Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 2 to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 2 to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 2 has 1757 lines, and 7% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 69% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 24% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.13 strong matches and 3.92 weak matches.

Geoffrey Chaucer

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10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 8

O lady myn, that called art Cleo,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 229

O lady myn, that I love and no mo!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 15

Wherfore I nil have neither thank ne blame
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6155

Wol I not blame, ne dispyse,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6156

But I nil love it, in no wyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 18

For as myn auctor seyde, so seye I.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 699

And what she thoughte somwhat shal I wryte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 700

As to myn auctor listeth for to endyte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 163

Though that I speke of love to you thus blyve; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 19

Eek though I speke of love unfelingly,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 163

[continues previous] Though that I speke of love to you thus blyve;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 20

No wonder is, for it no-thing of newe is;
10

Melibee's Tale: 49

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, that whan a man is inpacient and wroth, of that that toucheth him noght and that aperteneth nat un-to him, though it harme him, it is no wonder. For the lawe seith: that "he is coupable that entremetteth or medleth with swich thyng as aperteneth nat un-to him." And Salomon seith: that "he that entremetteth him of the noyse or stryf of another man, is lyk to him that taketh an hound by the eres." For right as he ...
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 121

No wonder is, for it is to yow newe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 21

A blind man can nat Iuggen wel in hewis.
11

Clerk's Tale: 472

Ye ben so wys that ful wel knowe ye [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 473

That lordes hestes mowe nat been y-feyned; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 22

Ye knowe eek, that in forme of speche is chaunge
11

Clerk's Tale: 472

[continues previous] Ye ben so wys that ful wel knowe ye
11

Clerk's Tale: 473

[continues previous] That lordes hestes mowe nat been y-feyned;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 127

nis blisful but-yif he be god also ther-with. And seidest eek,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 128

that the forme of good is the substaunce of god and of blisfulnesse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1854

Lo here, the forme of olde clerkes speche
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1855

In poetrye, if ye hir bokes seche. —
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 24

That hadden prys, now wonder nyce and straunge
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 120

He seyde eek thus, 'I woot, yow thinketh straunge, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 121

No wonder is, for it is to yow newe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 25

Us thinketh hem; and yet they spake hem so,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 120

[continues previous] He seyde eek thus, 'I woot, yow thinketh straunge,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

And after this, whan that hem bothe leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 26

And spedde as wel in love as men now do;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

[continues previous] They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 27

Eek for to winne love in sondry ages,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 14

To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 28

In sondry londes, sondry ben usages.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 14

[continues previous] To ferne halwes, couthe in sondry londes; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 29

And for-thy if it happe in any wyse,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 15

[continues previous] And specially, from every shires ende
11

Pardoner's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For I wol preche and begge in sondry londes;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2155

Now is good to here, in fay, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2156

If any be that can it say, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 30

That here be any lovere in this place
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2155

[continues previous] Now is good to here, in fay,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2156

[continues previous] If any be that can it say,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 31

That herkeneth, as the story wol devyse,
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 291

And deyden, as the story wol devyse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1372

And herkeneth how, if that ye wole assente. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1094

Ferther than the story wol devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 32

How Troilus com to his lady grace,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1372

[continues previous] And herkeneth how, if that ye wole assente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1373

[continues previous] Lo, Troilus, men seyn that hard it is
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 35

I noot; but it is me no wonderinge;
11

Compleynt of Venus: 7

Ther oghte blame me no creature, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1555

For which me thinketh every maner wight [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 36

For every wight which that to Rome went,
11

Compleynt of Venus: 8

[continues previous] For every wight preiseth his gentilesse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1555

[continues previous] For which me thinketh every maner wight
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1556

[continues previous] That haunteth armes oughte to biwayle
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 39

If that they ferde in love as men don here,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 432

That ferde as been don in an hyve, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 40

As thus, in open doing or in chere,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 432

[continues previous] That ferde as been don in an hyve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 44

That han in love seyd lyk and doon in al;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1070

Al this Pandare in his herte thoughte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 45

For to thy purpos this may lyken thee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1069

[continues previous] Alderfirst his purpos for to winne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1070

[continues previous] Al this Pandare in his herte thoughte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 46

And thee right nought, yet al is seyd or shal;
11

Knight's Tale: 2172

He moot ben deed, the king as shal a page; [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

... understonde the philosophre that seith, "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshen hir housbondes." And ther-as ye blamen alle wommen and hir resouns, I shal shewe yow by manye ensamples that many a womman hath ben ful good, and yet been; and hir conseils ful hoolsome and profitable. Eek som men han seyd, that "the conseillinge of wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 47

Eek som men grave in tree, som in stoon wal,
11

Knight's Tale: 2173

[continues previous] Som in his bed, som in the depe see,
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... y-blamed. Thus sholde ye understonde the philosophre that seith, "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshen hir housbondes." And ther-as ye blamen alle wommen and hir resouns, I shal shewe yow by manye ensamples that many a womman hath ben ful good, and yet been; and hir conseils ful hoolsome and profitable. Eek som men han seyd, that "the conseillinge of wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 48

As it bitit; but sin I have begonne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 699

And what she thoughte somwhat shal I wryte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 49

Myn auctor shal I folwen, if I conne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 699

[continues previous] And what she thoughte somwhat shal I wryte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 700

[continues previous] As to myn auctor listeth for to endyte.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 50

In May, that moder is of monthes glade,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 90

Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede. [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 185

Ther as that swetnesse evermore y-now is, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 354

That maken hony of floures fresshe of hewe; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1432

And fresshe pervinke, riche of hewe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 611

At ese wel, with hertes fresshe and glade, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 51

That fresshe floures, blewe, and whyte, and rede,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 90

[continues previous] Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede.
13

Knight's Tale: 195

She gadereth floures, party whyte and rede,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 42

Than love I most these floures whyte and rede,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 42

Than love I most these floures whyte and rede,
13

Compleynt of Mars: 2

Lo! Venus risen among yon rowes rede!
13

Compleynt of Mars: 3

And floures fresshe, honoureth ye this day;
13

Parlement of Foules: 185

[continues previous] Ther as that swetnesse evermore y-now is,
15+

Parlement of Foules: 186

[continues previous] With floures whyte, blewe, yelowe, and rede;
15+

Parlement of Foules: 187

And colde welle-stremes, no-thing dede,
11

Parlement of Foules: 354

[continues previous] That maken hony of floures fresshe of hewe;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1432

[continues previous] And fresshe pervinke, riche of hewe,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1433

[continues previous] And floures yelowe, whyte, and rede;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1578

Blewe, yelowe, and rede, that fresh and newe is. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 158

And swote smellen floures whyte and rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 611

[continues previous] At ese wel, with hertes fresshe and glade,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 612

[continues previous] And wel was him that coude best devyse
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 52

Ben quike agayn, that winter dede made,
14

Parson's Tale: 33

... the devel; for it is the develes fourneys, that is eschaufed with the fyr of helle. For certes, right so as fyr is more mighty to destroyen erthely thinges than any other element, right so Ire is mighty to destroyen alle spirituel thinges. Loke how that fyr of smale gledes, that been almost dede under asshen, wollen quike agayn whan they been touched with brimstoon; right so Ire wol everemo quiken agayn, whan it is touched by the pryde that is covered in mannes herte. For certes fyr ne may nat comen out of no-thing, but-if it were first in the same thing naturelly; as fyr is drawen out ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1578

[continues previous] Blewe, yelowe, and rede, that fresh and newe is.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 54

Whan Phebus doth his brighte bemes sprede
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 6: 2

bemes of Phebus, that is to seyn, whan that Phebus the sonne is
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1574

Cast in that welle his bemes brighte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 55

Right in the whyte Bole, it so bitidde
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1573

[continues previous] For whan the sonne, cleer in sighte,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1574

[continues previous] Cast in that welle his bemes brighte,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1575

[continues previous] And that the heet descended is,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 57

That Pandarus, for al his wyse speche,
12

Manciple's Tale: 201

And made him blak, and refte him al his song, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 202

And eek his speche, and out at dore him slong [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1599

And gonne a while of this and that devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1600

But Pandarus brak al this speche anoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 58

Felte eek his part of loves shottes kene,
12

Manciple's Tale: 201

[continues previous] And made him blak, and refte him al his song,
12

Manciple's Tale: 202

[continues previous] And eek his speche, and out at dore him slong
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6197

With rasour whetted never so kene, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 59

That, coude he never so wel of loving preche,
11

Manciple's Tale: 13

That with his singing walled that citee,
11

Manciple's Tale: 14

Coude never singen half so wel as he.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6196

[continues previous] How high that ever his heed he shere
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6197

[continues previous] With rasour whetted never so kene,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6198

[continues previous] That Gyle in braunches cut thrittene;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1796

And over al this, so wel coude he devyse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1797

Of sentement, and in so unkouth wyse
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 60

It made his hewe a-day ful ofte grene;
13

Knight's Tale: 1765

Ful ofte a-day han thise Thebanes two
11

Merchant's Tale: 793

That stood under a laurer alwey grene.
11

Merchant's Tale: 794

Ful ofte tyme he, Pluto, and his quene,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 496

Of the body; and that made al
11

Book of the Duchesse: 497

His hewe chaunge and wexe grene
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1214

For ferde, and myn hewe al pale,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1215

Ful ofte I wex bothe pale and reed;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 61

So shoop it, that him fil that day a tene
10

Shipman's Tale: 53

But so bifel, this marchant on a day
10

Shipman's Tale: 54

Shoop him to make redy his array
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 954

He was so fallen in despeyr that day,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 955

That outrely he shoop him for to deye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 62

In love, for which in wo to bedde he wente,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 605

And up and doun ther made he many a wente, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 63

And made, er it was day, ful many a wente.
10

Merchant's Tale: 529

Which carf biforn the knight ful many a day. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 530

He was so ravisshed on his lady May, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 605

[continues previous] And up and doun ther made he many a wente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 606

[continues previous] And to him-self ful ofte he seyde 'allas!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 64

The swalwe Proignè, with a sorwful lay,
10

Merchant's Tale: 529

[continues previous] Which carf biforn the knight ful many a day.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1167

But whan he saugh that specheles she lay, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1168

With sorwful voys, and herte of blisse al bare, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 180

Hir thoughte hir sorwful herte brast a-two. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 65

Whan morwe com, gan make hir weymentinge,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 152

Myn housbond shal it have bothe eve and morwe,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 153

Whan that him list com forth and paye his dette.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1167

[continues previous] But whan he saugh that specheles she lay,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 180

[continues previous] Hir thoughte hir sorwful herte brast a-two.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 181

[continues previous] For whan she gan hir fader fer aspye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 68

Til she so neigh him made hir chiteringe
12

Hous of Fame 1: 367

And called on hir suster Anne, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 368

And gan hir to compleyne thanne; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 69

How Tereus gan forth hir suster take,
10

Clerk's Tale: 856

For he by noyse of folk knew hir cominge, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 857

And with hir olde cote, as it mighte be, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 367

[continues previous] And called on hir suster Anne,
12

Hous of Fame 1: 368

[continues previous] And gan hir to compleyne thanne;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 419

And took hir suster Phedra tho [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 420

With him, and gan to shippe go. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 70

That with the noyse of hir he gan a-wake;
12

Clerk's Tale: 233

The markis cam and gan hir for to calle; [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 856

[continues previous] For he by noyse of folk knew hir cominge,
10

Clerk's Tale: 857

[continues previous] And with hir olde cote, as it mighte be,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 420

[continues previous] With him, and gan to shippe go.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 477

And with that word she gan to calle [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 478

Hir messanger, that was in halle, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1172

And gan some of hir women to hir calle, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1173

And streyght in-to hir chaumbre gan she goon; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1123

And with a syk, whan he gan bet a-wake, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1124

He seyde, 'O mercy, god, what thing is this?' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 71

And gan to calle, and dresse him up to ryse,
10

Miller's Tale: 282

And to the chambre-dore he gan him dresse.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1002

The morwe cam, and Alla gan him dresse,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1003

And eek his wyf, this emperour to mete;
12

Clerk's Tale: 233

[continues previous] The markis cam and gan hir for to calle;
12

Clerk's Tale: 234

[continues previous] And she sette doun hir water-pot anoon
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 719

To him anon, and his pouder caste in
10

Hous of Fame 3: 477

[continues previous] And with that word she gan to calle
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1773

And for to shete gan him dresse;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1172

[continues previous] And gan some of hir women to hir calle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1173

[continues previous] And streyght in-to hir chaumbre gan she goon;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1123

[continues previous] And with a syk, whan he gan bet a-wake,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 279

Gan after that to dresse him up to fare, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 72

Remembringe him his erand was to done
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 279

[continues previous] Gan after that to dresse him up to fare,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 75

To doon viage, and took his wey ful sone
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 77

For he was late y-come from his viage,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 78

And wente for to doon his pilgrimage.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 504

And wente his wey, ther god yeve him meschance! [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 505

Sone after comth this constable hoom agayn, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1094

A-morwe, and to his neces paleys sterte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1302

And al was wel, he roos and took his leve. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1303

And on his wey ful faste homward he spedde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 76

Un-to his neces paleys ther bi-syde;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 504

[continues previous] And wente his wey, ther god yeve him meschance!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 78

Whan he was come un-to his neces place,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1094

[continues previous] A-morwe, and to his neces paleys sterte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1302

[continues previous] And al was wel, he roos and took his leve.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1303

[continues previous] And on his wey ful faste homward he spedde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 78

Whan he was come un-to his neces place,
10

Merchant's Tale: 754

Ther lakketh noght but only day and place, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 755

Wher that she mighte un-to his lust suffyse: [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 92

Whan Eneas was come un-to that place,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 76

Un-to his neces paleys ther bi-syde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 79

'Wher is my lady?' to hir folk seyde he;
10

Merchant's Tale: 755

[continues previous] Wher that she mighte un-to his lust suffyse:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 702

Of al this werk he tolde him word and ende, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 703

And seyde, 'make thee redy right anon, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 217

And to him-self right thus he spak, and seyde:
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 218

'Wher is myn owene lady lief and dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 80

And they him tolde; and he forth in gan pace,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 702

[continues previous] Of al this werk he tolde him word and ende,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 703

[continues previous] And seyde, 'make thee redy right anon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 84

Of the Sege of Thebes, whyl hem leste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 965

And seyde, 'kneleth now, whyl that yow leste, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 85

Quod Pandarus, 'ma dame, god yow see,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 378

It is ful fair to been y-clept "ma dame," [continues next]
11

Friar's Prologue: 6

'Dame,' quod he, 'god yeve yow right good lyf!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 965

[continues previous] And seyde, 'kneleth now, whyl that yow leste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 966

[continues previous] Ther god your hertes bringe sone at reste!'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 86

With al your book and al the companye!'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 379

[continues previous] And goon to vigilyës al bifore,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 129

For al this world ne can I reden what [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 128

[continues previous] What? bet than swiche fyve? ey, nay, y-wis!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 848

'So shal I do to-morwe, y-wis,' quod she, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1303

'Y-wis,' quod she, 'myn owne hertes list, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 88

And up she roos, and by the hond in hye
12

Squire's Tale: 596

And took him by the hond, seint Iohn to borwe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

[continues previous] 'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

[continues previous] 'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

[continues previous] 'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

[continues previous] 'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

[continues previous] 'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

[continues previous] 'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

[continues previous] 'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 848

[continues previous] 'So shal I do to-morwe, y-wis,' quod she,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 849

[continues previous] 'And god to-forn, so that it shal suffyse.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

[continues previous] 'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1303

[continues previous] 'Y-wis,' quod she, 'myn owne hertes list,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

[continues previous] 'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1661

[continues previous] 'And blisful Venus lat me never sterve
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 89

She took him faste, and seyde, 'this night thrye,
10

Squire's Tale: 595

[continues previous] As I best mighte, I hidde fro him my sorwe,
12

Squire's Tale: 596

[continues previous] And took him by the hond, seint Iohn to borwe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 144

To knowe thing desired she so faste;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 145

And with a syk she seyde him at the laste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 463

And with a sorwful syk she seyde thrye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 91

And with that word she doun on bench him sette.
12

Miller's Tale: 537

This Absolon doun sette him on his knees,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 231

She sette hir doun, and sayde as ye shal here. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 540

She sette her doun on knees, and thus she sayde,
10

Summoner's Tale: 412

And doun anon he sette him on his knee.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1167

And with that word she leep doun fro the tree.
11

Physician's Tale: 253

And with that word aswowne doun she fil.
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 160

Ne folwen him, she sette her doun right tho,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 122

With that word she heng doun the heed,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 123

And fil a-swown as cold as ston;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1228

And doun she sette hir by him on a stoon
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 92

'Ye, nece, ye shal fare wel the bet,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 231

[continues previous] She sette hir doun, and sayde as ye shal here.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 429

'A! may it be no bet?' quod Pandarus; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 93

If god wole, al this yeer,' quod Pandarus;
12

Book of the Duchesse: 522

'A! goode sir, no fors,' quod I, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 106

Quod Pandarus, 'al this knowe I my-selve, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 107

And al the assege of Thebes and the care; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 429

[continues previous] 'A! may it be no bet?' quod Pandarus;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 430

[continues previous] 'By god, I shal no-more com here this wyke,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 94

'But I am sory that I have yow let
12

Book of the Duchesse: 522

[continues previous] 'A! goode sir, no fors,' quod I,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 523

[continues previous] I am right sory if I have ought
11

Book of the Duchesse: 524

Destroubled yow out of your thought;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 106

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'al this knowe I my-selve,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

[continues previous] 'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 639

[continues previous] But tel me than, hastow hir wel assayed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 95

To herknen of your book ye preysen thus;
11

Summoner's Tale: 489

For goddes love your pacience ye holde; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 96

For goddes love, what seith it? tel it us.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 489

[continues previous] For goddes love your pacience ye holde;
10

Summoner's Tale: 490

[continues previous] Tel me your grief:' and he anon him tolde,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1143

For goddes love, tel me al.' [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 123

For goddes love; is than the assege aweye? [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 97

Is it of love? O, som good ye me lere!'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

[continues previous] What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1142

[continues previous] That she hath left yow? is hit this?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

[continues previous] 'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 123

[continues previous] For goddes love; is than the assege aweye?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 493

Ye wol it holden trewly un-to me?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 98

'Uncle,' quod she, 'your maistresse is not here!'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

[continues previous] 'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 99

With that they gonnen laughe, and tho she seyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 58

A tyme of trewe, and tho they gonnen trete,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 101

And we han herd how that king Laius deyde
10

Squire's Tale: 10

Ther dwelte a king, that werreyed Russye, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 11

Thurgh which ther deyde many a doughty man. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 877

The king, with othere lordes, for the beste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 102

Thurgh Edippus his sone, and al that dede;
10

Squire's Tale: 11

[continues previous] Thurgh which ther deyde many a doughty man.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 105

Amphiorax, fil thurgh the ground to helle.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 912

Fil gruf, and gan to wepe pitously. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1500

And how Amphiorax fil through the grounde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 106

Quod Pandarus, 'al this knowe I my-selve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 93

If god wole, al this yeer,' quod Pandarus; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 94

'But I am sory that I have yow let [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 913

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'allas! why do ye so,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 107

And al the assege of Thebes and the care;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 93

[continues previous] If god wole, al this yeer,' quod Pandarus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

[continues previous] 'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1460

[continues previous] And took his leve, and never gan to fyne,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

[continues previous] 'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 109

But lat be this, and tel me how ye fare;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 146

Tel me, what that ye seken, by your fey? [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 125

But as my brother tel me, how do ye?' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1017

Til this be doon? and goode, eek tel me this,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1018

How wiltow seyn of me and my destresse?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 501

Tel me how first ye wisten of his wo:
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 110

Do wey your barbe, and shew your face bare;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 145

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sir knight, heer-forth ne lyth no wey.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 146

[continues previous] Tel me, what that ye seken, by your fey?
13

Friar's Tale: 125

[continues previous] But as my brother tel me, how do ye?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 111

Do wey your book, rys up, and lat us daunce,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 221

But yet, I seye, aryseth, lat us daunce, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 222

And cast your widwes habit to mischaunce: [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 944

But rys, and lat us soupe and go to reste;' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 537

Rys up anoon, and lat this weping be, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 388

And rys up now with-oute more speche, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 389

And lat us caste how forth may best be drive [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 393

Rys, lat us speke of lusty lyf in Troye [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 112

And lat us don to May som observaunce.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 221

[continues previous] But yet, I seye, aryseth, lat us daunce,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 222

[continues previous] And cast your widwes habit to mischaunce:
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 944

[continues previous] But rys, and lat us soupe and go to reste;'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 537

[continues previous] Rys up anoon, and lat this weping be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 538

[continues previous] And kyth thou art a man, for in this houre
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 388

[continues previous] And rys up now with-oute more speche,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 389

[continues previous] And lat us caste how forth may best be drive
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 393

[continues previous] Rys, lat us speke of lusty lyf in Troye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 113

'A! god forbede!' quod she, 'be ye mad?'
12

Shipman's Tale: 207

Goth now, and beeth as trewe as I shal be.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 208

'Now, elles god forbede, sire,' quod she,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 114

Is that a widewes lyf, so god you save?
13

Summoner's Tale: 101

In al the chirche, god so save me!' [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 102

'Ye, god amende defautes, sir,' quod she, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 115

By god, ye maken me right sore a-drad,
13

Summoner's Tale: 101

[continues previous] In al the chirche, god so save me!'
13

Summoner's Tale: 102

[continues previous] 'Ye, god amende defautes, sir,' quod she,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 87

And loveth so sore, that ye ben verrayly [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 116

Ye ben so wilde, it semeth as ye rave!
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 87

[continues previous] And loveth so sore, that ye ben verrayly
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1045

I may wel maken, as it semeth me, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 117

It sete me wel bet ay in a cave
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1045

[continues previous] I may wel maken, as it semeth me,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 120

'As ever thryve I,' quod this Pandarus,
11

Summoner's Tale: 56

So thryve I, quod this Somnour, so I shal. — [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 116

At your requeste, as ever moot I thryve,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 525

'As thryve I,' quod she, 'ye shal faile,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 125

'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'as ever mote I thryve! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 121

'Yet coude I telle a thing to doon you pleye.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 192

For myn entente nis but for to pleye. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale. — [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 56

[continues previous] So thryve I, quod this Somnour, so I shal. — [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 40

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'I have no lust to pleye; [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 41

Now let another telle, as I have told.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 125

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'as ever mote I thryve!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us
10

Reeve's Tale: 320

'Now dere lemman,' quod she, 'go, far weel!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

[continues previous] Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale. —
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 54

'Pees,' quod our Host, 'for Cristes moder dere; [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Tel forth thy tale and spare it nat at al.' [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 490

Tel me your grief:' and he anon him tolde, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Prologue: 4

Sir parish prest,' quod he, 'for goddes bones, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Prologue: 5

Tel us a tale, as was thy forward yore. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 41

[continues previous] Now let another telle, as I have told.'
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1143

For goddes love, tel me al.' [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1144

'Before god,' quod he, 'and I shal. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 96

For goddes love, what seith it? tel it us. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 97

Is it of love? O, som good ye me lere!' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 310

Quod she, 'com of, and tel me what it is; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

[continues previous] 'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

[continues previous] 'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 503

'Can he wel speke of love?' quod she, 'I preye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 594

Now beth nought wrooth, my blood, my nece dere.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 595

'Now wel,' quod she, 'foryeven be it here!'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 123

For goddes love; is than the assege aweye?
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

[continues previous] What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it,
11

Summoner's Tale: 54

[continues previous] 'Pees,' quod our Host, 'for Cristes moder dere;
10

Summoner's Tale: 489

[continues previous] For goddes love your pacience ye holde;
13

Shipman's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] Sir parish prest,' quod he, 'for goddes bones,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1142

[continues previous] That she hath left yow? is hit this?
13

Book of the Duchesse: 1143

[continues previous] For goddes love, tel me al.'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 96

[continues previous] For goddes love, what seith it? tel it us.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 97

[continues previous] Is it of love? O, som good ye me lere!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 309

[continues previous] 'Now, my good eem, for goddes love, I preye,'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 503

[continues previous] 'Can he wel speke of love?' quod she, 'I preye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

[continues previous] Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 124

I am of Grekes so ferd that I deye.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 618

'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'than have I Cristes curs! [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 910

'Nay, nay,' quod Plato, 'certein, that I nille. [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 321

For now I pleyne, and now I pleye,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 322

I am so mased that I deye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 427

For so astonied am I that I deye!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 428

With that she gan ful sorwfully to syke;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 125

'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'as ever mote I thryve!
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 834

As ever mote I drinke wyn or ale,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 194

As ever mote I drinken wyn or ale,
10

Summoner's Tale: 326

'Ye shul be deed,' quod he, 'so moot I thryve! [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 116

At your requeste, as ever moot I thryve, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 117

Ther as myn herte is set, ther wol I wyve; [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 618

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'than have I Cristes curs!
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 910

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay,' quod Plato, 'certein, that I nille.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 80

I wol nat wratthe him, al-so mote I thryve!
11

Manciple's Tale: 151

The mountance of a gnat; so mote I thryve! [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 239

But noght nil I, so mote I thryve,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1067

Wel yvel mote they thryve and thee, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 120

'As ever thryve I,' quod this Pandarus,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 121

'Yet coude I telle a thing to doon you pleye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 135

This thing be told to yow, as mote I thryve!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

[continues previous] 'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 851

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay, it may not stonden in this wyse;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1206

And seyde, 'O swete, as ever mote I goon,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 126

It is a thing wel bet than swiche fyve.'
11

Miller's Tale: 184

This passeth forth; what wol ye bet than wel? [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 327

[continues previous] That is to seyn, bothe oon, and two, and three!'
10

Clerk's Tale: 117

[continues previous] Ther as myn herte is set, ther wol I wyve;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 730

Now gode sirs, what wol ye bet than wel? [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 151

[continues previous] The mountance of a gnat; so mote I thryve!
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1067

[continues previous] Wel yvel mote they thryve and thee,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that? [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 128

What? bet than swiche fyve? ey, nay, y-wis! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 135

[continues previous] This thing be told to yow, as mote I thryve!'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that?
11

Miller's Tale: 184

[continues previous] This passeth forth; what wol ye bet than wel?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 730

[continues previous] Now gode sirs, what wol ye bet than wel?
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?' [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 3

'What doute is that?' quod she. 'For certes, I coniecte now [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 126

[continues previous] It is a thing wel bet than swiche fyve.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 128

[continues previous] What? bet than swiche fyve? ey, nay, y-wis! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 119

Or slee us bothe at ones, er that ye wende.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1604

'O mercy, god, what lyf is this?' quod she;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1605

'Allas, ye slee me thus for verray tene!
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 128

What? bet than swiche fyve? ey, nay, y-wis!
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 105

She swoor him 'nay, for al this world to winne, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

[continues previous] 'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 3

[continues previous] 'What doute is that?' quod she. 'For certes, I coniecte now
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 126

[continues previous] It is a thing wel bet than swiche fyve.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

[continues previous] 'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 129

For al this world ne can I reden what
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 105

[continues previous] She swoor him 'nay, for al this world to winne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 86

[continues previous] With al your book and al the companye!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 675

That al this world ne mighte hir love unbinde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1323

Thal al this world ne mighte our blisse telle.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1696

Ye han me cast, and I ne can nor may,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1697

For al this world, with-in myn herte finde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 132

My wit is for to arede it al to lene;
11

Miller's Tale: 591

As lene it me, I have ther-with to done, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 133

As help me god, I noot nat what ye mene.'
10

Miller's Tale: 523

'As help me god, it wol nat be "com ba me,"
11

Miller's Tale: 585

By sëynt Note, ye woot wel what I mene.' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 586

This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 591

[continues previous] As lene it me, I have ther-with to done,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 201

As help me god, I laughe whan I thinke
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 605

As help me god, I was a lusty oon,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

As help me god, I shal thee never smyte;
10

Manciple's Prologue: 22

As ther is falle on me swich hevinesse,
10

Manciple's Prologue: 23

Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe
12

Legend of Dido: 350

Noot I nat what; and songes wolde he make, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 134

'And I your borow, ne never shal, for me,
13

Knight's Tale: 2066

How they weren feld, shal nat be told for me; [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 2067

Ne how the goddes ronnen up and doun, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 585

[continues previous] By sëynt Note, ye woot wel what I mene.'
11

Miller's Tale: 586

[continues previous] This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene
11

Franklin's Tale: 255

By thilke god that yaf me soule and lyf,
11

Franklin's Tale: 256

Ne shal I never been untrewe wyf
12

Legend of Dido: 350

[continues previous] Noot I nat what; and songes wolde he make,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 135

This thing be told to yow, as mote I thryve!'
13

Knight's Tale: 2066

[continues previous] How they weren feld, shal nat be told for me;
10

Manciple's Prologue: 80

I wol nat wratthe him, al-so mote I thryve!
12

Manciple's Tale: 151

The mountance of a gnat; so mote I thryve! [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 239

But noght nil I, so mote I thryve, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 240

Been aboute to discryve [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 125

'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'as ever mote I thryve!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 126

It is a thing wel bet than swiche fyve.'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she.
11

Franklin's Tale: 271

'Is ther non other grace in yow,' quod he. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 272

'No, by that lord,' quod she, 'that maked me! [continues next]
12

Melibee's Prologue: 7

This may wel be rym dogerel,' quod he. [continues next]
12

Melibee's Prologue: 8

'Why so?' quod I, 'why wiltow lette me [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 151

[continues previous] The mountance of a gnat; so mote I thryve!
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 1: 32

'That wole I gladly don,' quod she, 'for the cause of thee; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 34

'Certes,' quod she, 'and he that hath lakke or nede of aught [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 12

'By whiche governement,' quod she, 'that this world is [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 49

'This is a verray consequence,' quod I. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 50

'And certein is,' quod she, 'that by the getinge of good ben [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 170

'But, certes, shrewes mowen don yvel,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 171

'Ye, wolde god,' quod I, 'that they mighten don non!' [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 178

'Than,' quod she, 'by these causes and by othre causes that [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 16

nat able to ben wened to the poeple.' 'Why so?' quod she. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 55

'Why so?' quod she; 'for right as the stronge man ne semeth [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 192

Quod he. 'No, helpe me god so wis!' — [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 193

Quod I. 'No? why?' quod he. 'For hit [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 239

[continues previous] But noght nil I, so mote I thryve,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 756

'And wherfor didest thou so?' quod she. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 757

'By my thrift,' quod he, 'madame, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 88

And up she roos, and by the hond in hye [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 843

Why doth my dere herte thus, allas?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn!
11

Franklin's Tale: 271

[continues previous] 'Is ther non other grace in yow,' quod he.
11

Franklin's Tale: 272

[continues previous] 'No, by that lord,' quod she, 'that maked me!
12

Melibee's Prologue: 7

[continues previous] This may wel be rym dogerel,' quod he.
12

Melibee's Prologue: 8

[continues previous] 'Why so?' quod I, 'why wiltow lette me
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 1: 32

[continues previous] 'That wole I gladly don,' quod she, 'for the cause of thee;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 3: 34

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod she, 'and he that hath lakke or nede of aught
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 12

[continues previous] 'By whiche governement,' quod she, 'that this world is
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 49

[continues previous] 'This is a verray consequence,' quod I.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 50

[continues previous] 'And certein is,' quod she, 'that by the getinge of good ben
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 170

[continues previous] 'But, certes, shrewes mowen don yvel,' quod she.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 171

[continues previous] 'Ye, wolde god,' quod I, 'that they mighten don non!'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 178

[continues previous] 'Than,' quod she, 'by these causes and by othre causes that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 16

[continues previous] nat able to ben wened to the poeple.' 'Why so?' quod she.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 55

[continues previous] 'Why so?' quod she; 'for right as the stronge man ne semeth
11

Hous of Fame 2: 192

[continues previous] Quod he. 'No, helpe me god so wis!' —
11

Hous of Fame 2: 193

[continues previous] Quod I. 'No? why?' quod he. 'For hit
12

Hous of Fame 3: 756

[continues previous] 'And wherfor didest thou so?' quod she.
12

Hous of Fame 3: 757

[continues previous] 'By my thrift,' quod he, 'madame,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 758

[continues previous] I wolde fayn han had a fame,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 992

But though I telle not as blyve
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

[continues previous] 'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

[continues previous] 'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

[continues previous] 'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

[continues previous] 'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

[continues previous] 'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

[continues previous] 'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

[continues previous] 'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

[continues previous] 'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 870

[continues previous] Ye hadde never thing so leef,' quod she.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

[continues previous] 'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

[continues previous] 'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

[continues previous] 'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 139

And ye it wiste, in al the toun of Troye;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 748

And so men seyn in al the toun of Troye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 749

What wonder is it though he of me have Ioye?
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 881

Of greet estat in al the toun of Troye;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 874

For al the tresour in the toun of Troye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 126

The toun of Troye shal ben set on-fyre.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 204

For he was after traytour to the toun
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 205

Of Troye; allas! they quitte him out to rathe;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 140

I iape nought, as ever have I Ioye!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1129

And took it nought, but al hir humble chere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 348

Gan tho for Ioye wasten and to-melte, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 875

[continues previous] I bidde god, I never mote have Ioye!
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 141

Tho gan she wondren more than biforn
13

Man of Law's Tale: 1022

A thousand fold wel more than I can telle. [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 208

Yet was ther Ioye more a thousand fold [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 546

A thousand fold his wo gan multiplye. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1002

I woot wel that thow wyser art than I [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1128

[continues previous] Ful dredfully tho gan she stonde stille,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1586

A thousand fold yet hyer than the sonne: — [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 348

[continues previous] Gan tho for Ioye wasten and to-melte,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 826

Tho gan she pleyne a thousand tymes more. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 142

A thousand fold, and doun hir eyen caste;
11

Knight's Tale: 1222

With bowe in honde, and arwes in a cas.
11

Knight's Tale: 1223

Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 1022

[continues previous] A thousand fold wel more than I can telle.
10

Franklin's Tale: 129

Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 130

And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke. [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypermnestra: 86

This Ypermistra caste her eyen doun, [continues next]
12

Legend of Hypermnestra: 87

And quook as dooth the leef of aspe grene; [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 208

[continues previous] Yet was ther Ioye more a thousand fold
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 546

[continues previous] A thousand fold his wo gan multiplye.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1003

[continues previous] A thousand fold, but if I were as thou,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1586

[continues previous] A thousand fold yet hyer than the sonne: —
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 522

And to the ground his eyen doun he caste. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 826

[continues previous] Tho gan she pleyne a thousand tymes more.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 143

For never, sith the tyme that she was born,
11

Franklin's Tale: 130

[continues previous] And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke.
10

Franklin's Tale: 808

Sith thilke tyme which that ye were born.
13

Hous of Fame 1: 59

For never, sith that I was born, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 85

[continues previous] Tak this to thee for ful conclusioun.'
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 87

[continues previous] And quook as dooth the leef of aspe grene;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 568

And god wot, never, sith that I was born,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 569

Was I so bisy no man for to preche,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1269

So wel, that never, sith that she was born,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1270

Ne hadde she swich routhe of his distresse;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1595

A hondred sythe he gan the tyme blesse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1596

That he was born to bringe him fro distresse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 522

[continues previous] And to the ground his eyen doun he caste.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 144

To knowe thing desired she so faste;
12

Squire's Tale: 498

And, with a syk, right thus she seyde hir wille. [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 58

[continues previous] Turne us every dreem to gode!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 89

She took him faste, and seyde, 'this night thrye, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 463

And with a sorwful syk she seyde thrye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1596

[continues previous] That he was born to bringe him fro distresse.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 145

And with a syk she seyde him at the laste,
12

Squire's Tale: 498

[continues previous] And, with a syk, right thus she seyde hir wille.
10

Legend of Philomela: 68

Til at the laste Pandion thus seyde:[continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 89

[continues previous] She took him faste, and seyde, 'this night thrye,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 463

[continues previous] And with a sorwful syk she seyde thrye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 464

[continues previous] 'A! lord! what me is tid a sory chaunce!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 801

And with a syk she sorwfully answerde,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1493

And with a syk she seyde, 'O herte dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1494

The game, y-wis, so ferforth now is goon,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1146

And at the laste he torned him, and seyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 146

'Now, uncle myn, I nil yow nought displese,
10

Legend of Philomela: 69

[continues previous] 'Now, sone,' quod he, 'that art to me so dere,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3418

Than do that shulde you displese. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 107

I may out-bringe, and if this yow displese,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 108

That shal I wreke upon myn owne lyf
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 147

Nor axen more, that may do yow disese.'
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3417

[continues previous] Lever I have endure disese
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3418

[continues previous] Than do that shulde you displese.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 149

And freendly tales, and with mery chere,
10

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 15

And after that he, with ful mery chere, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 680

And in thingot putte it with mery chere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 681

And in the water-vessel he it caste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

By Troilus he lay, with mery chere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 150

Of this and that they pleyde, and gunnen wade
10

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 15

[continues previous] And after that he, with ful mery chere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 152

As freendes doon, whan they ben met y-fere;
14

Clerk's Tale: 1057

Bitwixe hem two, now they ben met y-fere.
14

Clerk's Tale: 1058

Thise ladyes, whan that they hir tyme say,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 341

As freendes doon whan they ben met y-fere. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 343

That alwey freendes may nought been y-fere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 344

How doon this folk that seen hir loves wedded
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 853

And forth they speke of this and that y-fere,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 854

As freendes doon, of which som shal ye here.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 153

Til she gan axen him how Ector ferde,
13

Shipman's Tale: 342

[continues previous] Daun Iohn him maketh feste and mery chere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1698

That Ector hadde him sent to axen reed, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 154

That was the tounes wal and Grekes yerde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1698

[continues previous] That Ector hadde him sent to axen reed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 156

'Save in his arm he hath a litel wounde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1040

And eek a broche (and that was litel nede) [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 157

And eek his fresshe brother Troilus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 317

The goode, wyse, worthy, fresshe, and free, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1039

[continues previous] The which he ones wan of Troilus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1040

[continues previous] And eek a broche (and that was litel nede)
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 158

The wyse worthy Ector the secounde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 316

[continues previous] Now, nece myn, the kinges dere sone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 317

[continues previous] The goode, wyse, worthy, fresshe, and free,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 160

As alle trouthe and alle gentillesse,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye. [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 19

He was ther-with fulfild of gentillesse, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 20

Of honour, and of parfit worthinesse. [continues next]
13

Envoy to Scogan: 44

Of grace, of alle honour and worthinesse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1617

But alle trouthe and alle gentilesse. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 161

Wysdom, honour, fredom, and worthinesse.'
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

[continues previous] Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye.
12

Manciple's Tale: 20

[continues previous] Of honour, and of parfit worthinesse.
13

Envoy to Scogan: 44

[continues previous] Of grace, of alle honour and worthinesse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1617

[continues previous] But alle trouthe and alle gentilesse.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 162

'In good feith, eem,' quod she, 'that lyketh me;
13

Envoy to Scogan: 45

[continues previous] In thende of which streme I am dul as deed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 169

'In good feith, that is sooth,' quod Pandarus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 309

'Now, my good eem, for goddes love, I preye,'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 310

Quod she, 'com of, and tel me what it is;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 388

'Now, eem,' quod she, 'what wolde ye devyse,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 499

Til at the laste, 'O good eem,' quod she tho,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1171

'Now, eem,' quod she, 'we wol go dyne anoon;'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 939

'Thanne, eem,' quod she, 'doth her-of as yow list;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 147

Hem lyketh wel, and forth in they procede. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 163

They faren wel, god save hem bothe two!
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 7436

He shulde knowe hem bothe two; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 7437

For wel he knew Dame Abstinaunce [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 147

[continues previous] Hem lyketh wel, and forth in they procede.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 164

For trewely I holde it greet deyntee
14

Franklin's Prologue: 9

For of thy speche I have greet deyntee. [continues next]
14

Franklin's Prologue: 10

I have a sone, and, by the Trinitee, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 7437

[continues previous] For wel he knew Dame Abstinaunce
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 165

A kinges sone in armes wel to do,
14

Franklin's Prologue: 10

[continues previous] I have a sone, and, by the Trinitee,
11

Melibee's Tale: 35

... trewely, I trowe that they seyden right wysly and right sooth. For Tullius seith, "in every nede, er thou biginne it, apparaille thee with greet diligence." Thanne seye I, that in vengeance-taking, in werre, in bataille, and in warnestoring, er thow biginne, I rede that thou apparaille thee ther-to, and do it with greet deliberacioun. For Tullius seith: that "long apparailling biforn the bataille maketh short victorie." And Cassidorus seith: "the garnison is stronger whan it is longe tyme avysed." [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 90

A kinges sone to ben in swich prisoun [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 166

And been of good condiciouns ther-to;
11

Melibee's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... greet deliberacioun; trewely, I trowe that they seyden right wysly and right sooth. For Tullius seith, "in every nede, er thou biginne it, apparaille thee with greet diligence." Thanne seye I, that in vengeance-taking, in werre, in bataille, and in warnestoring, er thow biginne, I rede that thou apparaille thee ther-to, and do it with greet deliberacioun. For Tullius seith: that "long apparailling biforn the bataille maketh short victorie." And Cassidorus seith: "the garnison is stronger whan it is longe tyme avysed." [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 91

[continues previous] And be devoured, thoughte hem gret pitee.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 167

For greet power and moral vertu here
11

Melibee's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... that they seyden right wysly and right sooth. For Tullius seith, "in every nede, er thou biginne it, apparaille thee with greet diligence." Thanne seye I, that in vengeance-taking, in werre, in bataille, and in warnestoring, er thow biginne, I rede that thou apparaille thee ther-to, and do it with greet deliberacioun. For Tullius seith: that "long apparailling biforn the bataille maketh short victorie." And Cassidorus seith: "the garnison is stronger whan it is longe tyme avysed."
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 169

'In good feith, that is sooth,' quod Pandarus;
11

Cook's Prologue: 32

'Thou seist ful sooth,' quod Roger, 'by my fey, [continues next]
11

Cook's Prologue: 33

But "sooth pley, quaad pley," as the Fleming seith; [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 77

soverein good is blisfulnesse.'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 78

'And that is sooth,' quod I.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 163

nothing is so mighty as soverein good.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 164

'That is sooth,' quod I.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 771

'What? not as bisily,' quod Pandarus, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 162

'In good feith, eem,' quod she, 'that lyketh me;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 190

'Ye sey right sooth, y-wis,' quod Pandarus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 490

'I graunte wel,' quod Pandare, 'by my trouthe. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 430

'By god, my conseil is,' quod Pandarus, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 170

But, by my trouthe, the king hath sones tweye,
11

Cook's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] 'Thou seist ful sooth,' quod Roger, 'by my fey,
11

Cook's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] But "sooth pley, quaad pley," as the Fleming seith;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

[continues previous] 'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 490

[continues previous] 'I graunte wel,' quod Pandare, 'by my trouthe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 491

[continues previous] But may I truste wel ther-to,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 430

[continues previous] 'By god, my conseil is,' quod Pandarus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 171

That is to mene, Ector and Troilus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1627

I mene, Ector? or woot it Troilus?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 627

'I am right sory Troilus wol deye.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 628

And thus he droof a day yet forth or tweye. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 172

That certainly, though that I sholde deye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 929

Now may I iape of thee, if that I shal!
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 930

But nathelees, though that I sholde deye,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 931

That thou art noon of tho, that dorste I seye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1627

[continues previous] I mene, Ector? or woot it Troilus?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 626

[continues previous] Had of him routhe, and that they seyen sholde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 627

[continues previous] 'I am right sory Troilus wol deye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 173

They been as voyde of vyces, dar I seye,
12

Former Age: 27

But cursed was the tyme, I dar wel seye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 174

As any men that liveth under the sonne,
12

Former Age: 28

[continues previous] That men first dide hir swety bysinesse
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 176

Of Ector nedeth it nought for to telle;
11

Friar's Tale: 70

Than possible is to telle in yeres two. [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
13

Melibee's Tale: 65

... a strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul ... [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 31

He coude, whan he sholde telle a tale. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 917

Reherce it nedeth nought, for ye ben wyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1455

It nedeth nought his helpes for to crave;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1681

Nought nedeth it to yow, sin they ben met, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1437

For al this world, may nought out of his minde; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 177

In al this world ther nis a bettre knight
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
11

Friar's Tale: 70

[continues previous] Than possible is to telle in yeres two.
11

Friar's Tale: 71

[continues previous] For in this world nis dogge for the bowe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 266

By god, ther nis no man in al this toun
11

Merchant's Tale: 549

For in this world nis worse pestilence [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 550

Than hoomly foo al day in thy presence. [continues next]
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature,
12

Melibee's Tale: 52

... is to been a good man and have litel good and tresour, than to been holden a shrewe and have grete richesses." And yet seye I ferthermore, that ye sholde alwey doon your bisinesse to gete yow richesses, so that ye gete hem with good conscience. And thapostle seith: that "ther nis thing in this world, of which we sholden have so greet Ioye as whan our conscience bereth us good witnesse." And the wyse man seith: "the substance of a man is ful good, whan sinne is nat in mannes conscience." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses, and in usinge of hem, yow moste have ...
13

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 426

In al this world of falshede nis his peer;
12

Manciple's Tale: 31

[continues previous] He coude, whan he sholde telle a tale.
12

Manciple's Tale: 32

[continues previous] Ther-with in al this world no nightingale
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... lond of misese and of derknesse, where-as is the shadwe of deeth; where-as ther is noon ordre or ordinance, but grisly drede that evere shal laste.' Lo, here may ye seen that Iob preyde respyt a whyle, to biwepe and waille his trespas; for soothly oon day of respyt is bettre than al the tresor of the world. And for-as-muche as a man may acquiten him-self biforn god by penitence in this world, and nat by tresor, therfore sholde he preye to god to yeve him respyt a whyle, to biwepe and biwaillen his trespas. For certes, al the sorwe that a man mighte make fro the beginning ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1680

[continues previous] And thus they ben in quiete and in reste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1140

That in this world ther nis so hard an herte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1437

[continues previous] For al this world, may nought out of his minde;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1840

Yow made, and thinketh al nis but a fayre
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1841

This world, that passeth sone as floures fayre.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 178

Than he, that is of worthinesse welle;
11

Merchant's Tale: 550

[continues previous] Than hoomly foo al day in thy presence.
11

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.'
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... of misese and of derknesse, where-as is the shadwe of deeth; where-as ther is noon ordre or ordinance, but grisly drede that evere shal laste.' Lo, here may ye seen that Iob preyde respyt a whyle, to biwepe and waille his trespas; for soothly oon day of respyt is bettre than al the tresor of the world. And for-as-muche as a man may acquiten him-self biforn god by penitence in this world, and nat by tresor, therfore sholde he preye to god to yeve him respyt a whyle, to biwepe and biwaillen his trespas. For certes, al the sorwe that a ...
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 841

As he that is the welle of worthinesse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 842

Of trouthe ground, mirour of goodliheed, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1565

That next him was of worthinesse welle. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 179

And he wel more vertu hath than might.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 841

[continues previous] As he that is the welle of worthinesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1566

[continues previous] And in this wo gan Troilus to dwelle,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 180

This knoweth many a wys and worthy wight.
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1062

Ful many a worthy man and wys, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 39

Ector, and many a worthy wight out wente,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 181

The same prys of Troilus I seye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.' [continues next]
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1061

[continues previous] And foule abate the folkes prys.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 806

Horaste! allas! and falsen Troilus? [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 182

God help me so, I knowe not swiche tweye.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 823

God help me so, I was to him as kinde
10

Shipman's Tale: 274

God help me so, I wolde it were youres!
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

[continues previous] I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.'
10

Envoy to Scogan: 36

Nay, Scogan, sey not so, for I mexcuse,
10

Envoy to Scogan: 37

God help me so! in no rym, doutelees,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

[continues previous] I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 183

'By god,' quod she, 'of Ector that is sooth;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 78

'And that is sooth,' quod I.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 79

'Thanne,' quod she, 'moten we nedes graunten and confessen
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 145

'That is sooth,' quod I.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 146

'Thanne,' quod she, 'desiren alle thinges oon?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

[continues previous] I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1163

'Allas, thou seist right sooth,' quod Troilus; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1164

'But hardely, it is not al for nought [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 184

Of Troilus the same thing trowe I;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1163

[continues previous] 'Allas, thou seist right sooth,' quod Troilus;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 185

For dredelees, men tellen that he dooth
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 482

Fro day to day in armes so he spedde, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 483

That alle the Grekes as the deeth him dredde. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 186

In armes day by day so worthily,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 482

[continues previous] Fro day to day in armes so he spedde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 989

And ye in armes bisy, day by day. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 187

And bereth him here at hoom so gentilly
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 885

Have here, and bereth him this blewe ringe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 989

[continues previous] And ye in armes bisy, day by day.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 188

To every wight, that al the prys hath he
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 11: 32

that the Muse and the doctrine of Plato singeth sooth, al that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 11: 33

every wight lerneth, he ne doth no-thing elles thanne but
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 190

'Ye sey right sooth, y-wis,' quod Pandarus;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 960

But who-so sheteth right, y-wis, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 169

'In good feith, that is sooth,' quod Pandarus;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1283

Ye felen wel your-self that I not lye;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 931

At dulcarnon, right at my wittes ende.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 932

Quod Pandarus, 'ye, nece, wol ye here?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 191

'For yesterday, who-so hadde with him been,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 959

[continues previous] That hevy for to sheten is;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 960

[continues previous] But who-so sheteth right, y-wis,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 192

He might have wondred up-on Troilus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 706

Quod Troilus, 'for never yet no nede [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 193

For never yet so thikke a swarm of been
11

Squire's Tale: 204

They murmureden as dooth a swarm of been, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 706

[continues previous] Quod Troilus, 'for never yet no nede
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 194

Ne fleigh, as Grekes fro him gonne fleen;
11

Squire's Tale: 204

[continues previous] They murmureden as dooth a swarm of been,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 483

That alle the Grekes as the deeth him dredde. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 484

And fro this forth tho refte him love his sleep, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 195

And thorugh the feld, in every wightes ere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 483

[continues previous] That alle the Grekes as the deeth him dredde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 484

[continues previous] And fro this forth tho refte him love his sleep,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 196

Ther nas no cry but "Troilus is there!"
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 450

Ther nas no traytour but Iudas him-selve.
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 167

Ther nas no lak, but that he was agast
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 21

I nas but lorn; ther nas no more to seye.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 198

Ther nas but Grekes blood; and Troilus, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 197

Now here, now there, he hunted hem so faste,
11

Clerk's Tale: 659

For which it semed thus, that of hem two [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 8

That ther nas but a stoon-wal hem bitwene, [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 190

With al his folk, to doon what so hem leste. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 199

[continues previous] Now hem he hurte, and hem alle doun he caste;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 198

Ther nas but Grekes blood; and Troilus,
11

Clerk's Tale: 660

[continues previous] Ther nas but o wil; for, as Walter leste,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 8

[continues previous] That ther nas but a stoon-wal hem bitwene,
11

Legend of Dido: 191

[continues previous] Ther nas coursere wel y-brydled noon,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 196

Ther nas no cry but "Troilus is there!" [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 199

Now hem he hurte, and hem alle doun he caste;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 197

[continues previous] Now here, now there, he hunted hem so faste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1820

Ther he was slayn, his loking doun he caste; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 200

Ay where he wente it was arayed thus:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1820

[continues previous] Ther he was slayn, his loking doun he caste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 202

That as that day ther dorste noon with-stonde,
10

Knight's Tale: 320

They foughte al day, and yet hir part was noon; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 321

Ther cam a kyte, whyl that they were wrothe, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 654

That in the castel noon so hardy was [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 655

That any whyle dorste ther endure. [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 93

For in that contree was ther noon [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 94

That to him dorste ryde or goon, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 203

Whyl that he held his blody swerd in honde.
10

Knight's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Ther cam a kyte, whyl that they were wrothe,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 655

[continues previous] That any whyle dorste ther endure.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 93

[continues previous] For in that contree was ther noon
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 94

[continues previous] That to him dorste ryde or goon,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 205

Of grete estat, that ever I saw my lyve;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 127

Of olde werke, then I saw ever.
10

Hous of Fame 1: 128

For certeynly, I niste never [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 129

Wher that I was, but wel wiste I, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 206

And wher him list, best felawshipe can
10

Knight's Tale: 469

Goon at his large, and wher him list may turne.
10

Merchant's Tale: 332

Be wedded whanne him list and wher he wolde.
10

Hous of Fame 1: 129

[continues previous] Wher that I was, but wel wiste I,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 949

And wher him list upon his wey he spedde;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 208

And with that word tho Pandarus, as blyve,
14

Legend of Phyllis: 82

And openly he took his leve tho, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 152

Go now faste, and hy thee blyve!' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 225

Eleyne him kiste, and took hir leve blyve, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 477

And seyde, 'leve brother Pandarus, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 209

He took his leve, and seyde, 'I wol go henne:'
10

Squire's Tale: 584

So on a day of me he took his leve,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 278

And thus he took his leve, and wente his way.
12

Legend of Phyllis: 81

[continues previous] As fil to her honour and his also.
14

Legend of Phyllis: 82

[continues previous] And openly he took his leve tho,
14

Legend of Phyllis: 83

[continues previous] And hath her sworn, he wolde nat soiorne,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 152

[continues previous] Go now faste, and hy thee blyve!'
12

Book of the Duchesse: 153

[continues previous] This messager took leve and wente
12

Book of the Duchesse: 154

Upon his wey, and never ne stente
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1460

[continues previous] And took his leve, and never gan to fyne,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1536

Therwith he took his leve al softely,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 225

[continues previous] Eleyne him kiste, and took hir leve blyve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 226

[continues previous] Deiphebus eek, and hoom wente every wight;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 476

[continues previous] The ferthe day, and seyde, he wolde wende.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 477

[continues previous] And seyde, 'leve brother Pandarus,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1124

And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow? [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 100

'Nece,' quod he, 'it oghte y-nough suffyse [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 88

And up she roos, and by the hond in hye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 238

And that ye witen wel your-self, I leve.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 495

'Ne that I shal han cause in this matere,'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1639

And over al this, I pray yow,' quod she tho, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1640

'Myn owene hertes soothfast suffisaunce, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 211

'What eyleth yow to be thus wery sone,
10

Miller's Tale: 583

What eyleth yow? som gay gerl, god it woot,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone? [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1123

[continues previous] 'O stronge lady store, what dostow?'
11

Merchant's Tale: 1124

[continues previous] And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow?
14

Shipman's Tale: 99

[continues previous] 'What eyleth yow so rathe for to ryse?'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 70

What eyleth yow, to grone in this manere? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1104

[continues previous] What maner windes gydeth yow now here?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1639

[continues previous] And over al this, I pray yow,' quod she tho,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 212

And namelich of wommen? wol ye so?
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

[continues previous] What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone?
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 69

[continues previous] She was agast, and seyde, 'O herte dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 213

Nay, sitteth down; by god, I have to done
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1694

To yow have I to speke of o matere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1695

To been avysed by your reed the bettre': — [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 214

With yow, to speke of wisdom er ye go.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1694

[continues previous] To yow have I to speke of o matere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1695

[continues previous] To been avysed by your reed the bettre': —
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 215

And every wight that was a-boute hem tho,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 151

every wight, and leneth hem that he wot that is covenable to hem. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 48

Be cleped Rose of every wight. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 49

That it was May me thoughte tho, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 216

That herde that, gan fer a-wey to stonde,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 151

[continues previous] every wight, and leneth hem that he wot that is covenable to hem.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 49

[continues previous] That it was May me thoughte tho,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 217

Whyl they two hadde al that hem liste in honde.
10

Legend of Dido: 321

In-to the cave; and demed as hem liste; [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 322

And whan the king, that Yarbas hight, hit wiste, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 962

Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 963

That she was lyk to torche bright, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 358

And whan that he in chaumbre was allone, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 258

Yet for al that, in hir entencioun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 218

Whan that hir tale al brought was to an ende
11

Man of Law's Tale: 853

Hath shapen, thurgh hir endelees goodnesse, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 854

To make an ende of al hir hevinesse. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 322

[continues previous] And whan the king, that Yarbas hight, hit wiste,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 962

[continues previous] Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 963

[continues previous] That she was lyk to torche bright,
11

Parlement of Foules: 666

And whan this werk al broght was to an ende,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

[continues previous] But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 358

[continues previous] And whan that he in chaumbre was allone,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 258

[continues previous] Yet for al that, in hir entencioun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 259

[continues previous] Hir tale is al for som conclusioun.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 769

And whan my tale al brought is to an ende,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 219

Of hire estat and of hir governaunce,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 854

[continues previous] To make an ende of al hir hevinesse.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 220

Quod Pandarus, 'now is it tyme I wende;
10

Shipman's Tale: 421

For your honour, for goddes sake, I seye, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 208

Quod Pandarus, 'it tyme is that we wende;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 221

But yet, I seye, aryseth, lat us daunce,
10

Shipman's Tale: 421

[continues previous] For your honour, for goddes sake, I seye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 422

[continues previous] As be nat wrooth, but lat us laughe and pleye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 111

Do wey your book, rys up, and lat us daunce, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 112

And lat us don to May som observaunce.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1502

And doth somwhat, as that I shal yow seye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1503

And lat us stele away bitwixe us tweye; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 222

And cast your widwes habit to mischaunce:
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 111

[continues previous] Do wey your book, rys up, and lat us daunce,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 112

[continues previous] And lat us don to May som observaunce.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1503

[continues previous] And lat us stele away bitwixe us tweye;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 223

What list yow thus your-self to disfigure,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

[continues previous] To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make? [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1149

[continues previous] But thus ye faren, wel neigh alle and some, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1160

Swich answere as yow list your-self purveye, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 224

Sith yow is tid thus fair an aventure?'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

[continues previous] To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1160

[continues previous] Swich answere as yow list your-self purveye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 225

'A! wel bithought! for love of god,' quod she,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 499

Til at the laste, 'O good eem,' quod she tho,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 500

'For love of god, which that us bothe made,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 105

That she not wite as yet shal what I mene.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 226

'Shal I not witen what ye mene of this?'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 119

[continues previous] Or slee us bothe at ones, er that ye wende.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

[continues previous] 'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 104

[continues previous] So sone awey; but I shal finde a mene,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 105

[continues previous] That she not wite as yet shal what I mene.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 106

[continues previous] This Diomede, as he that coude his good,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 227

'No, this thing axeth layser,' tho quod he,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4600

Yit, if my lust he wolde acheve [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1205

'Ye, for I can so wryte,' quod she tho; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 228

'And eek me wolde muche greve, y-wis,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1206

[continues previous] 'And eek I noot what I sholde to him seye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 229

If I it tolde, and ye it toke amis.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4600

[continues previous] Yit, if my lust he wolde acheve
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 230

Yet were it bet my tonge for to stille
13

Melibee's Tale: 24

... in doute, whether thou mayst parfourne a thing or noon, chese rather to suffre than biginne. And Piers Alphonce seith: "if thou hast might to doon a thing of which thou most repente thee, it is bettre 'nay' than 'ye';" this is to seyn, that thee is bettre holde thy tonge stille, than for to speke. Thanne may ye understonde by strenger resons, that if thou hast power to parfourne a werk of which thou shalt repente, thanne is it bettre that thou suffre than biginne. Wel seyn they, that defenden every wight to assaye any thing of which he is in doute, whether he ... [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 514

But bet is that a wightes tonge reste [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 570

Lo, swich hit is to have a tonge loos!
11

Parlement of Foules: 571

Now parde, fool, yet were hit bet for thee
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1031

Be sooth, for that he sit, than seye I this, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 231

Than seye a sooth that were ayeins your wille.
13

Melibee's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... whether thou mayst parfourne a thing or noon, chese rather to suffre than biginne. And Piers Alphonce seith: "if thou hast might to doon a thing of which thou most repente thee, it is bettre 'nay' than 'ye';" this is to seyn, that thee is bettre holde thy tonge stille, than for to speke. Thanne may ye understonde by strenger resons, that if thou hast power to parfourne a werk of which thou shalt repente, thanne is it bettre that thou suffre than biginne. Wel seyn they, that defenden every wight to assaye any thing of which he is in doute, ...
10

Parlement of Foules: 514

[continues previous] But bet is that a wightes tonge reste
10

Parlement of Foules: 515

[continues previous] Than entremeten him of such doinge
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1031

[continues previous] Be sooth, for that he sit, than seye I this,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 237

That I best love, and lothest am to greve,
13

Franklin's Tale: 584

'Whom I most drede and love as I best can, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 585

And lothest were of al this world displese, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 238

And that ye witen wel your-self, I leve.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 421

Ye woot your-self wel, how that ye cam here
12

Merchant's Tale: 496

Assayeth it your-self, than may ye witen
12

Merchant's Tale: 497

If that I lye or noon in this matere.
13

Franklin's Tale: 584

[continues previous] 'Whom I most drede and love as I best can,
13

Franklin's Tale: 585

[continues previous] And lothest were of al this world displese,
10

Manciple's Tale: 181

Smyt nat to sone, er that ye witen why,
10

Manciple's Tale: 182

And beeth avysed wel and sobrely
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3897

For [wel] ye witen how that he
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 495

'Ne that I shal han cause in this matere,' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1283

Ye felen wel your-self that I not lye;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 644

For hoom to goon it may nought wel bityde. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 239

'Y-wis, myn uncle,' quod she, 'grant mercy;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 87

'Ey, uncle myn, welcome y-wis,' quod she,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 88

And up she roos, and by the hond in hye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 136

'And why so, uncle myn? why so?' quod she.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 137

'By god,' quod he, 'that wole I telle as blyve;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 210

[continues previous] 'Nay, blame have I, myn uncle,' quod she thenne.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

[continues previous] 'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 645

[continues previous] 'I wol,' quod she, 'myn uncle leef and dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1303

'Y-wis,' quod she, 'myn owne hertes list, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 240

Your freendship have I founden ever yit;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1103

[continues previous] 'Now by your feyth, myn uncle,' quod she, 'dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1302

[continues previous] If that it lyke un-to your womanhede.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 242

So muche as yow, and have so litel quit;
11

Friar's Tale: 248

So muche wo as I have with yow tholed!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 243

And, with the grace of god, emforth my wit,
12

Knight's Tale: 1377

Emforth my might, thy trewe servant be, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 997

Have I nought fayned, but emforth my wit [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 244

As in my gilt I shal you never offende;
12

Knight's Tale: 1376

[continues previous] As wisly as I shal for evermore,
12

Knight's Tale: 1377

[continues previous] Emforth my might, thy trewe servant be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 997

[continues previous] Have I nought fayned, but emforth my wit
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 998

[continues previous] Don al thy lust, and shal with al my might.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1514

Thus seyde I never er this, ne shal to mo; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 245

And if I have er this, I wol amende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1514

[continues previous] Thus seyde I never er this, ne shal to mo;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1515

[continues previous] And if to yow it were a gret gladnesse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 168

I wol alwey, and mercy I yow preye. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 246

But, for the love of god, I yow beseche,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 87

And yit I wolde beseche yow of no more
10

Compleint to His Lady: 88

But leveth wel, and be nat wrooth ther-fore,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 115

And this I wol beseche yow hertely, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 755

'No word, for love of god I yow biseche;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 167

[continues previous] Ayens the god of love, but him obeye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 168

[continues previous] I wol alwey, and mercy I yow preye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 247

As ye ben he that I most love and triste,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 115

[continues previous] And this I wol beseche yow hertely,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 116

[continues previous] That, ther ever ye finde, whyl ye live,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 249

And sey to me, your nece, what yow liste:'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1688

Was ther non other broche yow liste lete [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1689

To feffe with your newe love,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 250

And with that word hir uncle anoon hir kiste,
11

Squire's Tale: 377

As is hir maistresse, answerde hir anoon, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 225

Eleyne him kiste, and took hir leve blyve, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 754

And ner he com, and seyde hir in hir ere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 755

'No word, for love of god I yow biseche; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 961

In every thing, to pleye anoon bigan, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 191

And tweynty tyme he kiste his doughter swete, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1689

[continues previous] To feffe with your newe love,' quod he,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 251

And seyde, 'gladly, leve nece dere,
11

Squire's Tale: 378

[continues previous] And seyde, 'madame, whider wil ye goon
11

Prioress' Prologue: 17

Now wol ye vouche-sauf, my lady dere?'
11

Prioress' Prologue: 18

'Gladly,' quod she, and seyde as ye shal here.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 580

I have a poudre heer, that coste me dere, [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 93

And seyde, 'Phedra, leve suster dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 316

Now, nece myn, the kinges dere sone, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 209

Tak, nece myn, your leve at alle three, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 210

And lat hem speke, and cometh forth with me.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 225

[continues previous] Eleyne him kiste, and took hir leve blyve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 754

[continues previous] And ner he com, and seyde hir in hir ere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 946

'That is wel seyd,' quod he, 'my nece dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 962

[continues previous] And seyde, 'nece, see how this lord can knele!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 541

And seyde, 'parde, leve brother dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 192

[continues previous] And seyde, 'O dere doughter myn, wel-come!'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 252

Tak it for good that I shal seye yow here.'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 781

And for to werken as I shal yow seye,
11

Prioress' Tale: 35

Gydeth my song that I shal of yow seye. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 604

Com doun, and I shal telle yow what I mente.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 581

[continues previous] Shal make al good, for it is cause of al
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 670

Of an ingot, as I shal yow devyse.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 671

I seye, he took out of his owene sleve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 292

Ascaunces, 'what! may I not stonden here?' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 315

[continues previous] 'So wol I doon, now herkneth, I shal telle:
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 154

And been so looth to suffren him yow serve.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 208

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'it tyme is that we wende;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 209

[continues previous] Tak, nece myn, your leve at alle three,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 556

And fynally, he swor and gan hir seye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 947

[continues previous] Ther good thrift on that wyse gentil herte!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1568

O! who-so seeth yow knoweth yow ful lyte!' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 831

Wher shal I seye to yow "wel come" or no,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1107

For-thy take hede of that that I shal seye; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1108

I have with hir y-spoke and longe y-be, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1502

And doth somwhat, as that I shal yow seye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here: [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste,
13

Knight's Tale: 1223

Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 233

The markis cam and gan hir for to calle; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 234

And she sette doun hir water-pot anoon [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 236

And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 129

Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 130

And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke. [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 35

[continues previous] Gydeth my song that I shal of yow seye.
12

Hous of Fame 3: 318

As I myn eyen gan up caste,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 319

That this ilke noble quene
10

Hous of Fame 3: 477

And with that word she gan to calle
10

Hous of Fame 3: 478

Hir messanger, that was in halle,
12

Legend of Hypermnestra: 86

This Ypermistra caste her eyen doun, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 212

With that hir eyen up she casteth,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 865

Alle that on hir gan beholde.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 866

Hir eyen semed anoon she wolde
10

Compleynt of Venus: 29

And doun to caste visage and loking, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1217

With eyen gladde, and browes bente; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1218

Hir heer doun to hir heles wente. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 293

[continues previous] And after that hir loking gan she lighte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 726

And up his eyen caste he, that in fere [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 142

A thousand fold, and doun hir eyen caste; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 648

How sobreliche he caste doun his yën.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 649

Cryseyda gan al his chere aspyen,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 659

And gan to caste and rollen up and doun [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 660

With-inne hir thought his excellent prowesse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 691

Wher-on she wolde apoynte hir at the laste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1142

This Pandarus gan on hir for to stare, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen on him caste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

And gan his look on Pandarus up caste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 556

[continues previous] And fynally, he swor and gan hir seye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 557

[continues previous] By this and that, she sholde him not escape,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1541

And in his thought gan up and doun to winde [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1542

Hir wordes alle, and every contenaunce, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1569

[continues previous] With that she gan hir face for to wrye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 522

And to the ground his eyen doun he caste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1107

[continues previous] For-thy take hede of that that I shal seye;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1108

[continues previous] I have with hir y-spoke and longe y-be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1223

But at the laste, as that hir eyen glente
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1224

A-syde, anoon she gan his swerd aspye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1502

[continues previous] And doth somwhat, as that I shal yow seye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 182

Wel neigh doun of hir hors she gan to sye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 999

[continues previous] As helpe me Pallas with hir heres clere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte,
11

Knight's Tale: 1222

[continues previous] With bowe in honde, and arwes in a cas.
11

Clerk's Tale: 234

[continues previous] And she sette doun hir water-pot anoon
12

Clerk's Tale: 236

[continues previous] And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle,
11

Clerk's Tale: 237

[continues previous] And with sad contenance kneleth stille
12

Franklin's Tale: 129

[continues previous] Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke,
12

Franklin's Tale: 130

[continues previous] And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke.
12

Legend of Hypermnestra: 87

[continues previous] And quook as dooth the leef of aspe grene;
10

Compleynt of Venus: 29

[continues previous] And doun to caste visage and loking,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1217

[continues previous] With eyen gladde, and browes bente;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1218

[continues previous] Hir heer doun to hir heles wente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 727

[continues previous] Was Pandarus, lest that in frenesye
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 142

[continues previous] A thousand fold, and doun hir eyen caste;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 505

Tho Pandarus a litel gan to smyle, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 506

And seyde, 'by my trouthe, I shal yow telle. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 659

[continues previous] And gan to caste and rollen up and doun
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

[continues previous] Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1142

[continues previous] This Pandarus gan on hir for to stare, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1143

[continues previous] And seyde, 'now is this the grettest wonder [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1164

And he gan at him-self to iape faste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1318

And Pandarus gan him the lettre take, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1319

And seyde, 'pardee, god hath holpen us; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen on him caste
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 156

[continues previous] Ful esily, and ful debonairly,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

[continues previous] And gan his look on Pandarus up caste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

[continues previous] Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1541

[continues previous] And in his thought gan up and doun to winde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1556

Un-to his nece, and gan hir fayre grete, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1571

And Pandarus gan under for to prye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1572

And seyde, 'nece, if that I shal ben deed, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 522

[continues previous] And to the ground his eyen doun he caste.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

[continues previous] And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 255

And seyde, 'nece, alwey, lo! to the laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 506

[continues previous] And seyde, 'by my trouthe, I shal yow telle.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1143

[continues previous] And seyde, 'now is this the grettest wonder
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1164

[continues previous] And he gan at him-self to iape faste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1165

[continues previous] And seyde, 'nece, I have so greet a pyne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1318

[continues previous] And Pandarus gan him the lettre take,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1319

[continues previous] And seyde, 'pardee, god hath holpen us;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

[continues previous] And gan his look on Pandarus up caste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1556

[continues previous] Un-to his nece, and gan hir fayre grete,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1557

[continues previous] Seyde, 'al this night so reyned it, allas!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1571

[continues previous] And Pandarus gan under for to prye,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1572

[continues previous] And seyde, 'nece, if that I shal ben deed,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 874

But nathelees, as he best mighte, he seyde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 875

From Troilus thise wordes to Criseyde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 256

How-so it be that som men hem delyte
11

Clerk's Tale: 403

Though som men preise it for a subtil wit, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 683

For pitous Ioye, and wenden hir delyte; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 257

With subtil art hir tales for to endyte,
11

Clerk's Tale: 403

[continues previous] Though som men preise it for a subtil wit,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 683

[continues previous] For pitous Ioye, and wenden hir delyte;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 684

[continues previous] And with hir tales, dere y-nough a myte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 258

Yet for al that, in hir entencioun,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 217

Whyl they two hadde al that hem liste in honde. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 218

Whan that hir tale al brought was to an ende [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 259

Hir tale is al for som conclusioun.
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 162

This tale is seid for this conclusioun ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 218

[continues previous] Whan that hir tale al brought was to an ende
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 264

And with that word he gan right inwardly
11

Merchant's Tale: 685

And with that word he gan to him to calle
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 204

And with that word he gan cast up the browe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 206

At which the god of love gan loken rowe [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 207

Right for despyt, and shoop for to ben wroken; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 869

And with that word he gan him for to shake,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 741

And with that word he gan un-do a trappe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 361

And on his pitous face he gan biholden; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 925

And with that word he gan to waxen reed,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 265

Biholden hir, and loken on hir face,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 434

That alle hir loven that loken on hir face. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 435

This constable and dame Hermengild his wyf [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 583

He rubbeth hir aboute hir tendre face, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 584

And seyde thus, 'allas! I moot trespace [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 378

His wyf al newe, and kiste hir on hir face, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 379

And up he gooth and maketh it ful tough. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 206

[continues previous] At which the god of love gan loken rowe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 207

[continues previous] Right for despyt, and shoop for to ben wroken;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 361

[continues previous] And on his pitous face he gan biholden;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 266

And seyde, 'on suche a mirour goode grace!'
13

Man of Law's Tale: 434

[continues previous] That alle hir loven that loken on hir face.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 435

[continues previous] This constable and dame Hermengild his wyf
11

Merchant's Tale: 584

[continues previous] And seyde thus, 'allas! I moot trespace
11

Shipman's Tale: 378

[continues previous] His wyf al newe, and kiste hir on hir face,
11

Shipman's Tale: 379

[continues previous] And up he gooth and maketh it ful tough.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 581

My lady first me took un-to hir grace.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 267

Than thoughte he thus, 'if I my tale endyte
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 582

[continues previous] Thanne thoughte he thus, 'O blisful lord Cupyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 269

She shal no savour han ther-in but lyte,
11

Friar's Tale: 302

I shall no profit han ther-by but lyte; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 270

And trowe I wolde hir in my wil bigyle.
11

Friar's Tale: 302

[continues previous] I shall no profit han ther-by but lyte;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 687

For evermore, I trowe trewly, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 688

For al my wil, my lust hoolly [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5891

And were she nigh, she comen wolde,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5892

I trowe that no-thing might hir holde.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5893

'My modir is of greet prowesse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 271

For tendre wittes wenen al be wyle
10

Book of the Duchesse: 687

[continues previous] For evermore, I trowe trewly,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 688

[continues previous] For al my wil, my lust hoolly
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 272

Ther-as they can nat pleynly understonde;
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1260

To do hir knowe and understonde [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1583

And for to doon you understonde, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 273

For-thy hir wit to serven wol I fonde'
10

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 166

And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 167

To whom I may be wedded hastily. [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1259

[continues previous] I thoughte ones I wolde fonde
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1260

[continues previous] To do hir knowe and understonde
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1584

[continues previous] To make ensample wol I fonde;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 274

And loked on hir in a besy wyse,
11

Merchant's Tale: 166

[continues previous] And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
14

Franklin's Tale: 229

It may wel be he loked on hir face
14

Franklin's Tale: 230

In swich a wyse, as man that asketh grace;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 275

And she was war that he byheld hir so,
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 14

He lafte hir falsly, er that she was war,
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 15

And wolde algates han another wyf;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 276

And seyde, 'lord! so faste ye me avyse!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 277

Sey ye me never er now? what sey ye, no?'
14

Squire's Tale: 460

Ne sey I never er now no brid ne beest
11

Parson's Prologue: 68

'Sir preest,' quod he, 'now fayre yow bifalle! [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 69

Sey what yow list, and we wol gladly here' — [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 568

Ye schul sey your erand er ye comen in.'
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 569

'Sey to Gamelyn and Adam if here wille be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

[continues previous] 'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1283

[continues previous] Ye felen wel your-self that I not lye;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 278

'Yes, yes,' quod he, 'and bet wole er I go;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 841

'Now, by my feith, I shal, er that I go, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 143

'Now, sir,' quod she, 'but o word er I go; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 339

'Go bet,' quod he, 'and axe redily,
11

Parson's Prologue: 68

[continues previous] 'Sir preest,' quod he, 'now fayre yow bifalle!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 279

But, by my trouthe, I thoughte now if ye
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 841

[continues previous] 'Now, by my feith, I shal, er that I go,
10

Summoner's Tale: 143

[continues previous] 'Now, sir,' quod she, 'but o word er I go;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1142

And by my trouthe, me thoughte he dide thee so.'
11

Monk's Prologue: 40

But, by my trouthe, I knowe nat your name,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 281

For to every wight som goodly aventure
11

Knight's Tale: 430

That by som aventure, or som tretee, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 844

To every maner wight in som degree? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 282

Som tyme is shape, if he it can receyven;
11

Knight's Tale: 430

[continues previous] That by som aventure, or som tretee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 843

[continues previous] Wostow nat wel that Fortune is commune
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 844

[continues previous] To every maner wight in som degree?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 286

But right his verray slouthe and wrecchednesse;
11

Franklin's Tale: 543

To maken his Iapes and his wrecchednesse [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 287

And swich a wight is for to blame, I gesse.
11

Franklin's Tale: 543

[continues previous] To maken his Iapes and his wrecchednesse
11

Franklin's Tale: 544

[continues previous] Of swich a superstitious cursednesse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1147

In many a cas; for every wight, I gesse,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 291

Cacche it anoon, lest aventure slake.
13

Legend of Cleopatra: 40

Hit were to long, lest that I sholde slake [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 965

What sholde I lenger sermon of it holde? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1613

'My lordes and my ladyes, it stant thus; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1621

And so he shal, for it ne may not varien.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 292

What sholde I lenger proces of it make?
13

Franklin's Tale: 437

What sholde I make a lenger tale of this?
12

Franklin's Tale: 822

What sholde I lenger of this cas endyte?
13

Legend of Cleopatra: 40

[continues previous] Hit were to long, lest that I sholde slake
13

Legend of Cleopatra: 41

[continues previous] Of thing that bereth more effect and charge;
13

Legend of Ariadne: 140

What sholde I lenger sermoun of hit make?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 964

[continues previous] Algate a foot is hameled of thy sorwe.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 965

[continues previous] What sholde I lenger sermon of it holde?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1613

[continues previous] 'My lordes and my ladyes, it stant thus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1614

[continues previous] What sholde I lenger,' quod he, 'do yow dwelle?'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1621

[continues previous] And so he shal, for it ne may not varien.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1622

[continues previous] What sholde I lenger in this tale tarien?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 293

Yif me your hond, for in this world is noon,
11

Knight's Tale: 2223

And taken him for housbonde and for lord:
12

Knight's Tale: 2224

Leen me your hond, for this is our acord.
11

Summoner's Tale: 469

God yelde yow! adoun in your village, [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 470

That in this world is noon so povre a page, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 18

For in this world was noon so fair on lyve.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1029

In world is noon so fair a wight; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1073

For in this world is noon it liche,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1646

For in this world ther liveth lady noon, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 294

If that you list, a wight so wel begoon.
12

Summoner's Tale: 470

[continues previous] That in this world is noon so povre a page,
10

Summoner's Tale: 471

[continues previous] That he nolde have abhominacioun
11

Parlement of Foules: 171

But lord! so I was glad and wel begoon! [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1029

[continues previous] In world is noon so fair a wight;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1647

[continues previous] If that ye were untrewe, as god defende!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 295

And sith I speke of good entencioun,
13

Parson's Tale: 46

Now comth the sinne of double tonge; swiche as speken faire biforn folk, and wikkedly bihinde; or elles they maken semblant as though they speke of good entencioun, or elles in game and pley, and yet they speke of wikked entente. [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 171

[continues previous] But lord! so I was glad and wel begoon!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 683

For douteth no-thing, myn entencioun [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 684

Nis nought to yow of reprehencioun, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 685

To speke as now, for no wight may bireve [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1603

To speke here of the nedes of Criseyde?' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 296

As I to yow have told wel here-biforn,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 307

For, as I trowe, I have yow told y-nowe
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 308

To reyse a feend, al loke he never so rowe.
13

Parson's Tale: 46

[continues previous] Now comth the sinne of double tonge; swiche as speken faire biforn folk, and wikkedly bihinde; or elles they maken semblant as though they speke of good entencioun, or elles in game and pley, and yet they speke of wikked entente.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 189

As I have told yow here-tofore;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 271

Right thus as I have told hit yow,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 684

[continues previous] Nis nought to yow of reprehencioun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 685

[continues previous] To speke as now, for no wight may bireve
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1285

'Wel,' quod Pandare, 'as I have told yow thrye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1602

[continues previous] If yourë wille be, as I yow preyde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1603

[continues previous] To speke here of the nedes of Criseyde?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1497

And if ye goon, as I have told yow yore,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 297

And love as wel your honour and renoun
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1285

[continues previous] 'Wel,' quod Pandare, 'as I have told yow thrye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 298

As creature in al this world y-born;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1049

This world is al in hir daungere. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 299

By alle the othes that I have yow sworn,
12

Merchant's Tale: 1106

Ladies, I prey yow that ye be nat wrooth; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 1107

I can nat glose, I am a rude man. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1048

[continues previous] This wyde world hir dredeth alle;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 300

And ye be wrooth therfore, or wene I lye,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 765

For by my trouthe, if that I shal nat lye, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 766

I ne saugh this yeer so mery a companye [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 181

Un-to your grace, for I shal to Surryë, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 182

Ne shal I never seen yow more with yë. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 1106

[continues previous] Ladies, I prey yow that ye be nat wrooth;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 20

'Certes,' quod I, 'ne yit ne doute I it naught, ne I nel never [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 21

wene that it were to doute; as who seith, but I wot wel that god [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 354

That I have doon, rekever I never, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 355

That I ne shal be seyd, allas, [continues next]
10

Compleint to His Lady: 87

And yit I wolde beseche yow of no more [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2438

Or esed shal I never been, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 875

Ne coude I never seen yow but in sorwe. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1079

'And certes, yow ne haten shal I never, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 301

Ne shal I never seen yow eft with yë.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 765

[continues previous] For by my trouthe, if that I shal nat lye,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 766

[continues previous] I ne saugh this yeer so mery a companye
13

Man of Law's Tale: 181

[continues previous] Un-to your grace, for I shal to Surryë, [continues next]
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 182

[continues previous] Ne shal I never seen yow more with yë. [continues next]
15+

Second Nun's Tale: 230

Ne never wight shal seen hem with his yë,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 20

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod I, 'ne yit ne doute I it naught, ne I nel never
10

Hous of Fame 1: 354

[continues previous] That I have doon, rekever I never,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 355

[continues previous] That I ne shal be seyd, allas,
15+

Hous of Fame 3: 947

Nas never seen, ne shal ben eft;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 11

Wel more thing then men han seen with yë!
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 12

Men shal nat wenen every-thing a lyë
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 11

Wel more thing then men han seen with yë!
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 12

Men shal nat wenen every-thing a lyë
12

Anelida and Arcite: 344

For I shal never eft putten in balaunce
11

Anelida and Arcite: 345

My sekernes, ne lerne of love the lore.
10

Compleint to His Lady: 86

[continues previous] That bet loved is noon, ne never shal;
10

Compleint to His Lady: 87

[continues previous] And yit I wolde beseche yow of no more
11

Compleynt of Mars: 190

But grace be, I see hir never with yë.
11

Compleynt of Mars: 191

¶ To whom shal I than pleyne of my distresse?
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2437

[continues previous] Wherfore I wol gon her to seen,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2438

[continues previous] Or esed shal I never been,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 251

Which that I never doon shal eft for other,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1656

Sin thilke day I saw hir first with yë,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1657

Was fals, ne never shal til that I dye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 616

And shal, til I may seen hir eft in Troye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 875

[continues previous] Ne coude I never seen yow but in sorwe.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1079

[continues previous] 'And certes, yow ne haten shal I never,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 302

Beth nought agast, ne quaketh nat; wher-to?
13

Man of Law's Tale: 182

[continues previous] Ne shal I never seen yow more with yë.
12

Merchant's Tale: 439

Beth nat agast her-of, my brother dere.' —
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 17

ne blood y-shad by egre hate ne hadde nat deyed yit armures. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 18

For wher-to or which woodnesse of enemys wolde first moeven [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 193

good that they desiren; but they ne geten ne ateinen nat ther-to, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 194

for vyces ne comen nat to blisfulnesse. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 97

present. Wher-fore this devyne prescience ne chaungeth nat the [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 98

nature ne the propretee of thinges, but biholdeth swiche thinges [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1096

Beth nought agast;' but certeyn, at the laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 303

Ne chaungeth nat for fere so your hewe;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 17

[continues previous] ne blood y-shad by egre hate ne hadde nat deyed yit armures.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 18

[continues previous] For wher-to or which woodnesse of enemys wolde first moeven
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 193

[continues previous] good that they desiren; but they ne geten ne ateinen nat ther-to,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 194

[continues previous] for vyces ne comen nat to blisfulnesse.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 97

[continues previous] present. Wher-fore this devyne prescience ne chaungeth nat the
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 98

[continues previous] nature ne the propretee of thinges, but biholdeth swiche thinges
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 305

And though my tale as now be to yow newe,
10

Amorous Compleint: 82

Alwey in oon to love yow freshly newe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 306

Yet trist alwey, ye shal me finde trewe;
11

Melibee's Tale: 29

... trewe freendes and your feyned conseillours; ne ye han nat knowe the wil of your trewe freendes olde and wyse; but ye han cast alle hir wordes in an hochepot, and enclyned your herte to the more part and to the gretter nombre; and ther been ye condescended. And sith ye wot wel that men shal alwey finde a gretter nombre of foles than of wyse men, and therfore the conseils that been at congregaciouns and multitudes of folk, ther-as men take more reward to the nombre than to the sapience of persones, ye see wel that in swiche conseillinges foles han the maistrie.' Melibeus answerde agayn, and ...
10

Amorous Compleint: 82

[continues previous] Alwey in oon to love yow freshly newe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 333

For at thy day thou shalt me trewe finde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 334

I shal thy proces sette in swich a kinde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 308

To yow nolde I no swiche tales bringe.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 498

Tho fillen they in othere tales glade, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 309

'Now, my good eem, for goddes love, I preye,'
13

Miller's Prologue: 63

And ther-fore every gentil wight I preye,
13

Miller's Prologue: 64

For goddes love, demeth nat that I seye
10

Clerk's Tale: 588

Beth pacient, and ther-of I yow preye.' [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 589

'I have,' quod she, 'seyd thus, and ever shal, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 464

For goddes love, com fro the tree adoun; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 47

'But I preye,' quod she, 'see now how thou mayst proeven, [continues next]
13

Legend of Philomela: 36

But to her husband gan she for to preye, [continues next]
13

Legend of Philomela: 37

For goddes love, that she moste ones goon [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 140

To god,' quod she, 'preye I, and ofte have prayed, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 123

For goddes love; is than the assege aweye? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 162

'In good feith, eem,' quod she, 'that lyketh me; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 499

[continues previous] Til at the laste, 'O good eem,' quod she tho, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 500

'For love of god, which that us bothe made, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 503

'Can he wel speke of love?' quod she, 'I preye, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1199

And gan to humme, and seyde, 'so I trowe.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1200

'Aquyte him wel, for goddes love,' quod he; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1728

Seyde, 'alle folk, for goddes love, I preye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 124

'Now thanne thus,' quod she, 'I wolde him preye [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 310

Quod she, 'com of, and tel me what it is;
11

Miller's Tale: 542

'Have do,' quod she, 'com of, and speed thee faste,
11

Summoner's Tale: 466

Sit doun anon, and tel me what your greef is,
11

Summoner's Tale: 467

And it shal been amended, if I may.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 589

[continues previous] 'I have,' quod she, 'seyd thus, and ever shal,
11

Squire's Tale: 463

[continues previous] I have of yow so gret compassioun.
12

Squire's Tale: 464

[continues previous] For goddes love, com fro the tree adoun;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 47

[continues previous] 'But I preye,' quod she, 'see now how thou mayst proeven,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 959

'No,' quod [the other], 'tel me what;'
10

Hous of Fame 3: 960

And than he tolde him this and that,
13

Legend of Philomela: 36

[continues previous] But to her husband gan she for to preye,
13

Legend of Philomela: 37

[continues previous] For goddes love, that she moste ones goon
11

Legend of Phyllis: 140

[continues previous] To god,' quod she, 'preye I, and ofte have prayed,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 862

Loke up, I seye, and tel me what she is
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

[continues previous] 'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 162

[continues previous] 'In good feith, eem,' quod she, 'that lyketh me;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 499

[continues previous] Til at the laste, 'O good eem,' quod she tho,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 503

[continues previous] 'Can he wel speke of love?' quod she, 'I preye,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

[continues previous] Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1200

[continues previous] 'Aquyte him wel, for goddes love,' quod he;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1729

[continues previous] Stinteth right here, and softely yow pleye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 124

[continues previous] 'Now thanne thus,' quod she, 'I wolde him preye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 125

[continues previous] To telle me the fyn of his entente;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 311

For bothe I am agast what ye wol seye,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6106

Of good men am I nought agast,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6107

For they wol taken on hem nothing,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 312

And eek me longeth it to wite, y-wis.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4781

Than thinke to fleen wel, y-wis; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4782

May nought helpe elles; for wite thou this: — [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 313

For whether it be wel or be amis,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4781

[continues previous] Than thinke to fleen wel, y-wis;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4782

[continues previous] May nought helpe elles; for wite thou this: —
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 314

Sey on, lat me not in this fere dwelle:'
11

Compleynt of Mars: 122

A naturel day in derk I lete hir dwelle. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1321

A-wey, thou foule daunger and thou fere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1322

And lat hem in this hevene blisse dwelle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 315

'So wol I doon, now herkneth, I shal telle:
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 122

[continues previous] A naturel day in derk I lete hir dwelle.
11

Compleynt of Mars: 123

[continues previous] Now wol I speke of Mars, furious and wood;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 252

Tak it for good that I shal seye yow here.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 476

I shal myn herte ayeins my lust constreyne, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1664

And whyl that god my wit wol me conserve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1665

I shal so doon, so trewe I have yow founde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 316

Now, nece myn, the kinges dere sone,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 53

[continues previous] For this thing that I shal telle thee now ne shal nat seme lasse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 226

Though he a worthy kinges sone were, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 158

The wyse worthy Ector the secounde, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 251

[continues previous] And seyde, 'gladly, leve nece dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

[continues previous] 'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

[continues previous] 'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 317

The goode, wyse, worthy, fresshe, and free,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 225

[continues previous] So ferde it by this fers and proude knight;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 226

[continues previous] Though he a worthy kinges sone were,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 227

[continues previous] And wende no-thing hadde had swiche might
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 157

[continues previous] And eek his fresshe brother Troilus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 158

[continues previous] The wyse worthy Ector the secounde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 320

That, bot ye helpe, it wol his bane be.
11

Legend of Dido: 256

I wolde fain to him y-wedded be; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4491

That it wol my bane be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 907

For wel wot I, it wol my bane be;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 908

And deye I wol in certayn,' tho quod she;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 321

Lo, here is al, what sholde I more seye?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 626

How pore he was, ne eek of what degree. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 627

What sholde I seye, but, at the monthes ende, [continues next]
11

Friar's Prologue: 26

'Nay,' quod the Somnour, 'lat him seye to me [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 37

For which I seye, if that yow list to here [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 257

[continues previous] This is theffect; what sholde I more seye? [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 258

In him lyth al, to do me live or deye.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1134

Than to his lust; what sholde I more seye? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 593

As Tantalus!' What sholde I more telle? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 594

Whan al was wel, he roos and took his leve, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1175

Be any wrong, I wol no more trespace; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1176

Do what yow list, I am al in your grace.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 322

Doth what yow list, to make him live or deye.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 626

[continues previous] How pore he was, ne eek of what degree.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 627

[continues previous] What sholde I seye, but, at the monthes ende,
11

Friar's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] 'Nay,' quod the Somnour, 'lat him seye to me
11

Friar's Prologue: 27

[continues previous] What so him list; whan it comth to my lot,
11

Squire's Tale: 319

Or to what contree that yow list to ryde.
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
11

Franklin's Tale: 609

In yow lyth al, to do me live or deye;[continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 37

[continues previous] For which I seye, if that yow list to here
13

Legend of Dido: 257

[continues previous] This is theffect; what sholde I more seye?
10

Legend of Dido: 258

[continues previous] In him lyth al, to do me live or deye.'
10

Parlement of Foules: 420

Do what hir list, to do me live or sterve.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1134

[continues previous] Than to his lust; what sholde I more seye?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1147

Wolde I a lettre un-to yow bringe or take
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 593

[continues previous] As Tantalus!' What sholde I more telle?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1176

[continues previous] Do what yow list, I am al in your grace.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1410

But whether that ye do me live or deye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 323

But if ye lete him deye, I wol sterve;
10

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 609

[continues previous] In yow lyth al, to do me live or deye;
11

Franklin's Tale: 610

[continues previous] But wel I woot the rokkes been aweye!'
11

Compleint to His Lady: 112

Now, certes, and ye lete me thus sterve, [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 113

Yit have ye wonne ther-on but a smal. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1410

[continues previous] But whether that ye do me live or deye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 324

Have her my trouthe, nece, I nil not lyen;
10

Knight's Tale: 752

[continues previous] Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 113

[continues previous] Yit have ye wonne ther-on but a smal.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 327

And seyde, 'if that ye doon us bothe dyen,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 440

And I with him, here I me shryve, and seye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 441

That wikkedly ye doon us bothe deye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 331

That trewe man, that noble gentil knight,
11

Knight's Tale: 2219

That gentil Palamon, your owne knight, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2220

That serveth yow with wille, herte, and might, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 332

That nought desireth but your freendly chere,
11

Knight's Tale: 2219

[continues previous] That gentil Palamon, your owne knight,
11

Knight's Tale: 2220

[continues previous] That serveth yow with wille, herte, and might,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 334

And hasteth him, with al his fulle might,
10

Parson's Tale: 57

Of the remedie of thise two sinnes, as seith the wyse man, that 'he that dredeth god, he spareth nat to doon that him oghte doon.' And he that loveth god, he wol doon diligence to plese god by his werkes, and abaundone him-self, with al his might, wel for to doon. Thanne comth ydelnesse, that is the yate of alle harmes. An ydel man is lyk to a place that hath no walles; the develes may entre on every syde and sheten at him at discovert, by temptacion on every syde. This ydelnesse is the thurrok of ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1552

To been hir fulle freend with al his might. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 436

This was his lyf; with al his fulle might,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 75

He peyned him with al his fulle might [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 76

Him to with-holde of wepinge at the leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1539

A sooth of this, with al his fulle cure;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 335

For to be slayn, if fortune wol assente;
13

Clerk's Tale: 73

And we wol, lord, if that ye wol assente, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Of the remedie of thise two sinnes, as seith the wyse man, that 'he that dredeth god, he spareth nat to doon that him oghte doon.' And he that loveth god, he wol doon diligence to plese god by his werkes, and abaundone him-self, with al his might, wel for to doon. Thanne comth ydelnesse, that is the yate of alle harmes. An ydel man is lyk to a place that hath no walles; the develes may entre on every syde and sheten at him at discovert, by temptacion on every syde. This ydelnesse is the thurrok of alle wikked and ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1552

[continues previous] To been hir fulle freend with al his might.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 76

[continues previous] Him to with-holde of wepinge at the leste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1063

And wommen most wol hate me of alle. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 336

Allas! that god yow swich a beautee sente!
13

Clerk's Tale: 73

[continues previous] And we wol, lord, if that ye wol assente,
13

Clerk's Tale: 74

[continues previous] Chese yow a wyf in short tyme, atte leste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 340

No more than of a Iapere or a wrecche, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 341

If ye be swich, your beautee may not strecche [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1064

[continues previous] Allas, that swich a cas me sholde falle!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 337

If it be so that ye so cruel be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 341

[continues previous] If ye be swich, your beautee may not strecche
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 385

That of his deeth ye be nought for to wyte.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 338

That of his deeth yow liste nought to recche,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 385

[continues previous] That of his deeth ye be nought for to wyte.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 434

Mighte he yet live, of me is nought to recche. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 339

That is so trewe and worthy, as ye see,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 434

[continues previous] Mighte he yet live, of me is nought to recche.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 340

No more than of a Iapere or a wrecche,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 336

Allas! that god yow swich a beautee sente! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 341

If ye be swich, your beautee may not strecche
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 336

[continues previous] Allas! that god yow swich a beautee sente!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 337

[continues previous] If it be so that ye so cruel be,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 344

Wo worth the faire gemme vertulees!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 346

Wo worth that beautee that is routhelees! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 347

Wo worth that wight that tret ech under fote! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 345

Wo worth that herbe also that dooth no bote!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 346

[continues previous] Wo worth that beautee that is routhelees! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 347

[continues previous] Wo worth that wight that tret ech under fote!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 346

Wo worth that beautee that is routhelees!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 344

Wo worth the faire gemme vertulees! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 345

[continues previous] Wo worth that herbe also that dooth no bote! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 347

Wo worth that wight that tret ech under fote!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 344

[continues previous] Wo worth the faire gemme vertulees!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 345

[continues previous] Wo worth that herbe also that dooth no bote!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 348

And ye, that been of beautee crop and rote,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1245

'O Pandarus, now knowe I crop and rote! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 349

If therwith-al in you ther be no routhe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1246

[continues previous] I nam but deed, ther nis non other bote!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 350

Than is it harm ye liven, by my trouthe!
10

Parson's Tale: 35

... god in youre swering, as seith Ieremye quarto capitulo, 'Iurabis in veritate, in iudido et in iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled lawefully to swere, the wounde shal nat departe from his hous whyl he useth swich unleveful swering. Thou shalt sweren eek in doom, whan thou art constreyned by thy domesman to witnessen the trouthe. Eek thou shalt nat swere for ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 351

And also thenk wel, that this is no gaude;
10

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... lawe of god in youre swering, as seith Ieremye quarto capitulo, 'Iurabis in veritate, in iudido et in iustida: thou shalt kepe three condicions; thou shalt swere in trouthe, in doom, and in rightwisnesse.' This is to seyn, thou shalt swere sooth; for every lesinge is agayns Crist. For Crist is verray trouthe. And think wel this, that every greet swerere, nat compelled lawefully to swere, the wounde shal nat departe from his hous whyl he useth swich unleveful swering. Thou shalt sweren eek in doom, whan thou art constreyned by thy domesman to witnessen the trouthe. Eek thou shalt nat swere for envye ne for favour, ne ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 354

As heyghe, as men mighte on us alle y-see:
11

Legend of Thisbe: 120

The mone shoon, men mighte wel y-see,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 121

And in his weye, as that he com ful faste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 360

But only that ye make him bettre chere
10

Melibee's Tale: 45

... that ye have leve to venge yow. I seye ye been nat of might and power as now to venge yow. For if ye wole maken comparisoun un-to the might of your adversaries, ye shul finde in manye thinges, that I have shewed yow er this, that hir condicioun is bettre than youres. And therfore seye I, that it is good as now that ye suffre and be pacient. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 361

Than ye han doon er this, and more feste,
10

Clerk's Tale: 568

'Wyf,' quod this markis, 'ye han herd er this,
10

Melibee's Tale: 45

[continues previous] But lat us now putte, that ye have leve to venge yow. I seye ye been nat of might and power as now to venge yow. For if ye wole maken comparisoun un-to the might of your adversaries, ye shul finde in manye thinges, that I have shewed yow er this, that hir condicioun is bettre than youres. And therfore seye I, that it is good as now that ye suffre and be pacient.
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 703

And do ther-with as ye han doon er this
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 80

Ye han er this wel herd it me devyse;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1682

Allas, I never wolde han wend, er this, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1683

That ye, Criseyde, coude han chaunged so; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 362

So that his lyf be saved, at the leste:
10

Melibee's Prologue: 16

Or telle in prose somwhat at the leste [continues next]
10

Melibee's Prologue: 17

In which ther be som mirthe or som doctryne.' [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 423

That, so she saved him his lyf,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1683

[continues previous] That ye, Criseyde, coude han chaunged so;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 363

This al and som, and playnly our entente;
10

Melibee's Prologue: 17

[continues previous] In which ther be som mirthe or som doctryne.'
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1236

'And whan I had my tale y-do, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1293

'For playnly hir entente,' as seyde she, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 485

To fecchen fyr, and rennen hoom ayeyn? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 364

God helpe me so, I never other mente.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 187

So helpe me god, ther-by shal he nat winne,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 192

Quod he. 'No, helpe me god so wis!' —
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

I wolde, as wis god helpe me so,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 838

As helpe me god, so was y-caught
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1235

[continues previous] I nil, as wis god helpe me so!"
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1236

[continues previous] 'And whan I had my tale y-do,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1004

God helpe me so, as I wolde outrely,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1126

Or, helpe me god, so pleynly for to seyne,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1213

God helpe me so, this is the firste lettre
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1230

And seyde, 'as wisly helpe me god the grete,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1231

I never dide a thing with more peyne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1292

[continues previous] To graunten him so greet a libertee.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1566

God helpe me so, ye caused al this fare,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 613

God helpe me so, she nil not take a-greef,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 363

God helpe me so, I counte hem not a bene,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 486

[continues previous] God helpe me so, I can not tellen whider
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 366

Ne doute of reson, pardee, is ther noon.
11

A. B. C.: 24

Nere mercy of you, blisful hevene quene.
12

A. B. C.: 25

Doute is ther noon, thou queen of misericorde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 913

Ne, pardee, harm may ther be noon ne sinne; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 367

I sette the worste that ye dredden this,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 914

[continues previous] I wol my-self be with yow al this night.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 373

To temple go, that he the images eteth?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 736

I thenk eek how he able is for to have [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 374

Thenk eek how wel and wysly that he can
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 644

And eek ye knowen wel, how that a Iay
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 645

Can clepen 'Watte,' as well as can the pope.
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

... seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and hele thinges that men oghte secreely to hyde. And soothly, as to your fifthe resoun, wher-as ye seyn, that "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" god woot, thilke resoun stant here in no stede. For understand now, ye asken conseil to do wikkednesse; and if ye wole werken wikkednesse, and ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 956

He hasteth wel that wysly can abyde; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 957

Be diligent, and trewe, and ay wel hyde. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 393

Thenk eek, how elde wasteth every houre
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 736

[continues previous] I thenk eek how he able is for to have
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 608

Thenk eek how Paris hath, that is thy brother,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 375

Governe him-self, that he no-thing foryeteth,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 956

[continues previous] He hasteth wel that wysly can abyde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 378

What fors were it though al the toun behelde?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 420

Amonges us, wolde infecte al a toun,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 421

Though it as greet were as was Ninivee,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 381

And, god so wis be my savacioun,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 621

For, god so wis be my savacioun, [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 77

And specially, for thy savacioun [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 270

This balade may ful wel y-songen be, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 271

As I have seyd erst, by my lady free; [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

I wolde, as wis god helpe me so, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1235

I nil, as wis god helpe me so!" [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1236

'And whan I had my tale y-do, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6433

And, god so wis be my socour,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 563

And god so wis be my savacioun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 382

As I have seyd, your beste is to do so.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 622

[continues previous] I ne loved never by no discrecioun,
12

Summoner's Tale: 78

[continues previous] Have I seyd many a precious orisoun,
10

Melibee's Tale: 24

... thise thinges thou shalt chese the beste, and weyve alle othere thinges. Thanne shaltow considere of what rote is engendred the matere of thy conseil, and what fruit it may conceyve and engendre. Thou shalt eek considere alle thise causes, fro whennes they been sprongen. And whan ye han examined your conseil as I have seyd, and which partie is the bettre and more profitable, and hast approved it by manye wyse folk and olde; thanne shaltou considere, if thou mayst parfourne it and maken of it a good ende. For certes, resoun wol nat that any man sholde biginne a thing, but-if he mighte parfourne it as him oghte. Ne no wight sholde take up-on hym so hevy a charge that he mighte nat bere it. For the proverbe seith: "he that to muche embraceth, distreyneth litel." And Catoun seith: "assay to do swich thing as thou hast power to doon, lest that the charge oppresse thee so sore, that thee bihoveth to weyve thing that thou hast bigonne." And if so be that thou be in doute, whether thou mayst parfourne a thing or noon, chese rather to suffre than biginne. And Piers Alphonce seith: "if thou hast might to doon a thing of which thou most repente thee, it is bettre 'nay' than 'ye';" this is to seyn, that thee is bettre holde thy tonge stille, than for to speke. Thanne may ye understonde by strenger resons, that if thou hast power to parfourne a werk of which thou shalt repente, thanne is it bettre that thou suffre than biginne. Wel seyn they, that defenden every wight to assaye any thing of which he is in doute, whether he may parfourne it or no. And after, whan ye han examined your conseil as I have seyd biforn, and knowen wel that ye may parfourne youre emprise, conferme it thanne sadly til it be at an ende.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 271

[continues previous] As I have seyd erst, by my lady free;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

[continues previous] I wolde, as wis god helpe me so,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1235

[continues previous] I nil, as wis god helpe me so!"
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1236

[continues previous] 'And whan I had my tale y-do,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 564

[continues previous] As never of thing hadde I no routhe more.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 383

But alwey, goode nece, to stinte his wo,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 42

Love hath me taught no more of his art
10

Compleint to His Lady: 43

But serve alwey, and stinte for no wo.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 630

'Now were it tyme a lady to go henne!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 631

But goode nece, if I mighte ever plese
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 384

So lat your daunger sucred ben a lyte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1278

Tel me that I shal axen yow a lyte. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1279

A womman, that were of his deeth to wyte, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 385

That of his deeth ye be nought for to wyte.'
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1541

For if hir deeth be yow to wyte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 825

And of his deeth his lady nought to wyte;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 826

For of his wo, god woot, she knew ful lyte.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 337

If it be so that ye so cruel be,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 338

That of his deeth yow liste nought to recche,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1279

[continues previous] A womman, that were of his deeth to wyte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1280

[continues previous] With-outen his gilt, but for hir lakked routhe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 386

Criseyde, which that herde him in this wyse,
10

Merchant's Tale: 275

Iustinus, that ay stille sat and herde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 276

Right in this wyse to Placebo answerde:
11

Book of the Duchesse: 113

Or how he fareth, or in what wyse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 721

Sith it is so, he meneth in good wyse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 799

Criseyde, which that al this wonder herde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 387

Thoughte, 'I shal fele what he meneth, y-wis.'
11

Hous of Fame 3: 748

'I graunte hit yow,' quod she, 'y-wis. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 113

[continues previous] Or how he fareth, or in what wyse,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 114

[continues previous] And I shal make you sacrifyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 721

[continues previous] Sith it is so, he meneth in good wyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 722

[continues previous] And eek I knowe, of longe tyme agoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 927

And eem, y-wis, fayn wolde I doon the beste, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 388

'Now, eem,' quod she, 'what wolde ye devyse,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 622

Ne of fame wolde they nought. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 623

'What?' quod she, 'and be ye wood? [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 748

[continues previous] 'I graunte hit yow,' quod she, 'y-wis.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 749

[continues previous] But what art thou that seyst this tale,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 162

'In good feith, eem,' quod she, 'that lyketh me;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 499

Til at the laste, 'O good eem,' quod she tho,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1170

And whan that she was comen in-to halle,
12