Ariadne: 194

Answerde to his profre and to his chere.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 240

And to her suster seide in this manere, [continues next]
11

Balade of Compleynt: 19

Ne yit to long to suffren in this plyte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 872

In which myn herte growen is so faste, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 468

But welaway, al this nas but a mase; [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 196

'Now, trewely, myn owene lady dere,
11

Friar's Tale: 39

[continues previous] Ne spareth nat, myn owene maister dere.'
12

Friar's Tale: 269

Heer may ye see, myn owene dere brother, [continues next]
15+

Friar's Tale: 328

[continues previous] 'Now Mabely, myn owene moder dere,
14

Clerk's Tale: 87

'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 825

Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Prologue: 31

'Gladly,' quod he, 'but of myn owene sore, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 244

Myn owene dere brother and my lord,
10

Merchant's Tale: 277

[continues previous] 'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye,
15+

Physician's Epilogue: 15

[continues previous] But trewely, myn owene mayster dere,
10

Shipman's Tale: 279

And fare-now wel, myn owene cosin dere, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 425

Forgive it me, myn owene spouse dere;
11

Second Nun's Tale: 321

[continues previous] This lyf to lese, myn owene dere brother,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 333

[continues previous] To whom answerde Tiburce, 'o suster dere,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 334

[continues previous] Ne seydestow right now in this manere,
10

Manciple's Tale: 117

And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 640

[continues previous] They seyden: 'Mercy, lady dere!
10

Legend of Ariadne: 218

'Ye, lady myn,' quod he, 'or elles torn [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 241

[continues previous] Al softely, 'now, suster myn,' quod she,
12

Amorous Compleint: 77

Forgiveth it me, myn owne lady dere! [continues next]
11

Balade of Compleynt: 20

[continues previous] I yow beseche, myn hertes lady dere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 772

'As though myn owene lyf lay on this nede?' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

[continues previous] My dere herte, and al myn owene knight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 147

Lo, this mene I, myn owene swete herte.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1485

But nathelees, myn owene lady bright,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 405

For-thy be glad, myn owene dere brother,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1311

That day by day, myn owene herte dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1449

Dwel rather here, myn owene swete herte!
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1450

For trewely, myn owene lady dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 162

And wondreth not, myn owene lady bright, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 218

'Wher is myn owene lady lief and dere,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 467

[continues previous] Wel-come, y-wis, myn owene lady dere.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 565

'Lo, yond saugh I myn owene lady daunce; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 576

Herde I myn alderlevest lady dere [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 669

'Lo, yonder is myn owene lady free,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1315

And to Criseyde, his owene lady dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1401

Y-wis, myn owene dere herte trewe, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 197

I have,' quod he, 'on yow so greet a routhe,
12

Friar's Tale: 268

[continues previous] 'Lo! brother,' quod the feend, 'what tolde I thee?
14

Clerk's Tale: 87

[continues previous] 'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere,
14

Clerk's Tale: 88

[continues previous] To that I never erst thoghte streyne me.
11

Clerk's Tale: 826

[continues previous] I was your wyf, thogh I unworthy were.
10

Clerk's Tale: 945

A ful greet fool is he that on yow leveth!' [continues next]
10

Merchant's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] 'Gladly,' quod he, 'but of myn owene sore,
10

Shipman's Tale: 278

[continues previous] For yet to-night thise beestes moot I beye;
11

Melibee's Tale: 48

... knowen wel, that ye maken no defence as now for to defende yow, but for to venge yow; and so seweth it that ye han no wil to do your dede attemprely. And therfore, me thinketh that pacience is good. For Salomon seith: that "he that is nat pacient shal have greet harm."'
11

Melibee's Tale: 49

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, that whan a man is inpacient and wroth, of that that toucheth him noght and that aperteneth nat un-to him, though it harme him, it is no wonder. For the lawe seith: that "he is coupable that entremetteth or medleth with swich thyng as aperteneth nat un-to him." And Salomon ...
12

Legend of Dido: 422

So greet a routhe I have hit for tendyte — [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 218

[continues previous] 'Ye, lady myn,' quod he, 'or elles torn
10

Legend of Ariadne: 219

[continues previous] Mote I be with the Minotaur to-morwe!
12

Amorous Compleint: 78

[continues previous] Ever have I been, and shal, how-so I wende,
11

Balade of Compleynt: 20

[continues previous] I yow beseche, myn hertes lady dere,
11

Balade of Compleynt: 21

[continues previous] Sith I yow serve, and so wil yeer by yere.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 771

[continues previous] 'What? not as bisily,' quod Pandarus,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 772

[continues previous] 'As though myn owene lyf lay on this nede?'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

[continues previous] 'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

[continues previous] 'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

[continues previous] 'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 122

'I? what?' quod he, 'that ye han on him routhe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 147

[continues previous] Lo, this mene I, myn owene swete herte.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 148

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'lo, here an hard request,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

[continues previous] 'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

[continues previous] 'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1451

[continues previous] Tho sleightes yet that I have herd yow stere
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 163

[continues previous] Though that I speke of love to you thus blyve;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 565

[continues previous] 'Lo, yond saugh I myn owene lady daunce;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 576

[continues previous] Herde I myn alderlevest lady dere
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1316

[continues previous] He wroot right thus, and seyde as ye may here.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1402

[continues previous] I woot that, whan ye next up-on me see,
14

Shipman's Tale: 198

That I yow swere and plighte yow my trouthe,
10

Clerk's Tale: 945

[continues previous] A ful greet fool is he that on yow leveth!'
11

Franklin's Tale: 808

Sith thilke tyme which that ye were born. [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 809

My trouthe I plighte, I shal yow never repreve [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 421

[continues previous] Compleyned had, of which I may nat wryte —
12

Legend of Dido: 422

[continues previous] So greet a routhe I have hit for tendyte —
13

Legend of Ariadne: 234

Upon my trouthe I swere, and yow assure,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 122

[continues previous] 'I? what?' quod he, 'that ye han on him routhe,
12

Shipman's Tale: 199

That whan your housbond is to Flaundres fare,
12

Franklin's Tale: 808

[continues previous] Sith thilke tyme which that ye were born.
11

Shipman's Tale: 239

To Flaundres wol I go to-morwe at day, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 200

I wol delivere yow out of this care;
10

Knight's Tale: 757

And mete and drinke this night wol I bringe [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 239

[continues previous] To Flaundres wol I go to-morwe at day,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 457

If they werne me thanne to bringe me out of bendes, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1445

To reste bringe out of this cruel sorwe, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 201

For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.'
10

Knight's Tale: 757

[continues previous] And mete and drinke this night wol I bringe
10

Knight's Tale: 758

[continues previous] Y-nough for thee, and clothes for thy beddinge.
12

Knight's Tale: 993

Everich of yow shal bringe an hundred knightes,
12

Knight's Tale: 994

Armed for listes up at alle rightes,
11

Shipman's Tale: 180

A Sonday next, I moste nedes paye
11

Shipman's Tale: 181

An hundred frankes, or elles am I lorn.
14

Shipman's Tale: 187

Daun Iohn, I seye, lene me thise hundred frankes;
14

Shipman's Tale: 188

Pardee, I wol nat faille yow my thankes,
13

Shipman's Tale: 270

I wolde prey yow; for to lene me
13

Shipman's Tale: 271

An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 292

After my might ful fayn wolde I yow plese.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 293

Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 315

That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 389

That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 457

[continues previous] If they werne me thanne to bringe me out of bendes,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 458

[continues previous] I wol sette goode strokes right on here lendes.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1445

[continues previous] To reste bringe out of this cruel sorwe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1446

[continues previous] I wol my-selven slee if that ye drecche.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 202

And with that word he caughte hir by the flankes,
13

Knight's Tale: 541

And with that word he caughte a greet mirour,
11

Knight's Tale: 542

And saugh that chaunged was al his colour,
11

Miller's Tale: 90

And prively he caughte hir by the queynte, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 91

And seyde, 'y-wis, but if ich have my wille, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 293

[continues previous] Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon,
11

Shipman's Tale: 314

[continues previous] This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn,
11

Shipman's Tale: 315

[continues previous] That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night
15+

Shipman's Tale: 389

[continues previous] That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed
15+

Shipman's Tale: 203

And hir embraceth harde, and kiste hir ofte.
11

Miller's Tale: 90

[continues previous] And prively he caughte hir by the queynte,
11

Miller's Tale: 91

[continues previous] And seyde, 'y-wis, but if ich have my wille,
12

Miller's Tale: 416

Ful ofte he seith 'allas' and 'weylawey,' [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 95

And hir embraceth in his armes narwe,
15+

Summoner's Tale: 96

And kiste hir swete, and chirketh as a sparwe
10

Shipman's Tale: 378

His wyf al newe, and kiste hir on hir face,
10

Shipman's Tale: 379

And up he gooth and maketh it ful tough.
10

Legend of Dido: 133

And al hir tempest and hir harde cas,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1161

But ofte tyme hir colde mouth he kiste; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1219

Took hir in armes two, and kiste hir ofte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1220

And hir to glade he dide al his entente;
12

Shipman's Tale: 204

'Goth now your wey,' quod he, 'al stille and softe,
11

Knight's Tale: 1701

With long swerd and with maces fight your fille.
12

Knight's Tale: 1702

Goth now your wey; this is the lordes wille.'
12

Miller's Tale: 415

[continues previous] This sely carpenter goth forth his wey.
12

Miller's Tale: 416

[continues previous] Ful ofte he seith 'allas' and 'weylawey,'
11

Franklin's Tale: 744

'Ye, wyf,' quod he, 'lat slepen that is stille; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 223

What! lat us here a messe, and go we dyne.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 953

Quod Pandarus, 'ly stille, and lat me slepe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 954

And don thyn hood, thy nedes spedde be; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 698

And gan the stewe-dore al softe un-pinne, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 699

And stille as stoon, with-outen lenger lette, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1161

[continues previous] But ofte tyme hir colde mouth he kiste;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1129

And for-thy lat us dyne, I thee biseche; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1130

And after noon than mayst thou come ayeyn.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 205

And lat us dyne as sone as that ye may;
12

Merchant's Tale: 570

'For goddes love, as sone as it may be,
12

Merchant's Tale: 571

Lat voyden al this hous in curteys wyse.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 744

[continues previous] 'Ye, wyf,' quod he, 'lat slepen that is stille;
10

Shipman's Tale: 223

[continues previous] What! lat us here a messe, and go we dyne.'
10

Shipman's Tale: 240

And come agayn, as sone as ever I may. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 417

And I shal paye, as sone as ever I may. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 953

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'ly stille, and lat me slepe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 954

[continues previous] And don thyn hood, thy nedes spedde be;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 698

[continues previous] And gan the stewe-dore al softe un-pinne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 699

[continues previous] And stille as stoon, with-outen lenger lette,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1128

[continues previous] Pandare answerde, 'it may wel be, certeyn;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1129

[continues previous] And for-thy lat us dyne, I thee biseche;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1130

[continues previous] And after noon than mayst thou come ayeyn.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 206

For by my chilindre it is pryme of day.
10

Shipman's Tale: 241

[continues previous] For which, my dere wyf, I thee biseke,
12

Shipman's Tale: 418

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, I have on myn array,
12

Shipman's Tale: 207

Goth now, and beeth as trewe as I shal be.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 492

Un-to that day in which that I shal crepe [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 206

Been as trewe and loving as a man! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 113

'A! god forbede!' quod she, 'be ye mad?' [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 208

'Now, elles god forbede, sire,' quod she,
11

Reeve's Tale: 301

And forth she gooth til she the cradel fond. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this,
11

Merchant's Tale: 421

And elles, god forbede but he sente
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 122

Now, sire,' quod she, 'whan we flee fro the bemes,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 493

[continues previous] In-to my grave, and elles god forbede;
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 511

Quod the chanoun, 'and elles god forbede!' [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 205

[continues previous] But god forbede but a woman can
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 113

[continues previous] 'A! god forbede!' quod she, 'be ye mad?'
13

Shipman's Tale: 209

And forth she gooth, as Iolif as a pye,
11

Miller's Tale: 153

This Absolon, that Iolif was and gay, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 154

Gooth with a sencer on the haliday, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 169

And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And forth she gooth til she the cradel fond.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 511

[continues previous] Quod the chanoun, 'and elles god forbede!'
13

Shipman's Tale: 210

And bad the cokes that they sholde hem hye,
11

Miller's Tale: 153

[continues previous] This Absolon, that Iolif was and gay,
11

Miller's Tale: 169

[continues previous] And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous,
13

Monk's Tale: 61

Hye on an hille, that men mighte hem see. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 767

So that, for hem, the hous men mighte myne; [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 211

So that men mighte dyne, and that anon.
13

Monk's Tale: 61

[continues previous] Hye on an hille, that men mighte hem see.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 767

[continues previous] So that, for hem, the hous men mighte myne;
12

Shipman's Tale: 212

Up to hir housbonde is this wyf y-gon,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 377

Right so a wyf destroyeth hir housbonde;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 378

This knowe they that been to wyves bonde.'
12

Melibee's Tale: 14

... a good man: but certes, of alle wommen, good womman fond I never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And ...
11

Shipman's Tale: 214

'Qui la?' quod he. 'Peter! it am I,'
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 249

'Ye, certainly,' quod he, 'no wonder is.' [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 425

'I am a gentil womman born,' quod she. [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 426

'I axe thee,' quod he, 'thogh it thee greve, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 118

'So,' quod she, 'as it semeth that blisfulnesse conteneth many [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 77

'And what seystow thanne,' quod she, 'of thilke wrecche that [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 162

'But,' quod she, 'I am certein, by many resouns, that shrewes [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 47

'Certes,' quod she, 'it folweth or comth of thinges that ben [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 525

'And what soun is it lyk?' quod he. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 526

'Peter! lyk beting of the see,' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 215

Quod she, 'what, sire, how longe wol ye faste?
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

[continues previous] 'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this,
11

Shipman's Tale: 216

How longe tyme wol ye rekene and caste [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 425

[continues previous] 'I am a gentil womman born,' quod she.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 426

[continues previous] 'I axe thee,' quod he, 'thogh it thee greve,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 118

[continues previous] 'So,' quod she, 'as it semeth that blisfulnesse conteneth many
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 77

[continues previous] 'And what seystow thanne,' quod she, 'of thilke wrecche that
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 162

[continues previous] 'But,' quod she, 'I am certein, by many resouns, that shrewes
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 47

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod she, 'it folweth or comth of thinges that ben
10

Hous of Fame 2: 525

[continues previous] 'And what soun is it lyk?' quod he.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 379

Y-halowed, and rechased faste [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 800

'What do ye there, beau sire?' quod she,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 857

'Allas!' quod she, 'what wordes may ye bringe?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 858

What wol my dere herte seyn to me,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1325

As ye wel knowe how longe tyme agoon [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1326

That ye me lafte in aspre peynes smerte, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 216

How longe tyme wol ye rekene and caste
11

Shipman's Tale: 215

[continues previous] Quod she, 'what, sire, how longe wol ye faste?
11

Book of the Duchesse: 379

[continues previous] Y-halowed, and rechased faste
12

Book of the Duchesse: 380

[continues previous] Longe tyme; and at the laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1325

[continues previous] As ye wel knowe how longe tyme agoon
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1326

[continues previous] That ye me lafte in aspre peynes smerte,
12

Shipman's Tale: 219

Ye have y-nough, pardee, of goddes sonde;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 425

She kneleth doun, and thanketh goddes sonde. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 335

He shal have never the lasse light, pardee;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 336

Have thou y-nough, thee thar nat pleyne thee.
12

Shipman's Tale: 220

Come doun to-day, and lat your bagges stonde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 842

And ye, sir clerk, lat be your shamfastnesse, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 425

[continues previous] She kneleth doun, and thanketh goddes sonde.
13

Shipman's Tale: 221

Ne be ye nat ashamed that daun Iohn
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 842

[continues previous] And ye, sir clerk, lat be your shamfastnesse,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 843

[continues previous] Ne studieth noght; ley hond to, every man.'
10

Shipman's Tale: 58

A messager, and preyed hath daun Iohn
10

Shipman's Tale: 59

That he sholde come to Seint Denys to pleye
12

Shipman's Tale: 294

And prively he took hem to daun Iohn. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 298

Til that daun Iohn rydeth to his abbeye.
10

Shipman's Tale: 314

This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 315

That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 319

Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 349

Daun Iohn answerde, 'certes, I am fayn
10

Shipman's Tale: 350

That ye in hele ar comen hoom agayn.
11

Shipman's Tale: 402

'Marie, I defye the false monk, daun Iohn!
11

Shipman's Tale: 403

I kepe nat of hise tokenes never a deel;
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 99

hadde nat Fortune ben ashamed that innocence was accused, yit [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 222

Shal fasting al this day elenge goon?
12

Shipman's Tale: 295

[continues previous] No wight in al this world wiste of this lone,
10

Shipman's Tale: 314

[continues previous] This faire wyf accorded with daun Iohn,
13

Shipman's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Til it was day, that daun Iohn wente his way,
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 98

[continues previous] diceret, non). Was not Fortune ashamed of this? Certes, al
13

Shipman's Tale: 223

What! lat us here a messe, and go we dyne.'
10

Shipman's Tale: 204

'Goth now your wey,' quod he, 'al stille and softe,
10

Shipman's Tale: 205

And lat us dyne as sone as that ye may;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1163

Therwith she lough, and seyde, 'go we dyne.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1164

And he gan at him-self to iape faste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1171

'Now, eem,' quod she, 'we wol go dyne anoon;' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1172

And gan some of hir women to hir calle, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1129

And for-thy lat us dyne, I thee biseche;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1130

And after noon than mayst thou come ayeyn.'
13

Shipman's Tale: 224

'Wyf,' quod this man, 'litel canstow devyne
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1171

[continues previous] 'Now, eem,' quod she, 'we wol go dyne anoon;'
15+

Shipman's Tale: 227

And by that lord that cleped is Seint Yve,
11

Reeve's Tale: 344

For by that lord that called is seint Iame,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 312

Now by that lord, that called is seint Iame,
15+

Summoner's Tale: 235

And by that lord that clepid is seint Yve, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 228

Scarsly amonges twelve ten shul thryve,
13

Summoner's Tale: 236

[continues previous] Nere thou our brother, sholdestou nat thryve!
11

Shipman's Tale: 233

Til we be deed, or elles that we pleye
11

Knight's Tale: 729

I wol be deed, or elles thou shalt dye.
10

Knight's Tale: 1180

Who shal be slayn or elles deed for love.
10

Merchant's Tale: 145

Housbond and wyf, what so men Iape or pleye, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 234

A pilgrimage, or goon out of the weye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Housbond and wyf, what so men Iape or pleye,
10

Merchant's Tale: 146

[continues previous] Of worldly folk holden the siker weye;
11

Shipman's Tale: 239

To Flaundres wol I go to-morwe at day,
11

Clerk's Tale: 123

That he wolde graunten hem a certein day [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 199

That whan your housbond is to Flaundres fare,
11

Shipman's Tale: 200

I wol delivere yow out of this care;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 384

Upon the goddes alle, I wol thee swere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 385

To-morwe day, if that thee lyketh here.
14

Shipman's Tale: 240

And come agayn, as sone as ever I may.
13

Clerk's Tale: 95

To wedde me, as sone as ever I may.
12

Clerk's Tale: 124

[continues previous] Of his spousaille, as sone as ever he may; [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 221

And cometh hoom as sone as ever she may. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 854

And voyden hir as sone as ever he mighte.
13

Merchant's Tale: 669

But after mete, as sone as ever I may,
11

Merchant's Tale: 670

I wol my-self visyte him and eek May,
10

Shipman's Tale: 205

And lat us dyne as sone as that ye may; [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 417

And I shal paye, as sone as ever I may. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 61

As sone as ever the sonne ginneth weste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 422

I shal aryse, as sone as ever I may;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 423

And god, to whom myn herte I sacrifyse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 511

She wolde come as sone as ever she mighte.
14

Shipman's Tale: 241

For which, my dere wyf, I thee biseke,
12

Clerk's Tale: 125

[continues previous] For yet alwey the peple som-what dredde
12

Clerk's Tale: 222

[continues previous] For wel she hadde herd seyd, that thilke day
10

Shipman's Tale: 206

[continues previous] For by my chilindre it is pryme of day.
14

Shipman's Tale: 418

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, I have on myn array,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1674

So after this quod she, 'we yow biseke,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1675

My dere brother, Deiphebus, and I,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1676

For love of god, and so doth Pandare eke,
10

Shipman's Tale: 243

And for to kepe our good be curious,
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part ... [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 244

And honestly governe wel our hous.
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... bere with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part to hem that ...
13

Shipman's Tale: 245

Thou hast y-nough, in every maner wyse,
12

Clerk's Tale: 549

Was she to him in every maner wyse; [continues next]
13

Second Nun's Tale: 496

And that thou were, in every maner wyse, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 246

That to a thrifty houshold may suffyse.
12

Clerk's Tale: 549

[continues previous] Was she to him in every maner wyse;
13

Second Nun's Tale: 496

[continues previous] And that thou were, in every maner wyse,
12

Second Nun's Tale: 497

[continues previous] A lewed officer and a veyn Iustyse.
12

Shipman's Tale: 248

Of silver in thy purs shaltow nat faille.'
12

Knight's Tale: 1940

And with that word his speche faille gan, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 472

Fro point to point, nat o word wol he faille. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 249

And with that word his countour-dore he shette,
11

Knight's Tale: 718

For ire he quook, no lenger wolde he byde. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 719

And whan that he had herd Arcites tale, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1940

[continues previous] And with that word his speche faille gan,
12

Merchant's Tale: 562

Wolde go to bedde, he wolde no lenger tarie. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 613

And doun he leyde his heed, and sleep til pryme. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 523

And forth he gooth, no lenger wolde he tarie, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 85

For which ful faste his countour-dore he shette; [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 86

And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 472

[continues previous] Fro point to point, nat o word wol he faille.
11

Monk's Tale: 473

[continues previous] Al-though that Nero were as vicious
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 213

Remembring on his dremes that he mette, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 214

And forth he goth, no lenger wolde he lette, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1332

No lenger wolde he that he kepte [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1615

And with that word doun in his bed he lay, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 250

And doun he gooth, no lenger wolde he lette,
12

Knight's Tale: 718

[continues previous] For ire he quook, no lenger wolde he byde.
11

Knight's Tale: 719

[continues previous] And whan that he had herd Arcites tale,
10

Miller's Tale: 223

This Nicholas no lenger wolde tarie, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 387

That doun he gooth and cryde, 'harrow! I dye!'
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1019

The day goth faste, I wol no lenger lette.
12

Summoner's Tale: 28

He wente his wey, no lenger wolde he reste,
13

Clerk's Tale: 244

And in she gooth with-outen lenger lette,
13

Clerk's Tale: 245

And to the markis she hir fader fette.
12

Merchant's Tale: 562

[continues previous] Wolde go to bedde, he wolde no lenger tarie.
12

Merchant's Tale: 563

[continues previous] He drinketh ipocras, clarree, and vernage
11

Merchant's Tale: 612

[continues previous] Now day is come, I may no lenger wake.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 613

[continues previous] And doun he leyde his heed, and sleep til pryme.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 523

[continues previous] And forth he gooth, no lenger wolde he tarie,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 86

[continues previous] And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 213

[continues previous] Remembring on his dremes that he mette,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 214

[continues previous] And forth he goth, no lenger wolde he lette,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1332

[continues previous] No lenger wolde he that he kepte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1071

And caste his werk ful wysly, or he wroughte. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1072

But Troilus lay tho no lenger doun, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1615

[continues previous] And with that word doun in his bed he lay,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1666

[continues previous] His lady nas no lenger on to triste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

[continues previous] He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende
11

Shipman's Tale: 251

But hastily a messe was ther seyd,
10

Miller's Tale: 224

[continues previous] But doth ful softe un-to his chambre carie
11

Summoner's Tale: 80

I have to-day been at your chirche at messe, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 81

And seyd a sermon after my simple wit, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3289

Of God of Love to hastily;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3290

Ther was no wisdom, but foly.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1072

[continues previous] But Troilus lay tho no lenger doun,
11

Shipman's Tale: 252

And spedily the tables were y-leyd,
11

Summoner's Tale: 81

[continues previous] And seyd a sermon after my simple wit,
12

Shipman's Tale: 253

And to the diner faste they hem spedde;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1020

This glade folk to diner they hem sette; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1021

In Ioye and blisse at mete I lete hem dwelle [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1678

That drowe nigh to hir sesoun, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1679

And spedde hem faste for to sprede; [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 254

And richely this monk the chapman fedde.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1021

[continues previous] In Ioye and blisse at mete I lete hem dwelle
13

Shipman's Tale: 402

'Marie, I defye the false monk, daun Iohn! [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1679

[continues previous] And spedde hem faste for to sprede;
13

Shipman's Tale: 255

At-after diner daun Iohn sobrely
10

Miller's Tale: 476

Ful prively after Iohn the carpenter; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 190

At-after diner gonne they to daunce,
10

Franklin's Tale: 857

This philosophre sobrely answerde, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 402

[continues previous] 'Marie, I defye the false monk, daun Iohn!
10

Shipman's Tale: 256

This chapman took a-part, and prively
10

Miller's Tale: 477

[continues previous] And he drough him a-part out of the chirche, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 857

[continues previous] This philosophre sobrely answerde, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 858

[continues previous] And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde: [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 257

He seyde him thus, 'cosyn, it standeth so,
10

Miller's Tale: 477

[continues previous] And he drough him a-part out of the chirche,
10

Franklin's Tale: 858

[continues previous] And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde:
12

Melibee's Tale: 72

And right anon they token hir wey to the court of Melibee, and token with hem somme of hir trewe freendes, to maken feith for hem and for to been hir borwes. And whan they were comen to the presence of Melibee, he seyde hem thise wordes: 'it standeth thus,' quod Melibee, 'and sooth it is, that ye, causeless, and with-outen skile and resoun, han doon grete iniuries and wronges to me and to my wyf Prudence, and to my doghter also. For ye han entred in-to myn hous by violence, and have doon swich outrage, that alle men knowen ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 866

But wel I woot, that ye wol not do so; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 258

That wel I see to Brugges wol ye go.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1040

How that thou seyst; but fare-wel, I wol go. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 866

[continues previous] But wel I woot, that ye wol not do so;
11

Shipman's Tale: 259

God and seint Austin spede yow and gyde!
10

Summoner's Tale: 106

I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 97

To chese me a wyf, I yow relesse [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 98

That choys, and prey yow of that profre cesse. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 638

And pardoner, I prey thee, drawe thee neer, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

... yow that in this necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1041

[continues previous] A-dieu! be glad! god spede us bothe two!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 632

Yow any-thing, than prey I yow,' quod he, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 260

I prey yow, cosin, wysly that ye ryde;
11

Summoner's Tale: 106

[continues previous] I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 107

[continues previous] I wol with Thomas speke a litel throwe. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 97

[continues previous] To chese me a wyf, I yow relesse
11

Clerk's Tale: 98

[continues previous] That choys, and prey yow of that profre cesse.
11

Merchant's Tale: 321

I prey yow that ye be nat yvel apayd.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 1106

Ladies, I prey yow that ye be nat wrooth;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1107

I can nat glose, I am a rude man.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 637

[continues previous] I prey yow that ye kisse the pardoner.
10

Melibee's Tale: 57

Whanne Melibee hadde herd dame Prudence maken semblant of wratthe, he seyde in this wyse, 'dame, I prey yow that ye be nat displesed of thinges that I seye; for ye knowe wel that I am angry and wrooth, and that is no wonder; and they that been wrothe witen nat wel what they doon, ne what they seyn. Therfore the prophete seith: that "troubled eyen han no cleer sighte." But ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

[continues previous] ... that in this necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 632

[continues previous] Yow any-thing, than prey I yow,' quod he,
11

Shipman's Tale: 261

Governeth yow also of your diete
11

Summoner's Tale: 106

[continues previous] I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve,
11

Shipman's Tale: 264

Fare-wel, cosyn; god shilde yow fro care.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 49

Good men and wommen, o thing warne I yow, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1019

To tarien ought, god shilde us fro mischaunce!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1561

And your honour; god shilde us fro mischaunce! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1434

Thus gooth the world; god shilde us fro mischaunce,
13

Shipman's Tale: 265

If any thing ther be by day or night,
10

Knight's Tale: 354

Ever in his lyf, by day or night or stounde
10

Knight's Tale: 355

In any contree of this Theseus,
12

Squire's Tale: 330

And come agayn, be it by day or night, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 49

[continues previous] Good men and wommen, o thing warne I yow,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 50

[continues previous] If any wight be in this chirche now,
12

Parson's Tale: 104

Now preye I to hem alle that herkne this litel tretis or rede, that if ther be any thing in it that lyketh hem, that ther-of they thanken oure lord Iesu Crist, of whom procedeth al wit and al goodnesse. And if ther be any thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 157

propre heved; or elles, yif ther be any thing to which that
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4085

From hennesforth, by night or day, [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 3

To knowe every tyme of the day by light of the sonne, and every tyme of the night by the sterres fixe, and eke to knowe by night or by day the degree of any signe that assendeth on the Est Orisonte, which that is cleped communly the Assendent, or elles Oruscupum. Tak the altitude of the sonne whan thee list, as I have said; and set the degree of the sonne, in cas that it be by-forn the middel of the day, among thyn ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1562

[continues previous] And if so be that pees her-after take,
13

Shipman's Tale: 266

If it lye in my power and my might,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 155

Thou shalt it do, if it lye in thy might;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.'
12

Squire's Tale: 330

[continues previous] And come agayn, be it by day or night,
12

Parson's Tale: 104

[continues previous] Now preye I to hem alle that herkne this litel tretis or rede, that if ther be any thing in it that lyketh hem, that ther-of they thanken oure lord Iesu Crist, of whom procedeth al wit and al goodnesse. And if ther be any thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat ...
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4086

[continues previous] I shal defende it, if I may,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 267

That ye me wol comande in any wyse,
10

Clerk's Tale: 272

And al this shal be doon in thy presence, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 273

I wol noght speke out of thyn audience.' [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 293

'That, sith it shal be doon in hastif wyse, [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 294

Wol ye assente, or elles yow avyse? [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 571

Lat voyden al this hous in curteys wyse.' [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3096

Than in any wyse it shulde falle [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3097

That ye wratthed shulde been with me.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6357

What wol ye more? in every wyse, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 268

It shal be doon, right as ye wol devyse.
11

Reeve's Tale: 113

I pray yow spede us hethen that ye may.'
11

Reeve's Tale: 114

'It shal be doon,' quod Simkin, 'by my fay;
10

Reeve's Tale: 321

But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 272

[continues previous] And al this shal be doon in thy presence,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 293

[continues previous] 'That, sith it shal be doon in hastif wyse,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 294

[continues previous] Wol ye assente, or elles yow avyse?
14

Merchant's Tale: 572

[continues previous] And they han doon right as he wol devyse.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 756

For it shal be right as he wol devyse.
11

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 507

That I wol doon a maistrie er I go.' [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 508

'Ye,' quod the preest, 'ye, sir, and wol ye so? [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3096

[continues previous] Than in any wyse it shulde falle
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3589

Of Bialacoil, as ye devyse;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3590

I wol him letten in no wyse.'
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6357

[continues previous] What wol ye more? in every wyse,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6358

[continues previous] Right as me list, I me disgyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 336

For it shal been right as thou wolt devyse.
12

Shipman's Tale: 269

O thing, er that ye goon, if it may be,
10

Reeve's Tale: 321

[continues previous] But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 35

I prey to god that it may plesen yow, [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 113

Shal I percen, if I may, [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 114

Er it be fully pryme of day, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 56

If ye him knewe, it wolde be for your prow; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 507

[continues previous] That I wol doon a maistrie er I go.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

[continues previous] This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1082

And, trewely, I wolde sory be [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 270

I wolde prey yow; for to lene me
11

Summoner's Tale: 106

I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 35

[continues previous] I prey to god that it may plesen yow,
14

Shipman's Tale: 187

Daun Iohn, I seye, lene me thise hundred frankes; [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 201

For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.' [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 389

That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 113

[continues previous] Shal I percen, if I may,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 55

[continues previous] As homely as he rit amonges yow,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 56

[continues previous] If ye him knewe, it wolde be for your prow;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1082

[continues previous] And, trewely, I wolde sory be
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1083

[continues previous] For to seen yow in adversitee.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 271

An hundred frankes, for a wyke or tweye,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 567

But thurgh his magik, for a wyke or tweye, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 181

An hundred frankes, or elles am I lorn.
14

Shipman's Tale: 187

[continues previous] Daun Iohn, I seye, lene me thise hundred frankes;
13

Shipman's Tale: 201

[continues previous] For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.'
13

Shipman's Tale: 389

[continues previous] That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed
15+

Shipman's Tale: 272

For certein beestes that I moste beye,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 567

[continues previous] But thurgh his magik, for a wyke or tweye,
14

Franklin's Tale: 568

[continues previous] It semed that alle the rokkes were aweye.
12

Shipman's Tale: 278

For yet to-night thise beestes moot I beye;
10

Shipman's Tale: 274

God help me so, I wolde it were youres!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 823

God help me so, I was to him as kinde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 182

God help me so, I knowe not swiche tweye.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 275

I shal nat faille surely of my day,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... hem evere, as though they sholde dye anon; but certes they shal nat dye. For as seith Seint Gregorie: 'to wrecche caytives shal be deeth with-oute deeth, and ende with-outen ende, and defaute with-oute failinge. For hir deeth shal alwey liven, and hir ende shal everemo biginne, and hir defaute shal nat faille.' And therfore seith Seint Iohn the Evangelist: 'they shullen folwe deeth, and they shul nat finde him; and they shul desyren to dye, and deeth shal flee fro hem.' And eek Iob seith: that 'in helle is noon ordre of rule.' And al-be-it so that god hath creat alle thinges ...
13

Shipman's Tale: 277

But lat this thing be secree, I yow preye,
10

Miller's Prologue: 32

Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye; [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 33

For I wol telle a legende and a lyf [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 513

But o thing wol I preye yow of your grace,
11

Clerk's Tale: 823

Be seyn al bare; wherfor I yow preye,
11

Clerk's Tale: 824

Lat me nat lyk a worm go by the weye.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 78

Yet preye I yow that reden that I wryte, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 90

And therfor kepe it secree, I yow preye).
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1625

Yet preye I yow on yvel ye ne take, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 278

For yet to-night thise beestes moot I beye;
10

Miller's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] For I wol telle a legende and a lyf
10

Friar's Tale: 266

I pray god save thee and sëynt Loy! [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 268

'Lo! brother,' quod the feend, 'what tolde I thee? [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 88

To that I never erst thoghte streyne me. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 826

I was your wyf, thogh I unworthy were. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 855

Than were I wel; for elles moot I selle [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 197

I have,' quod he, 'on yow so greet a routhe, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 272

For certein beestes that I moste beye,
13

Shipman's Tale: 362

And in his companye moot I gon. [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 78

[continues previous] Yet preye I yow that reden that I wryte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 750

I am myn owene woman, wel at ese, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 751

I thank it god, as after myn estat; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1451

Tho sleightes yet that I have herd yow stere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1402

I woot that, whan ye next up-on me see, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1625

[continues previous] Yet preye I yow on yvel ye ne take,
14

Shipman's Tale: 279

And fare-now wel, myn owene cosin dere,
10

Friar's Tale: 39

Ne spareth nat, myn owene maister dere.'
10

Friar's Tale: 265

[continues previous] That was wel twight, myn owene lyard boy!
10

Friar's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Heer may ye see, myn owene dere brother,
11

Friar's Tale: 328

'Now Mabely, myn owene moder dere, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 87

[continues previous] 'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 825

[continues previous] Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 244

Myn owene dere brother and my lord,
10

Franklin's Tale: 855

[continues previous] Than were I wel; for elles moot I selle
10

Franklin's Tale: 856

[continues previous] Myn heritage; ther is na-more to telle.'
10

Physician's Epilogue: 15

But trewely, myn owene mayster dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
10

Shipman's Tale: 196

[continues previous] 'Now, trewely, myn owene lady dere,
14

Shipman's Tale: 363

[continues previous] Grete wel our dame, myn owene nece swete, [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 364

And fare-wel, dere cosin, til we mete!' [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 425

Forgive it me, myn owene spouse dere; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 426

Turne hiderward and maketh bettre chere.' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 321

This lyf to lese, myn owene dere brother,
10

Manciple's Tale: 117

And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7504

Graunt mercy, swete sire dere!' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

[continues previous] 'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

[continues previous] 'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 750

[continues previous] I am myn owene woman, wel at ese,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

My dere herte, and al myn owene knight,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1304

My ground of ese, and al myn herte dere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 405

For-thy be glad, myn owene dere brother,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1311

That day by day, myn owene herte dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1450

[continues previous] For trewely, myn owene lady dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1661

'And blisful Venus lat me never sterve [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 218

'Wher is myn owene lady lief and dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 467

Wel-come, y-wis, myn owene lady dere.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1401

[continues previous] Y-wis, myn owene dere herte trewe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1421

And fare now wel, myn owene swete herte!
14

Shipman's Tale: 280

Graunt mercy of your cost and of your chere.'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 859

And he bigan with right a mery chere [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 329

[continues previous] Is this your wil in ernest, that ye seye?'
11

Clerk's Tale: 826

[continues previous] I was your wyf, thogh I unworthy were.
12

Shipman's Tale: 364

[continues previous] And fare-wel, dere cosin, til we mete!'
11

Shipman's Tale: 426

[continues previous] Turne hiderward and maketh bettre chere.' [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 150

'Madame,' quod he, 'graunt mercy of your lore.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7503

[continues previous] Sey what you list, and I wol here.'
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7504

[continues previous] Graunt mercy, swete sire dere!'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1304

[continues previous] My ground of ese, and al myn herte dere,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1305

[continues previous] Graunt mercy, for on that is al my trist;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

[continues previous] 'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 281

This noble marchant gentilly anon
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 860

[continues previous] His tale anon, and seyde in this manere. [continues next]
15+

Knight's Tale: 222

And with that cry Arcite anon up-sterte, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 884

This worthy duk answerde anon agayn, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 885

And seyde, 'This is a short conclusioun: [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 20

This noble Marchant heeld a worthy hous,
11

Shipman's Tale: 57

For which he hath to Paris sent anon [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 293

Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 427

[continues previous] This marchant saugh ther was no remedye,
12

Melibee's Tale: 6

This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges ... [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 30

To this sentence answerde anon dame Prudence, and seyde: 'Examineth,' quod she, 'your conseil, and lat us see the whiche of hem han spoken most resonably, and taught yow best conseil. And for-as-muche as that the examinacioun is necessarie, lat us biginne at the surgiens and at the phisiciens, that first speken in this matere. ... [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 282

Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 860

[continues previous] His tale anon, and seyde in this manere.
15+

Knight's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And seyde, 'Cosin myn, what eyleth thee,
12

Knight's Tale: 884

[continues previous] This worthy duk answerde anon agayn,
12

Knight's Tale: 885

[continues previous] And seyde, 'This is a short conclusioun:
10

Miller's Tale: 315

He seyde, 'Iohn, myn hoste lief and dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 58

[continues previous] A messager, and preyed hath daun Iohn
13

Shipman's Tale: 68

Who was so welcome as my lord daun Iohn,
13

Shipman's Tale: 69

Our dere cosin, ful of curteisye?
15+

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
11

Shipman's Tale: 158

'My dere love,' quod she, 'o my daun Iohn, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 294

[continues previous] And prively he took hem to daun Iohn.
13

Shipman's Tale: 348

And thanne he sholde been in Ioye and reste.
13

Shipman's Tale: 349

Daun Iohn answerde, 'certes, I am fayn
12

Melibee's Tale: 6

[continues previous] This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges folk in ...
12

Melibee's Tale: 30

[continues previous] To this sentence answerde anon dame Prudence, and seyde: 'Examineth,' quod she, 'your conseil, and lat us see the whiche of hem han spoken most resonably, and taught yow best conseil. And for-as-muche as that the examinacioun is necessarie, lat us biginne at the surgiens and at the phisiciens, that first speken in this matere. I sey yow, that ...
11

Shipman's Tale: 283

Now sikerly this is a smal requeste;
11

Shipman's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Ful lief were me this conseil for to hyde,
11

Shipman's Tale: 284

My gold is youres, whan that it yow leste.
11

Friar's Tale: 101

And eek of brotherhede, if that yow leste. [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 102

I have gold and silver in my cheste; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 422

With pitous voys, 'O lord, now youres is
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 423

My spirit, which that oughte youres be.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 424

Yow thanke I, lord, that han me brought to this;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 671

The wyn anon, and whan so that yow leste, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 285

And nat only my gold, but my chaffare;
11

Friar's Tale: 102

[continues previous] I have gold and silver in my cheste;
11

Shipman's Tale: 193

And but I do, god take on me vengeance [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 671

[continues previous] The wyn anon, and whan so that yow leste,
12

Shipman's Tale: 286

Take what yow list, god shilde that ye spare.
11

Shipman's Tale: 192

[continues previous] That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
11

Shipman's Tale: 193

[continues previous] And but I do, god take on me vengeance
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1147

Wolde I a lettre un-to yow bringe or take
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1149

But thus ye faren, wel neigh alle and some, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 287

But o thing is, ye knowe it wel y-nogh,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1149

[continues previous] But thus ye faren, wel neigh alle and some,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 291

Paye it agayn whan it lyth in your ese;
11

Clerk's Tale: 608

For wiste I that my deeth wolde do yow ese, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 477

Han in myn hous y-been, to my gret ese; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1225

She wolde fayn, to doon his herte an ese. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1740

And dredelees, for hertes ese of yow, [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 292

After my might ful fayn wolde I yow plese.'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 768

Fayn wolde I doon yow mirthe, wiste I how.
11

Clerk's Tale: 608

[continues previous] For wiste I that my deeth wolde do yow ese,
11

Clerk's Tale: 609

[continues previous] Right gladly wolde I dyen, yow to plese.
11

Clerk's Tale: 640

But now of wommen wolde I axen fayn, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 906

After my lust, and therfor wolde I fayn
11

Merchant's Tale: 174

Old fish and yong flesh wolde I have ful fayn.
12

Shipman's Tale: 187

Daun Iohn, I seye, lene me thise hundred frankes; [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 188

Pardee, I wol nat faille yow my thankes, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 201

For I wol bringe yow an hundred frankes.' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 389

That he yow hadde an hundred frankes payed [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 477

[continues previous] Han in myn hous y-been, to my gret ese;
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 478

[continues previous] And certes, sire, ful fayn wolde I yow plese.
12

Parson's Tale: 104

... be any thing in it that lyketh hem, that ther-of they thanken oure lord Iesu Crist, of whom procedeth al wit and al goodnesse. And if ther be any thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3854

Ful fayn he wolde have fled awey,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1224

[continues previous] In love, but as his suster, him to plese,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1225

[continues previous] She wolde fayn, to doon his herte an ese.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1011

Thus causelees is cropen in-to yow;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1012

The harm of which I wolde fayn delivere!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1102

'Y-wis, so wolde I, and I wiste how,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1103

Ful fayn,' quod she; 'allas! that I was born!'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1740

[continues previous] And dredelees, for hertes ese of yow,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1741

[continues previous] Right fayn wolde I amende it, wiste I how.
15+

Shipman's Tale: 293

Thise hundred frankes he fette forth anon,
11

Clerk's Tale: 641

[continues previous] If thise assayes mighte nat suffyse?
11

Shipman's Tale: 57

For which he hath to Paris sent anon [continues next]