Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Canon's Yeoman's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Canon's Yeoman's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Canon's Yeoman's Tale has 928 lines, and 4% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 68% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 28% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.06 strong matches and 3.03 weak matches.

Geoffrey Chaucer

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12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 1

Whan ended was the lyf of seint Cecyle,
12

Shipman's Tale: 325

This marchant, whan that ended was the faire,
12

Shipman's Tale: 326

To Seint Denys he gan for to repaire,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 416

And mad the Lyf also of seynt Cecyle;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 426

And mad the Lyf also of seynt Cecyle;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 3

At Boghton under Blee us gan atake
12

Manciple's Prologue: 3

Under the Blee, in Caunterbury weye?
12

Manciple's Prologue: 4

Ther gan our hoste for to Iape and pleye,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 4

A man, that clothed was in clothes blake,
10

Knight's Tale: 41

Ech after other, clad in clothes blake; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 42

But swich a cry and swich a wo they make, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 2026

In clothes blake, y-dropped al with teres;
10

Knight's Tale: 2120

But in his blake clothes sorwefully [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 835

But ever live as widwe in clothes blake,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 5

And undernethe he hadde a whyt surplys.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 617

This reve sat up-on a ful good stot, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 619

A long surcote of pers up-on he hade, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 42

[continues previous] But swich a cry and swich a wo they make,
10

Knight's Tale: 1219

And undernethe hir feet she hadde a mone,
10

Knight's Tale: 2119

[continues previous] Unwist of him what was the cause and why;
10

Knight's Tale: 2121

[continues previous] He cam at his comaundement in hye.
15+

Miller's Tale: 137

And ther-up-on he hadde a gay surplys
15+

Miller's Tale: 138

As whyt as is the blosme up-on the rys.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1136

Of thefte or mordre, if that he [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1137

Hadde in his stable an hakeney. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 6

His hakeney, that was al pomely grys,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 618

[continues previous] That was al pomely grey, and highte Scot. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1136

[continues previous] Of thefte or mordre, if that he
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1137

[continues previous] Hadde in his stable an hakeney.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 7

So swatte, that it wonder was to see;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 618

[continues previous] That was al pomely grey, and highte Scot.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 9

The hors eek that his yeman rood upon
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 64

His faire stede in his prikinge [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 66

His sydes were al blood. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 10

So swatte, that unnethe mighte it gon.
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 65

[continues previous] So swatte that men mighte him wringe,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 12

He was of fome al flekked as a pye.
14

Merchant's Tale: 604

And ful of Iargon as a flekked pye. [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 13

A male tweyfold on his croper lay,
14

Merchant's Tale: 604

[continues previous] And ful of Iargon as a flekked pye.
14

Merchant's Tale: 605

[continues previous] The slakke skin aboute his nekke shaketh,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 15

Al light for somer rood this worthy man,
10

Franklin's Tale: 786

Aurelius gan wondren on this cas, [continues next]
12

Against Women Unconstaunt: 20

Al light for somer, ye woot wel what I mene,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 16

And in myn herte wondren I bigan
10

Franklin's Tale: 786

[continues previous] Aurelius gan wondren on this cas,
10

Franklin's Tale: 787

[continues previous] And in his herte had greet compassioun
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 17

What that he was, til that I understood
10

Knight's Tale: 631

That litel wiste how ny that was his care, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 632

Til that fortune had broght him in the snare. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 18

How that his cloke was sowed to his hood;
10

Knight's Tale: 631

[continues previous] That litel wiste how ny that was his care,
10

Knight's Tale: 632

[continues previous] Til that fortune had broght him in the snare.
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 21

His hat heng at his bak doun by a laas,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 240

A purs, that heng [doun] by a bande;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 639

That by a tissew heng, his bak bihinde,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 640

His sheld to-dasshed was with swerdes and maces,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 811

Doun by hir coler at hir bak bihinde,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 23

He had ay priked lyk as he were wood.
10

Knight's Tale: 719

And whan that he had herd Arcites tale,
10

Knight's Tale: 720

As he were wood, with face deed and pale,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 63

And priked as he were wood: [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 3: 418

Of soulfre, lyk as he were wood, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 24

A clote-leef he hadde under his hood
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 194

With grys, and that the fyneste of a lond; [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 195

And, for to festne his hood under his chin, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 196

He hadde of gold y-wroght a curious pin: [continues next]
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 63

[continues previous] And priked as he were wood:
11

Hous of Fame 3: 418

[continues previous] Of soulfre, lyk as he were wood,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 25

For swoot, and for to kepe his heed from hete.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 195

[continues previous] And, for to festne his hood under his chin,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 29

And whan that he was come, he gan to crye,
10

Miller's Prologue: 16

But in Pilates vois he gan to crye,
10

Miller's Tale: 628

As he were wood, for wo he gan to crye
10

Reeve's Tale: 158

'What? whilk way is he geen?' he gan to crye. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1122

'Out! help! allas! harrow!' he gan to crye, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 334

A certein frankes; and somme with him he ladde.
12

Shipman's Tale: 335

And whan that he was come in-to the toun,
10

Melibee's Tale: 4

Prudence his wyf, as ferforth as she dorste, bisoghte him of his weping for to stinte; but nat for-thy he gan to crye and wepen ever lenger the more.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 219

And with an hardy herte he gan to crye
13

Hous of Fame 2: 483

With that this egle gan to crye: [continues next]
13

Hous of Fame 2: 484

'Lat be,' quod he, 'thy fantasye; [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 511

A whyl, and than he gan to crye, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 501

This messanger gan faste crye, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 502

'Rys up,' quod he, 'and faste hye, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 638

And gonne faste on Fame crye. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 322

His wo he gan dissimulen and hyde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 323

Whan he was fro the temple thus departed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 750

But nathelees, whan he had herd him crye
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 751

'Awake!' he gan to syke wonder sore,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 554

Whan he was come, he gan anoon to pleye
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 532

Wel neigh for sorwe a-doun he gan to falle.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 533

Therwith whan he was war and gan biholde
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 30

'God save,' quod he, 'this Ioly companye!
10

Reeve's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'What? whilk way is he geen?' he gan to crye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 1122

[continues previous] 'Out! help! allas! harrow!' he gan to crye,
13

Hous of Fame 2: 483

[continues previous] With that this egle gan to crye:
13

Hous of Fame 2: 484

[continues previous] 'Lat be,' quod he, 'thy fantasye;
10

Hous of Fame 2: 511

[continues previous] A whyl, and than he gan to crye,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 502

[continues previous] 'Rys up,' quod he, 'and faste hye, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 31

Faste have I priked,' quod he, 'for your sake,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 501

[continues previous] This messanger gan faste crye,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 502

[continues previous] 'Rys up,' quod he, 'and faste hye,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 638

[continues previous] And gonne faste on Fame crye.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 33

To ryden in this mery companye.'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 766

I ne saugh this yeer so mery a companye
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 767

At ones in this herberwe as is now.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 27

Which that heer rydeth in this companye, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 34

His yeman eek was ful of curteisye,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 47

Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 28

[continues previous] And that our host wol, of his curteisye, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 35

And seyde, 'sires, now in the morwe-tyde
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 46

[continues previous] Trouthe and honour, fredom and curteisye.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 28

[continues previous] And that our host wol, of his curteisye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 38

Which that to ryden with yow is ful fayn,
10

Melibee's Tale: 2

Upon a day bifel, that he for his desport is went in-to the feeldes him to pleye. His wyf and eek his doghter hath he left inwith his hous, of which the dores weren fast y-shette. Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and ... [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 478

And certes, sire, ful fayn wolde I yow plese. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 39

For his desport; he loveth daliaunce.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 670

For his desport he wolde rede alway. [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 2

[continues previous] Upon a day bifel, that he for his desport is went in-to the feeldes him to pleye. His wyf and eek his doghter hath he left inwith his hous, of which the dores weren fast y-shette. Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 479

[continues previous] But for men speke of singing, I wol saye,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 40

'Freend, for thy warning god yeve thee good chaunce,'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 670

[continues previous] For his desport he wolde rede alway.
15+

Franklin's Prologue: 7

If that thou live; god yeve thee good chaunce,
13

Parson's Prologue: 20

I prey to god, so yeve him right good chaunce,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4274

I pray god yeve him evel chaunce,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 41

Than seyde our host, 'for certes, it wolde seme
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, for the grete bountee that is in wommen, our lord Iesu Crist, whan he was risen fro deeth to lyve, appeered rather to a womman than to his apostles. And though that ... [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 42

Thy lord were wys, and so I may wel deme;
13

Man of Law's Tale: 993

Sente any child, but it is bet to deme [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 994

He wente him-self, and so it may wel seme. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 521

Wher-as he shoon ful pale, I dar wel seyn. [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, for the grete bountee that is in wommen, our lord Iesu Crist, whan he was risen fro deeth to lyve, appeered rather to a womman than to his apostles. ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 18

First, he that axeth conseil of him-self, certes he moste been with-outen ire, for manye causes. The firste is this: he that hath greet ire and wratthe in him-self, he weneth alwey that he may do thing that he may nat do. And secoundely, he that is irous and wroth, he ne may nat wel deme; and he that may nat wel deme, may nat wel conseille. The thridde is this; that "he that is irous and wrooth," as seith Senek, "ne may nat speke but he blame thinges;" and with his viciouse wordes he stireth other folk to angre and to ire. And eek sir, ye moste dryve coveitise out of your herte. For the ... [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 43

He is ful Iocund also, dar I leye.
13

Man of Law's Tale: 994

[continues previous] He wente him-self, and so it may wel seme.
10

Franklin's Tale: 521

[continues previous] Wher-as he shoon ful pale, I dar wel seyn.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 132

A moral tale yet I yow telle can, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Prologue: 24

And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 18

[continues previous] First, he that axeth conseil of him-self, certes he moste been with-outen ire, for manye causes. The firste is this: he that hath greet ire and wratthe in him-self, he weneth alwey that he may do thing that he may nat do. And secoundely, he that is irous and wroth, he ne may nat wel deme; and he that may nat wel deme, may nat wel conseille. The thridde is this; that "he that is irous and wrooth," as seith Senek, "ne may nat speke but he blame thinges;" and with his viciouse wordes he stireth other folk to angre and to ire. And eek sir, ye moste ...
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 58

For mochel good, I dar leye in balaunce
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 230

Is lost also, which we upon it leye.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 231

Ther is also ful many another thing
12

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 166

Mo wonder thinges, dar I leye,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 964

'That shal be found' — ' That dar I leye:'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1605

Saw never yet, my lyf, that dar I leye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

He feleth other weyes, dar I leye, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 44

Can he oght telle a mery tale or tweye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 859

And he bigan with right a mery chere [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 860

His tale anon, and seyde in this manere. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Prologue: 9

Telle us som mery tale, by your fey;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 132

[continues previous] A moral tale yet I yow telle can,
11

Shipman's Prologue: 23

[continues previous] My Ioly body shal a tale telle,
11

Shipman's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] And I shal clinken yow so mery a belle,
11

Monk's Prologue: 36

My lord the Monk,' quod he, 'be mery of chere;
11

Monk's Prologue: 37

For ye shul telle a tale trewely.
10

Monk's Prologue: 80

To telle yow a tale, or two, or three.
13

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

By Troilus he lay, with mery chere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

[continues previous] He feleth other weyes, dar I leye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1659

[continues previous] Than thilke tyme he first herde of it seye.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 45

With which he glade may this companye?'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 859

[continues previous] And he bigan with right a mery chere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 229

[continues previous] And on a paillet, al that glade night,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

[continues previous] By Troilus he lay, with mery chere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 49

And ye him knewe as wel as do I,
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, he shal no-thing bere with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 18

thee to ben the resoun of this so wrongful a conclusioun? For I [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 19

wolde wondre wel the lasse, yif I trowede that al thise thinges [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 50

Ye wolde wondre how wel and craftily
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, he shal no-thing bere with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 19

[continues previous] wolde wondre wel the lasse, yif I trowede that al thise thinges
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 51

He coude werke, and that in sondry wyse.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 102

God clepeth folk to him in sondry wyse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 103

And everich hath of god a propre yifte, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... dong and in the myre, on horse and eek on fote, as wel of man as of womman, that al thilke trailing is verraily as in effect wasted, consumed, thredbare, and roten with donge, rather than it is yeven to the povre; to greet damage of the forseyde povre folk. And that in sondry wyse: this is to seyn, that the more that clooth is wasted, the more it costeth to the peple for the scantnesse; and forther-over, if so be that they wolde yeven swich pounsoned and dagged clothing to the povre folk, it is nat convenient to were for hir estaat, ne suffisant to bete hir necessitee, to ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 440

And brende him so in sondry wyse ay newe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 441

That sixty tyme a day he loste his hewe. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 959

And al is wel, if thou werke in this wyse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 960

But he that parted is in every place [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 964

As plaunte a tre or herbe, in sondry wyse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 965

And on the morwe pulle it up as blyve, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 52

He hath take on him many a greet empryse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 102

[continues previous] God clepeth folk to him in sondry wyse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 103

[continues previous] And everich hath of god a propre yifte,
12

Franklin's Tale: 4

And many a labour, many a greet empryse
11

Franklin's Tale: 5

He for his lady wroghte, er she were wonne.
10

Franklin's Tale: 454

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 440

[continues previous] And brende him so in sondry wyse ay newe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 960

[continues previous] But he that parted is in every place
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 965

[continues previous] And on the morwe pulle it up as blyve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 53

Which were ful hard for any that is here
10

Franklin's Tale: 453

[continues previous] And he answerde him that they dede were,
10

Franklin's Tale: 454

[continues previous] For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1468

Is now aboute eft-sones for to plete, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1581

[continues previous] If he among the Grekes knowen were;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

[continues previous] For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 54

To bringe aboute, but they of him it lere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1468

[continues previous] Is now aboute eft-sones for to plete,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1469

[continues previous] And bringe on yow advocacyës newe?'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 55

As homely as he rit amonges yow,
11

Shipman's Tale: 270

I wolde prey yow; for to lene me [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 56

If ye him knewe, it wolde be for your prow;
11

Shipman's Tale: 269

[continues previous] O thing, er that ye goon, if it may be,
11

Shipman's Tale: 270

[continues previous] I wolde prey yow; for to lene me
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 147

And whan this chanon saugh it wolde nat be, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 830

Maken assay, at swich tyme as he wolde, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 831

Of this receit, far-wel! it wolde nat be! [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 57

Ye wolde nat forgoon his aqueyntaunce
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 147

[continues previous] And whan this chanon saugh it wolde nat be,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 148

[continues previous] But his yeman wolde telle his privetee,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 830

[continues previous] Maken assay, at swich tyme as he wolde,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 831

[continues previous] Of this receit, far-wel! it wolde nat be!
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 58

For mochel good, I dar leye in balaunce
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 43

He is ful Iocund also, dar I leye.
10

Hous of Fame 2: 166

Mo wonder thinges, dar I leye, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 964

'That shal be found' — ' That dar I leye:'[continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1605

Saw never yet, my lyf, that dar I leye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

He feleth other weyes, dar I leye,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 59

Al that I have in my possessioun.
12

Summoner's Tale: 416

'Swich thing as is in my possessioun,' [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 417

Quod he, 'that may I yeven, and non other. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 166

[continues previous] Mo wonder thinges, dar I leye,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 964

[continues previous] 'That shal be found' — ' That dar I leye:' —
12

Hous of Fame 3: 965

[continues previous] That al the folk that is a-lyve
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 60

He is a man of heigh discrecioun,
12

Summoner's Tale: 416

[continues previous] 'Swich thing as is in my possessioun,'
12

Summoner's Tale: 417

[continues previous] Quod he, 'that may I yeven, and non other.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 62

''Wel,' quod our host, 'I pray thee, tel me than,
12

Summoner's Tale: 54

'Pees,' quod our Host, 'for Cristes moder dere;
12

Summoner's Tale: 55

Tel forth thy tale and spare it nat at al.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 630

'Now,' quod our host, 'I wol no lenger pleye
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 64

'Nay, he is gretter than a clerk, y-wis,' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 101

Tel how he dooth, I pray thee hertely, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 362

But tel me this, now pray I thee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 367

And peril was it noon to thee by-wreye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 368

That wiste I wel; but tel me, if thee liste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 369

Sith I so looth was that thy-self it wiste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 330

But Troilus, I pray thee tel me now,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 63

Is he a clerk, or noon? tel what he is.'
10

Melibee's Tale: 46

... bifalle or happe that a man of gretter might and strengthe than thou art do thee grevaunce, studie and bisie thee rather to stille the same grevaunce, than for to venge thee. For Senek seith: that "he putteth him in greet peril that stryveth with a gretter man than he is him-self." And Catoun seith: "if a man of hyer estaat or degree, or more mighty than thou, do thee anoy or grevaunce, suffre him; for he that ones hath greved thee may another tyme releve thee and helpe." Yet sette I caas, ye have bothe might and licence for to ... [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 64

[continues previous] 'Nay, he is gretter than a clerk, y-wis,' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 101

[continues previous] Tel how he dooth, I pray thee hertely,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 64

'Nay, he is gretter than a clerk, y-wis,'
12

Melibee's Tale: 46

[continues previous] ... stryf." And if it so bifalle or happe that a man of gretter might and strengthe than thou art do thee grevaunce, studie and bisie thee rather to stille the same grevaunce, than for to venge thee. For Senek seith: that "he putteth him in greet peril that stryveth with a gretter man than he is him-self." And Catoun seith: "if a man of hyer estaat or degree, or more mighty than thou, do thee anoy or grevaunce, suffre him; for he that ones hath greved thee may another tyme releve thee and helpe." Yet sette I caas, ye have bothe might and licence for to ...
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 62

''Wel,' quod our host, 'I pray thee, tel me than,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 63

[continues previous] Is he a clerk, or noon? tel what he is.'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 65

Seyde this yeman, 'and in wordes fewe,
10

Friar's Tale: 89

Seyde this yeman, 'wiltow fer to day?'
10

Friar's Tale: 90

This Somnour him answerde, and seyde, 'nay;
12

Franklin's Tale: 796

Agayns franchyse and alle gentillesse;
12

Franklin's Tale: 797

For which in fewe wordes seyde he thus:
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 66

Host, of his craft som-what I wol yow shewe.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 748

And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 50

... bitter deeth than for to liven in swich wyse." By thise resons that I have seid un-to yow, and by manye othere resons that I coude seye, I graunte yow that richesses been goode to hem that geten hem wel, and to hem that wel usen tho richesses. And therfore wol I shewe yow how ye shul have yow, and how ye shul here yow in gaderinge of richesses, and in what manere ye shul usen hem. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1290

That now these wordes, whiche that I shal seye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1291

Nis but to shewe yow my mocioun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 67

I seye, my lord can swich subtilitee —
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

[continues previous] Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas,
12

Clerk's Tale: 748

[continues previous] And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye,
12

Clerk's Tale: 749

[continues previous] My newe wyf is coming by the weye.
12

Merchant's Tale: 10

I can nat seye, but swich a greet corage [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
12

Franklin's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
12

Melibee's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... deeth than for to liven in swich wyse." By thise resons that I have seid un-to yow, and by manye othere resons that I coude seye, I graunte yow that richesses been goode to hem that geten hem wel, and to hem that wel usen tho richesses. And therfore wol I shewe yow how ye shul have yow, and how ye shul here yow in gaderinge of richesses, and in what manere ye shul usen hem.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

[continues previous] I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1290

[continues previous] That now these wordes, whiche that I shal seye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1291

[continues previous] Nis but to shewe yow my mocioun,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 68

(But al his craft ye may nat wite at me;
12

Merchant's Tale: 10

[continues previous] I can nat seye, but swich a greet corage
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 69

And som-what helpe I yet to his werking)
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 814

Al his werking nas but fraude and deceit. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 70

That al this ground on which we been ryding,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 813

[continues previous] To this chanoun, for this ilke receit;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 814

[continues previous] Al his werking nas but fraude and deceit.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 74

And whan this yeman hadde thus y-told
11

Reeve's Prologue: 45

Whan that our host hadde herd this sermoning, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 37

Thus seyde our host, 'and lat him telle his tale. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 139

And thus he seyde un-to his yeman tho, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 75

Unto our host, he seyde, 'benedicite!
11

Reeve's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] Whan that our host hadde herd this sermoning,
10

Reeve's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] He gan to speke as lordly as a king;
10

Friar's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Thus seyde our host, 'and lat him telle his tale.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 139

[continues previous] And thus he seyde un-to his yeman tho,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 94

Than gan our host to laughen wonder loude, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 95

And seyde, 'I see wel, it is necessarie, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 76

This thing is wonder merveillous to me,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 94

[continues previous] Than gan our host to laughen wonder loude,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 77

Sin that thy lord is of so heigh prudence,
14

Shipman's Tale: 64

By-cause he was a man of heigh prudence, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 78

By-cause of which men sholde him reverence,
14

Shipman's Tale: 64

[continues previous] By-cause he was a man of heigh prudence,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 79

That of his worship rekketh he so lyte;
10

Physician's Tale: 187

She nis his doghter nat, what so he seye; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 29

... humilitee in herte, and another humilitee in his mouth; the thridde in hise werkes. The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres: that oon is, whan a man holdeth him-self as noght worth biforn god of hevene. Another is, whan he ne despyseth noon other man. The thridde is, whan he rekketh nat thogh men holde him noght worth. The ferthe is, whan he nis nat sory of his humiliacion. Also, the humilitee of mouth is in foure thinges: in attempree speche, and in humblesse of speche, and whan he biknoweth with his owene mouth that he is swich as him thinketh ... [continues next]
13

Legend of Thisbe: 35

But yit this clifte was so narwe and lyte, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7551

And, nathelesse, he rekketh lyte; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7552

He yeveth nat now thereof a myte; [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 80

His oversloppe nis nat worth a myte,
10

Knight's Tale: 700

Now highte I Philostrate, noght worth a myte.
15+

Summoner's Tale: 253

Thomas, that Iape nis nat worth a myte;
10

Physician's Tale: 187

[continues previous] She nis his doghter nat, what so he seye;
15+

Second Nun's Tale: 511

For in effect they been nat worth a myte.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 145

Of al his threting rekke nat a myte!' [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 29

[continues previous] ... herte, and another humilitee in his mouth; the thridde in hise werkes. The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres: that oon is, whan a man holdeth him-self as noght worth biforn god of hevene. Another is, whan he ne despyseth noon other man. The thridde is, whan he rekketh nat thogh men holde him noght worth. The ferthe is, whan he nis nat sory of his humiliacion. Also, the humilitee of mouth is in foure thinges: in attempree speche, and in humblesse of speche, and whan he biknoweth with his owene mouth that he is swich as him thinketh that he is in his herte. Another ...
13

Legend of Thisbe: 36

[continues previous] It as nat sene, dere y-nogh a myte. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7552

[continues previous] He yeveth nat now thereof a myte;
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 81

As in effect, to him, so mote I go!
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 50

'Yis, sir,' quod he, 'yis, host, so mote I go,
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 51

But I be mery, y-wis, I wol be blamed:' —
15+

Second Nun's Tale: 511

[continues previous] For in effect they been nat worth a myte.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 146

[continues previous] 'In feith,' quod he, 'namore I do but lyte.'
13

Legend of Thisbe: 36

[continues previous] It as nat sene, dere y-nogh a myte.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6486

'Sir, I wol fillen, so mote I go,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6591

That he ne shal, so mote I go,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6623

They don not wel, so mote I go,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6624

That taken such almesse so,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 984

I am disposed bet, so mote I go,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 85

If that his dede accorde with thy speche?
10

Franklin's Prologue: 46

Have me excused of my rude speche; [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 101

Hir lemman? certes, this is a knavish speche! [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 104

The word mot nede accorde with the dede. [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 105

If men shal telle proprely a thing, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 86

Telle me that, and that I thee biseche.'
10

Miller's Tale: 414

Go, save our lyf, and that I thee biseche.' [continues next]
10

Franklin's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] At my biginning first I yow biseche
10

Franklin's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] Have me excused of my rude speche;
10

Franklin's Prologue: 47

[continues previous] I lerned never rethoryk certeyn;
12

Manciple's Tale: 102

[continues previous] Foryeveth it me, and that I yow biseche.
14

Manciple's Tale: 105

[continues previous] If men shal telle proprely a thing,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 393

But here, with al myn herte, I thee biseche,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 394

That never in me thou deme swich folye
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 87

'Why?' quod this yeman, 'wherto axe ye me?
11

Knight's Tale: 269

God help me so, me list ful yvele pleye.' [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 415

[continues previous] This sely carpenter goth forth his wey.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

As help me god, I shal thee never smyte; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5693

For an usurer, so god me see, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 864

God help me so, ye hadde him never leef, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 153

God help me so, whyl that my lyf may dure, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 392

God help me so, the beste is thus to done. [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 88

God help me so, for he shal never thee!
11

Knight's Tale: 269

[continues previous] God help me so, me list ful yvele pleye.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 45

Welcome the sixte, whan that ever he shal. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 46

For sothe, I wol nat kepe me chast in al; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

[continues previous] As help me god, I shal thee never smyte;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 822

After that day we hadden never debaat.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 823

God help me so, I was to him as kinde
11

Friar's Tale: 215

But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 499

'Far weel, my child; I shal thee never see; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 169

Save un-to yow thus muche I tellen shal;
10

Shipman's Tale: 170

As help me god, he is noght worth at al
11

Hous of Fame 3: 1009

With the nones that thou wolt do so, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 1010

That I shal never fro thee go, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5693

[continues previous] For an usurer, so god me see,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5694

[continues previous] Shal never for richesse riche bee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 864

[continues previous] God help me so, ye hadde him never leef,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 152

[continues previous] Yeve me your hond, I am, and shal ben ay,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 153

[continues previous] God help me so, whyl that my lyf may dure,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 391

[continues previous] Whan that she cometh, the which shal be right sone;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 392

[continues previous] God help me so, the beste is thus to done.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 89

(But I wol nat avowe that I seye,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] For sothe, I wol nat kepe me chast in al;
11

Friar's Tale: 215

[continues previous] But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape,
10

Clerk's Tale: 499

[continues previous] 'Far weel, my child; I shal thee never see;
10

Clerk's Tale: 500

[continues previous] But, sith I thee have marked with the croys,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
12

Melibee's Tale: 20

Whan ye han taken conseil in your-self, and han demed by good deliberacion swich thing as you semeth best, thanne rede I yow, that ye kepe it secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne ... [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 206

Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye: [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 289

Therfor I wol seye a proverbe, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 290

That 'he that fully knoweth therbe [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 1010

[continues previous] That I shal never fro thee go,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 1011

[continues previous] But be thyn owne sworen brother!
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 90

And therfor kepe it secree, I yow preye).
10

Clerk's Tale: 774

That thonke I god and yow, to whom I preye [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 775

Foryelde it yow; there is na-more to seye. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 277

But lat this thing be secree, I yow preye,
12

Prioress' Tale: 34

Right so fare I, and therfor I yow preye,
11

Prioress' Tale: 35

Gydeth my song that I shal of yow seye.
14

Melibee's Tale: 20

[continues previous] Whan ye han taken conseil in your-self, and han demed by good deliberacion swich thing as you semeth best, thanne rede I yow, that ye kepe it secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne thy folie; for they wol yeve ...
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 905

What is Magnesia, good sir, I yow preye?' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 906

'It is a water that is maad, I seye, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 205

[continues previous] Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye,
11

Manciple's Tale: 206

[continues previous] Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye:
12

Hous of Fame 1: 289

[continues previous] Therfor I wol seye a proverbe,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche. — [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 91

He is to wys, in feith, as I bileve;
10

Clerk's Tale: 774

[continues previous] That thonke I god and yow, to whom I preye
10

Clerk's Tale: 775

[continues previous] Foryelde it yow; there is na-more to seye.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 63

Be sinful, yet accepte my bileve. [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 64

And, for that feith is deed with-outen werkes, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 906

[continues previous] 'It is a water that is maad, I seye,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 160

[continues previous] Under the cope of heven that is above;
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

[continues previous] And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche. —
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 92

That that is overdoon, it wol nat preve
11

Merchant's Tale: 49

And yet somme clerkes seyn, it nis nat so, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 157

I wool wel clerkes wol seyn, as hem leste, [continues next]
14

Physician's Tale: 168

And if that he wol seyn it is nat thus, [continues next]
14

Physician's Tale: 169

I wol it preve, and finde good witnesse, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 64

[continues previous] And, for that feith is deed with-outen werkes,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 93

Aright, as clerkes seyn, it is a vyce.
11

Merchant's Tale: 49

[continues previous] And yet somme clerkes seyn, it nis nat so,
11

Franklin's Tale: 157

[continues previous] I wool wel clerkes wol seyn, as hem leste,
14

Physician's Tale: 168

[continues previous] And if that he wol seyn it is nat thus,
14

Physician's Tale: 169

[continues previous] I wol it preve, and finde good witnesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 987

And but she do, I holde it for a vyce. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 94

Wherfor in that I holde him lewed and nyce.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 372

'Straw!' quod the thridde, 'ye been lewed and nyce,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 987

[continues previous] And but she do, I holde it for a vyce.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 988

[continues previous] Wherfore I am, and wol be, ay redy
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 97

So dooth my lord, and that me greveth sore.
11

Summoner's Tale: 473

And yet ne greveth me no-thing so sore,
11

Summoner's Tale: 474

As that this olde cherl, with lokkes hore,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

I wolde, as wis god helpe me so, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 98

God it amende, I can sey yow na-more.'
12

Man of Law's Tale: 77

And liven in wele; I can sey yow no more. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 78

Now fel it, that thise marchants stode in grace [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 149

Dredeth no dreem; I can say yow na-more.' [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

[continues previous] I wolde, as wis god helpe me so,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 551

[continues previous] Amende hit, yif I can or may;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1377

My Ioye, in wo; I can sey yow nought elles,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1616

But now no fors, I can not in yow gesse [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 99

'Ther-of no fors, good yeman,' quod our host;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 77

[continues previous] And liven in wele; I can sey yow no more.
11

Merchant's Epilogue: 12

Ther-of no fors, lat alle swiche thinges go.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 149

[continues previous] Dredeth no dreem; I can say yow na-more.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1616

[continues previous] But now no fors, I can not in yow gesse
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 100

'Sin of the conning of thy lord thou wost,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 331

If that thou trowe, er this, that any wight [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 101

Tel how he dooth, I pray thee hertely,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 62

''Wel,' quod our host, 'I pray thee, tel me than,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 63

Is he a clerk, or noon? tel what he is.'
11

Hous of Fame 2: 362

But tel me this, now pray I thee,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 363

How thinkth thee my conclusioun?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1277

And seyde, 'nece, I pray yow hertely,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1278

Tel me that I shal axen yow a lyte.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 330

[continues previous] But Troilus, I pray thee tel me now,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 103

Wher dwellen ye, if it to telle be?'
10

Squire's Tale: 447

'What is the cause, if it be for to telle,
10

Squire's Tale: 448

That ye be in this furial pyne of helle?'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 104

'In the suburbes of a toun,' quod he,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 197

And at the west gate of the toun,' quod he,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 198

'A carte ful of donge ther shaltow see,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 108

As they that dar nat shewen hir presence;
10

Monk's Prologue: 32

Al be it that I dar nat hir withstonde,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 109

So faren we, if I shal seye the sothe.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 601

And I was fourty, if I shal seye sooth;
11

Franklin's Tale: 207

And shortly, if the sothe I tellen shal,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 629

So wrooth he was, no word ne wolde he seye. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 630

'Now,' quod our host, 'I wol no lenger pleye [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 864

So faren ye that multiplye, I seye.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 865

If that your yën can nat seen aright,
11

Manciple's Tale: 39

Save only, if the sothe that I shal sayn,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 110

'Now,' quod our host, 'yit lat me talke to the;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 630

[continues previous] 'Now,' quod our host, 'I wol no lenger pleye
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 111

Why artow so discoloured of thy face?'
12

Summoner's Tale: 519

O nyce proude cherl, I shrewe his face! [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 390

Why artow al forwrapped save thy face?
13

Pardoner's Tale: 391

Why livestow so longe in so greet age?'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 112

'Peter!' quod he, 'god yeve it harde grace,
11

Friar's Prologue: 6

'Dame,' quod he, 'god yeve yow right good lyf!
12

Summoner's Tale: 520

[continues previous] Lo, sires,' quod the lord, with harde grace,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 15

Awake, thou cook,' quod he, 'god yeve thee sorwe,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 113

I am so used in the fyr to blowe,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 153

To kindle and blowe the fyr of lecherye, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 199

Our termes been so clergial and so queynte. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 200

I blowe the fyr til that myn herte feynte. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 114

That it hath chaunged my colour, I trowe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 154

[continues previous] That is annexed un-to glotonye;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 200

[continues previous] I blowe the fyr til that myn herte feynte.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 9

'Certes,' quod I, 'I ne trowe nat in no manere, that so [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 115

I am nat wont in no mirour to prye,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 9

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod I, 'I ne trowe nat in no manere, that so
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 116

But swinke sore and lerne multiplye.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 282

Lat him come forth, and lerne multiplye; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 283

And every man that oght hath in his cofre, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 117

We blondren ever and pouren in the fyr,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 282

[continues previous] Lat him come forth, and lerne multiplye;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 123

And make hem wenen, at the leeste weye,
12

Clerk's Tale: 910

Do thou thy devoir at the leeste weye.' [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 43

ne hadde never y-ben, yit algate or at the leeste weye it is certein [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 44

thing, that the endes and bitydinges of thinges to comen sholden [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 124

That of a pound we coude make tweye!
12

Clerk's Tale: 911

[continues previous] 'Nat only, lord, that I am glad,' quod she,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 44

[continues previous] thing, that the endes and bitydinges of thinges to comen sholden
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7448

Ne coude he not espye, nor gesse; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 125

Yet is it fals, but ay we han good hope
10

Parson's Tale: 11

... seith seint Gregorie thus: 'that we shulle understonde this principally; that whan we doon deedly sinne, it is for noght thanne to rehercen or drawen in-to memorie the gode werkes that we han wroght biforn.' For certes, in the werkinge of the deedly sinne, ther is no trust to no good werk that we han doon biforn; that is to seyn, as for to have therby the lyf perdurable in hevene. But nathelees, the gode werkes quiken agayn, and comen agayn, and helpen, and availlen to have the lyf perdurable in hevene, whan we han contricion. But soothly, the gode werkes that men doon whyl ... [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7447

[continues previous] Yet fals was he, but his falsnesse
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 126

It for to doon, and after it we grope.
10

Parson's Tale: 11

[continues previous] ... thilke chapitre seith seint Gregorie thus: 'that we shulle understonde this principally; that whan we doon deedly sinne, it is for noght thanne to rehercen or drawen in-to memorie the gode werkes that we han wroght biforn.' For certes, in the werkinge of the deedly sinne, ther is no trust to no good werk that we han doon biforn; that is to seyn, as for to have therby the lyf perdurable in hevene. But nathelees, the gode werkes quiken agayn, and comen agayn, and helpen, and availlen to have the lyf perdurable in hevene, whan we han contricion. But soothly, the gode werkes that men doon whyl they ...
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 127

But that science is so fer us biforn,
13

Knight's Tale: 231

Hath yeven us this, al-though we hadde it sworn; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 115

to ben confus and trouble to us men, for we ne mowen nat considere [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 24

thilke thinges that the prescience wot biforn ne mowen nat unbityde? [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 25

That is to seyn, that they moten bityde. But thanne, yif [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 5: 58

mowen nat ben wist biforn certeinly to bityden. And thanne [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 5

mowen, which that the estat is of the devyne substaunce; so that [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 6

we mowen eek knowen what his science is. The commune Iugement [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 128

We mowen nat, al-though we hadde it sworn,
15+

Knight's Tale: 231

[continues previous] Hath yeven us this, al-though we hadde it sworn; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 115

[continues previous] to ben confus and trouble to us men, for we ne mowen nat considere
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 24

[continues previous] thilke thinges that the prescience wot biforn ne mowen nat unbityde?
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 5: 58

[continues previous] mowen nat ben wist biforn certeinly to bityden. And thanne
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 6

[continues previous] we mowen eek knowen what his science is. The commune Iugement
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 129

It overtake, it slit awey so faste;
15+

Knight's Tale: 231

[continues previous] Hath yeven us this, al-though we hadde it sworn;
10

Hous of Fame 3: 585

Al esely, and not to faste, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 793

Upon the carole wonder faste, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5126

Fro Love, that hath thee so faste [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 130

It wol us maken beggers atte laste.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 389

Til atte laste him fil in remembraunce, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 44

... him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 586

[continues previous] That hit be knowen atte laste.'
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 794

[continues previous] I gan biholde; til atte laste
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5125

[continues previous] And if thou scape yit, atte laste,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 131

Whyl this yeman was thus in his talking,
11

Franklin's Tale: 389

[continues previous] Til atte laste him fil in remembraunce,
11

Franklin's Tale: 390

[continues previous] That whyl he was at Orliens in Fraunce,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 717

And whyl this preest was in his bisinesse, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 132

This chanoun drough him neer, and herde al thing
10

Reeve's Tale: 384

And with the staf she drough ay neer and neer,
10

Reeve's Tale: 385

And wende han hit this Aleyn at the fulle,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 717

[continues previous] And whyl this preest was in his bisinesse,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

[continues previous] This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1590

Herde al this thing Criseyde wel y-nough, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1591

And every word gan for to notifye; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1422

This Troilus, with herte and eres spradde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1423

Herde al this thing devysen to and fro; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1424

And verraylich him semed that he hadde [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 133

Which this yeman spak, for suspecioun
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1590

[continues previous] Herde al this thing Criseyde wel y-nough,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1423

[continues previous] Herde al this thing devysen to and fro;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 135

For Catoun seith, that he that gilty is
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... the prophete David, that seith: "if god ne kepe the citee, in ydel waketh he that it kepeth." Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your trewe freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 46

... so bifalle or happe that a man of gretter might and strengthe than thou art do thee grevaunce, studie and bisie thee rather to stille the same grevaunce, than for to venge thee. For Senek seith: that "he putteth him in greet peril that stryveth with a gretter man than he is him-self." And Catoun seith: "if a man of hyer estaat or degree, or more mighty than thou, do thee anoy or grevaunce, suffre him; for he that ones hath greved thee may another tyme releve thee and helpe." Yet sette I caas, ye have bothe might and licence for to venge yow. I seye, ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7545

For I dar seyn, that Reson demeth, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7546

It is not al sooth thing that semeth, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 136

Demeth al thing be spoke of him, y-wis.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7545

[continues previous] For I dar seyn, that Reson demeth,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7546

[continues previous] It is not al sooth thing that semeth,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 137

That was the cause he gan so ny him drawe
15+

Knight's Tale: 668

That was so ny to herknen al his sawe, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 355

And every wight gan drawe him to his reste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1119

And at the laste, he gan his breeth to drawe, [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 138

To his yeman, to herknen al his sawe.
13

Knight's Tale: 667

[continues previous] Ful litel woot Arcite of his felawe,
15+

Knight's Tale: 668

[continues previous] That was so ny to herknen al his sawe, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 355

[continues previous] And every wight gan drawe him to his reste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1119

[continues previous] And at the laste, he gan his breeth to drawe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1120

[continues previous] And of his swough sone after that adawe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 38

And seyde un-to him-self this ilke sawe, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 139

And thus he seyde un-to his yeman tho,
13

Knight's Tale: 669

[continues previous] For in the bush he sitteth now ful stille.
12

Knight's Tale: 1810

Saturnus seyde: 'Doghter, hold thy pees. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1811

Mars hath his wille, his knight hath al his bone, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

And thus he seyde un-to us everichon,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 74

And whan this yeman hadde thus y-told
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 75

Unto our host, he seyde, 'benedicite!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 38

[continues previous] And seyde un-to him-self this ilke sawe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 39

[continues previous] 'Allas,' quod he, 'thus foul a wrecchednesse
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 140

'Hold thou thy pees, and spek no wordes mo,
12

Knight's Tale: 1810

[continues previous] Saturnus seyde: 'Doghter, hold thy pees.
11

Merchant's Tale: 488

Hold thou thy pees, thou poete Marcian,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 102

'Stond stille, gadeling and hold right thy pees;
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 103

Thou schalt be fayn for to have thy mete and thy wede;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 455

So hold thy pees; thou sleest me with thy speche.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 141

For if thou do, thou shalt it dere abye;
11

Summoner's Tale: 446

This hastow for despyt doon, for the nones! [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 447

Thou shalt abye this fart, if that I may!' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 428

Tel wher he is, or thou shalt it abye, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 142

Thou sclaundrest me heer in this companye,
12

Summoner's Tale: 447

[continues previous] Thou shalt abye this fart, if that I may!'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 428

[continues previous] Tel wher he is, or thou shalt it abye,
12

Manciple's Prologue: 27

Which that heer rydeth in this companye, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 75

... by Iesu Crist, as witnesseth seint Mathew in the gospel: 'A man shal lete fader and moder, and taken him to his wyf, and they shullen be two in o flesh.' This sacrement bitokneth the knittinge togidre of Crist and of holy chirche. And nat only that god forbad avoutrie in dede, but eek he comanded that thou sholdest nat coveite thy neighebores wyf. In this heeste, seith seint Augustin, is forboden alle manere coveitise to doon lecherie. Lo what seith seint Mathew in the gospel: that 'who-so seeth a womman to coveitise of his lust, he hath doon lecherie with ... [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 143

And eek discoverest that thou sholdest hyde.'
11

Manciple's Prologue: 27

[continues previous] Which that heer rydeth in this companye,
12

Manciple's Prologue: 28

[continues previous] And that our host wol, of his curteisye,
11

Parson's Tale: 75

[continues previous] ... as witnesseth seint Mathew in the gospel: 'A man shal lete fader and moder, and taken him to his wyf, and they shullen be two in o flesh.' This sacrement bitokneth the knittinge togidre of Crist and of holy chirche. And nat only that god forbad avoutrie in dede, but eek he comanded that thou sholdest nat coveite thy neighebores wyf. In this heeste, seith seint Augustin, is forboden alle manere coveitise to doon lecherie. Lo what seith seint Mathew in the gospel: that 'who-so seeth a womman to coveitise of his lust, he hath doon lecherie with hir in his herte.' Here may ye seen ...
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 144

'Ye,' quod our host, 'telle on, what so bityde;
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 13

And of swich thing were goodly for to telle.'
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 14

'Ye,' quod our hoste, 'by seint Poules belle,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 145

Of al his threting rekke nat a myte!'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 80

His oversloppe nis nat worth a myte, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 146

'In feith,' quod he, 'namore I do but lyte.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 81

[continues previous] As in effect, to him, so mote I go!
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 495

Go now thy wey, this penance is but lyte. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 147

And whan this chanon saugh it wolde nat be,
11

Summoner's Tale: 142

By god, I wolde nat telle it but a fewe.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 56

If ye him knewe, it wolde be for your prow; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 57

Ye wolde nat forgoon his aqueyntaunce [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 830

Maken assay, at swich tyme as he wolde, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 831

Of this receit, far-wel! it wolde nat be! [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 495

[continues previous] Go now thy wey, this penance is but lyte.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 496

[continues previous] And whan this book is maad, yive hit the quene
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1655

The same day; and whan this Troilus
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1656

It saugh, he gan to taken of it hede,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 148

But his yeman wolde telle his privetee,
11

Summoner's Tale: 142

[continues previous] By god, I wolde nat telle it but a fewe.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Ye wolde nat forgoon his aqueyntaunce
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 830

[continues previous] Maken assay, at swich tyme as he wolde,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 831

[continues previous] Of this receit, far-wel! it wolde nat be!
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 149

He fledde awey for verray sorwe and shame.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 71

Ye been a verray sleper, fy for shame!' [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3860

But fledde awey for verrey drede.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3861

Than Shame cam forth ful simply;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 150

'A!' quod the yeman, 'heer shal aryse game,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 71

[continues previous] Ye been a verray sleper, fy for shame!'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

Al that I can anon now wol I telle.
11

Knight's Tale: 495

Now demeth as yow liste, ye that can,
11

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan.
11

Knight's Tale: 1194

As shortly as I can I wol me haste,
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

To telle yow al the descripcioun.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale. —
10

Friar's Tale: 313

If I thexcuse, though them shul be spilt!' [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 4

For I can al by rote that I telle.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 332

But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 481

Thy profit wol I telle thee anon.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 482

Thou woost wel that our felawe is agon;
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 185

Anon I wol yow telle.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 152

Sin he is goon, the foule feend him quelle!
10

Friar's Tale: 312

[continues previous] 'Nay than,' quod he, 'the foule feend me fecche
11

Friar's Tale: 341

And with that word this foule feend him hente;
11

Friar's Tale: 342

Body and soule, he with the devel wente
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 606

This fals chanoun, the foule feend him fecche!
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 156

Er that he dye, sorwe have he and shame!
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

... lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For sothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his moder, that shal sterve yong by-cause of that ilke werre, or elles live in sorwe and dye in wrecchednesse. And ther-fore, er that any werre biginne, men moste have greet conseil and greet deliberacioun.' And whan this olde man wende to enforcen his tale by resons, wel ny alle at-ones bigonne they to ryse for to breken his tale, and beden him ful ofte his wordes for to abregge. For soothly, he that ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1787

Ther god thy maker yet, er that he dye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 157

For it is ernest to me, by my feith;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 196

Allas! a foul thing is it, by my feith,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 197

To seye this word, and fouler is the dede,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 91

I can nat love a coward, by my feith. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 507

That plesen yow wel more, by my feith, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 316

For wel I fele, by my maladye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 317

And by my dremes now and yore ago, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 158

That fele I wel, what so any man seith.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 92

[continues previous] For certes, what so any womman seith,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 507

[continues previous] That plesen yow wel more, by my feith,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 508

[continues previous] Than he that soothfastnesse unto yow seith.
10

Compleint to His Lady: 99

Serve yow trewly, what wo so that I fele.
10

Compleint to His Lady: 100

For I am set on yow in swich manere
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 316

[continues previous] For wel I fele, by my maladye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 161

I coude never leve it in no wyse.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 17

Hit were to liven in this wyse; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 55

This nil I not foryeten in no wyse.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 56

God leve him werken as he gan devyse. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 162

Now wolde god my wit mighte suffyse
11

Merchant's Tale: 514

Now wolde god ye mighte wel endure [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 515

Al my corage, it is so sharp and kene; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Epilogue: 21

And eek my wit suffyseth nat ther-to [continues next]
12

Merchant's Epilogue: 22

To tellen al; wherfor my tale is do.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 56

[continues previous] God leve him werken as he gan devyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 838

Al mighte a geaunt passen him of might, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 163

To tellen al that longeth to that art!
13

Knight's Tale: 1933

Fredom, and al that longeth to that art,
11

Merchant's Tale: 515

[continues previous] Al my corage, it is so sharp and kene;
12

Merchant's Epilogue: 22

[continues previous] To tellen al; wherfor my tale is do.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 837

[continues previous] In durring don that longeth to a knight.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 838

[continues previous] Al mighte a geaunt passen him of might,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 164

But natheles yow wol I tellen part;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 873

And right as swythe I wol yow tellen here,
12

Hous of Fame 1: 65

I wol yow tellen every del.
12

Hous of Fame 1: 66

But at my ginning, trusteth wel,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 165

Sin that my lord is gon, I wol nat spare;
11

Friar's Tale: 30

To telle his harlotrye I wol nat spare;
10

Former Age: 39

Ther wol they gon, and spare for no sinne
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 167

With this chanoun I dwelt have seven yeer,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 235

Thise seven yeer I have your servant be;
10

Legend of Ariadne: 236

Now have I yow, and also have ye me,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 170

And god wot, so hath many mo than I.
12

Summoner's Tale: 59

Refresshed more than in an hundred placis. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 869

Yet was he blent; and, god wot, so ben mo,
14

Hous of Fame 1: 112

Whan hit was night, to slepe I lay [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 1: 113

Right ther as I was wont to done, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 594

Ye, quek!' yit quod the doke, ful wel and faire,
11

Parlement of Foules: 595

'There been mo sterres, god wot, than a paire!'
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 171

Ther I was wont to be right fresh and gay
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

That I was born, and make me fresh and gay,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 337

Thou seyst also, that if we make us gay [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 338

With clothing and with precious array, [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 58

[continues previous] Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be
14

Hous of Fame 1: 112

[continues previous] Whan hit was night, to slepe I lay
14

Hous of Fame 1: 113

[continues previous] Right ther as I was wont to done,
13

Hous of Fame 1: 114

[continues previous] And fil on slepe wonder sone,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 435

Ne she was gay, fresh, ne Iolyf,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 436

But semed be ful ententyf
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 172

Of clothing and of other good array,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 338

[continues previous] With clothing and with precious array,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 174

And wher my colour was bothe fresh and reed,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 82

His colour was bitwixe yelwe and reed;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 83

And tipped was his tail, and bothe his eres,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 176

Who-so it useth, sore shal he rewe.
11

Knight's Tale: 1375

Considere al this, and rewe up-on my sore, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1376

As wisly as I shal for evermore, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 177

And of my swink yet blered is myn yë,
11

Knight's Tale: 1375

[continues previous] Considere al this, and rewe up-on my sore,
12

Reeve's Tale: 333

Myn heed is toty of my swink to-night,
11

Manciple's Tale: 148

For al thy waiting, blered is thyn
11

Manciple's Tale: 149

With oon of litel reputacioun,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3912

That almost blered is myn ye; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3913

No wonder is, if that drede have I. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 178

Lo! which avantage is to multiplye!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3913

[continues previous] No wonder is, if that drede have I.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 182

Of gold that I have borwed, trewely,
13

Parson's Tale: 12

The fifthe thing that oghte moeve a man to contricion, is remembrance of the passion that oure lord Iesu Crist suffred for our sinnes. For, as seith seint Bernard: 'whyl that I live, I shal have remembrance of the travailles that oure lord Crist suffred in preching; his werinesse in travailling, hise temptacions whan he fasted, hise longe wakinges whan he preyde, hise teres whan that he weep for pitee of good peple; the wo and the shame and the filthe that men seyden to him; ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 942

And ever shal, whyl I to live have space, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 183

That whyl I live, I shal it quyte never.
11

Franklin's Tale: 273

For wel I woot that it shal never bityde. [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 12

[continues previous] The fifthe thing that oghte moeve a man to contricion, is remembrance of the passion that oure lord Iesu Crist suffred for our sinnes. For, as seith seint Bernard: 'whyl that I live, I shal have remembrance of the travailles that oure lord Crist suffred in preching; his werinesse in travailling, hise temptacions whan he fasted, hise longe wakinges whan he preyde, hise teres whan that he weep for pitee of good peple; the wo and the shame and the filthe that men seyden to ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 938

And I shal never-more whyl I live.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 941

[continues previous] To serven you as hertely as I can,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 942

[continues previous] And ever shal, whyl I to live have space,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 184

Lat every man be war by me for ever!
11

Franklin's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Lat swiche folies out of your herte slyde.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 4: 1

What maner man, stable and war, that wole founden him [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 23

Allas! that day! that ever hit shulde falle! [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 185

What maner man that casteth him ther-to,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 4: 1

[continues previous] What maner man, stable and war, that wole founden him
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 23

[continues previous] Allas! that day! that ever hit shulde falle!
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 24

[continues previous] What maner man dar now holde up his heed?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 187

So helpe me god, ther-by shal he nat winne,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 192

Quod he. 'No, helpe me god so wis!' —
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 279

For she hath taught him how he shal nat faile [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 280

The flees to winne, and stinten his bataile; [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 550

I wolde, as wis god helpe me so,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 838

As helpe me god, so was y-caught
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1235

I nil, as wis god helpe me so!"
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 364

God helpe me so, I never other mente.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1004

God helpe me so, as I wolde outrely,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1126

Or, helpe me god, so pleynly for to seyne,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1213

God helpe me so, this is the firste lettre
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1566

God helpe me so, ye caused al this fare,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 613

God helpe me so, she nil not take a-greef,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 363

God helpe me so, I counte hem not a bene,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 486

God helpe me so, I can not tellen whider
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 188

But empte his purs, and make his wittes thinne.
10

Friar's Tale: 50

And they were gladde for to fille his purs,
10

Friar's Tale: 51

And make him grete festes atte nale.
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 280

[continues previous] The flees to winne, and stinten his bataile;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 189

And whan he, thurgh his madnes and folye,
11

Parson's Tale: 24

... regard of his value, and of his conning, and of his speking, and of his bering. Elacion, is whan he ne may neither suffre to have maister ne felawe. Impacient, is he that wol nat been y-taught ne undernome of his vyce, and by stryf werreieth trouthe witingly, and deffendeth his folye. Contumax, is he that thurgh his indignacion is agayns everich auctoritee or power of hem that been hise sovereyns. Presumpcion, is whan a man undertaketh an empryse that him oghte nat do, or elles that he may nat do; and that is called Surquidrie. Irreverence, is whan men do nat honour thereas hem oghte to doon, and waiten to be reverenced. Pertinacie, is whan man deffendeth his folye, and trusteth to muchel in his owene wit. Veyne glorie, is for to have pompe and delyt in his temporel hynesse, and glorifie him in this worldly estaat. Ianglinge, is whan men speken to muche biforn folk, and clappen as a mille, and taken no kepe what they seye. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 190

Hath lost his owene good thurgh Iupartye,
11

Parson's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... regard of his value, and of his conning, and of his speking, and of his bering. Elacion, is whan he ne may neither suffre to have maister ne felawe. Impacient, is he that wol nat been y-taught ne undernome of his vyce, and by stryf werreieth trouthe witingly, and deffendeth his folye. Contumax, is he that thurgh his indignacion is agayns everich auctoritee or power of hem that been hise sovereyns. Presumpcion, is whan a man undertaketh an empryse that him oghte nat do, or elles that he may nat do; and that is called Surquidrie. Irreverence, is whan men do nat honour thereas hem oghte to doon, and waiten to be reverenced. Pertinacie, is whan man deffendeth his folye, and trusteth to muchel in his owene wit. Veyne glorie, is for to have pompe and delyt in his temporel hynesse, and glorifie him in this worldly estaat. Ianglinge, is whan men speken to muche biforn folk, and clappen as a mille, and taken no kepe what they seye.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 194

To have hir felawes in peyne and disese;
12

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 3

... the lyne of midday un-to the point of my label in the bordure; and fond that it was passed 8 of the clokke the space of 2 degrees. Tho loked I doun up-on myn est orisonte, and fond ther 23 degrees of Libra assending, whom I tok for myn assendent; and thus lerned I to knowe ones for ever in which manere I shuld come to the houre of the night and to myn assendent; as verreyly as may be taken by so smal an instrument. But natheles, in general, wolde I warne thee for evere, ne mak thee nevere bold to have take a iust ascendent by thyn Astrolabie, ... [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 195

Thus was I ones lerned of a clerk.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 482

He was also a lerned man, a clerk, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 689

That any clerk wol speke good of wyves, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
12

Clerk's Prologue: 27

Lerned at Padowe of a worthy clerk, [continues next]
12

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 3

[continues previous] ... lyne of midday un-to the point of my label in the bordure; and fond that it was passed 8 of the clokke the space of 2 degrees. Tho loked I doun up-on myn est orisonte, and fond ther 23 degrees of Libra assending, whom I tok for myn assendent; and thus lerned I to knowe ones for ever in which manere I shuld come to the houre of the night and to myn assendent; as verreyly as may be taken by so smal an instrument. But natheles, in general, wolde I warne thee for evere, ne mak thee nevere bold to have take a iust ascendent ...
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 196

Of that no charge, I wol speke of our werk.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 483

[continues previous] That Cristes gospel trewely wolde preche;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 689

[continues previous] That any clerk wol speke good of wyves,
12

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
12

Clerk's Prologue: 27

[continues previous] Lerned at Padowe of a worthy clerk,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 340

I wol no more speke of this matere;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 197

Whan we been ther as we shul exercyse
10

Clerk's Tale: 69

That we shul deye, as uncerteyn we alle
10

Clerk's Tale: 70

Been of that day whan deeth shal on us falle.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1321

And thanne at erste shul we been so fayn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1322

So as we shulle to-gederes ever dwelle,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 199

Our termes been so clergial and so queynte.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 113

I am so used in the fyr to blowe, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 200

I blowe the fyr til that myn herte feynte.
11

Knight's Tale: 286

And ever shal, til that myn herte sterve.
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 55

In his Epistelles, that been ful olde. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 525

Til that myn herte, to pitous and to nyce,
11

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 153

To kindle and blowe the fyr of lecherye,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 113

[continues previous] I am so used in the fyr to blowe,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 114

[continues previous] That it hath chaunged my colour, I trowe.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

And ever shal, til that myn herte dye; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 150

For ever-mo, til that myn herte sterve. [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 151

Forsake I wol at hoom myn heritage, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1475

Now fele I that myn herte moot a-two! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 976

The whos myn herte al was, til that he deyde;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 201

What sholde I tellen ech proporcioun
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 56

[continues previous] What sholde I tellen hem, sin they ben tolde?
11

Man of Law's Tale: 605

What sholde I tellen of the royaltee [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

[continues previous] Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 151

[continues previous] Forsake I wol at hoom myn heritage,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1475

[continues previous] Now fele I that myn herte moot a-two!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1476

[continues previous] For how sholde I my lyf an houre save,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 202

Of thinges whiche that we werche upon,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 604

[continues previous] Maken so long a tale, as of the corn.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 605

[continues previous] What sholde I tellen of the royaltee
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 203

As on fyve or sixe ounces, may wel be,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 370

Or in som other place, may wel be. [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 204

Of silver or som other quantite,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 370

[continues previous] Or in som other place, may wel be.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 206

Of orpiment, brent bones, yren squames,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 221

Our orpiment and sublymed Mercurie, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 207

That into poudre grounden been ful smal?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 222

[continues previous] Our grounden litarge eek on the porphurie,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 219

Of quik-silver, y-clept Mercurie crude?
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 274

Mars yren, Mercurie quik-silver we clepe, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 220

For alle our sleightes we can nat conclude.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 273

[continues previous] Sol gold is, and Luna silver we threpe,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Mars yren, Mercurie quik-silver we clepe,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 221

Our orpiment and sublymed Mercurie,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 206

Of orpiment, brent bones, yren squames, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 222

Our grounden litarge eek on the porphurie,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 207

[continues previous] That into poudre grounden been ful smal?
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 225

Ne eek our spirites ascencioun,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 261

Resalgar, and our materes enbibing; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 262

And eek of our materes encorporing, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 263

And of our silver citrinacioun, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 264

Our cementing and fermentacioun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 226

Ne our materes that lyen al fixe adoun,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 261

[continues previous] Resalgar, and our materes enbibing;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 262

[continues previous] And eek of our materes encorporing,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 263

[continues previous] And of our silver citrinacioun,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 264

[continues previous] Our cementing and fermentacioun,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 228

For lost is al our labour and travayle,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 80

Than were I holde to quyte thy labour. [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 81

And al the cost I wol my-selven make; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 955

Or elles al our labour is on ydel;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 229

And al the cost, a twenty devel weye,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 81

[continues previous] And al the cost I wol my-selven make;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 230

Is lost also, which we upon it leye.
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

... callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence more for drede than for love, as it happeth ofte. Ther comen also ful many subtile flatereres, and wyse advocats lerned in the lawe. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 43

He is ful Iocund also, dar I leye. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 231

Ther is also ful many another thing
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

[continues previous] ... congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence more for drede than for love, as it happeth ofte. Ther comen also ful many subtile flatereres, and wyse advocats lerned in the lawe.
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

... that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For sothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his moder, that shal sterve yong by-cause of that ilke werre, or elles live in sorwe and dye in wrecchednesse. And ther-fore, er that any werre biginne, men moste have greet conseil and greet deliberacioun.' And whan this olde man wende to enforcen his tale by ... [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 43

[continues previous] He is ful Iocund also, dar I leye.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 232

That is unto our craft apertening;
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For sothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his moder, that shal sterve yong by-cause of that ilke werre, or elles live in sorwe and dye in wrecchednesse. And ther-fore, er that any werre biginne, men moste have greet conseil and greet deliberacioun.' And whan this olde man wende to enforcen his ...
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 233

Though I by ordre hem nat reherce can,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 43

Which I shal seyn with good wil as I can. [continues next]
12

Monk's Prologue: 97

Though I by ordre telle nat thise thinges,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 236

Though I ne can nat sette hem in hir kinde;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 243

Nat nedeth it for to reherce hem alle, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 357

'A ha!' quod he, 'lo, so I can, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 234

By-cause that I am a lewed man,
12

Cook's Prologue: 17

A tale of me, that am a povre man, [continues next]
12

Cook's Prologue: 18

I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can [continues next]
10

Franklin's Prologue: 43

[continues previous] Which I shal seyn with good wil as I can.
12

Franklin's Prologue: 44

[continues previous] But, sires, by-cause I am a burel man,
11

Franklin's Tale: 766

Wol holden him a lewed man in this, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 767

That he wol putte his wyf in Iupartye; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 242

[continues previous] And othere swiche, dere y-nough a leek.
12

Manciple's Tale: 131

But, for I am a man noght textuel, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 132

I wol noght telle of textes never a del; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 24

And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 357

[continues previous] 'A ha!' quod he, 'lo, so I can,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 358

[continues previous] Lewedly to a lewed man
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 235

Yet wol I telle hem as they come to minde,
11

Knight's Tale: 1955

Ne me ne list thilke opiniouns to telle [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1956

Of hem, though that they wryten wher they dwelle. [continues next]
12

Cook's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can
11

Franklin's Tale: 766

[continues previous] Wol holden him a lewed man in this,
11

Franklin's Tale: 767

[continues previous] That he wol putte his wyf in Iupartye;
10

Manciple's Tale: 131

[continues previous] But, for I am a man noght textuel,
12

Manciple's Tale: 132

[continues previous] I wol noght telle of textes never a del;
11

Parson's Tale: 24

[continues previous] And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, and ...
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 236

Though I ne can nat sette hem in hir kinde;
11

Knight's Tale: 712

Ne sette I nat the mountaunce of a tare,
11

Knight's Tale: 1956

[continues previous] Of hem, though that they wryten wher they dwelle.
12

Franklin's Tale: 159

Though I ne can the causes nat y-knowe.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 393

And seyde thus, 'for I ne can nat finde
12

Pardoner's Tale: 394

A man, though that I walked in-to Inde,
12

Melibee's Tale: 37

... werkinge, that broghten laddres and cloumben in at thy windowes. The cause final was for to slee thy doghter; it letted nat in as muche as in hem was. But for to speken of the fer cause, as to what ende they shul come, or what shal finally bityde of hem in this caas, ne can I nat deme but by coniectinge and by supposinge. For we shul suppose that they shul come to a wikked ende, by-cause that the Book of Decrees seith: "selden or with greet peyne been causes y-broght to good ende whanne they been baddely bigonne."
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 233

Though I by ordre hem nat reherce can,
11

Parson's Tale: 35

... for his youthe, or elles his complexioun is so corageous, that he may nat forbere; or elles it is his destinee, as he seith, unto a certein age; or elles, he seith, it cometh him of gentillesse of hise auncestres; and semblable thinges. Alle this manere of folk so wrappen hem in hir sinnes, that they ne wol nat delivere hem-self. For soothly, no wight that excuseth him wilfully of his sinne may nat been delivered of his sinne, til that he mekely biknoweth his sinne. After this, thanne cometh swering, that is expres agayn the comandement of god; and this bifalleth ofte of anger and of Ire. God ...
11

Parson's Tale: 65

Thus may ye seen that the gilt disserveth thraldom, but nat nature. Wherfore thise lordes ne sholde nat muche glorifyen hem in hir lordshipes, sith that by naturel condicion they been nat lordes of thralles; but for that thraldom comth first by the desert of sinne. And forther-over, ther-as the lawe seith, that temporel godes of bonde-folk been the godes of hir lordshipes, ye, that is for to understonde, the godes of the ...
11

Parson's Tale: 67

... the commune profit mighte nat han be kept, ne pees and reste in erthe, but-if god hadde ordeyned that som men hadde hyer degree and som men lower: therfore was sovereyntee ordeyned to kepe and mayntene and deffenden hir underlinges or hir subgets in resoun, as ferforth as it lyth in hir power; and nat to destroyen hem ne confounde. Wherfore I seye, that thilke lordes that been lyk wolves, that devouren the possessiouns or the catel of povre folk wrongfully, with-outen mercy or mesure, they shul receyven, by the same mesure that they han mesured to povre folk, the mercy of Iesu Crist, but-if it be amended. Now ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 61

powers ne ben nat goode of hir owne kinde; sin that they suffren
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 52

uttereste and the worste kinde of shrewednesse) ne defouleth ne
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 53

enteccheth nat hem only, but infecteth and envenimeth hem
10

Compleint to His Lady: 2

Shulde have hir rest in somwhat, as by kinde,
10

Compleint to His Lady: 3

Or elles ne may hir lyf nat long endure,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 242

And othere swiche, dere y-nough a leek.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 511

For in effect they been nat worth a myte.' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 512

Thise wordes and swiche othere seyde she, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 234

By-cause that I am a lewed man, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 918

A nightingale, upon a cedre grene, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 243

Nat nedeth it for to reherce hem alle,
11

Summoner's Tale: 13

Ne ther it nedeth nat for to be yive,
11

Summoner's Tale: 14

As to possessioners, that mowen live,
11

Merchant's Epilogue: 19

Of whom, it nedeth nat for to declare,
11

Squire's Tale: 65

And eek it nedeth nat for to devyse
11

Squire's Tale: 453

Of other harm it nedeth nat to speke.
11

Squire's Tale: 454

For ye your-self upon your-self yow wreke,
12

Franklin's Tale: 738

It nedeth nat reherce it yow na-more.
14

Franklin's Tale: 866

It nedeth nat to yow reherce it more.
11

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 511

[continues previous] For in effect they been nat worth a myte.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 233

[continues previous] Though I by ordre hem nat reherce can,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 76

semeth to ben right cleer and renomed. For certes, it nedeth nat
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 77

to seye, that blisfulnesse be [nat] anguissous ne drery, ne subgit to
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 917

[continues previous] Reherce it nedeth nought, for ye ben wyse.
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 244

Watres rubifying and boles galle,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 271

Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon. [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 245

Arsenik, sal armoniak, and brimstoon;
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 271

[continues previous] Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon. [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 246

And herbes coude I telle eek many oon,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 271

[continues previous] Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 272

[continues previous] The bodies sevene eek, lo! hem heer anoon:
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 249

Our lampes brenning bothe night and day,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 400

And but I do, sirs, lat me han the wyte; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 30

... discord, that unbindeth alle manere of frendshipe. Thanne comth scorninge, as whan a man seketh occasioun to anoyen his neighebor, al do he never so weel. Thanne comth accusinge, as whan man seketh occasion to anoyen his neighebor, which that is lyk to the craft of the devel, that waiteth bothe night and day to accusen us alle. Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively if he may; and if he noght may, algate his wikked wil ne shal nat wante, as for to brennen his hous prively, or empoysone or sleen hise bestes, and semblable thinges. [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 785

For he was fast aboute bothe day and other, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 250

To bringe aboute our craft, if that we may.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 399

[continues previous] To bringe our craft al in another plyte; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... manere of frendshipe. Thanne comth scorninge, as whan a man seketh occasioun to anoyen his neighebor, al do he never so weel. Thanne comth accusinge, as whan man seketh occasion to anoyen his neighebor, which that is lyk to the craft of the devel, that waiteth bothe night and day to accusen us alle. Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively if he may; and if he noght may, algate his wikked wil ne shal nat wante, as for to brennen his hous prively, or empoysone or sleen hise bestes, and semblable thinges.
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 785

[continues previous] For he was fast aboute bothe day and other,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 786

[continues previous] For to hyre the quest to hangen his brother.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 251

Our fourneys eek of calcinacioun,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 399

[continues previous] To bringe our craft al in another plyte;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 254

Poudres diverse, asshes, dong, pisse, and cley,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 257

Sal tartre, alkaly, and sal preparat, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 258

And combust materes and coagulat, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 259

Cley maad with hors or mannes heer, and oile
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 255

Cered pokets, sal peter, vitriole;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 257

[continues previous] Sal tartre, alkaly, and sal preparat, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 256

And divers fyres maad of wode and cole;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 257

[continues previous] Sal tartre, alkaly, and sal preparat, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 258

[continues previous] And combust materes and coagulat,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 257

Sal tartre, alkaly, and sal preparat,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 254

Poudres diverse, asshes, dong, pisse, and cley, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 255

Cered pokets, sal peter, vitriole; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 256

[continues previous] And divers fyres maad of wode and cole; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 258

And combust materes and coagulat,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 254

[continues previous] Poudres diverse, asshes, dong, pisse, and cley, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 256

[continues previous] And divers fyres maad of wode and cole;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 259

Cley maad with hors or mannes heer, and oile
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 254

[continues previous] Poudres diverse, asshes, dong, pisse, and cley,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 261

Resalgar, and our materes enbibing;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 225

Ne eek our spirites ascencioun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 226

Ne our materes that lyen al fixe adoun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 262

And eek of our materes encorporing, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 263

And of our silver citrinacioun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 264

Our cementing and fermentacioun, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 262

And eek of our materes encorporing,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 263

And of our silver citrinacioun,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 264

Our cementing and fermentacioun,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 225

[continues previous] Ne eek our spirites ascencioun,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 226

[continues previous] Ne our materes that lyen al fixe adoun,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 261

[continues previous] Resalgar, and our materes enbibing;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 262

[continues previous] And eek of our materes encorporing,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 265

Our ingottes, testes, and many mo.
10

Reeve's Tale: 5

A Miller was ther dwelling many a day; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.' [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 226

And I wol telle yow wherfore; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 266

I wol yow telle, as was me taught also,
11

Knight's Tale: 478

And of Arcita forth I wol yow telle.
11

Knight's Tale: 1194

As shortly as I can I wol me haste,
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

To telle yow al the descripcioun.
10

Reeve's Tale: 4

[continues previous] And this is verray soth that I yow telle.
10

Reeve's Tale: 5

[continues previous] A Miller was ther dwelling many a day;
12

Cook's Prologue: 18

I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

[continues previous] And I wol telle it yow er it be night.'
12

Clerk's Prologue: 25

As fer as reson axeth, hardily.
12

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I
11

Squire's Tale: 661

First wol I telle yow of Cambynskan,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 185

Anon I wol yow telle.
11

Melibee's Prologue: 19

I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose,
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
11

Hous of Fame 3: 337

Of whiche I wol yow telle fonde,
11

Legend of Philomela: 122

And of her suster forth I wol yow telle.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 226

[continues previous] And I wol telle yow wherfore;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1321

Right thus me mette, as I yow telle,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1543

Whan that this lettre, of whiche I telle,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1544

Had taught me that it was the welle
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6690

'Sir, I wol gladly telle yow:
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 91

I yow wol telle, as techen bokes olde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1264

Me thinketh thus, that neither ye nor I
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 268

By ordre, as ofte I herde my lord hem nevene.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 876

And whan that Pandare herde hir name nevene,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 877

Lord, he was glad, and seyde, 'freend so dere,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 271

Sal armoniak, and the ferthe brimstoon.
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 244

Watres rubifying and boles galle,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 245

Arsenik, sal armoniak, and brimstoon; [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 246

And herbes coude I telle eek many oon, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 272

The bodies sevene eek, lo! hem heer anoon:
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 246

[continues previous] And herbes coude I telle eek many oon,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 273

Sol gold is, and Luna silver we threpe,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 220

For alle our sleightes we can nat conclude. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 887

That out of sol and luna were y-drawe.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 274

Mars yren, Mercurie quik-silver we clepe,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 219

[continues previous] Of quik-silver, y-clept Mercurie crude?
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 220

[continues previous] For alle our sleightes we can nat conclude.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 276

And Venus coper, by my fader kin!
12

Reeve's Tale: 118

Yet saugh I never, by my fader kin,
12

Merchant's Tale: 271

To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5953

'But, [by] my modir seint Venus,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5954

And by hir fader Saturnus,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 277

This cursed craft who-so wol exercyse,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 17

Assaye who-so wol, and he shal finde [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 102

... And thogh he never so longe have leyn in sinne, the mercy of Crist is alwey redy to receiven him to mercy. Agayns the wanhope, that he demeth that he sholde nat longe persevere in goodnesse, he shal thinke, that the feblesse of the devel may no-thing doon but-if men wol suffren him; and eek he shal han strengthe of the help of god, and of al holy chirche, and of the proteccioun of aungels, if him list. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 278

He shal no good han that him may suffyse;
11

Merchant's Prologue: 17

[continues previous] Assaye who-so wol, and he shal finde
10

Parson's Tale: 102

[continues previous] ... he never so longe have leyn in sinne, the mercy of Crist is alwey redy to receiven him to mercy. Agayns the wanhope, that he demeth that he sholde nat longe persevere in goodnesse, he shal thinke, that the feblesse of the devel may no-thing doon but-if men wol suffren him; and eek he shal han strengthe of the help of god, and of al holy chirche, and of the proteccioun of aungels, if him list.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 279

For al the good he spendeth ther-aboute,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5928

Certeyn, the byer shal lese al; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5929

For he ne can so dere it bye [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 280

He lese shal, ther-of have I no doute.
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... that him lyketh. Soothly swich multitude is nat honeste. As to the seconde resoun, where-as ye seyn that "alle wommen been wikke," save your grace, certes ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 14

... that sinne in dede, yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god with perfit consentinge of his reson; for ther-of is no doute, that it is deedly sinne in consentinge. For certes, ther is no deedly sinne, that it nas first in mannes thought, and after that in his delyt; and so forth in-to consentinge and in-to dede. Wherfore I seye, that many men ne repenten hem nevere of swiche thoghtes and delytes, ... [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5927

[continues previous] The prys and profit have shal.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5928

[continues previous] Certeyn, the byer shal lese al;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5929

[continues previous] For he ne can so dere it bye
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1277

Ther-of am I no maner thing in doute.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 281

Who-so that listeth outen his folye,
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... and clatereth what that him lyketh. Soothly swich multitude is nat honeste. As to the seconde resoun, where-as ye seyn that "alle wommen been wikke," save your grace, certes ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been ...
11

Parson's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god with perfit consentinge of his reson; for ther-of is no doute, that it is deedly sinne in consentinge. For certes, ther is no deedly sinne, that it nas first in mannes thought, and after that in his delyt; and so forth in-to consentinge and in-to dede. Wherfore I seye, that many men ne repenten hem nevere of swiche thoghtes and delytes, ne ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 111

'Goth and beteth this boy and reveth him his wit, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 282

Lat him come forth, and lerne multiplye;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 116

But swinke sore and lerne multiplye. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 117

We blondren ever and pouren in the fyr, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 111

[continues previous] 'Goth and beteth this boy and reveth him his wit, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 112

[continues previous] And lat him lerne another tyme to answere me bet.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6060

Now lat him come:' and he forth ran.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 283

And every man that oght hath in his cofre,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 116

[continues previous] But swinke sore and lerne multiplye.
11

Parson's Tale: 64

What difference is bitwixe an ydolastre and an avaricious man, but that an ydolastre, per aventure, ne hath but o mawmet or two, and the avaricious man hath manye? For certes, every florin in his cofre is his mawmet. And certes, the sinne of Mawmetrye is the firste thing that God deffended in the ten comaundments, as bereth witnesse Exodi, capitulo xxº: 'Thou shall have no false goddes bifore me, ne thou shall make to thee no grave thing.' Thus is an avaricious man, that loveth ...
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 112

[continues previous] And lat him lerne another tyme to answere me bet.'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 284

Lat him appere, and wexe a philosofre.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 569

In the name of Crist, to wexe a philosofre. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 285

Ascaunce that craft is so light to lere?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 570

[continues previous] Ther been ful fewe, whiche that I wolde profre
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 286

Nay, nay, god woot, al be he monk or frere,
11

Friar's Tale: 285

I trowe thou hast som frere or preest with thee!' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 147

With myn housbonde, al be he your cosyn.'
12

Shipman's Tale: 148

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'by god and seint Martyn,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 509

Abbot or priour monk or chanoun, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1535

Or drede of fader, or of other wight, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1536

Or for estat, delyt, or for weddinge [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 287

Preest or chanoun, or any other wight,
11

Friar's Tale: 285

[continues previous] I trowe thou hast som frere or preest with thee!'
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 509

[continues previous] Abbot or priour monk or chanoun,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1535

[continues previous] Or drede of fader, or of other wight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1536

[continues previous] Or for estat, delyt, or for weddinge
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 288

Though he sitte at his book bothe day and night,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 139

They daunce and pleye at dees bothe day and night,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 140

And ete also and drinken over hir might,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3915

Whos might [yit] growith night and day. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3916

Bothe in cloistre and in abbey [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 289

In lernyng of this elvish nyce lore,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3916

[continues previous] Bothe in cloistre and in abbey
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 292

Fy! spek nat ther-of, for it wol nat be;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 735

Fy! spek na-more — it is a grisly thing —
11

Manciple's Tale: 47

To kepe a shrewe, for it wol nat be.
11

Manciple's Tale: 48

This holde I for a verray nycetee,
11

Legend of Philomela: 161

For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 293

Al conne he letterure, or conne he noon,
11

Legend of Philomela: 161

[continues previous] For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame,
11

A. B. C.: 72

That shal he finde, as he the lyf shal lete. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 294

As in effect, he shal finde it al oon.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 86

Assay, and he shal finde it that so dooth.
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1014

Shal han that oon [of] two, but bothe [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1015

At ones, al beside his leve, [continues next]
11

A. B. C.: 71

[continues previous] Who-so thee loveth he shal not love in veyn,
11

A. B. C.: 72

[continues previous] That shal he finde, as he the lyf shal lete.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5228

But that his freend alwey him finde, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5229

Bothe pore and riche, in oon [e]state. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 592

And namely, sin ye two been al oon. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 295

For bothe two, by my savacioun,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1014

[continues previous] Shal han that oon [of] two, but bothe
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5229

[continues previous] Bothe pore and riche, in oon [e]state.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5230

[continues previous] For if his freend, thurgh any gate,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 592

[continues previous] And namely, sin ye two been al oon.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 593

[continues previous] Rys up, for by myn heed, she shal not goon;
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 297

Y-lyke wel, whan they han al y-do;
10

Knight's Tale: 681

Selde is the Friday al the wyke y-lyke. [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 682

Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 74

And, whan they han this blisful mayden seyn, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 313

For al our craft, whan we han al y-do,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 314

And al our sleighte, he wol nat come us to.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 298

This is to seyn, they faylen bothe two.
10

Knight's Tale: 681

[continues previous] Selde is the Friday al the wyke y-lyke.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 74

[continues previous] And, whan they han this blisful mayden seyn,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 75

[continues previous] Hoom to Surryë been they went ful fayn,
12

Friar's Tale: 194

And som-tyme han we might of bothe two,
12

Friar's Tale: 195

This is to seyn, of soule and body eke.
11

Summoner's Tale: 327

That is to seyn, bothe oon, and two, and three!'
12

Parson's Tale: 77

... this is in two maneres, that is to seyn, chastitee in mariage, and chastitee of widwehode. Now shaltow understonde, that matrimoine is leefful assemblinge of man and of womman, that receyven by vertu of the sacrement the bond, thurgh which they may nat be departed in al hir lyf, that is to seyn, whyl that they liven bothe. This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. God maked it, as I have seyd, in paradys, and wolde him-self be born in mariage. And for to halwen mariage, he was at a weddinge, where-as he turned water in-to wyn; which was the firste miracle that he wroghte in ...
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 6: 36

faylen, that is to seyn, torne in-to nought.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 6: 37

This is the comune Love to alle thinges; and alle thinges axen
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 306

Of alle thise names now wol I me reste.
11

Squire's Tale: 379

Thus erly? for the folk ben alle on reste.' [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 380

'I wol,' quod she, 'aryse, for me leste [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 606

Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 307

For, as I trowe, I have yow told y-nowe
12

Clerk's Tale: 415

In which that I have put yow, as I trowe,
11

Clerk's Tale: 416

Maketh yow nat foryetful for to be
11

Squire's Tale: 379

[continues previous] Thus erly? for the folk ben alle on reste.'
11

Squire's Tale: 380

[continues previous] 'I wol,' quod she, 'aryse, for me leste
10

Squire's Tale: 606

[continues previous] Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste,
10

Squire's Tale: 607

[continues previous] I trowe he hadde thilke text in minde,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 271

Right thus as I have told hit yow,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 272

That sodeynly, I niste how,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 296

As I to yow have told wel here-biforn, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1497

And if ye goon, as I have told yow yore,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1498

So thenk I nam but deed, with-oute more.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 308

To reyse a feend, al loke he never so rowe.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 612

Al wilfully, god lat him never thee!' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 296

[continues previous] As I to yow have told wel here-biforn,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 309

A! nay! lat be; the philosophres stoon,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 612

[continues previous] Al wilfully, god lat him never thee!'
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 613

[continues previous] 'Nay,' quod the fox, 'but god yeve him meschaunce,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 313

For al our craft, whan we han al y-do,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 297

Y-lyke wel, whan they han al y-do; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 773

With al the sleighte and al that ever he can, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 314

And al our sleighte, he wol nat come us to.
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 28

But los of tyme shendeth us," quod he. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 29

It wol nat come agayn, with-outen drede, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 297

[continues previous] Y-lyke wel, whan they han al y-do;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 773

[continues previous] With al the sleighte and al that ever he can,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 315

He hath y-maad us spenden mochel good,
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 28

[continues previous] But los of tyme shendeth us," quod he.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 317

But that good hope crepeth in our herte,
10

Summoner's Tale: 383

Hold nat the develes knyf ay at thyn herte; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 318

Supposinge ever, though we sore smerte,
10

Summoner's Tale: 384

[continues previous] Thyn angre dooth thee al to sore smerte; [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 319

To be releved by him afterward;
10

Summoner's Tale: 384

[continues previous] Thyn angre dooth thee al to sore smerte;
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 320

Swich supposing and hope is sharp and hard;
11

Summoner's Tale: 83

For it is hard to yow, as I suppose, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 84

And therfore wol I teche yow al the glose. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 286

I warne yow wel, it is no childes pley [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 801

'By our lady,' quod this chanoun, 'it is dere, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere, [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 321

I warne yow wel, it is to seken ever;
11

Summoner's Tale: 83

[continues previous] For it is hard to yow, as I suppose,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 286

[continues previous] I warne yow wel, it is no childes pley
13

Merchant's Tale: 287

[continues previous] To take a wyf with-oute avysement.
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 801

[continues previous] 'By our lady,' quod this chanoun, 'it is dere,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

[continues previous] I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 325

For unto hem it is a bitter swete;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4636

Is it swete or bitter thing?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 329

They wolde hem selle and spenden on this craft;
11

Squire's Tale: 185

And cause why, for they can nat the craft. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 186

And therefore in the place they han it laft [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 842

In this craft, that men can nat come therby, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 330

They can nat stinte til no-thing be laft.
12

Clerk's Tale: 647

They can nat stinte of hir entencioun,
11

Squire's Tale: 185

[continues previous] And cause why, for they can nat the craft.
10

Prioress' Tale: 105

He can nat stinte of singing by the weye.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 842

[continues previous] In this craft, that men can nat come therby,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 331

And evermore, wher that ever they goon,
11

Reeve's Tale: 177

For al his art; now lat hem goon hir weye. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 178

Lo wher they goon, ye, lat the children pleye; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 358

And whan that he in chaumbre was allone, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 332

Men may hem knowe by smel of brimstoon;
11

Reeve's Tale: 177

[continues previous] For al his art; now lat hem goon hir weye.
10

Parson's Tale: 6

... in the herte of him that is verray repentant, right as the rote of a tree hydeth him in the erthe. Of the rote of Contricion springeth a stalke, that bereth braunches and leves of Confession, and fruit of Satisfaccion. For which Crist seith in his gospel: 'dooth digne fruit of Penitence'; for by this fruit may men knowe this tree, and nat by the rote that is hid in the herte of man, ne by the braunches ne by the leves of Confession. And therefore oure Lord Iesu Crist seith thus: 'by the fruit of hem ye shul knowen hem.' Of this rote eek springeth a seed of ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 357

[continues previous] But bad his folk to goon wher that hem liste.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 333

For al the world, they stinken as a goot;
10

Parson's Tale: 6

[continues previous] ... herte of him that is verray repentant, right as the rote of a tree hydeth him in the erthe. Of the rote of Contricion springeth a stalke, that bereth braunches and leves of Confession, and fruit of Satisfaccion. For which Crist seith in his gospel: 'dooth digne fruit of Penitence'; for by this fruit may men knowe this tree, and nat by the rote that is hid in the herte of man, ne by the braunches ne by the leves of Confession. And therefore oure Lord Iesu Crist seith thus: 'by the fruit of hem ye shul knowen hem.' Of this ...
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 335

That, though a man from hem a myle be,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 228

Ne never-mo ne shal they roten be, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 336

The savour wol infecte him, trusteth me;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 229

[continues previous] Ne lese her sote savour, trusteth me;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 338

If that men liste, this folk they knowe may.
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... do he never so weel. Thanne comth accusinge, as whan man seketh occasion to anoyen his neighebor, which that is lyk to the craft of the devel, that waiteth bothe night and day to accusen us alle. Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively if he may; and if he noght may, algate his wikked wil ne shal nat wante, as for to brennen his hous prively, or empoysone or sleen hise bestes, and semblable thinges. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 339

And if a man wol aske hem prively,
10

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... man seketh occasioun to anoyen his neighebor, al do he never so weel. Thanne comth accusinge, as whan man seketh occasion to anoyen his neighebor, which that is lyk to the craft of the devel, that waiteth bothe night and day to accusen us alle. Thanne comth malignitee, thurgh which a man anoyeth his neighebor prively if he may; and if he noght may, algate his wikked wil ne shal nat wante, as for to brennen his hous prively, or empoysone or sleen hise bestes, and semblable thinges.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 342

And seyn, that if that they espyed were,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 351

How they wolde slee the hert with strengthe, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 343

Men wolde hem slee, by-cause of hir science;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 350

[continues previous] And al men speken of hunting,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 351

[continues previous] How they wolde slee the hert with strengthe,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 349

Now he is goon, I dar seyn boldely
10

Squire's Tale: 581

For o thing dar I tellen boldely, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 582

I knowe what is the peyne of deth ther-by; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 865

That dar I seyn, now there is but we two;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 350

For, as men seyn, he can don craftily;
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 48

On metres and on ryming craftily, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 581

[continues previous] For o thing dar I tellen boldely,
10

Franklin's Tale: 157

I wool wel clerkes wol seyn, as hem leste, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 351

Algate I wool wel he hath swich a name,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 487

And swich he was y-preved ofte sythes. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 49

[continues previous] Hath seyd hem in swich English as he can
10

Franklin's Tale: 157

[continues previous] I wool wel clerkes wol seyn, as hem leste,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 352

And yet ful ofte he renneth in a blame;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 486

[continues previous] And in adversitee ful pacient;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 487

[continues previous] And swich he was y-preved ofte sythes.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 488

[continues previous] Ful looth were him to cursen for his tythes,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 353

And wite ye how? ful ofte it happeth so,
12

Squire's Tale: 592

For his honour, as ofte it happeth so,
13

Melibee's Tale: 8

... callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence more for drede than for love, as it happeth ofte. Ther comen also ful many subtile flatereres, and wyse advocats lerned in the lawe.
12

Manciple's Tale: 97

The more harm is; it happeth ofte so,
11

Parlement of Foules: 10

Yet happeth me ful ofte in bokes rede
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 625

'Though I be nyce; it happeth ofte so,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 626

That oon that exces doth ful yvele fare,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 355

Thise metals been of so greet violence,
11

Parson's Tale: 67

... that is, the blisse of hevene. Now comth hasardrye with hise apurtenaunces, as tables and rafles; of which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for ... [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 356

Our walles mowe nat make hem resistence,
11

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... of lambes, that is, the blisse of hevene. Now comth hasardrye with hise apurtenaunces, as tables and rafles; of which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In ...
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 357

But if they weren wroght of lym and stoon;
12

Franklin's Tale: 421

Somtyme a castel, al of lym and stoon; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 422

And whan hem lyked, voyded it anoon. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 358

They percen so, and thurgh the wal they goon,
11

Franklin's Tale: 422

[continues previous] And whan hem lyked, voyded it anoon.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 361

And somme are scatered al the floor aboute,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 653

Man shal nat suffre his wyf go roule aboute; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 734

Men loven wommen al this toun aboute; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 362

Somme lepe in-to the roof; with-outen doute,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 654

[continues previous] Than wolde he seye right thus, with-outen doute,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 735

[continues previous] Be they the wers? why, nay, with-outen doute.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 364

I trowe he with us be, that ilke shrewe!
11

Hous of Fame 3: 752

'Madame,' quod he, 'sooth to telle, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 753

I am that ilke shrewe, y-wis, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 754

That brende the temple of Isidis [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 365

In helle wher that he is lord and sire,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 357

At sessiouns ther was he lord and sire; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 13

Doun in-to helle, wher he yet is inne.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 753

[continues previous] I am that ilke shrewe, y-wis,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 754

[continues previous] That brende the temple of Isidis
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 366

Nis ther more wo, ne more rancour ne ire.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 357

[continues previous] At sessiouns ther was he lord and sire;
10

Knight's Tale: 388

That ther nis erthe, water, fyr, ne eir,
10

Knight's Tale: 389

Ne creature, that of hem maked is,
10

Franklin's Tale: 145

For by this werk, south, north, ne west, ne eest,
10

Franklin's Tale: 146

Ther nis y-fostred man, ne brid, ne beest;
11

Parson's Tale: 33

... the pryde that is covered in mannes herte. For certes fyr ne may nat comen out of no-thing, but-if it were first in the same thing naturelly; as fyr is drawen out of flintes with steel. And right so as pryde is ofte tyme matere of Ire, right so is rancour norice and keper of Ire. Ther is a maner tree, as seith seint Isidre, that whan men maken fyr of thilke tree, and covere the coles of it with asshen, soothly the fyr of it wol lasten al a yeer or more. And right so fareth it of rancour; whan it is ones conceyved in the ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 92

ne ther nis no man that ne wot wel that they ne
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 367

Whan that our pot is broke, as I have sayd,
14

Merchant's Tale: 267

Nin al Itaille, that coude bet han sayd; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 322

'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd? [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 495

God thanke I, and in good tyme be it sayd, [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 368

Every man chit, and halt him yvel apayd.
14

Merchant's Tale: 268

[continues previous] Crist halt him of this conseil wel apayd.
10

Merchant's Tale: 269

And trewely, it is an heigh corage
13

Merchant's Tale: 321

[continues previous] I prey yow that ye be nat yvel apayd.'
13

Merchant's Tale: 322

[continues previous] 'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd?
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 496

[continues previous] That ther was never man yet yvel apayd
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 369

Som seyde, it was long on the fyr-making,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 370

Som seyde, nay! it was on the blowing; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 370

Som seyde, nay! it was on the blowing;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 369

[continues previous] Som seyde, it was long on the fyr-making,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 372

'Straw!' quod the thridde, 'ye been lewed and nyce,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 94

Wherfor in that I holde him lewed and nyce.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 373

It was nat tempred as it oghte be.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 629

This is nat couched as it oghte be;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 375

By-cause our fyr ne was nat maad of beech,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 9: 15

the drye thinges with the moiste thinges; that the fyr, that [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 9: 16

is purest, ne flee nat over hye, ne that the hevinesse ne drawe [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 376

That is the cause, and other noon, so theech!'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 619

Lat be,' quod he, 'it shal nat be, so theech! [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 9: 15

[continues previous] the drye thinges with the moiste thinges; that the fyr, that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 9: 16

[continues previous] is purest, ne flee nat over hye, ne that the hevinesse ne drawe
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1297

So wel, I can nat telle how.' [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 377

I can nat telle wher-on it was long,
12

Knight's Tale: 329

Greet was the stryf and long bitwixe hem tweye, [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 95

Fer in the north, I can nat telle where.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 619

[continues previous] Lat be,' quod he, 'it shal nat be, so theech!
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1297

[continues previous] So wel, I can nat telle how.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1018

That it bihoveth that the bifallinge [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 378

But wel I wot greet stryf is us among.
12

Knight's Tale: 329

[continues previous] Greet was the stryf and long bitwixe hem tweye,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 10

certein thinges sholde be moeved by fortunous fortune; but I
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 11

wot wel that god, maker and mayster, is governour of his werk.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 21

wene that it were to doute; as who seith, but I wot wel that god
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 402

But wel I wot, with that he can endyte,
10

Envoy to Scogan: 34

But wel I wot, thou wilt answere and seye:
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1504

But wel wot I, thou art now in a drede;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1017

[continues previous] How the ordre of causes stant; but wel wot I,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 379

'What!' quod my lord, 'ther is na-more to done,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 477

The flour is goon, ther is na-more to telle,
10

Summoner's Tale: 365

His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 380

Lest thee repente;" ther is na-more to seye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 486

'Sir,' quod the lord, 'ye woot what is to done.
10

Clerk's Tale: 315

Who-so me loveth; ther is na-more to seye.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
10

Squire's Tale: 314

And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne,
13

Squire's Tale: 334

Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 856

Myn heritage; ther is na-more to telle.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 878

This al and som, ther is na-more to seyn.'
10

Manciple's Tale: 162

This is theffect, ther is na-more to sayn;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 385

The mullok on an hepe y-sweped was,
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 124

And drof alle his brotheres men right on an hepe.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 1059

And whan they were alle on an hepe,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 390

Yet is ther heer, though that we han nat al.
12

Cook's Prologue: 35

Be thou nat wrooth, er we departen heer,
12

Cook's Prologue: 36

Though that my tale be of an hostileer.
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... absent. For certes, there availleth noon essoyne ne excusacion. And nat only that oure defautes shullen be iuged, but eek that alle oure werkes shullen openly be knowe. And as seith Seint Bernard: 'ther ne shal no pledinge availle, ne no sleighte; we shullen yeven rekeninge of everich ydel word.' Ther shul we han a Iuge that may nat been deceived ne corrupt. And why? For, certes, alle our thoghtes been discovered as to him; ne for preyere ne for mede he shal nat been corrupt. And therfore seith Salomon: 'the wratthe of god ne wol nat spare no wight, for preyere ne for yifte'; and therfore, at the ...
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 396

Somtyme his good is drenched in the see,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 293

And fond his fader drenched in the see. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 397

And somtym comth it sauf un-to the londe.'
11

Legend of Ariadne: 293

[continues previous] And fond his fader drenched in the see.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 398

'Pees!' quod my lord, 'the next tyme I wol fonde
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

But yet to be right mery wol I fonde. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 227

The markisesse, and therfor wol I fonde [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1331

That I wol, by processe of tyme, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1332

Fonde to putte this sweven in ryme [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5858

Fonde Shame adoun to bringe; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 399

To bringe our craft al in another plyte;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

[continues previous] But yet to be right mery wol I fonde.
11

Clerk's Tale: 228

[continues previous] To doon at hoom, as sone as it may be,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 250

To bringe aboute our craft, if that we may. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 251

Our fourneys eek of calcinacioun,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1332

[continues previous] Fonde to putte this sweven in ryme
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5858

[continues previous] Fonde Shame adoun to bringe;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5859

[continues previous] With al hir hoost, erly and late,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 400

And but I do, sirs, lat me han the wyte;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 249

[continues previous] Our lampes brenning bothe night and day,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 739

And folowe me, for I wol han the wyte;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 740

But byd, and lat me go bifore a lyte.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 401

Ther was defaute in som-what, wel I woot.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 471

Tho gan I wexen in a were, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 472

And seyde, 'I woot wel I am here; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 402

Another seyde, the fyr was over hoot:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 422

Were it of hoot or cold, or moiste, or drye, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde
11

Hous of Fame 2: 472

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I woot wel I am here;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 403

But, be it hoot or cold, I dar seye this,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 422

[continues previous] Were it of hoot or cold, or moiste, or drye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 451

But were he fer or neer, I dar seye this,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 452

By night or day, for wysdom or folye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 404

That we concluden evermore amis.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

[continues previous] This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1298

[continues previous] That shal ye finden in me al my lyf,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 408

Every man semeth a Salomon.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 409

But al thing which that shyneth as the gold
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 65

that is dyvers from any thing, that thilke thing nis nat that [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 66

same thing fro which it is understonden to ben dyvers. Thanne [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 29

[continues previous] 'But al thing that is good,' quod she, 'grauntest thou that it be
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 410

Nis nat gold, as that I have herd it told;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 31

'I have herd it told som-tyme,' quod I; 'but drerinesse hath
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 47

same? I have herd told of Busirides, that was wont to sleen his
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 65

[continues previous] that is dyvers from any thing, that thilke thing nis nat that
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 412

Ne is nat good, what-so men clappe or crye.
12

Parson's Tale: 33

... is ofte tyme matere of Ire, right so is rancour norice and keper of Ire. Ther is a maner tree, as seith seint Isidre, that whan men maken fyr of thilke tree, and covere the coles of it with asshen, soothly the fyr of it wol lasten al a yeer or more. And right so fareth it of rancour; whan it is ones conceyved in the hertes of som men, certein, it wol lasten peraventure from oon Estre-day unto another Estre-day, and more. But certes, thilke man is ful fer fro the mercy of god al thilke while. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 413

Right so, lo! fareth it amonges us;
11

Monk's Tale: 164

Amonges othere Daniel was oon, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... dyen for peyne, and by hir deeth flee fro peyne, that may they understonden by the word of Iob, that seith: 'ther-as is the shadwe of deeth.' Certes, a shadwe hath the lyknesse of the thing of which it is shadwe, but shadwe is nat the same thing of which it is shadwe. Right so fareth the peyne of helle; it is lyk deeth for the horrible anguissh, and why? For it peyneth hem evere, as though they sholde dye anon; but certes they shal nat dye. For as seith Seint Gregorie: 'to wrecche caytives shal be deeth with-oute deeth, and ende with-outen ende, and defaute ...
11

Parson's Tale: 21

... dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace in-to the thurrok, and in-to the botme of the ship, if men be so necligent that they ne descharge hem nat by tyme. And therfore, al-thogh ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchinge, algates the ship is dreynt. Right so fareth it somtyme of deedly sinne, and of anoyouse veniale sinnes, whan they multiplye in a man so greetly, that thilke worldly thinges that he loveth, thurgh whiche he sinneth venially, is as greet in his herte as the love of god, or more. And therfore, the love of every thing, that ...
12

Parson's Tale: 33

[continues previous] ... matere of Ire, right so is rancour norice and keper of Ire. Ther is a maner tree, as seith seint Isidre, that whan men maken fyr of thilke tree, and covere the coles of it with asshen, soothly the fyr of it wol lasten al a yeer or more. And right so fareth it of rancour; whan it is ones conceyved in the hertes of som men, certein, it wol lasten peraventure from oon Estre-day unto another Estre-day, and more. But certes, thilke man is ful fer fro the mercy of god al thilke while.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 414

He that semeth the wysest, by Iesus!
11

Monk's Tale: 165

[continues previous] That was the wysest child of everichoon;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 416

And he that semeth trewest is a theef;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 3

That semeth trewest, whan she wol bygyle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 4

And can to foles so hir song entune,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 417

That shul ye knowe, er that I fro yow wende,
11

Merchant's Tale: 430

I hope to god, her-after shul ye knowe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 431

That their nis no so greet felicitee
12

Franklin's Tale: 894

Which was the moste free, as thinketh yow?
12

Franklin's Tale: 895

Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 896

I can na-more, my tale is at an ende. [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... your trewe freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne tak no companye by the weye of a straunge man, but-if so be that thou have knowe him of a lenger tyme. And if so be that he falle in-to thy companye ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 56

... "the dissensioun biginneth by another man, and the reconsiling bi-ginneth by thy-self." And the prophete seith: "flee shrewednesse and do goodnesse; seke pees and folwe it, as muchel as in thee is." Yet seye I nat that ye shul rather pursue to your adversaries for pees than they shuln to yow; for I knowe wel that ye been so hard-herted, that ye wol do no-thing for me. And Salomon seith: "he that hath over-hard an herte, atte laste he shal mishappe and mistyde."'
12

Second Nun's Tale: 181

And whan that he hath purged yow fro sinne,
12

Second Nun's Tale: 182

Thanne shul ye see that angel, er ye twinne.'
12

Parlement of Foules: 440

To serven hir, how fer so that she wende; [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 441

Sey what yow list, my tale is at an ende.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 5

My purpos is, er that I parte fro ye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 119

Or slee us bothe at ones, er that ye wende.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1634

And for the love which that I love yow eke, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1635

That er that I departe fro yow here, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1636

That of so good a comfort and a chere [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 418

By that I of my tale have maad an ende.
12

Knight's Tale: 1778

Som tyme an ende ther is of every dede; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2108

And maken of my longe tale an ende.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1018

But of my tale make an ende I shal;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1061

And fareth now weel, my tale is at an ende. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 896

[continues previous] I can na-more, my tale is at an ende. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 262

Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.' [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 440

[continues previous] To serven hir, how fer so that she wende; [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 441

[continues previous] Sey what yow list, my tale is at an ende.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 119

[continues previous] Or slee us bothe at ones, er that ye wende.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

[continues previous] 'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 769

And whan my tale al brought is to an ende, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1635

[continues previous] That er that I departe fro yow here,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1636

[continues previous] That of so good a comfort and a chere
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 419

Ther is a chanoun of religioun
12

Knight's Tale: 1778

[continues previous] Som tyme an ende ther is of every dede;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1061

[continues previous] And fareth now weel, my tale is at an ende.
11

Franklin's Tale: 896

[continues previous] I can na-more, my tale is at an ende.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 262

[continues previous] Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.'
11

Parlement of Foules: 441

[continues previous] Sey what yow list, my tale is at an ende.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 769

[continues previous] And whan my tale al brought is to an ende,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 420

Amonges us, wolde infecte al a toun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 378

What fors were it though al the toun behelde? [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 421

Though it as greet were as was Ninivee,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 669

As greet as it were for an ale-stake;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 378

[continues previous] What fors were it though al the toun behelde?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 423

His sleightes and his infinit falsnesse
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7447

Yet fals was he, but his falsnesse [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 424

Ther coude no man wryten, as I gesse,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 604

Ther coude no man bringe him in arrerage.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 605

Ther nas baillif, ne herde, ne other hyne,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 931

Ther is no man coude bringe hir to that prikke.'
12

Friar's Tale: 353

Thogh that I mighte a thousand winter telle, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 350

To translaten that olde clerkes wryten, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 351

As thogh that he of malice wolde endyten [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 370

To translaten that olde clerkes wryten, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 371

As thogh that he of malice wolde endyten [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1115

For no man coude preyse or gesse
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7448

[continues previous] Ne coude he not espye, nor gesse;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 425

Thogh that he mighte liven a thousand yeer.
12

Friar's Tale: 353

[continues previous] Thogh that I mighte a thousand winter telle,
10

Clerk's Tale: 1072

Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 1073

Liven thise two in concord and in reste, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 350

[continues previous] To translaten that olde clerkes wryten,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 351

[continues previous] As thogh that he of malice wolde endyten
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 370

[continues previous] To translaten that olde clerkes wryten,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 371

[continues previous] As thogh that he of malice wolde endyten
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 426

In al this world of falshede nis his peer;
10

Clerk's Tale: 1072

[continues previous] Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee
11

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 177

In al this world ther nis a bettre knight
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 431

But it a feend be, as him-selven is.
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

... right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat ... [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 809

Unknowe, unkist, and lost that is un-sought. [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 432

Ful many a man hath he bigyled er this,
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... sholden smyte, right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For ...
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 348

For he hath writen many a book er this.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 349

He ne hath nat doon so grevously amis
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1609

Ful many a worthy man hath it
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 810

[continues previous] What! many a man hath love ful dere y-bought
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 433

And wol, if that he live may a whyle;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 434

And yet men ryde and goon ful many a myle
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 135

[continues previous] And whan I had a whyle goon,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 137

[continues previous] Ful long and brood, and everydel
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 435

Him for to seke and have his aqueyntaunce,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 244

Acorded nat, as by his facultee, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 245

To have with seke lazars aqueyntaunce. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 436

Noght knowinge of his false governaunce.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 244

[continues previous] Acorded nat, as by his facultee,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 437

And if yow list to yeve me audience,
10

Miller's Tale: 611

This wol I yeve thee, if thou me kisse!' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 52

Yet wol I yeve thee leve for to gon [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 273

I wol noght speke out of thyn audience.' [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 122

Or, if yow list to fleen as hye in the air
12

Melibee's Tale: 20

... secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne thy folie; for they wol yeve yow audience and loking and supportacioun in thy presence, and scorne thee in thyn absence." Another clerk seith, that "scarsly shaltou finden any persone that may kepe conseil secreely." The book seith: "whyl that thou kepest thy conseil in thyn herte, thou kepest it in thy prisoun: and whan thou biwreyest thy conseil to any ... [continues next]
13

Monk's Prologue: 81

And if yow list to herkne hiderward, [continues next]
13

Monk's Prologue: 82

I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward; [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

I wol yow teche pleynly the manere, [continues next]
14

Parson's Prologue: 39

And thanne that ye wol yeve me audience, [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 18

On mortal thing, and as yow list, ay ye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 19

Yeve him in love ese or adversitee;
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 438

I wol it tellen heer in your presence.
10

Miller's Tale: 611

[continues previous] This wol I yeve thee, if thou me kisse!'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

[continues previous] And if thou canst nat tellen it anon,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 52

[continues previous] Yet wol I yeve thee leve for to gon
10

Clerk's Tale: 272

[continues previous] And al this shal be doon in thy presence,
10

Clerk's Tale: 273

[continues previous] I wol noght speke out of thyn audience.'
12

Melibee's Tale: 20

[continues previous] ... it secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne thy folie; for they wol yeve yow audience and loking and supportacioun in thy presence, and scorne thee in thyn absence." Another clerk seith, that "scarsly shaltou finden any persone that may kepe conseil secreely." The book seith: "whyl that thou kepest thy conseil in thyn herte, thou kepest it in thy prisoun: and whan thou biwreyest thy conseil to any wight, he ...
13

Monk's Prologue: 82

[continues previous] I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

[continues previous] I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

[continues previous] I wol yow teche pleynly the manere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 662

I ne wol nat been out of your presence, [continues next]
14

Parson's Prologue: 39

[continues previous] And thanne that ye wol yeve me audience,
14

Parson's Prologue: 40

[continues previous] I wol ful fayn, at Cristes reverence,
11

Parson's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose.
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 439

But worshipful chanouns religious,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 663

[continues previous] But go with yow, and come with yow ageyn.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 440

Ne demeth nat that I sclaundre your hous,
10

Miller's Prologue: 64

For goddes love, demeth nat that I seye
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 662

[continues previous] I ne wol nat been out of your presence,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 14

Al-though it be nat worth a botel hey. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 441

Al-though my tale of a chanoun be.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

And telle forth my tale of the chanoun, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 13

[continues previous] For he shal telle a tale, by my fey!
11

Manciple's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] Al-though it be nat worth a botel hey.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 442

Of every ordre som shrewe is, parde,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And telle forth my tale of the chanoun,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 443

And god forbede that al a companye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 761

'Ey! god forbede that it sholde falle,' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 762

Quod Pandarus, 'that ye swich foly wroughte! [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 444

Sholde rewe a singuler mannes folye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 761

[continues previous] 'Ey! god forbede that it sholde falle,'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 445

To sclaundre yow is no-thing myn entente,
10

Merchant's Tale: 223

And sin that ye han herd al myn entente, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 224

I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 75

For my entente is nat but for to winne, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 76

And no-thing for correccioun of sinne. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 104

... thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, of my translacions and endytinges of worldly vanitees, the whiche I revoke in my retracciouns: as is the book of Troilus; The book also of ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 150

I wolde of this yow telle al myn entente; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 446

But to correcten that is mis I mente.
10

Merchant's Tale: 224

[continues previous] I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 75

[continues previous] For my entente is nat but for to winne,
11

Parson's Tale: 104

[continues previous] ... any thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, of my translacions and endytinges of worldly vanitees, the whiche I revoke in my retracciouns: as is the ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 151

[continues previous] But this enseled til another day.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 447

This tale was nat only told for yow,
11

Franklin's Tale: 594

Er ye me sleen by-cause that I yow love. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 448

But eek for othere mo; ye woot wel how
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 742

And wel ye woot, no vileinye is it.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 743

Eek Plato seith, who-so that can him rede,
11

Clerk's Tale: 420

Ther is no wight that hereth it but we tweye. [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 421

Ye woot your-self wel, how that ye cam here [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1019

Both in repreve of hir and othere mo.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 1020

'Ye shal,' quod Proserpyne, 'wol ye so;
11

Franklin's Tale: 595

[continues previous] For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight;
10

Monk's Tale: 330

Agayn Sapor the king and othere mo, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 331

And how that al this proces fil in dede, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 786

'Now am I not a fool, that woot wel how [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 787

Hir wo for love is of another wight, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 449

That, among Cristes apostelles twelve,
12

Clerk's Tale: 421

[continues previous] Ye woot your-self wel, how that ye cam here
10

Monk's Tale: 331

[continues previous] And how that al this proces fil in dede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 786

[continues previous] 'Now am I not a fool, that woot wel how
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 450

Ther nas no traytour but Iudas him-selve.
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 167

Ther nas no lak, but that he was agast
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 21

I nas but lorn; ther nas no more to seye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 196

Ther nas no cry but "Troilus is there!"
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 451

Than why sholde al the remenant have blame
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 230

And sithen al the remenant by and by, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 304

And sithen al the remenant by and by, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 452

That giltlees were? by yow I seye the same.
12

Shipman's Tale: 134

'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye;
12

Shipman's Tale: 135

By god and by this porthors, I yow swere,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 230

[continues previous] And sithen al the remenant by and by,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 231

[continues previous] As they were of degree, ful curteisly;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 304

[continues previous] And sithen al the remenant by and by,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 305

[continues previous] As they were of estaat, ful curteisly;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 453

Save only this, if ye wol herkne me,
11

Summoner's Tale: 542

Among your covent, if it lyked me.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 454

If any Iudas in your covent be,
11

Summoner's Tale: 541

[continues previous] How that this fart sholde even deled be
11

Summoner's Tale: 542

[continues previous] Among your covent, if it lyked me.'
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 457

And beth no-thing displesed, I yow preye,
10

Clerk's Tale: 108

But I yow preye, and charge up-on your lyf, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 588

Beth pacient, and ther-of I yow preye.'
12

Clerk's Tale: 589

'I have,' quod she, 'seyd thus, and ever shal,
10

Merchant's Tale: 277

'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 278

Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 245

But herkneth, lordings, o word, I yow preye, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 103

Tel on thy tale, maunciple, I thee preye.' [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.' [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 205

Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 206

Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye: [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1784

To speke, and in effect yow alle I preye, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1785

Beth war of men, and herkeneth what I seye! — [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 458

But in this cas herkneth what I shal seye.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 857

Now lat us ryde, and herkneth what I seye.'
12

Knight's Tale: 1924

For love of God, and herkneth what I seye.
10

Knight's Tale: 1925

I have heer with my cosin Palamon
10

Clerk's Tale: 108

[continues previous] But I yow preye, and charge up-on your lyf,
10

Merchant's Tale: 277

[continues previous] 'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye,
12

Merchant's Tale: 278

[continues previous] Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye.
12

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
10

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
10

Franklin's Tale: 709

What shal I seye of Nicerates wyf,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 245

[continues previous] But herkneth, lordings, o word, I yow preye,
14

Melibee's Prologue: 47

And therfor herkneth what that I shal seye,
14

Melibee's Tale: 7

... answerde Melibeus un-to his wyf Prudence: 'Alle thy wordes,' quod he, 'been sothe, and ther-to profitable; but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."' [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 104

[continues previous] 'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
12

Manciple's Tale: 205

[continues previous] Lordings, by this ensample I yow preye,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 1

But what shal I seye of dignitees and of powers, the whiche
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 1

But what shal I seye of delices of body, of whiche delices the
12

Legend of Ariadne: 332

I can my-selven in this cas nat rede!' [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 333

What shal I telle more her compleining? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 290

What shal my sorwful lyf don in this cas [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1784

[continues previous] To speke, and in effect yow alle I preye,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 459

In London was a preest, an annueleer,
14

Melibee's Tale: 7

[continues previous] ... 'Alle thy wordes,' quod he, 'been sothe, and ther-to profitable; but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."'
12

Legend of Ariadne: 332

[continues previous] I can my-selven in this cas nat rede!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 290

[continues previous] What shal my sorwful lyf don in this cas
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 460

That therin dwelled hadde many a yeer,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 255

For thogh a widwe hadde noght a sho, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2228

Sin he hath served yow so many a yeer, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 461

Which was so plesaunt and so servisable
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 256

[continues previous] So plesaunt was his "In principio,"
11

Knight's Tale: 2228

[continues previous] Sin he hath served yow so many a yeer,
11

Knight's Tale: 2229

[continues previous] And had for yow so greet adversitee,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 463

That she wolde suffre him no-thing for to paye
13

Monk's Tale: 294

That she was nat with childe with that dede,
13

Monk's Tale: 295

Than wolde she suffre him doon his fantasye
12

Monk's Tale: 300

Than wolde she ones suffre him do the same.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 167

That wolde she nat suffre, by no wey.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7278

But god ne preiseth him no-thing, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 464

For bord ne clothing, wente he never so gaye;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7277

[continues previous] The pore man in sich clothing.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7278

[continues previous] But god ne preiseth him no-thing,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1537

And Troilus to paleys wente blyve.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1538

So glad ne was he never in al his lyve;
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 465

And spending-silver hadde he right y-now.
13

Book of the Duchesse: 542

'I do no fors therof,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Merciles Beautè: 31

I do no fors, I speke right as I mene. [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 466

Therof no fors; I wol precede as now,
12

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 185

Seyde this Pardoner, 'as ye bigan, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale. — [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 194

As ever mote I drinken wyn or ale, [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 38

Now telleth forth, thogh that the Somnour gale, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 332

But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale. [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 542

[continues previous] 'I do no fors therof,' quod he,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1170

But therof no fors, of hem two.
12

Merciles Beautè: 31

[continues previous] I do no fors, I speke right as I mene.
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

And telle forth my tale of the chanoun,
12

Knight's Tale: 496

[continues previous] For I wol telle forth as I bigan.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 186

[continues previous] Telle forth your tale, spareth for no man,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

[continues previous] Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale.
12

Friar's Tale: 37

[continues previous] Thus seyde our host, 'and lat him telle his tale.
12

Friar's Tale: 38

[continues previous] Now telleth forth, thogh that the Somnour gale,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 331

[continues previous] Leveth your othes, bothe grete and smale;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 332

[continues previous] But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 333

[continues previous] Thise ryotoures three, of whiche I telle,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 441

Al-though my tale of a chanoun be.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 442

Of every ordre som shrewe is, parde,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 635

And whyles that the preest wyped his face, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 636

This chanoun took his cole with harde grace, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 468

That broghte this preest to confusioun.
11

Physician's Tale: 164

This false cherl cam forth a ful greet pas, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 635

[continues previous] And whyles that the preest wyped his face, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 636

[continues previous] This chanoun took his cole with harde grace, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 717

[continues previous] And whyl this preest was in his bisinesse, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

[continues previous] This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 469

This false chanoun cam up-on a day
13

Physician's Tale: 163

[continues previous] And yaf his domes up-on sondry cas. [continues next]
13

Physician's Tale: 164

[continues previous] This false cherl cam forth a ful greet pas, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 636

[continues previous] This chanoun took his cole with harde grace,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 717

[continues previous] And whyl this preest was in his bisinesse,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

[continues previous] This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 743

He wente his wey, and with the coper cam, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 744

And this chanoun it in his handes nam, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 470

Unto this preestes chambre, wher he lay,
12

Physician's Tale: 164

[continues previous] This false cherl cam forth a ful greet pas,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 744

[continues previous] And this chanoun it in his handes nam,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 471

Biseching him to lene him a certeyn
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7025

Or if a wight, out of mesure, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7026

Wolde lene his gold, and take usure, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 472

Of gold, and he wolde quyte it him ageyn.
10

Cook's Tale: 16

And daunced wel, he wolde nat come ageyn. [continues next]
10

Cook's Tale: 17

And gadered him a meinee of his sort [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4324

I see he wolde it selle ageyn, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4325

And me a newe bargeyn lere, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7025

[continues previous] Or if a wight, out of mesure,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7026

[continues previous] Wolde lene his gold, and take usure,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 473

'Lene me a mark,' quod he, 'but dayes three,
10

Cook's Tale: 17

[continues previous] And gadered him a meinee of his sort
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 483

'Certes,' quod he, 'no-thing anoyeth me
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 484

To lene a man a noble, or two or three,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4325

[continues previous] And me a newe bargeyn lere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 474

And at my day I wol it quyten thee.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2523

And if so be it happe thee [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 475

And if so be that thou me finde fals,
11

Melibee's Tale: 25

... purpos and his conseil if the cause cesseth, or whan a newe caas bitydeth. For the lawe seith: that "upon thinges that newely bityden bihoveth newe conseil." And Senek seith: "if thy conseil is comen to the eres of thyn enemy, chaunge thy conseil." Thou mayst also chaunge thy conseil if so be that thou finde that, by errour or by other cause, harm or damage may bityde. Also, if thy conseil be dishonest, or elles cometh of dishoneste cause, chaunge thy conseil. For the lawes seyn: that "alle bihestes that been dishoneste been of no value." And eek, if it so be that it be inpossible, ...
10

Hous of Fame 1: 393

And when she wiste that he was fals, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 456

I dar eek seye, if she me finde fals,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2523

[continues previous] And if so be it happe thee
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2524

[continues previous] That thou thy love ther mayst see,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 476

Another day do hange me by the hals!'
10

Hous of Fame 1: 394

[continues previous] She heng hir-self right by the hals,
11

Parlement of Foules: 458

Or Ialous, do me hongen by the hals!
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 477

This preest him took a mark, and that as swythe,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 641

'As swythe al shal be wel, I undertake; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 478

And this chanoun him thanked ofte sythe,
11

Clerk's Tale: 177

Ful ofte sythe this markis sette his yë [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 640

[continues previous] 'Now yeve us drinke,' quod the chanoun thenne,
10

Legend of Dido: 226

She thanked him ful ofte, in good entente. [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 479

And took his leve, and wente forth his weye,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 62

And taketh his leve, and wendeth forth his weye. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 177

[continues previous] Ful ofte sythe this markis sette his
12

Clerk's Tale: 518

But took the child and wente upon his weye. [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 278

And thus he took his leve, and wente his way. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 556

And he al redy was at his bidding, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 557

And wente him forth, and cam anon agayn [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 665

They opened and shette, and wente hir weye. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 666

And forth with hem they carieden the keye, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 225

[continues previous] And of the present that his fader sente
12

Book of the Duchesse: 153

This messager took leve and wente [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 154

Upon his wey, and never ne stente [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 597

And lord, how he was glad and wel bigoon! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1302

And al was wel, he roos and took his leve.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1303

And on his wey ful faste homward he spedde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1460

And took his leve, and never gan to fyne,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 594

Whan al was wel, he roos and took his leve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 595

And she to souper com, whan it was eve,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 480

And at the thridde day broghte his moneye,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 62

[continues previous] And taketh his leve, and wendeth forth his weye.
12

Clerk's Tale: 518

[continues previous] But took the child and wente upon his weye.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 278

[continues previous] And thus he took his leve, and wente his way.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 556

[continues previous] And he al redy was at his bidding,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 557

[continues previous] And wente him forth, and cam anon agayn
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 665

[continues previous] They opened and shette, and wente hir weye.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 666

[continues previous] And forth with hem they carieden the keye,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 153

[continues previous] This messager took leve and wente
12

Book of the Duchesse: 154

[continues previous] Upon his wey, and never ne stente
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

[continues previous] With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 597

[continues previous] And lord, how he was glad and wel bigoon!
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 482

Wherof this preest was wonder glad and fayn.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 603

'Graunt mercy,' quod the preest, and was ful glad, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 604

And couched coles as the chanoun bad. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 688

Of silver fyn, and glad in every veyne
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 689

Was this preest, whan he saugh that it was so.
10

Manciple's Prologue: 92

And of that drinke the cook was wonder fayn,
10

Manciple's Prologue: 93

And thanked him in swich wyse as he coude.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 122

And wonder glad was I to see
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 483

'Certes,' quod he, 'no-thing anoyeth me
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 473

'Lene me a mark,' quod he, 'but dayes three, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 603

[continues previous] 'Graunt mercy,' quod the preest, and was ful glad,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 484

To lene a man a noble, or two or three,
11

Monk's Prologue: 80

To telle yow a tale, or two, or three. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 236

Though it abyde a yeer, or two, or three, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 473

[continues previous] 'Lene me a mark,' quod he, 'but dayes three,
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 144

So that, within a day, or two, or three, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 106

And seyde, 'herof a draught, or two or three, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 411

If thou thus ligge a day, or two, or three, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 485

Or what thing were in my possessioun,
11

Summoner's Tale: 416

'Swich thing as is in my possessioun,' [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 80

[continues previous] To telle yow a tale, or two, or three.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 236

[continues previous] Though it abyde a yeer, or two, or three,
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 144

[continues previous] So that, within a day, or two, or three,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 106

[continues previous] And seyde, 'herof a draught, or two or three,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 411

[continues previous] If thou thus ligge a day, or two, or three,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 486

Whan he so trewe is of condicioun,
11

Summoner's Tale: 417

[continues previous] Quod he, 'that may I yeven, and non other.
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

... for if thou do hem bountee, they wol perverten it in-to wikkednesse." And eek thou most eschewe the conseilling of hem that been thy servants, and beren thee greet reverence; for peraventure they seyn it more for drede than for love. And therfore seith a philosophre in this wyse: "ther is no wight parfitly trewe to him that he to sore dredeth." And Tullius seith: "ther nis no might so greet of any emperour, that longe may endure, but-if he have more love of the peple than drede." Thou shalt also eschewe the conseiling of folk that been dronkelewe; for they ne can no conseil ... [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 487

That in no wyse he breke wol his day;
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

[continues previous] ... with thyne olde enemys; for if thou do hem bountee, they wol perverten it in-to wikkednesse." And eek thou most eschewe the conseilling of hem that been thy servants, and beren thee greet reverence; for peraventure they seyn it more for drede than for love. And therfore seith a philosophre in this wyse: "ther is no wight parfitly trewe to him that he to sore dredeth." And Tullius seith: "ther nis no might so greet of any emperour, that longe may endure, but-if he have more love of the peple than drede." Thou shalt also eschewe the conseiling of folk that been dronkelewe; for they ne ...
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 488

To swich a man I can never seye nay.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 10

I can nat seye, but swich a greet corage
11

Squire's Tale: 3

Connen ther-on as muche as any man.' [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 4

'Nay, sir,' quod he, 'but I wol seye as I can [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 206

Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye: [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 207

Ne telleth never no man in your lyf [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 257

This is theffect; what sholde I more seye? [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1206

'And eek I noot what I sholde to him seye.' [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1207

'Nay, nece,' quod Pandare, 'sey not so; [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 489

'What!' quod this chanoun, 'sholde I be untrewe?
11

Squire's Tale: 4

[continues previous] 'Nay, sir,' quod he, 'but I wol seye as I can
11

Manciple's Tale: 206

[continues previous] Beth war, and taketh kepe what I seye:
11

Legend of Dido: 256

[continues previous] I wolde fain to him y-wedded be;
11

Legend of Dido: 257

[continues previous] This is theffect; what sholde I more seye?
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1206

[continues previous] 'And eek I noot what I sholde to him seye.'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1207

[continues previous] 'Nay, nece,' quod Pandare, 'sey not so;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 491

Trouthe is a thing that I wol ever kepe
11

Knight's Tale: 1554

And evere-mo, un-to that day I dye, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1555

Eterne fyr I wol biforn thee finde. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 356

Me fro the feend, and fro his clawes kepe, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 750

But-if ye sholde your trouthe kepe and save.
11

Franklin's Tale: 751

Trouthe is the hyeste thing that man may kepe':
10

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 492

Un-to that day in which that I shal crepe
11

Knight's Tale: 1554

[continues previous] And evere-mo, un-to that day I dye,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 357

[continues previous] That day that I shal drenchen in the depe.
11

Shipman's Tale: 207

Goth now, and beeth as trewe as I shal be.' [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 493

In-to my grave, and elles god forbede;