Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Merchant's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Merchant's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Merchant's Tale has 1174 lines, and 9% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 71% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 20% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.16 strong matches and 3.77 weak matches.

Merchant's Tale

Loading ...

Geoffrey Chaucer

Loading ...
14

Merchant's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge in Lumbardye
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 43

A Knight ther was, and that a worthy man, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 4

With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 447

Of olde Britons, dwellinge in this yle;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 448

Ther was hir refut for the mene whyle.
12

Friar's Tale: 1

Whilom ther was dwellinge in my contree [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 2

A worthy knight, that born was of Pavye,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 43

[continues previous] A Knight ther was, and that a worthy man,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 44

[continues previous] That fro the tyme that he first bigan
14

Miller's Tale: 2

[continues previous] A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord,
10

Miller's Tale: 4

[continues previous] With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler,
12

Friar's Tale: 2

[continues previous] An erchedeken, a man of heigh degree,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1267

And by hir wente a knight dauncing
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1268

That worthy was and wel speking,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

[continues previous] Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

[continues previous] Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 66

[continues previous] A gret devyn that cleped was Calkas,
10

Merchant's Tale: 3

In which he lived in greet prosperitee;
10

Clerk's Tale: 1072

Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 1073

Liven thise two in concord and in reste, [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 87

Of him that stood in greet prosperitee [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 4

And sixty yeer a wyflees man was he,
10

Clerk's Tale: 1072

[continues previous] Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee
11

Merchant's Tale: 8

And whan that he was passed sixty yeer, [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 88

[continues previous] And is y-fallen out of heigh degree
15+

Merchant's Tale: 5

And folwed ay his bodily delyt
11

Merchant's Tale: 8

[continues previous] And whan that he was passed sixty yeer,
14

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 219

For, to desyren, through his appetyt, [continues next]
15+

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 220

To doon with gentil wommen his delyt, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 6

On wommen, ther-as was his appetyt,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 7

As doon thise foles that ben seculeer.
10

Franklin's Tale: 90

As doon thise noble wyves whan hem lyketh. [continues next]
15+

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 220

[continues previous] To doon with gentil wommen his delyt,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 705

As doon thise foles that hir sorwes eche [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 8

And whan that he was passed sixty yeer,
11

Merchant's Tale: 4

And sixty yeer a wyflees man was he,
11

Merchant's Tale: 5

And folwed ay his bodily delyt
10

Franklin's Tale: 89

[continues previous] For his absence wepeth she and syketh,
10

Franklin's Tale: 90

[continues previous] As doon thise noble wyves whan hem lyketh.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 706

[continues previous] With sorwe, whan they han misaventure,
11

Merchant's Tale: 9

Were it for holinesse or for dotage,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 709

Than sit he doun, and writ in his dotage [continues next]
11

Envoy to Bukton: 8

Lest I my-self falle eft in swich dotage. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 10

I can nat seye, but swich a greet corage
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 710

[continues previous] That wommen can nat kepe hir mariage!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 711

But now to purpos, why I tolde thee
10

Merchant's Tale: 95

That hath a wyf? certes, I can nat seye.
12

Merchant's Tale: 730

I can nat seye; but grete god above,
12

Physician's Tale: 4

And strong of freendes and of greet richesse. [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 5

This knight a doghter hadde by his wyf, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 67

I seye, my lord can swich subtilitee —
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 68

(But al his craft ye may nat wite at me;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 488

To swich a man I can never seye nay.'
12

Parson's Tale: 37

... Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fyr, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep. I can nat seye but that they doon cursedly and damnably, agayns Crist and al the feith of holy chirche.
10

Legend of Ariadne: 188

And mercy, lady! I can nat elles seye!'
10

Legend of Ariadne: 189

A seemly knight was Theseus to see,
11

Envoy to Bukton: 8

[continues previous] Lest I my-self falle eft in swich dotage.
11

Envoy to Bukton: 9

[continues previous] I wol nat seyn, how that hit is the cheyne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 461

What men wolde of hit deme I can nat seye;
12

Merchant's Tale: 11

Hadde this knight to been a wedded man,
12

Clerk's Tale: 55

That for to been a wedded man yow leste, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 533

This subtil clerk swich routhe had of this man, [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 5

[continues previous] This knight a doghter hadde by his wyf,
12

Merchant's Tale: 12

That day and night he dooth al that he can
12

Clerk's Tale: 55

[continues previous] That for to been a wedded man yow leste,
11

Squire's Tale: 641

To helen with this hauk; fro day to night
11

Squire's Tale: 642

She dooth hir bisinesse and al hir might.
11

Franklin's Tale: 534

[continues previous] That night and day he spedde him that he can,
11

Parson's Tale: 55

Now comth Slouthe, that wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne no penaunce. For soothly, Slouthe is so tendre, and so delicat, as seith Salomon, that he wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne penaunce, and therfore he shendeth al that he dooth. Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour is a greet thing; for it maketh, ... [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 13

Tespyen where he mighte wedded be;
10

Parson's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Now comth Slouthe, that wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne no penaunce. For soothly, Slouthe is so tendre, and so delicat, as seith Salomon, that he wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne penaunce, and therfore he shendeth al that he dooth. Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour is a greet thing; for it ...
10

Merchant's Tale: 14

Preyinge our lord to granten him, that he
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 131

sin that, whan thilke selve lyf is ended, it ne maketh folk no [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 15

Mighte ones knowe of thilke blisful lyf
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 544

Whan that hir housbond hadde lost his lyf, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 1

Our swete lord god of hevene, that no man wole perisse, but wole that we comen alle to the knoweleche of him, and to the blisful lyf that is perdurable, amonesteth us by the prophete Ieremie, that seith in this wyse: 'stondeth upon the weyes, and seeth and axeth of olde pathes (that is to seyn, of olde sentences) which is the goode wey; and walketh in that wey, and ye shul finde refresshinge for your soules,' ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 51

... greet sinne. Heer-agayns suffred Crist ful paciently, and taughte us pacience, whan he bar up-on his blissed shulder the croys, up-on which he sholde suffren despitous deeth. Heer may men lerne to be pacient; for certes, noght only Cristen men been pacient for love of Iesu Crist, and for guerdoun of the blisful lyf that is perdurable; but certes, the olde payens, that nevere were Cristene, commendeden and useden the vertu of pacience. [continues next]
14

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 130

[continues previous] tormentes; how mighte than this present lyf maken men blisful, [continues next]
14

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 131

[continues previous] sin that, whan thilke selve lyf is ended, it ne maketh folk no [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 16

That is bitwixe an housbond and his wyf;
14

Franklin's Tale: 77

That is bitwixe an housbonde and his wyf? [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 78

A yeer and more lasted this blisful lyf, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 543

[continues previous] Ful louder than dide Hasdrubales wyf,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 544

[continues previous] Whan that hir housbond hadde lost his lyf,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 545

[continues previous] And that the Romayns hadde brend Cartage;
11

Parson's Tale: 1

[continues previous] Our swete lord god of hevene, that no man wole perisse, but wole that we comen alle to the knoweleche of him, and to the blisful lyf that is perdurable, amonesteth us by the prophete Ieremie, that seith in this wyse: 'stondeth upon the weyes, and seeth and axeth of olde pathes (that is to seyn, of olde sentences) which is the goode wey; and walketh in that wey, and ye shul finde refresshinge for your soules,' &c. Manye ...
11

Parson's Tale: 42

... is repreved. Lo, what seith seint Augustin: 'ther is no-thing so lyk the develes child as he that ofte chydeth.' Seint Paul seith eek: 'I, servant of god, bihove nat to chyde.' And how that chydinge be a vileyns thing bitwixe alle manere folk, yet it is certes most uncovenable bitwixe a man and his wyf; for there is nevere reste. And therfore seith Salomon, 'an hous that is uncovered and droppinge, and a chydinge wyf, been lyke.' A man that is in a droppinge hous in many places, though he eschewe the droppinge in o place, it droppeth on him in another place; so fareth it by a ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 51

[continues previous] ... Crist ful paciently, and taughte us pacience, whan he bar up-on his blissed shulder the croys, up-on which he sholde suffren despitous deeth. Heer may men lerne to be pacient; for certes, noght only Cristen men been pacient for love of Iesu Crist, and for guerdoun of the blisful lyf that is perdurable; but certes, the olde payens, that nevere were Cristene, commendeden and useden the vertu of pacience.
12

Parson's Tale: 76

... soules; for they bireven alle thise him that sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to hir lecherie, the malisoun of al the court cristen, till they come to amendement. The thridde spece of avoutrie is som-tyme bitwixe a man and his wyf; and that is whan they take no reward in hir assemblinge, but only to hire fleshly delyt, as seith seint Ierome; and ne rekken of nothing but that they been assembled; by-cause that they been maried, al is good y-nough, as thinketh to hem. But in swich folk hath the devel power, as ... [continues next]
14

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 131

[continues previous] sin that, whan thilke selve lyf is ended, it ne maketh folk no
12

Merchant's Tale: 17

And for to live under that holy bond
12

Franklin's Tale: 77

[continues previous] That is bitwixe an housbonde and his wyf?
12

Franklin's Tale: 78

[continues previous] A yeer and more lasted this blisful lyf,
11

Parson's Tale: 42

[continues previous] ... Augustin: 'ther is no-thing so lyk the develes child as he that ofte chydeth.' Seint Paul seith eek: 'I, servant of god, bihove nat to chyde.' And how that chydinge be a vileyns thing bitwixe alle manere folk, yet it is certes most uncovenable bitwixe a man and his wyf; for there is nevere reste. And therfore seith Salomon, 'an hous that is uncovered and droppinge, and a chydinge wyf, been lyke.' A man that is in a droppinge hous in many places, though he eschewe the droppinge in o place, it droppeth on him in another place; so fareth it ...
12

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to hir lecherie, the malisoun of al the court cristen, till they come to amendement. The thridde spece of avoutrie is som-tyme bitwixe a man and his wyf; and that is whan they take no reward in hir assemblinge, but only to hire fleshly delyt, as seith seint Ierome; and ne rekken of nothing but that they been assembled; by-cause that they been maried, al is good y-nough, as thinketh to hem. But in swich folk hath the devel ...
11

Merchant's Tale: 18

With which that first god man and womman bond,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 322

If this were livinge only and non other. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 19

'Non other lyf,' seyde he, 'is worth a bene;
11

Merchant's Tale: 610

She preyseth nat his pleying worth a bene.
11

Merchant's Tale: 611

Than seide he thus, 'my reste wol I take;
11

Second Nun's Tale: 322

[continues previous] If this were livinge only and non other.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 323

[continues previous] But ther is better lyf in other place,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1167

Swich arguments ne been not worth a bene;
12

Merchant's Tale: 20

For wedlok is so esy and so clene,
12

Parson's Tale: 93

... for it sholde be coud the more lightly, and for to withholden it the more esily in herte, and helpen him-self the ofter with the orisoun; and for a man sholde be the lasse wery to seyen it, and for a man may nat excusen him to lerne it, it is so short and so esy; and for it comprehendeth in it-self alle gode preyeres. The exposicioun of this holy preyere, that is so excellent and digne, I bitake to thise maistres of theologie; save thus muchel wol I seyn: that, whan thou prayest that god sholde foryeve thee thy giltes as thou foryevest hem that agilten to ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 22

Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 852

And whan this gode man saugh it was so, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 853

As he that wys was and obedient [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 144

Agayn the knight this olde wyf gan ryse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 145

And seyde, 'sir knight, heer-forth ne lyth no wey. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 246

He by the hond than took this olde man,
11

Clerk's Tale: 247

And seyde thus, whan he him hadde asyde,
11

Squire's Tale: 88

Ful bisily ther wayten yonge and olde.
11

Squire's Tale: 89

This strange knight, that cam thus sodeynly,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 439

And yow amende!' — thus seyde this olde man.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 120

Lo Catoun, which that was so wys a man,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 121

Seyde he nat thus, ne do no fors of dremes?
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 162

And thyn howses reysed up that ben leyd so lowe.'
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 163

Thus seyde the knight to Gamelyn with mowthe,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 232

Medea, which that was so wys and fair [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 233

That fairer saw ther never man with yë, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 23

And certeinly, as sooth as god is king,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 853

[continues previous] As he that wys was and obedient
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 145

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sir knight, heer-forth ne lyth no wey.
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 232

[continues previous] Medea, which that was so wys and fair
12

Merchant's Tale: 25

And namely whan a man is old and hoor;
12

Parson's Tale: 43

Afterward speke we of scorninge, which is a wikked sinne; and namely, whan he scorneth a man for hise gode werkes. For certes, swiche scorneres faren lyk the foule tode, that may nat endure to smelle the sote savour of the vyne whanne it florissheth. Thise scorneres been parting felawes with the devel; for they han Ioye whan the devel winneth, and sorwe whan he leseth. They ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1284

Hir fader, which that old is and eek hoor, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 26

Thanne is a wyf the fruit of his tresor.
10

Parson's Tale: 63

... agayns that vyce; for it dooth wrong to Iesu Crist. For it bireveth him the love that men to him owen, and turneth it bakward agayns alle resoun; and maketh that the avaricious man hath more hope in his catel than in Iesu Crist, and dooth more observance in kepinge of his tresor than he dooth to service of Iesu Crist. And therfore seith seint Paul ad Ephesios, quinto, that 'an avaricious man is in the thraldom of ydolatrie.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1284

[continues previous] Hir fader, which that old is and eek hoor,
12

Merchant's Tale: 27

Than sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir,
12

Merchant's Tale: 201

For whiche causes man sholde take a wyf.
12

Merchant's Tale: 202

If he ne may nat liven chast his lyf,
12

Merchant's Tale: 271

To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin,
12

Merchant's Tale: 313

And namely with a yong wyf and a fair.
10

Parson's Tale: 63

[continues previous] ... for it dooth wrong to Iesu Crist. For it bireveth him the love that men to him owen, and turneth it bakward agayns alle resoun; and maketh that the avaricious man hath more hope in his catel than in Iesu Crist, and dooth more observance in kepinge of his tresor than he dooth to service of Iesu Crist. And therfore seith seint Paul ad Ephesios, quinto, that 'an avaricious man is in the thraldom of ydolatrie.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 28

On which he mighte engendren him an heir,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4899

And makith him love yvel company, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4901

And halt him payed with noon estate. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 29

And lede his lyf in Ioye and in solas,
12

Knight's Tale: 170

And there he liveth, in Ioye and in honour,
12

Knight's Tale: 171

Terme of his lyf; what nedeth wordes mo?
11

Merchant's Tale: 384

To lede in ese and holinesse his lyf.
11

Merchant's Tale: 385

And thanked god, that he mighte han hire al,
12

Franklin's Tale: 74

Wher-as he liveth in blisse and in solas. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 291

And hoom they goon in Ioye and in solas, [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 81

In mochel mirthe, in Ioye and in solas.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4900

[continues previous] And lede his lyf disrewlily,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4901

[continues previous] And halt him payed with noon estate.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 832

So blisful cause as me, my lyf to lede
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 833

In alle Ioye and seurtee, out of drede.
12

Merchant's Tale: 30

Wher-as thise bacheleres singe 'allas,'
12

Franklin's Tale: 74

[continues previous] Wher-as he liveth in blisse and in solas.
12

Franklin's Tale: 292

[continues previous] Save only wrecche Aurelius, allas!
11

Parson's Tale: 59

Thanne comth Lachesse; that is he, that whan he biginneth any good werk, anon he shal forleten it and stinten; as doon they that han any wight to governe, and ne taken of him na-more kepe, anon as they finden any contrarie or any anoy. Thise been the newe shepherdes, that leten hir sheep witingly go renne to the wolf that is in the breres, or do no fors of hir owene governaunce. Of this comth poverte and destruccioun, bothe of spirituel and temporel thinges. Thanne comth a manere coldnesse, that freseth al the herte of ... [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 31

Whan that they finden any adversitee
11

Parson's Tale: 59

[continues previous] Thanne comth Lachesse; that is he, that whan he biginneth any good werk, anon he shal forleten it and stinten; as doon they that han any wight to governe, and ne taken of him na-more kepe, anon as they finden any contrarie or any anoy. Thise been the newe shepherdes, that leten hir sheep witingly go renne to the wolf that is in the breres, or do no fors of hir owene governaunce. Of this comth poverte and destruccioun, bothe of spirituel and temporel thinges. Thanne comth a manere coldnesse, that freseth al the ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 33

And trewely it sit wel to be so,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 246

And trewelich it sit wel to be so;
13

Merchant's Tale: 36

They finde, whan they wene sikernesse.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3781

Whan they in ese wene best to live, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3782

They been with tempest al fordrive. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 37

They live but as a brid or as a beste,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 495

Brid, fish, beste, or him or here,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 496

As the Raven, or either Bere,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3781

[continues previous] Whan they in ese wene best to live,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3782

[continues previous] They been with tempest al fordrive.
12

Merchant's Tale: 39

Ther-as a wedded man in his estaat
12

Merchant's Tale: 487

Saugh never his lyf so mery a wedded man. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 40

Liveth a lyf blisful and ordinaat,
12

Clerk's Tale: 57

Boweth your nekke under that blisful yok [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 487

[continues previous] Saugh never his lyf so mery a wedded man.
12

Merchant's Tale: 41

Under the yok of mariage y-bounde;
12

Clerk's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Boweth your nekke under that blisful yok
12

Clerk's Tale: 58

[continues previous] Of soveraynetee, noght of servyse,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 69

ones put thy nekke under the yok of hir. For yif thou wolt
11

Merchant's Tale: 42

Wel may his herte in Ioye and blisse habounde.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1021

In Ioye and blisse at mete I lete hem dwelle
10

Franklin's Tale: 371

And thus in Ioye and blisse I lete hem dwelle,
10

Franklin's Tale: 372

And of the syke Aurelius wol I telle.
11

Balade to Rosemounde: 12

Maketh my thoght in Ioye and blis habounde. [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 74

And thus in Ioye and blisse I let hem dwelle;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1671

For which he felte his herte in Ioye flete;
10

Merchant's Tale: 43

For who can be so buxom as a wyf?
10

Balade to Rosemounde: 13

[continues previous] So curteisly I go, with lovë bounde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 44

Who is so trewe, and eek so ententyf
12

Manciple's Tale: 171

That were to me so sad and eek so trewe, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 45

To kepe him, syk and hool, as is his make?
12

Manciple's Tale: 171

[continues previous] That were to me so sad and eek so trewe,
12

Merchant's Tale: 46

For wele or wo, she wol him nat forsake.
11

Prioress' Tale: 217

Be nat agast, I wol thee nat forsake."' [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 42

... "thinges that been folily doon, and that been in hope of fortune, shullen never come to good ende." And as the same Senek seith: "the more cleer and the more shyning that fortune is, the more brotil and the sonner broken she is." Trusteth nat in hir, for she nis nat stidefast ne stable; for whan thow trowest to be most seur or siker of hir help, she wol faille thee and deceyve thee. And wher-as ye seyn that fortune hath norissed yow fro your childhede, I seye, that in so muchel shul ye the lasse truste in hir and in ... [continues next]
12

Legend of Cleopatra: 108

For wele or wo, for carole or for daunce;
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 110

That, right swich as ye felten, wele or wo,
12

Legend of Dido: 312

For wele or wo, and chaunge for no newe,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 184

To wele or wo, sith hit lyth in hir might?
10

Fortune: 2

As wele or wo, now povre and now honour,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5204

That wol not breke for wele ne wo;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1472

'My lady right, and of my wele or wo
11

Merchant's Tale: 47

She nis nat wery him to love and serve,
11

Prioress' Tale: 217

[continues previous] Be nat agast, I wol thee nat forsake."'
11

Melibee's Tale: 42

[continues previous] ... after the word of Senek: for "thinges that been folily doon, and that been in hope of fortune, shullen never come to good ende." And as the same Senek seith: "the more cleer and the more shyning that fortune is, the more brotil and the sonner broken she is." Trusteth nat in hir, for she nis nat stidefast ne stable; for whan thow trowest to be most seur or siker of hir help, she wol faille thee and deceyve thee. And wher-as ye seyn that fortune hath norissed yow fro your childhede, I seye, that in so muchel shul ye the lasse truste in hir and ...
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 25

As Cleopatras for to love and serve;
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 26

Him roghte nat in armes for to sterve
11

Legend of Ariadne: 149

That, as a wrecche unknowe, I wol yow serve [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 48

Thogh that he lye bedrede til he sterve.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 150

[continues previous] For ever-mo, til that myn herte sterve.
11

Merchant's Tale: 49

And yet somme clerkes seyn, it nis nat so,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 671

He cleped it Valerie and Theofraste, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 92

That that is overdoon, it wol nat preve
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 93

Aright, as clerkes seyn, it is a vyce.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 33

sholden ben defouled and vyle; but it nis nat so. For yif tho
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 39

absolut and unbounden. But thou wolt seyn that, al-be-it so that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 40

prescience nis nat cause of the necessitee of bitydinge to thinges
10

Compleynt of Mars: 274

Al be I not worthy to so grete a name,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 275

Yet, seyn these clerkes, I am your patroun;
10

Merchant's Tale: 50

Of whiche he, Theofraste, is oon of tho.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 671

[continues previous] He cleped it Valerie and Theofraste,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 672

[continues previous] At whiche book he lough alwey ful faste.
11

Merchant's Tale: 55

Thy good to kepe, than thyn owene wyf.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 883

The senatoures wyf hir aunte was, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 449

But I wol kepe it for your owene tooth. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 152

That thou it madest lyk to thyn owene merk.
11

Franklin's Tale: 153

Than semed it ye hadde a greet chiertee
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... name. And Cassidore seith: that "it is signe of a gentil herte, whan a man loveth and desyreth to han a good name." And therfore seith seint Augustin: that "ther been two thinges that arn necessarie and nedefulle, and that is good conscience and good loos; that is to seyn, good conscience to thyn owene persone inward, and good loos for thy neighebore outward." And he that trusteth him so muchel in his gode conscience, that he displeseth and setteth at noght his gode name or loos, and rekketh noght though he kepe nat his gode name, nis but a cruel cherl. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 56

For she wol clayme half part al hir lyf;
10

Knight's Tale: 1937

That serveth yow, and wol don al his lyf. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 883

[continues previous] The senatoures wyf hir aunte was,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 884

[continues previous] But for al that she knew hir never the more;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 449

[continues previous] But I wol kepe it for your owene tooth.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 263

For thogh they yeve us al hir heritage,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 264

For which we clayme to been of heigh parage,
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... gentil herte, whan a man loveth and desyreth to han a good name." And therfore seith seint Augustin: that "ther been two thinges that arn necessarie and nedefulle, and that is good conscience and good loos; that is to seyn, good conscience to thyn owene persone inward, and good loos for thy neighebore outward." And he that trusteth him so muchel in his gode conscience, that he displeseth and setteth at noght his gode name or loos, and rekketh noght though he kepe nat his gode name, nis but a cruel cherl.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 574

That thou reherce of al hir lyf the grete, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 57

And if that thou be syk, so god me save,
10

Knight's Tale: 1937

[continues previous] That serveth yow, and wol don al his lyf.
10

Knight's Tale: 1938

[continues previous] And if that ever ye shul been a wyf,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 574

[continues previous] That thou reherce of al hir lyf the grete,
12

Merchant's Tale: 58

Thy verray frendes or a trewe knave
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4389

A trewe herte wol not plye [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 59

Wol kepe thee bet than she that waiteth ay
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4388

[continues previous] At large kepe thyn herte free.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4389

[continues previous] A trewe herte wol not plye
11

Merchant's Tale: 61

And if thou take a wyf un-to thyn hold,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 199

Quod she, 'that thou me take un-to thy wyf;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 200

For wel thou wost that I have kept thy lyf.
12

Merchant's Tale: 69

As londes, rentes, pasture, or commune,
10

Knight's Tale: 393

Allas, why pleynen folk so in commune [continues next]
12

Physician's Epilogue: 9

That yiftes of fortune or of nature [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 70

Or moebles, alle ben yiftes of fortune,
10

Knight's Tale: 394

[continues previous] Of purveyaunce of God, or of fortune, [continues next]
14

Physician's Epilogue: 9

[continues previous] That yiftes of fortune or of nature [continues next]
14

Physician's Epilogue: 10

[continues previous] Ben cause of deeth to many a creature. [continues next]
14

Parson's Tale: 101

... thanne he wol shryven him; and, as he seith, him semeth thanne tymely y-nough to come to shrifte. Another is, surquidrie that he hath in Cristes mercy. Agayns the firste vyce, he shal thinke, that oure lyf is in no sikernesse; and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure, and passen as a shadwe on the wal. And, as seith seint Gregorie, that it aperteneth to the grete rightwisnesse of god, that nevere shal the peyne stinte of hem that nevere wolde withdrawen hem fro sinne, hir thankes, but ay continue in sinne; for thilke perpetuel wil ... [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 63

same thing may I most digneliche iugen and seyn of alle the [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 64

yiftes of fortune that most plentevously comen to shrewes; of [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 85

And at the laste, I may conclude the same thing of alle the
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 86

yiftes of Fortune, in which ther nis nothing to ben desired, ne
15+

Merchant's Tale: 71

That passen as a shadwe upon a wal.
10

Knight's Tale: 395

[continues previous] That yeveth hem ful ofte in many a gyse
11

Physician's Epilogue: 8

[continues previous] Wherfore I seye al day, as men may see,
14

Physician's Epilogue: 9

[continues previous] That yiftes of fortune or of nature
15+

Shipman's Tale: 9

Passen as dooth a shadwe up-on the wal. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 10

But wo is him that payen moot for al; [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 101

[continues previous] ... him; and, as he seith, him semeth thanne tymely y-nough to come to shrifte. Another is, surquidrie that he hath in Cristes mercy. Agayns the firste vyce, he shal thinke, that oure lyf is in no sikernesse; and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure, and passen as a shadwe on the wal. And, as seith seint Gregorie, that it aperteneth to the grete rightwisnesse of god, that nevere shal the peyne stinte of hem that nevere wolde withdrawen hem fro sinne, hir thankes, but ay continue in sinne; for thilke perpetuel wil to do sinne shul they han perpetuel peyne.
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 64

[continues previous] yiftes of fortune that most plentevously comen to shrewes; of
15+

Merchant's Tale: 72

But dredelees, if pleynly speke I shal,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 729

Thogh that I pleynly speke in this matere,
12

Merchant's Tale: 187

Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 188

I wol non old wyf han right for this cause. [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 10

[continues previous] But wo is him that payen moot for al;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 47

ayein un-to thyn hous. And I shal ficchen fetheres in thy thought, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 73

A wyf wol laste, and in thyn hous endure,
12

Merchant's Tale: 187

[continues previous] Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause,
12

Merchant's Tale: 188

[continues previous] I wol non old wyf han right for this cause.
12

Physician's Tale: 200

Thou shalt no lenger in thyn hous hir save. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 47

[continues previous] ayein un-to thyn hous. And I shal ficchen fetheres in thy thought,
12

Merchant's Tale: 74

Wel lenger than thee list, paraventure.
12

Physician's Tale: 200

[continues previous] Thou shalt no lenger in thyn hous hir save.
11

Merchant's Tale: 75

Mariage is a ful gret sacrement;
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is the filthe thurgh which they breken the comandement of god, and defoulen the auctour of matrimoine, that is Crist. For certes, in-so-muche as the sacrement of mariage is so noble and so digne, so muche is it gretter sinne for to breken it; for god made mariage in paradys, in the estaat of Innocence, to multiplye man-kinde to the service of god. And therfore is the brekinge ther-of more grevous. Of which brekinge comen false heires ofte tyme, ...
11

Parson's Tale: 77

... chastitee of widwehode. Now shaltow understonde, that matrimoine is leefful assemblinge of man and of womman, that receyven by vertu of the sacrement the bond, thurgh which they may nat be departed in al hir lyf, that is to seyn, whyl that they liven bothe. This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. God maked it, as I have seyd, in paradys, and wolde him-self be born in mariage. And for to halwen mariage, he was at a weddinge, where-as he turned water in-to wyn; which was the firste miracle that he wroghte in erthe biforn hise disciples. Trewe effect of mariage clenseth ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1171

A ful gret fool is he, y-wis, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 76

He which that hath no wyf, I holde him shent;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1171

[continues previous] A ful gret fool is he, y-wis,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1172

[continues previous] That bothe riche and nigard is.
13

Merchant's Tale: 79

And herke why, I sey nat this for noght,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 229

I sey nat this by wyves that ben wyse, [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

... the remenaunt of the noumbre that leveth the latitude of the regioun. As thus: I suppose that the sonne is thilke day at noon 38 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte. Abate thanne thise degrees and minutes out of 90; so leveth there 51 degrees and 50 minutes, the latitude. I sey nat this but for ensample; for wel I wot the latitude of Oxenforde is certein minutes lasse, as I mighte prove. Now yif so be that thee semeth to long a taryinge, to abyde til that the sonne be in the hevedes of Aries or of Libra, thanne waite whan the sonne is in any other ...
13

Merchant's Tale: 80

That womman is for mannes help y-wroght.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 228

[continues previous] Swere and lyen as a womman can.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 229

[continues previous] I sey nat this by wyves that ben wyse,
12

Merchant's Tale: 81

The hye god, whan he hadde Adam maked,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3857

And whan I saugh he hadde so, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 82

And saugh him al allone, bely-naked,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3856

[continues previous] Al sodeynly took him with me.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3857

[continues previous] And whan I saugh he hadde so,
12

Merchant's Tale: 83

God of his grete goodnesse seyde than,
11

Melibee's Tale: 63

... hir, that wonder was to telle. 'A! lady!' quod they, 'ye han shewed un-to us "the blessinge of swetnesse," after the sawe of David the prophete; for the reconsilinge which we been nat worthy to have in no manere, but we oghte requeren it with greet contricioun and humilitee, ye of your grete goodnesse have presented unto us. Now see we wel that the science and the conninge of Salomon is ful trewe; for he seith: that "swete wordes multiplyen and encresen freendes, and maken shrewes to be debonaire and meke." [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 567

Than seyde the porter 'so brouke I my chin, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 116

Of his goodnesse he gladed hir anoon, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 117

And seyde, 'lat your fadres treson goon [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 84

'Lat us now make an help un-to this man
10

Melibee's Tale: 51

... your wit and by your travaille un-to your profit; and that with-outen wrong or harm-doinge to any other persone. For the lawe seith: that "ther maketh no man himselven riche, if he do harm to another wight;" this is to seyn, that nature defendeth and forbedeth by right, that no man make him-self riche un-to the harm of another persone. And Tullius seith: that "no sorwe ne no drede of deeth, ne no-thing that may falle un-to a man is so muchel agayns nature, as a man to encressen his owene profit to the harm of another man. And though the grete men and the ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 63

[continues previous] ... lady!' quod they, 'ye han shewed un-to us "the blessinge of swetnesse," after the sawe of David the prophete; for the reconsilinge which we been nat worthy to have in no manere, but we oghte requeren it with greet contricioun and humilitee, ye of your grete goodnesse have presented unto us. Now see we wel that the science and the conninge of Salomon is ful trewe; for he seith: that "swete wordes multiplyen and encresen freendes, and maken shrewes to be debonaire and meke."
11

Parson's Tale: 40

... with milk of losengerie. For sothe, Salomon seith, that 'flaterie is wors than detraccioun.' For som-tyme detraccion maketh an hautein man be the more humble, for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce. Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of him-self be lyk that he nis nat lyk. They been lyk to Iudas that bitraysed [god; and thise flatereres bitraysen] a man to sellen him to his enemy, that is, to the devel. Flatereres been the develes chapelleyns, that singen evere Placebo. I rekene flaterye in the ... [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 566

[continues previous] 'Undo the gate, porter and lat us in goon.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 117

[continues previous] And seyde, 'lat your fadres treson goon
11

Merchant's Tale: 85

Lyk to him-self;' and thanne he made him Eve.
10

Melibee's Tale: 51

[continues previous] ... and by your travaille un-to your profit; and that with-outen wrong or harm-doinge to any other persone. For the lawe seith: that "ther maketh no man himselven riche, if he do harm to another wight;" this is to seyn, that nature defendeth and forbedeth by right, that no man make him-self riche un-to the harm of another persone. And Tullius seith: that "no sorwe ne no drede of deeth, ne no-thing that may falle un-to a man is so muchel agayns nature, as a man to encressen his owene profit to the harm of another man. And though the grete men ...
11

Parson's Tale: 40

[continues previous] ... losengerie. For sothe, Salomon seith, that 'flaterie is wors than detraccioun.' For som-tyme detraccion maketh an hautein man be the more humble, for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce. Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of him-self be lyk that he nis nat lyk. They been lyk to Iudas that bitraysed [god; and thise flatereres bitraysen] a man to sellen him to his enemy, that is, to the devel. Flatereres been the develes chapelleyns, that singen evere Placebo. I rekene flaterye in the vyces of Ire; for ofte tyme, if o ...
13

Merchant's Tale: 86

Heer may ye se, and heer-by may ye preve,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 123

Heer may ye se, thogh we a tyme abyde,
13

Merchant's Tale: 743

Heer may ye se how excellent franchyse
12

Monk's Tale: 249

Lordinges, ensample heer-by may ye take [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 87

That wyf is mannes help and his confort,
12

Monk's Tale: 250

[continues previous] How that in lordshipe is no sikernesse;
11

Merchant's Tale: 89

So buxom and so vertuous is she,
10

Franklin's Tale: 435

Than moste she nedes holden hir biheste, [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 109

That longeth to a mayden vertuous;
10

Physician's Tale: 110

She was so prudent and so bountevous.
10

Shipman's Tale: 328

And telleth hir that chaffare is so dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1662

That she from Troye moste nedes twinne, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 90

They moste nedes live in unitee.
10

Franklin's Tale: 435

[continues previous] Than moste she nedes holden hir biheste,
10

Shipman's Tale: 329

[continues previous] That nedes moste he make a chevisaunce.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1662

[continues previous] That she from Troye moste nedes twinne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1663

[continues previous] In remembraunce of him and of his sorwe;
10

Merchant's Tale: 91

O flesh they been, and o flesh, as I gesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1727

That in his herte he demede, as I gesse, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 92

Hath but on herte, in wele and in distresse.
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 72

And yaf him good forage. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1795

Aftir the herte; in wele and wo,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1727

[continues previous] That in his herte he demede, as I gesse,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 93

A wyf! a! Seinte Marie, benedicite!
10

Friar's Tale: 306

'Twelf pens,' quod she, 'now lady Seinte Marie
13

Merchant's Tale: 655

And seyde, 'Seinte Marie! how may this be, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1174

God bless us and his moder Seinte Marie!
10

Physician's Epilogue: 22

God blesse hem, and our lady seinte Marie!
10

Pardoner's Tale: 357

'By seinte Marie,' seyde this taverner,
15+

Sir Thopas' Tale: 73

[continues previous] 'O seinte Marie, benedicite!
13

Merchant's Tale: 94

How mighte a man han any adversitee
13

Merchant's Tale: 655

[continues previous] And seyde, 'Seinte Marie! how may this be,
11

Merchant's Tale: 95

That hath a wyf? certes, I can nat seye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 10

I can nat seye, but swich a greet corage
10

Merchant's Tale: 730

I can nat seye; but grete god above,
10

Melibee's Tale: 38

Now sir, if men wolde axe me, why that god suffred men to do yow this vileinye, certes, I can nat wel answere as for no sothfastnesse. For thapostle seith, that "the sciences and the Iuggementz of our lord god almighty been ful depe; ther may no man comprehende ne serchen hem suffisantly." Nathelees, by certeyne presumpcions and coniectinges, I holde and bileve that god, which that is ful of Iustice ...
11

Parson's Tale: 37

... Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fyr, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep. I can nat seye but that they doon cursedly and damnably, agayns Crist and al the feith of holy chirche.
10

Legend of Ariadne: 188

And mercy, lady! I can nat elles seye!'
10

Legend of Ariadne: 189

A seemly knight was Theseus to see,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 461

What men wolde of hit deme I can nat seye;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1296

For certes, fresshe wommanliche wyf,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1502

And doth somwhat, as that I shal yow seye, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 96

The blisse which that is bitwixe hem tweye
12

Knight's Tale: 329

Greet was the stryf and long bitwixe hem tweye,
12

Knight's Tale: 330

If that I hadde leyser for to seye;
12

Knight's Tale: 1767

Unhorsed hath ech other of hem tweye. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 801

Ther is no tonge that it telle may. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 977

And swich a blisse is ther bitwix hem two [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 978

That, save the Ioye that lasteth evermo, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 80

... hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente of engendrure of children to the service of god, for certes that is the cause fynal of matrimoine. Another cause is, to yelden everich of hem ... [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 73

Ther is no more, but unto bed they go, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1503

[continues previous] And lat us stele away bitwixe us tweye;
15+

Merchant's Tale: 97

Ther may no tonge telle, or herte thinke.
12

Knight's Tale: 1768

[continues previous] Ther nas no tygre in the vale of Galgopheye,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 801

[continues previous] Ther is no tonge that it telle may.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 977

[continues previous] And swich a blisse is ther bitwix hem two
12

Prioress' Tale: 24

Ther may no tonge expresse in no science;
15+

Monk's Tale: 418

Ther may no tonge telle for pitee;
13

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that for three thinges a man and his wyf fleshly mowen assemble. The firste is in entente of engendrure of children to the service of god, for certes that is the cause fynal of matrimoine. Another cause is, to yelden everich of hem to ...
15+

Parson's Tale: 81

[continues previous] ... chastitee is virginitee, and it bihoveth that she be holy in herte and clene of body; thanne is she spouse to Iesu Crist, and she is the lyf of angeles. She is the preisinge of this world, and she is as thise martirs in egalitee; she hath in hir that tonge may nat telle ne herte thinke. Virginitee baar oure lord Iesu Crist, and virgin was him-selve.
10

Compleynt of Mars: 72

[continues previous] Whan they be met, ther may no tunge telle,
10

Compleynt of Mars: 73

[continues previous] Ther is no more, but unto bed they go,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 445

That tonge telle or herte may recorde,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1321

That tonge telle or herte may devyse,
12

Merchant's Tale: 99

She kepeth his good, and wasteth never a deel;
11

Knight's Tale: 2206

Can he hem thank? nay, God wot, never a deel, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2207

That bothe his soule and eek hem-self offende, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel. [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 88

... man and a parcel to another; that is to understonde, in entente to departe thy confessioun as for shame or drede; for it nis but stranglinge of thy soule. For certes, Iesu Crist is entierly al good; in him nis noon inperfeccioun; and therfore outher he foryeveth al parfitly or never a deel. I seye nat that if thou be assigned to the penitauncer for certein sinne, that thou art bounde to shewen him al the remenaunt of thy sinnes, of whiche thou hast be shriven to thy curat, but-if it lyke to thee of thyn humilitee; this is no departinge of shrifte. ... [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 100

Al that hir housbonde lust, hir lyketh weel;
11

Knight's Tale: 2207

[continues previous] That bothe his soule and eek hem-self offende,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 950

But trusteth weel, hir liste nat to daunce [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 768

He dooth al that his lady lust and lyketh;
11

Melibee's Tale: 14

... wommen, good womman fond I never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

Whanne dame Prudence, ful debonairly and with greet pacience, hadde herd al that hir housbonde lyked for to seye, thanne axed she of him licence for to speke, and seyde in this wyse. 'My lord,' quod she, 'as to your firste resoun, certes it may lightly been answered. For I seye, that it is no folie to chaunge conseil whan the thing is chaunged; or ... [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel.
12

Parson's Tale: 80

Now how that a womman sholde be subget to hir housbonde, that telleth seint Peter. First, in obedience. And eek, as seith the decree, a womman that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no parfit mariage. Thanne shal men understonde that ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 81

... to been a clene widewe, and eschue the embracinges of man, and desyren the embracinge of Iesu Crist. Thise been tho that han been wyves and han forgoon hir housbondes, and eek wommen that han doon lecherie and been releeved by Penitence. And certes, if that a wyf coude kepen hir al chaast by licence of hir housbonde, so that she yeve nevere noon occasion that he agilte, it were to hire a greet merite. Thise manere wommen that observen chastitee moste be clene in herte as well as in body and in thoght, and mesurable in clothinge and in contenaunce; and been abstinent in etinge and drinkinge, ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 88

[continues previous] ... parcel to o man and a parcel to another; that is to understonde, in entente to departe thy confessioun as for shame or drede; for it nis but stranglinge of thy soule. For certes, Iesu Crist is entierly al good; in him nis noon inperfeccioun; and therfore outher he foryeveth al parfitly or never a deel. I seye nat that if thou be assigned to the penitauncer for certein sinne, that thou art bounde to shewen him al the remenaunt of thy sinnes, of whiche thou hast be shriven to thy curat, but-if it lyke to thee of thyn humilitee; this ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 101

She seith not ones 'nay,' whan he seith 'ye.'
10

Man of Law's Tale: 951

[continues previous] Whan that she wiste wherefor was that sonde.
11

Shipman's Tale: 37

And he again, he seith nat ones nay,
11

Melibee's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... but certes, of alle wommen, good womman fond I never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And also, if I ...
12

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be trewe of hir body so sholde an housbonde eek be to his wyf. For sith that al the body is the housbondes, so sholde hir herte been, or elles ther is bitwixe hem two, as in that, no ...
11

Merchant's Tale: 102

'Do this,' seith he; 'al redy, sir,' seith she.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 854

'Al redy, sir,' quod she, 'right as yow lest,
11

Merchant's Tale: 106

That every man that halt him worth a leek,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 572

I holde a mouses herte nat worth a leek,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 573

That hath but oon hole for to sterte to,
11

Franklin's Tale: 817

She thonketh him up-on hir knees al bare, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 107

Up-on his bare knees oghte al his lyf
13

Franklin's Tale: 817

[continues previous] She thonketh him up-on hir knees al bare,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 109

Or elles preye to god him for to sende
15+

Clerk's Tale: 979

And so hope I that he wol to yow sende [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 433

Thus endeth now my tale, and god us sende [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 104

... the sinne. But of the translacion of Boece de Consolacione, and othere bokes of Legendes of seintes, and omelies, and moralitee, and devocioun, that thanke I oure lord Iesu Crist and his blisful moder, and alle the seintes of hevene; bisekinge hem that they from hennes-forth, un-to my lyves ende, sende me grace to biwayle my giltes, and to studie to the salvacioun of my soule: — and graunte me grace of verray penitence, confessioun and satisfaccioun to doon in this present lyf; thurgh the benigne grace of him that is king of kinges and preest over alle preestes, that boghte ... [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5647

Thider he hopith god shal him sende [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 110

A wyf, to laste un-to his lyves ende.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 401

And thus they live, un-to hir lyves ende,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 252

As for my wyf, un-to hir lyves ende. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 777

And with him dwelle un-to my lyves ende.
15+

Clerk's Tale: 979

[continues previous] And so hope I that he wol to yow sende
15+

Clerk's Tale: 980

[continues previous] Plesance y-nogh un-to your lyves ende.
14

Shipman's Tale: 434

[continues previous] Taling y-nough un-to our lyves ende. Amen.
15+

Parson's Tale: 104

[continues previous] ... grete mercy foryeve me the sinne. But of the translacion of Boece de Consolacione, and othere bokes of Legendes of seintes, and omelies, and moralitee, and devocioun, that thanke I oure lord Iesu Crist and his blisful moder, and alle the seintes of hevene; bisekinge hem that they from hennes-forth, un-to my lyves ende, sende me grace to biwayle my giltes, and to studie to the salvacioun of my soule: — and graunte me grace of verray penitence, confessioun and satisfaccioun to doon in this present lyf; thurgh the benigne grace of him that is king of kinges and preest over alle preestes, that boghte us with the ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 8

... ben writen the names of the Twelve Signes, as Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricornus, Aquarius, Pisces; and the nombres of the degrees of tho signes ben writen in augrim above, and with longe devisiouns, fro fyve to fyve; devyded fro tyme that the signe entreth un-to the laste ende. But understond wel, that thise degrees of signes ben everich of hem considered of 60 minutes, and every minute of 60 secondes, and so forth in-to smale fraccions infinit, as seith Alkabucius. And ther-for, know wel, that a degree of the bordure contieneth foure minutes, and a degree of a ...
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 392

For ever-more, un-to my lyves ende! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1554

At which, allas! he caughte his lyves ende. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 111

For thanne his lyf is set in sikernesse;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 252

[continues previous] As for my wyf, un-to hir lyves ende.
11

Parson's Tale: 101

... for to live longe and for to purchacen muche richesse for his delyt, and thanne he wol shryven him; and, as he seith, him semeth thanne tymely y-nough to come to shrifte. Another is, surquidrie that he hath in Cristes mercy. Agayns the firste vyce, he shal thinke, that oure lyf is in no sikernesse; and eek that alle the richesses in this world ben in aventure, and passen as a shadwe on the wal. And, as seith seint Gregorie, that it aperteneth to the grete rightwisnesse of god, that nevere shal the peyne stinte of hem that nevere wolde withdrawen hem fro sinne, hir ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 8

in sikernesse that may nat ben over-comen. Knowest thou me [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 22

drede? And certes, yit wolden they liven in sikernesse, but [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5648

[continues previous] Aftir his wrecchid lyves ende.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 392

[continues previous] For ever-more, un-to my lyves ende!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1554

[continues previous] At which, allas! he caughte his lyves ende.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1555

[continues previous] For which me thinketh every maner wight
11

Merchant's Tale: 112

He may nat be deceyved, as I gesse,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 990

But, as I gesse, Alla was nat so nyce [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 8

[continues previous] in sikernesse that may nat ben over-comen. Knowest thou me
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 23

[continues previous] they may nat; and yit they glorifye hem in hir power. Holdest
11

Legend of Dido: 63

But Phebus suster artow, as I gesse. [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 64

And, if so be that thou be a goddesse, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 113

So that he werke after his wyves reed;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 990

[continues previous] But, as I gesse, Alla was nat so nyce
11

Legend of Dido: 64

[continues previous] And, if so be that thou be a goddesse,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 84

But thou consente and werke after my reed;
11

Merchant's Tale: 115

They been so trewe and ther-with-al so wyse;
10

Melibee's Tale: 21

... trewe freend." For certes, gold ne silver beth nat so muche worth as the gode wil of a trewe freend. And eek he seith, that "a trewe freend is a strong deffense; who-so that it findeth, certes he findeth a greet tresour." Thanne shul ye eek considere, if that your trewe freendes been discrete and wyse. For the book seith: "axe alwey thy conseil of hem that been wyse." And by this same resoun shul ye clepen to your conseil, of your freendes that been of age, swiche as han seyn and been expert in manye thinges, and been approved in conseillinges. For the book seith, ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 50

... noon harm that is doon to him. The philosophre seith, that 'pacience is thilke vertu that suffreth debonairely alle the outrages of adversitee and every wikked word.' This vertu maketh a man lyk to god, and maketh him goddes owene dere child, as seith Crist. This vertu disconfiteth thyn enemy. And therfore seith the wyse man, 'if thou wolt venquisse thyn enemy, lerne to suffre.' And thou shalt understonde, that man suffreth foure manere of grevances in outward thinges, agayns the whiche foure he moot have foure manere of paciences. [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 116

For which, if thou wolt werken as the wyse,
14

Miller's Tale: 340

'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
14

Miller's Tale: 341

'If thou wolt werken after lore and reed;
13

Miller's Tale: 342

Thou mayst nat werken after thyn owene heed.
13

Miller's Tale: 345

And if thou werken wolt by good conseil,
10

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... silver beth nat so muche worth as the gode wil of a trewe freend. And eek he seith, that "a trewe freend is a strong deffense; who-so that it findeth, certes he findeth a greet tresour." Thanne shul ye eek considere, if that your trewe freendes been discrete and wyse. For the book seith: "axe alwey thy conseil of hem that been wyse." And by this same resoun shul ye clepen to your conseil, of your freendes that been of age, swiche as han seyn and been expert in manye thinges, and been approved in conseillinges. For the book seith, that ...
11

Parson's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... is doon to him. The philosophre seith, that 'pacience is thilke vertu that suffreth debonairely alle the outrages of adversitee and every wikked word.' This vertu maketh a man lyk to god, and maketh him goddes owene dere child, as seith Crist. This vertu disconfiteth thyn enemy. And therfore seith the wyse man, 'if thou wolt venquisse thyn enemy, lerne to suffre.' And thou shalt understonde, that man suffreth foure manere of grevances in outward thinges, agayns the whiche foure he moot have foure manere of paciences.
13

Merchant's Tale: 118

Lo, how that Iacob, as thise clerkes rede,
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

... seyd, that "the conseillinge of wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed ... [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 34

For certeinly, as that thise clerkes seyn,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 119

By good conseil of his moder Rebekke,
15+

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... that "the conseillinge of wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the king, that ... [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 120

Bond the kides skin aboute his nekke;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 395

Aboute his nekke under his arm adoun. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 396

The hote somer had maad his hewe al broun; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 459

Forth comth the preest, with stole aboute his nekke, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 605

The slakke skin aboute his nekke shaketh, [continues next]
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the ... [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 121

Thurgh which his fadres benisoun he wan.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 394

[continues previous] A daggere hanging on a laas hadde he
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 395

[continues previous] Aboute his nekke under his arm adoun.
10

Merchant's Tale: 459

[continues previous] Forth comth the preest, with stole aboute his nekke,
14

Merchant's Tale: 605

[continues previous] The slakke skin aboute his nekke shaketh,
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the king, that wolde have ... [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 122

Lo, Iudith, as the storie eek telle can,
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the king, that wolde have slayn him, and ...
11

Merchant's Tale: 123

By wys conseil she goddes peple kepte,
11

Monk's Tale: 628

That noon of al his meynee that him kepte, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 124

And slow him, Olofernus, whyl he slepte.
11

Monk's Tale: 628

[continues previous] That noon of al his meynee that him kepte,
11

Monk's Tale: 629

[continues previous] Whether so he wook or elles slepte,
11

Merchant's Tale: 125

Lo Abigayl, by good conseil how she
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... han seyd, that "the conseillinge of wommen is outher to dere, or elles to litel of prys." But al-be-it so, that ful many a womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 126

Saved hir housbond Nabal, whan that he
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 752

Lucya, likerous, loved hir housbond so, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 753

That, for he sholde alwey up-on hir thinke, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 553

Right so they han him slayn, and that anon. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 554

And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 544

Whan that hir housbond hadde lost his lyf,
12

Merchant's Tale: 127

Sholde han be slayn; and loke, Ester also
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 753

[continues previous] That, for he sholde alwey up-on hir thinke,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 553

[continues previous] Right so they han him slayn, and that anon.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 554

[continues previous] And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon,
11

Parson's Tale: 76

... for it kerveth a-two and breketh a-two hem that first were maked o flesh, and therfore, by the olde lawe of god, they sholde be slayn. But nathelees, by the lawe of Iesu Crist, that is lawe of pitee, whan he seyde to the womman that was founden in avoutrie, and sholde han been slayn with stones, after the wil of the Iewes, as was hir lawe: 'Go,' quod Iesu Crist, 'and have na-more wil to sinne'; or, 'wille na-more to do sinne.' Soothly, the vengeaunce of avoutrie is awarded to the peynes of helle, but-if so be that it be destourbed by penitence. Yet ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 54

Sholde han ben slayn; lo, this was al his care.
12

Merchant's Tale: 128

By good conseil delivered out of wo
10

Man of Law's Tale: 843

And to deliveren out of wrecchednesse [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 844

The peple of god? I seye, for this entente, [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

... womman is badde, and hir conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the king, that wolde have slayn him, and apaysed the ire of the king by hir wit and by hir good conseilling. Hester by hir good conseil enhaunced greetly the peple of god in the regne of Assuerus the king. And the same bountee in good conseilling of many a good womman may men telle. And moreover, whan our lord hadde creat Adam our forme-fader, he seyde in this wyse: "it is nat good to been a man allone; make we to ... [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 129

The peple of god, and made him, Mardochee,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 844

[continues previous] The peple of god? I seye, for this entente,
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... conseil vile and noght worth, yet han men founde ful many a good womman, and ful discrete and wise in conseillinge. Lo, Iacob, by good conseil of his moder Rebekka, wan the benisoun of Ysaak his fader, and the lordshipe over alle his bretheren. Iudith, by hir good conseil, delivered the citee of Bethulie, in which she dwelled, out of the handes of Olofernus, that hadde it biseged and wolde have al destroyed it. Abigail delivered Nabal hir housbonde fro David the king, that wolde have slayn him, and apaysed the ire of the king by hir wit and by hir good conseilling. Hester by hir good conseil enhaunced greetly the peple of god in the regne of Assuerus the king. And the same bountee in good conseilling of many a good womman may men telle. And moreover, whan our lord hadde creat Adam our forme-fader, he seyde in this wyse: "it is nat good to been a man allone; make we to ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 130

Of Assuere enhaunced for to be.
12

Melibee's Tale: 65

... of his body, by a strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 69

... and seyde, 'Certes, sir,' quod she, 'ye han wel and goodly answered. For right as by the conseil, assent, and help of your freendes, ye han been stired to venge yow and maken werre, right so with-outen hir conseil shul ye nat accorden yow, ne have pees with your adversaries. For the lawe seith: "ther nis no-thing so good by wey of kinde, as a thing to been unbounde by him that it was y-bounde."' [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 6

... abhominable than thilke milk whan it is medled with other mete. Right so the sinful man that loveth his sinne, him semeth that it is to him most swete of any-thing; but fro that tyme that he loveth sadly our lord Iesu Crist, and desireth the lif perdurable, ther nis to him no-thing more abhominable. For soothly, the lawe of god is the love of god; for which David the prophete seith: 'I have loved thy lawe and hated wikkednesse and hate'; he that loveth god kepeth his lawe and his word. This tree saugh the prophete Daniel in spirit, up-on the avision of the king ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 126

me wel that over thilke good ther nis no-thing more to ben [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 147

of alle goodes; for with-outen him nis ther no-thing founden [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 29

woldest; or soner than they hem-self wene to lakken mowinge to [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 30

don yvel. For ther nis no-thing so late in so shorte boundes of [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 117

thinge, dressinge hem to goode, disponeth hem alle. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 118

For ther nis no-thing don for cause of yvel; ne thilke thing [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 40

'How shal it thanne be?' quod I. 'Nis ther thanne no-thing [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 131

Ther nis no-thing in gree superlatyf,
11

Summoner's Tale: 309

Whilom ther was an irous potestat, [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.'
12

Melibee's Tale: 69

[continues previous] ... quod she, 'ye han wel and goodly answered. For right as by the conseil, assent, and help of your freendes, ye han been stired to venge yow and maken werre, right so with-outen hir conseil shul ye nat accorden yow, ne have pees with your adversaries. For the lawe seith: "ther nis no-thing so good by wey of kinde, as a thing to been unbounde by him that it was y-bounde."' [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

... do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For Senek seith: "he overcometh in an yvel manere, that repenteth him of his victorie." Wherfore I pray yow, lat mercy been in your minde and in your herte, to theffect and entente that god almighty have mercy on yow in his laste Iugement. For seint Iame seith in his epistle: "Iugement withouten mercy shal be ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 6

[continues previous] ... him more abhominable than thilke milk whan it is medled with other mete. Right so the sinful man that loveth his sinne, him semeth that it is to him most swete of any-thing; but fro that tyme that he loveth sadly our lord Iesu Crist, and desireth the lif perdurable, ther nis to him no-thing more abhominable. For soothly, the lawe of god is the love of god; for which David the prophete seith: 'I have loved thy lawe and hated wikkednesse and hate'; he that loveth god kepeth his lawe and his word. This tree saugh the prophete Daniel in spirit, up-on the avision ...
14

Parson's Tale: 28

... curteisye, and clennesse, and to be liberal, that is to seyn, large by mesure; for thilke that passeth mesure is folye and sinne. Another is, to remembre him of bountee that he of other folk hath receyved. Another is, to be benigne to hise goode subgetis; wherfore, as seith Senek, 'ther is no-thing more covenable to a man of heigh estaat than debonairetee and pitee. And therfore thise flyes that men clepeth bees, whan they maken hir king, they chesen oon that hath no prikke wherwith he may stinge.' Another is, a man to have a noble herte and a diligent, to attayne ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 20

sterre Sirius eschaufeth hem. Ther nis no-thing unbounde from
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 126

[continues previous] me wel that over thilke good ther nis no-thing more to ben
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 147

[continues previous] of alle goodes; for with-outen him nis ther no-thing founden
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 30

[continues previous] don yvel. For ther nis no-thing so late in so shorte boundes of
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 118

[continues previous] For ther nis no-thing don for cause of yvel; ne thilke thing
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 40

[continues previous] 'How shal it thanne be?' quod I. 'Nis ther thanne no-thing
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 14

to seyn, fro tyme passed in-to tyme cominge; ne ther nis no-thing
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 15

establisshed in tyme that may enbracen to-gider al the space of
14

Merchant's Tale: 132

As seith Senek, above an humble wyf.
12

Summoner's Tale: 309

[continues previous] Whilom ther was an irous potestat,
12

Summoner's Tale: 310

[continues previous] As seith Senek, that, duringe his estaat,
10

Melibee's Tale: 18

... him-self, he weneth alwey that he may do thing that he may nat do. And secoundely, he that is irous and wroth, he ne may nat wel deme; and he that may nat wel deme, may nat wel conseille. The thridde is this; that "he that is irous and wrooth," as seith Senek, "ne may nat speke but he blame thinges;" and with his viciouse wordes he stireth other folk to angre and to ire. And eek sir, ye moste dryve coveitise out of your herte. For the apostle seith, that "coveitise is rote of alle harmes." And trust wel that a coveitous ...
12

Melibee's Tale: 69

[continues previous] ... sir,' quod she, 'ye han wel and goodly answered. For right as by the conseil, assent, and help of your freendes, ye han been stired to venge yow and maken werre, right so with-outen hir conseil shul ye nat accorden yow, ne have pees with your adversaries. For the lawe seith: "ther nis no-thing so good by wey of kinde, as a thing to been unbounde by him that it was y-bounde."'
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

[continues previous] ... wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For Senek seith: "he overcometh in an yvel manere, that repenteth him of his victorie." Wherfore I pray yow, lat mercy been in your minde and in your herte, to theffect and entente that god almighty have mercy on yow in his laste Iugement. For seint Iame seith in his epistle: "Iugement withouten mercy shal be doon ...
14

Parson's Tale: 28

[continues previous] ... and usinge vertu, curteisye, and clennesse, and to be liberal, that is to seyn, large by mesure; for thilke that passeth mesure is folye and sinne. Another is, to remembre him of bountee that he of other folk hath receyved. Another is, to be benigne to hise goode subgetis; wherfore, as seith Senek, 'ther is no-thing more covenable to a man of heigh estaat than debonairetee and pitee. And therfore thise flyes that men clepeth bees, whan they maken hir king, they chesen oon that hath no prikke wherwith he may stinge.' Another is, a man to have a noble herte and a ...
10

Merchant's Tale: 134

She shal comande, and thou shalt suffren it;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 807

But, love a woman that she woot it nought, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 808

And she wol quyte that thou shalt not fele; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 135

And yet she wol obeye of curteisye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 808

[continues previous] And she wol quyte that thou shalt not fele;
11

Merchant's Tale: 137

Wel may the syke man biwaille and wepe,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... also, that shal be ful of thonder-clappes and lightninges.' Now sothly, who-so wel remembreth him of thise thinges, I gesse that his sinne shal nat turne him in-to delyt, but to greet sorwe, for drede of the peyne of helle. And therfore seith Iob to god: 'suffre, lord, that I may a whyle biwaille and wepe, er I go with-oute returning to the derke lond, covered with the derknesse of deeth; to the lond of misese and of derknesse, where-as is the shadwe of deeth; where-as ther is noon ordre or ordinance, but grisly drede that evere shal laste.' Lo, here may ye seen that Iob ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 138

Ther-as ther nis no wyf the hous to kepe.
12

Manciple's Tale: 108

Ther nis no difference, trewely, [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 109

Bitwixe a wyf that is of heigh degree,
11

Manciple's Tale: 229

Is to restreyne and kepe wel thy tonge. — [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 139

I warne thee, if wysly thou wolt wirche,
13

Friar's Tale: 215

But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape,
13

Friar's Tale: 216

Thou wolt algates wite how we ben shape;
11

Manciple's Tale: 107

[continues previous] I am a boistous man, right thus seye I,
11

Manciple's Tale: 228

[continues previous] The firste vertu, sone, if thou wolt lere,
12

Hous of Fame 2: 560

But o thinge I wil warne thee
12

Hous of Fame 2: 561

Of the which thou wolt have wonder.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4777

But if thou wolt wel Love eschewe, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 140

Love wel thy wyf, as Crist loveth his chirche.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 469

The wil of Crist, as doghter of his chirche.
14

Parson's Tale: 79

... nat been holden to lowe; for she can nat paciently suffre: but god made womman of the rib of Adam, for womman sholde be felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4777

[continues previous] But if thou wolt wel Love eschewe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 145

Housbond and wyf, what so men Iape or pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 88

Whyl that hir housbond was at Oseneye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 233

Til we be deed, or elles that we pleye [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 234

A pilgrimage, or goon out of the weye. [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 4

Ther gan our hoste for to Iape and pleye,
10

Manciple's Prologue: 5

And seyde, 'sirs, what! Dun is in the myre!
10

Merchant's Tale: 146

Of worldly folk holden the siker weye;
10

Shipman's Tale: 234

[continues previous] A pilgrimage, or goon out of the weye.
12

Merchant's Tale: 147

They been so knit, ther may noon harm bityde;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 913

Ne, pardee, harm may ther be noon ne sinne;
13

Merchant's Tale: 153

And for his freendes on a day he sente,
10

Clerk's Tale: 707

And secrely he to Boloigne it sente. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 366

Agayn his chois, this was his fantasye. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 367

His freendes sente he to at his instaunce, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 368

And preyed hem to doon him that plesaunce, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 364

And to the image of Iupiter hem sente, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 154

To tellen hem theffect of his entente.
10

Knight's Tale: 628

Or winnen Emelye un-to his wyf; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 629

This is theffect and his entente pleyn. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 108

He hath to hem declared his entente, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 706

[continues previous] A lettre in which he sheweth his entente,
10

Clerk's Tale: 707

[continues previous] And secrely he to Boloigne it sente.
13

Merchant's Tale: 367

[continues previous] His freendes sente he to at his instaunce,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 363

[continues previous] Which hem apposed, and knew al hir entente,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 364

[continues previous] And to the image of Iupiter hem sente,
12

Merchant's Tale: 155

With face sad, his tale he hath hem told;
10

Knight's Tale: 628

[continues previous] Or winnen Emelye un-to his wyf;
10

Knight's Tale: 629

[continues previous] This is theffect and his entente pleyn.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 108

[continues previous] He hath to hem declared his entente,
11

Squire's Tale: 168

And whan this knight hath thus his tale told, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 169

He rydeth out of halle, and doun he lighte. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 52

And right anon his tale he hath attamed, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

And thus he seyde un-to us everichon, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 298

And therfore litel tale hath he told
13

Merchant's Tale: 156

He seyde, 'freendes, I am hoor and old,
11

Squire's Tale: 169

[continues previous] He rydeth out of halle, and doun he lighte.
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

[continues previous] And thus he seyde un-to us everichon,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6335

Som-tyme am I hoor and old; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6336

Now am I yong, [and] stout, and bold; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 157

And almost, god wot, on my pittes brinke;
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6336

[continues previous] Now am I yong, [and] stout, and bold;
12

Merchant's Tale: 160

Blessed be god, that it shal been amended!
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 241

And it shal been amended, if I may.' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 242

'Amended?' quod this knight, 'allas! nay, nay! [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 243

It wol nat been amended never mo! [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 467

And it shal been amended, if I may.' [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 248

'Blessed be god, that I shal dye a mayde.
12

Merchant's Tale: 161

For I wol be, certeyn, a wedded man,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 241

[continues previous] And it shal been amended, if I may.'
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 243

[continues previous] It wol nat been amended never mo!
12

Summoner's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And it shal been amended, if I may.'
12

Summoner's Tale: 468

[continues previous] 'I have,' quod he, 'had a despyt this day,
12

Merchant's Tale: 162

And that anoon in al the haste I can,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1586

To him to come in al the haste he may.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1587

He com anoon, nought ones seyde he 'nay,'
12

Merchant's Tale: 163

Un-to som mayde fair and tendre of age.
12

Clerk's Tale: 162

But thogh this mayde tendre were of age,
10

Clerk's Tale: 933

Than is Grisild, and more tendre of age,
10

Clerk's Tale: 934

And fairer fruit bitwene hem sholde falle,
11

Merchant's Tale: 164

I prey yow, shapeth for my mariage
11

Man of Law's Tale: 971

I prey yow al my labour to relesse; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 972

I may nat telle hir wo un-til tomorwe, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 224

I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.' [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde;
11

Miller's Prologue: 24

'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I; [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 25

For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.' [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 971

[continues previous] I prey yow al my labour to relesse;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1035

Ioye of this world, for tyme wol nat abyde; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

But yet to be right mery wol I fonde. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And sin that ye han herd al myn entente,
10

Squire's Tale: 72

Ther nis no man that may reporten al. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 73

I wol nat tarien yow, for it is pryme, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.' [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 118

Because I wol nat beggen ydelly. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 119

I wol non of the apostles counterfete; [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 435

Under a tree, and ther he wol abyde; [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 436

Nat for your boost he wol him no-thing hyde. [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 273

For-thy hir wit to serven wol I fonde' — [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 166

And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
11

Miller's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] 'By goddes soul,' quod he, 'that wol nat I;
11

Miller's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] For I wol speke, or elles go my wey.'
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1035

[continues previous] Ioye of this world, for tyme wol nat abyde;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

[continues previous] But yet to be right mery wol I fonde.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

[continues previous] Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde.
10

Squire's Tale: 73

[continues previous] I wol nat tarien yow, for it is pryme,
10

Franklin's Tale: 842

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 118

[continues previous] Because I wol nat beggen ydelly.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 119

[continues previous] I wol non of the apostles counterfete;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 435

[continues previous] Under a tree, and ther he wol abyde;
13

Pardoner's Tale: 436

[continues previous] Nat for your boost he wol him no-thing hyde.
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose.
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 273

[continues previous] For-thy hir wit to serven wol I fonde'[continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 167

To whom I may be wedded hastily.
10

Merchant's Tale: 450

As hastily as ever that she mighte, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 451

Shal wedded be un-to this Ianuarie. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 273

[continues previous] For-thy hir wit to serven wol I fonde' —
10

Merchant's Tale: 168

But for-as-muche as ye ben mo than I,
10

Merchant's Tale: 450

[continues previous] As hastily as ever that she mighte,
14

Merchant's Tale: 171

But o thing warne I yow, my freendes dere,
13

Friar's Tale: 215

But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 748

And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 749

My newe wyf is coming by the weye. [continues next]
14

Clerk's Tale: 981

O thing biseke I yow and warne also, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 187

Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause, [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 49

Good men and wommen, o thing warne I yow,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 801

'By our lady,' quod this chanoun, 'it is dere, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2009

And first of o thing warne I thee,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 172

I wol non old wyf han in no manere.
11

Friar's Tale: 215

[continues previous] But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape,
10

Clerk's Tale: 748

[continues previous] And treweliche thus muche I wol yow seye,
10

Clerk's Tale: 749

[continues previous] My newe wyf is coming by the weye.
11

Clerk's Tale: 981

[continues previous] O thing biseke I yow and warne also,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 187

[continues previous] Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 188

[continues previous] I wol non old wyf han right for this cause.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

[continues previous] I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 8

in no manere, that she were of oure elde. The stature of hir was [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 46

han nede of non help fro with-oute? For elles, yif he hadde [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 173

She shal nat passe twenty yeer, certayn;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 7

[continues previous] so that she was ful of so greet age, that men ne wolde nat trowen,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 8

[continues previous] in no manere, that she were of oure elde. The stature of hir was
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 45

[continues previous] 'And that, to governe this world,' quod she, 'ne shal he never
11

Legend of Ariadne: 190

And yong, but of a twenty yeer and three; [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 78

Yong was this quene, of twenty yeer of elde, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 174

Old fish and yong flesh wolde I have ful fayn.
11

Shipman's Tale: 292

After my might ful fayn wolde I yow plese.'
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 478

And certes, sire, ful fayn wolde I yow plese.
13

Parson's Tale: 104

... in it that lyketh hem, that ther-of they thanken oure lord Iesu Crist, of whom procedeth al wit and al goodnesse. And if ther be any thing that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, ...
11

Hous of Fame 3: 758

I wolde fayn han had a fame, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 190

[continues previous] And yong, but of a twenty yeer and three;
10

Anelida and Arcite: 78

[continues previous] Yong was this quene, of twenty yeer of elde,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3854

Ful fayn he wolde have fled awey, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1102

'Y-wis, so wolde I, and I wiste how, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1103

Ful fayn,' quod she; 'allas! that I was born!' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 551

Yet, sin I may no bet, fayn wolde I kisse [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 175

Bet is,' quod he, 'a pyk than a pikerel;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 775

"Bet is," quod he, "thyn habitacioun
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 778

Bet is," quod he, "hye in the roof abyde
11

Hous of Fame 3: 757

[continues previous] 'By my thrift,' quod he, 'madame,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3854

[continues previous] Ful fayn he wolde have fled awey,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1103

[continues previous] Ful fayn,' quod she; 'allas! that I was born!'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 551

[continues previous] Yet, sin I may no bet, fayn wolde I kisse
11

Merchant's Tale: 177

I wol no womman thritty yeer of age,
11

Monk's Tale: 422

The eldeste scarsly fyf yeer was of age. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 178

It is but bene-straw and greet forage.
11

Monk's Tale: 423

[continues previous] Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee
11

Merchant's Tale: 179

And eek thise olde widwes, god it woot,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 379

Wel worth of dremes ay thise olde wyves,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 380

And treweliche eek augurie of thise foules;
13

Merchant's Tale: 181

So muchel broken harm, whan that hem leste,
12

Manciple's Tale: 98

Of which ther cometh muchel harm and wo.
12

Manciple's Tale: 99

And so bifel, whan Phebus was absent,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1678

In Ioye and seurte Pandarus hem two [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1679

A-bedde broughte, whan hem bothe leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1770

To make hem love, and that hem leste ay rewe [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

And after this, whan that hem bothe leste, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 182

That with hem sholde I never live in reste.
11

Clerk's Tale: 431

To live my lyf with hem in reste and pees;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1678

[continues previous] In Ioye and seurte Pandarus hem two
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1679

[continues previous] A-bedde broughte, whan hem bothe leste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1770

[continues previous] To make hem love, and that hem leste ay rewe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

[continues previous] And after this, whan that hem bothe leste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

[continues previous] They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 187

Wherfore I sey yow pleynly, in a clause,
12

Merchant's Tale: 72

But dredelees, if pleynly speke I shal, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 73

A wyf wol laste, and in thyn hous endure, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 171

But o thing warne I yow, my freendes dere, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 172

I wol non old wyf han in no manere. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

I wol yow teche pleynly the manere, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 505

How I can werken in philosophye. [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 644

And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.' [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 645

'I graunte it you,' quod she; and right anoon [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1002

I sey not therfore that I wol yow love, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1003

Ne I sey not nay, but in conclusioun, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 188

I wol non old wyf han right for this cause.
12

Merchant's Tale: 72

[continues previous] But dredelees, if pleynly speke I shal,
12

Merchant's Tale: 73

[continues previous] A wyf wol laste, and in thyn hous endure,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 172

[continues previous] I wol non old wyf han in no manere.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

[continues previous] I wol yow teche pleynly the manere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 505

[continues previous] How I can werken in philosophye.
10

Parlement of Foules: 644

[continues previous] And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.'
10

Parlement of Foules: 645

[continues previous] 'I graunte it you,' quod she; and right anoon
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1002

[continues previous] I sey not therfore that I wol yow love,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1003

[continues previous] Ne I sey not nay, but in conclusioun,
10

Merchant's Tale: 189

For if so were, I hadde swich mischaunce,
10

Legend of Phyllis: 24

His ship was rent so lowe, in swich manere, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 190

That I in hir ne coude han no plesaunce,
12

Merchant's Tale: 406

How sholde I thanne, that live in swich plesaunce [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 90

That we ne conne in no-thing han plesaunce
10

Manciple's Tale: 91

That souneth in-to vertu any whyle.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 13

hem, thanne ne sholde ther dwellen outrely no doute: the whiche [continues next]
10

Legend of Phyllis: 24

[continues previous] His ship was rent so lowe, in swich manere,
10

Legend of Phyllis: 25

[continues previous] That carpenter ne coude hit nat amende.
12

Merchant's Tale: 191

Thanne sholde I lede my lyf in avoutrye,
12

Merchant's Tale: 406

[continues previous] How sholde I thanne, that live in swich plesaunce
10

Parson's Tale: 15

... companye and communion of holy chirche. And forther-over, it maketh him that whylom was sone of ire to be sone of grace; and alle thise thinges been preved by holy writ. And therfore, he that wolde sette his entente to thise thinges, he were ful wys; for soothly, he ne sholde nat thanne in al his lyf have corage to sinne, but yeven his body and al his herte to the service of Iesu Crist, and ther-of doon him hommage. For soothly, oure swete lord Iesu Crist hath spared us so debonairly in our folies, that if he ne hadde pitee of mannes soule, a sory song ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 13

[continues previous] hem, thanne ne sholde ther dwellen outrely no doute: the whiche
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 174

For his estat; for swich a lusty lyf
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 175

She sholde lede with this lusty knight!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 832

So blisful cause as me, my lyf to lede [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 833

In alle Ioye and seurtee, out of drede. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 192

And go streight to the devel, whan I dye.
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 176

[continues previous] And al this was compassed on the night
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 832

[continues previous] So blisful cause as me, my lyf to lede
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 833

[continues previous] In alle Ioye and seurtee, out of drede.
11

Merchant's Tale: 193

Ne children sholde I none up-on hir geten;
11

Franklin's Tale: 19

Ne sholde up-on him take no maistrye
11

Franklin's Tale: 20

Agayn hir wil, ne kythe hir Ialousye,
13

Merchant's Tale: 194

Yet were me lever houndes had me eten,
13

Shipman's Tale: 182

Yet were me lever that I were unborn [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 183

Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileinye; [continues next]
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 37

For yet me were wel lever for to sterve [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1034

For dredelees, me were lever dye [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

Than she of me ought elles understode [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1491

Yet sholde I bet enduren al my peyne.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 565

And me were lever deed than hir defame, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 195

Than that myn heritage sholde falle
12

Clerk's Tale: 82

And that a straunge successour sholde take [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 83

Your heritage, o! wo were us alyve! [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 182

[continues previous] Yet were me lever that I were unborn
13

Shipman's Tale: 183

[continues previous] Than me were doon a sclaundre or vileinye;
11

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 38

[continues previous] Than in my herte for to make an horde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1035

[continues previous] Than she of me ought elles understode
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1490

[continues previous] Me lever were than thise worldes tweyne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 565

[continues previous] And me were lever deed than hir defame,
12

Merchant's Tale: 196

In straunge hand, and this I tell yow alle.
12

Clerk's Tale: 82

[continues previous] And that a straunge successour sholde take
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... persone to your trewe freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne tak no companye by the weye of a straunge man, but-if so be that thou have knowe him of a lenger tyme. And if so be that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten ...
10

Merchant's Tale: 197

I dote nat, I woot the cause why
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 26

god doth, and the happe of fortune, yif men ne knowe nat the [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 198

Men sholde wedde, and forthermore wot I,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 26

[continues previous] god doth, and the happe of fortune, yif men ne knowe nat the
12

Merchant's Tale: 201

For whiche causes man sholde take a wyf.
12

Merchant's Tale: 27

Than sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir, [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 79

... of Adam, for womman sholde be felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede. [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 210

And ever kepte her chast, as for his wyf; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 202

If he ne may nat liven chast his lyf,
12

Merchant's Tale: 27

[continues previous] Than sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir,
12

Parson's Tale: 79

[continues previous] ... felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede.
10

Parson's Tale: 88

... o synne draweth in another; and eek the lenger that he tarieth, the ferther he is fro Crist. And if he abyde to his laste day, scarsly may he shryven him or remembre him of hise sinnes, or repenten him, for the grevous maladie of his deeth. And for-as-muche as he ne hath nat in his lyf herkned Iesu Crist, whanne he hath spoken, he shal crye to Iesu Crist at his laste day, and scarsly wol he herkne him. And understond that this condicioun moste han foure thinges. Thy shrift moste be purveyed bifore and avysed; for wikked haste doth no profit; and that a man ...
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 210

[continues previous] And ever kepte her chast, as for his wyf;
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 211

[continues previous] Ne never had she Ioye at her herte,
10

Merchant's Tale: 203

Take him a wyf with greet devocioun,
10

Parson's Tale: 90

... for veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. If thou ofte falle, ofte thou aryse by confessioun. And thogh thou shryve thee ofter than ones of sinne, of which thou hast be shriven, it is the more merite. And, as seith seint Augustin, thou shalt have the more lightly relesing and grace of ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 205

Of children, to thonour of god above,
12

Prioress' Tale: 125

And namely ther thonour of god shal sprede, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 206

And nat only for paramour or love;
12

Prioress' Tale: 124

[continues previous] Mordre wol out, certein, it wol nat faille,
12

Prioress' Tale: 125

[continues previous] And namely ther thonour of god shal sprede,
12

Merchant's Tale: 207

And for they sholde lecherye eschue,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 216

Withstond thanne and eschue thou vyces; worshipe and love [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 208

And yelde hir dettes whan that they ben due;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 215

[continues previous] ne with-oute effect, whan they ben rightful.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 216

[continues previous] Withstond thanne and eschue thou vyces; worshipe and love
10

Parlement of Foules: 669

A! lord! the blisse and Ioye that they make! [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4012

Whan they ben faire in hir sesouns. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 209

Or for that ech of hem sholde helpen other
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 429

For ech of hem made other for to winne;
11

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
11

Merchant's Tale: 447

For whan they sawe it moste nedes be,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 375

To live and dyen ech of hem for other,
10

Shipman's Tale: 41

And ech of hem gan other for tassure
10

Shipman's Tale: 42

Of bretherhede, whyl that hir lyf may dure.
11

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 15

is lakkinge to other, they ne han no power to bringen a good that [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 669

[continues previous] A! lord! the blisse and Ioye that they make! [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2883

In siker wyse; ye, every other [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2884

Shal helpen as his owne brother, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 210

In meschief, as a suster shal the brother;
11

Monk's Tale: 287

[continues previous] They lived in Ioye and in felicitee;
11

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 14

[continues previous] they ben dyverse that oon fro that othre; and so as ech of hem
11

Parlement of Foules: 670

[continues previous] For ech of hem gan other in winges take,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2883

[continues previous] In siker wyse; ye, every other
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2884

[continues previous] Shal helpen as his owne brother,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2885

[continues previous] In trouthe withoute doublenesse,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 212

But sires, by your leve, that am nat I.
11

Reeve's Prologue: 61

Peraventure in scorn, for I am oon. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Prologue: 62

And, by your leve, I shal him quyte anoon; [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 112

And lordinges, by your leve, that am nat I.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 113

I wol bistowe the flour of al myn age
12

Franklin's Tale: 848

And seyde, 'maister, I dar wel make avaunt, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 849

I failled never of my trouthe as yit; [continues next]
15+

Melibee's Tale: 15

... and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and hele thinges that men oghte secreely to hyde. And soothly, as to your fifthe resoun, wher-as ye seyn, that "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" god woot, thilke ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 213

For god be thanked, I dar make avaunt,
11

Reeve's Prologue: 61

[continues previous] Peraventure in scorn, for I am oon.
14

Franklin's Tale: 848

[continues previous] And seyde, 'maister, I dar wel make avaunt, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 849

[continues previous] I failled never of my trouthe as yit; [continues next]
15+

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and hele thinges that men oghte secreely to hyde. And soothly, as to your fifthe resoun, wher-as ye seyn, that "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" god woot, thilke resoun ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

[continues previous] And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1609

[continues previous] That thanked be the heighe worthinesse [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 214

I fele my limes stark and suffisaunt
14

Franklin's Tale: 848

[continues previous] And seyde, 'maister, I dar wel make avaunt,
14

Franklin's Tale: 849

[continues previous] I failled never of my trouthe as yit;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

[continues previous] And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 217

Though I be hoor, I fare as dooth a tree
11

Reeve's Prologue: 17

But-if I fare as dooth an open-ers; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 218

That blosmeth er that fruyt y-woxen be;
11

Reeve's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] That ilke fruit is ever leng the wers,
13

Merchant's Tale: 220

I fele me nowher hoor but on myn heed;
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1784

But in myn herte the heed was left, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 221

Myn herte and alle my limes been as grene
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1784

[continues previous] But in myn herte the heed was left,
12

Merchant's Tale: 222

As laurer thurgh the yeer is for to sene.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7094

Nis non of hem, that good prophete is;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7095

For they, thurgh wikked entencioun,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7096

The yeer of the incarnacioun
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 872

For, sin ye make this ensample of me, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 808

That for the beste it was accorded thus, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 223

And sin that ye han herd al myn entente,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 746

Al have I nat set folk in hir degree [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 515

As heer-biforn that ye han herd devyse.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 971

I prey yow al my labour to relesse; [continues next]
13

Summoner's Prologue: 5

I yow biseke that, of your curteisye,
13

Summoner's Prologue: 6

Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye,
10

Summoner's Tale: 114

To sprede his word is set al myn entente.'
12

Clerk's Tale: 805

That I yow yaf myn herte in hool entente. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 917

To love yow best with al my trewe entente.' [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 277

'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 278

Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 737

And told him al as ye han herd bifore;
11

Franklin's Tale: 770

And whan that ye han herd the tale, demeth. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd;
11

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd,
12

Franklin's Tale: 865

And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore;
12

Physician's Tale: 229

And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore
12

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
10

Prioress' Tale: 209

As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
10

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 60

... the mannes adversaries, and constreyneth hem to biseken him of pees and of grace." And I prey yow, lat me speke with your adversaries in privee place; for they shul nat knowe that it be of your wil or your assent. And thanne, whan I knowe hir wil and hir entente, I may conseille yow the more seurly.' [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 90

Now han ye lost myn herte and al my love;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 445

To sclaundre yow is no-thing myn entente, [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 19

Almost fulfild is al myn ordinaunce; [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 104

... that displese hem, I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, of my translacions and endytinges of worldly vanitees, the whiche I revoke in my retracciouns: as is the book of Troilus; ... [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 1042

Aboute, and dide al myn entente
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 139

This song to herkne I dide al myn entente, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 332

And for to han with yow som daliaunce. [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 15

Yet sang this foul — 'I rede yow al a-wake, [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 16

And ye, that han not chosen in humble wyse, [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 644

And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 580

And sin ye woot that myn entente is clene,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 828

Ben humble subgit, trewe in myn entente, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 966

As ye han herd bifore, al he him tolde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1547

That ye han herd Pandare er this devyse.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 111

But sin that ye han herd me som-what seye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 553

Ye han wel herd the fyn of his entente.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 871

[continues previous] 'Now by my thrift,' quod he, 'that shal be sene;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 872

[continues previous] For, sin ye make this ensample of me,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

[continues previous] Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 808

[continues previous] That for the beste it was accorded thus,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 150

I wolde of this yow telle al myn entente; [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 224

I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.'
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 745

[continues previous] Also I prey yow to foryeve it me,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 971

[continues previous] I prey yow al my labour to relesse;
12

Man of Law's Tale: 972

[continues previous] I may nat telle hir wo un-til tomorwe,
10

Clerk's Tale: 94

Wherfor of my free wil I wol assente
10

Clerk's Tale: 95

To wedde me, as sone as ever I may.
10

Clerk's Tale: 117

Ther as myn herte is set, ther wol I wyve;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 118

And but ye wole assente in swich manere,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 119

I prey yow, speketh na-more of this matere.'
12

Clerk's Tale: 805

[continues previous] That I yow yaf myn herte in hool entente.
12

Clerk's Tale: 806

[continues previous] My lord, ye woot that, in my fadres place,
11

Clerk's Tale: 917

[continues previous] To love yow best with al my trewe entente.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 164

[continues previous] I prey yow, shapeth for my mariage
11

Merchant's Tale: 277

[continues previous] 'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 769

[continues previous] She may have bettre fortune than yow semeth;
10

Melibee's Prologue: 42

[continues previous] As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 60

[continues previous] ... the hertes of the mannes adversaries, and constreyneth hem to biseken him of pees and of grace." And I prey yow, lat me speke with your adversaries in privee place; for they shul nat knowe that it be of your wil or your assent. And thanne, whan I knowe hir wil and hir entente, I may conseille yow the more seurly.'
14

Melibee's Tale: 77

... that in this necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For Senek seith: "he overcometh ...
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 445

[continues previous] To sclaundre yow is no-thing myn entente,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 446

[continues previous] But to correcten that is mis I mente.
11

Parson's Prologue: 20

[continues previous] I prey to god, so yeve him right good chaunce,
11

Parson's Tale: 104

[continues previous] ... I preye hem also that they arrette it to the defaute of myn unconninge, and nat to my wil, that wolde ful fayn have seyd bettre if I hadde had conninge. For oure boke seith, 'al that is writen is writen for oure doctrine'; and that is myn entente. Wherfore I biseke yow mekely for the mercy of god, that ye preye for me, that Crist have mercy on me and foryeve me my giltes: — and namely, of my translacions and endytinges of worldly vanitees, the whiche I revoke in my retracciouns: as is the book of Troilus; The book also of ...
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 139

[continues previous] This song to herkne I dide al myn entente,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 140

[continues previous] For-why I mette I wiste what they mente.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 332

[continues previous] And for to han with yow som daliaunce.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 333

[continues previous] Envye (I prey to god yeve hir mischaunce!)
10

Compleynt of Mars: 15

[continues previous] Yet sang this foul — 'I rede yow al a-wake,
12

Parlement of Foules: 643

[continues previous] And therfor graunteth me my firste bone,
12

Parlement of Foules: 644

[continues previous] And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.'
11

Parlement of Foules: 645

[continues previous] 'I graunte it you,' quod she; and right anoon
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 829

[continues previous] As I best can, to yow, lord, yeve ich al
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1630

It were good, if that ye wolde assente, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 110

[continues previous] If with my deeth your herte I may apese.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 632

[continues previous] Yow any-thing, than prey I yow,' quod he,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

[continues previous] 'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

[continues previous] 'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1372

And herkeneth how, if that ye wole assente. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1526

This is the beste, if that ye wole assente.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 150

[continues previous] I wolde of this yow telle al myn entente;
13

Merchant's Tale: 225

Diverse men diversely him tolde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1631

[continues previous] She tolde hir-self him al this, er she wente.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1373

[continues previous] Lo, Troilus, men seyn that hard it is
11

Merchant's Tale: 226

Of mariage manye ensamples olde.
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence more for drede than for love, as it happeth ofte. Ther comen also ful many subtile flatereres, and wyse advocats lerned in the lawe. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 227

Somme blamed it, somme preysed it, certeyn;
10

Squire's Tale: 576

But fynally, thus atte laste it stood, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

[continues previous] Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence more for drede than for love, as it happeth ofte. Ther comen also ful many subtile flatereres, and wyse advocats lerned in ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1096

Beth nought agast;' but certeyn, at the laste, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 228

But atte laste, shortly for to seyn,
10

Knight's Tale: 483

For shortly for to seyn, this Palamoun
10

Knight's Tale: 1407

But atte laste the statue of Venus shook,
10

Reeve's Tale: 277

And shortly for to seyn, they were at on;
10

Cook's Tale: 39

But atte laste his maister him bithoghte,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

But atte laste, with muchel care and wo,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
11

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he. [continues next]
11

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 491

But atte laste speken she bigan,
10

Clerk's Tale: 971

But atte laste, whan that thise lordes wende
11

Merchant's Tale: 709

She rente it al to cloutes atte laste, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 837

But atte laste, after a monthe or tweye,
10

Squire's Tale: 576

[continues previous] But fynally, thus atte laste it stood,
11

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
12

Melibee's Tale: 29

... hadde been necessarie mo conseillours, and more deliberacioun to parfourne your emprise. Ye han erred also, for ye han nat examined your conseil in the forseyde manere, ne in due manere as the caas requireth. Ye han erred also, for ye han maked no divisioun bitwixe your conseillours; this is to seyn, bitwixen your trewe freendes and your feyned conseillours; ne ye han nat knowe the wil of your trewe freendes olde and wyse; but ye han cast alle hir wordes in an hochepot, and enclyned your herte to the more part and to the gretter nombre; and ther been ye condescended. ...
10

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
12

Monk's Tale: 280

To no man deigned hir for to be bonde.
12

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
11

Second Nun's Tale: 359

How many wondres Iesus for hem wroghte;
11

Second Nun's Tale: 360

But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 664

The chambre-dore, shortly for to seyn,
10

Parson's Tale: 30

... the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the ...
10

Hous of Fame 3: 636

But atte laste hit was on-lofte.
10

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
10

Legend of Philomela: 127

And, shortly for to seyn, she hath her fille
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1194

So atte laste, soth to seyn,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1221

'So atte laste, sooth to seyn,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1096

[continues previous] Beth nought agast;' but certeyn, at the laste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1097

[continues previous] For this or that, he in-to bedde him caste,
12

Merchant's Tale: 229

As al day falleth altercacioun
11

Friar's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
11

Merchant's Tale: 709

[continues previous] She rente it al to cloutes atte laste,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 417

That in scole is gret altercacioun [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 230

Bitwixen freendes in disputisoun,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 254

Noon of his bretheren cam ther in his haunt;] [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 29

... necessarie mo conseillours, and more deliberacioun to parfourne your emprise. Ye han erred also, for ye han nat examined your conseil in the forseyde manere, ne in due manere as the caas requireth. Ye han erred also, for ye han maked no divisioun bitwixe your conseillours; this is to seyn, bitwixen your trewe freendes and your feyned conseillours; ne ye han nat knowe the wil of your trewe freendes olde and wyse; but ye han cast alle hir wordes in an hochepot, and enclyned your herte to the more part and to the gretter nombre; and ther been ye condescended. And sith ye wot ...
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 418

[continues previous] In this matere, and greet disputisoun,
13

Merchant's Tale: 231

Ther fil a stryf bitwixe his bretheren two,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 254

[continues previous] Noon of his bretheren cam ther in his haunt;]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 255

[continues previous] For thogh a widwe hadde noght a sho,
12

Knight's Tale: 155

Of whiche two, Arcita hight that oon, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 21

... a violence that it drencheth the ship. And the same harm doth som-tyme the smale dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace in-to the thurrok, and in-to the botme of the ship, if men be so necligent that they ne descharge hem nat by tyme. And therfore, al-thogh ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchinge, algates the ship is dreynt. Right so fareth it somtyme of deedly sinne, and of anoyouse veniale sinnes, whan they multiplye in a man so greetly, that thilke worldly thinges that he loveth, thurgh whiche he sinneth venially, is as greet in his herte as the love ... [continues next]
13

Legend of Hypermnestra: 1

In Grece whylom weren brethren two, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 232

Of whiche that oon was cleped Placebo,
12

Knight's Tale: 155

[continues previous] Of whiche two, Arcita hight that oon,
12

Knight's Tale: 156

[continues previous] And that other knight hight Palamon.
10

Parson's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... the same harm doth som-tyme the smale dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace in-to the thurrok, and in-to the botme of the ship, if men be so necligent that they ne descharge hem nat by tyme. And therfore, al-thogh ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchinge, algates the ship is dreynt. Right so fareth it somtyme of deedly sinne, and of anoyouse veniale sinnes, whan they multiplye in a man so greetly, that thilke worldly thinges that he loveth, thurgh whiche he sinneth venially, is as greet in his herte as the love of god, ...
13

Legend of Hypermnestra: 2

[continues previous] Of whiche that oon was called Danao, [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypermnestra: 3

That many a sone hath of his body wonne, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 233

Iustinus soothly called was that other.
13

Legend of Hypermnestra: 2

[continues previous] Of whiche that oon was called Danao,
11

Merchant's Tale: 235

Ful litel nede had ye, my lord so dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 45

Yet for as muche as ye, my lord so dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 265

I wol no-thing; ye be my lord so dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1431

Quod Pandarus, 'if ye, my lord so dere,
10

Merchant's Tale: 236

Conseil to axe of any that is here;
10

Miller's Tale: 108

'Myn housbond is so ful of Ialousye, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 237

But that ye been so ful of sapience,
10

Miller's Tale: 108

[continues previous] 'Myn housbond is so ful of Ialousye,
10

Miller's Tale: 109

[continues previous] That but ye wayte wel and been privee,
12

Merchant's Tale: 238

That yow ne lyketh, for your heighe prudence,
10

Melibee's Tale: 42

... so muchel shul ye the lasse truste in hir and in hir wit. For Senek seith: "what man that is norissed by fortune, she maketh him a greet fool." Now thanne, sin ye desyre and axe vengeance, and the vengeance that is doon after the lawe and bifore the Iuge ne lyketh yow nat, and the vengeance that is doon in hope of fortune is perilous and uncertein, thanne have ye noon other remedie but for to have your recours unto the sovereyn Iuge that vengeth alle vileinyes and wronges; and he shal venge yow after that him-self witnesseth, wher-as he seith: "leveth ...
12

Melibee's Tale: 48

'A!' quod dame Prudence, 'ye seyn your wil and as yow lyketh; but in no caas of the world a man sholde nat doon outrage ne excesse for to vengen him. For Cassidore seith: that "as yvel doth he that vengeth him by outrage, as he that doth the outrage." And therfore ye shul venge yow after the ordre of right, that ...
15+

Merchant's Tale: 240

This word seyde he un-to us everichon:
15+

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

And thus he seyde un-to us everichon, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 54

This swete preest, this goodly man, sir Iohn. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 241

"Wirk alle thing by conseil," thus seyde he,
11

Melibee's Tale: 7

... troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."' [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden him reverence ... [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 16

... he seith, that "wordes that been spoken discreetly by ordinaunce, been honycombes; for they yeven swetnesse to the soule, and hoolsomnesse to the body." And wyf, by-cause of thy swete wordes, and eek for I have assayed and preved thy grete sapience and thy grete trouthe, I wol governe me by thy conseil in alle thing.'
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

[continues previous] And thus he seyde un-to us everichon,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 160

Thanne seyde she thus: 'O my nory,' quod she, 'I have [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 37

Thanne seyde she: 'sin thou felest thus thise thinges,' quod [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 138

Thanne seyde she thus: 'I ne scorne thee nat, ne pleye, ne [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 71

Thanne seyde he thus, 'lo! lordes myne, I was [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1191

Thanne seyde he thus, fulfild of heigh desdayn, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 242

"And thanne shaltow nat repente thee."
11

Melibee's Tale: 7

[continues previous] ... with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."'
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

[continues previous] Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 160

[continues previous] Thanne seyde she thus: 'O my nory,' quod she, 'I have
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 37

[continues previous] Thanne seyde she: 'sin thou felest thus thise thinges,' quod
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 138

[continues previous] Thanne seyde she thus: 'I ne scorne thee nat, ne pleye, ne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 71

[continues previous] Thanne seyde he thus, 'lo! lordes myne, I was
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1191

[continues previous] Thanne seyde he thus, fulfild of heigh desdayn,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 243

But though that Salomon spak swich a word,
15+

Friar's Tale: 270

The carl spak oo thing, but he thoghte another. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 88

To that I never erst thoghte streyne me. [continues next]
12

Physician's Epilogue: 16

This is a pitous tale for to here. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 52

Now herkeneth with a gode entencioun, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1748

Spak swich a word; thus loked he, and he; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1311

That day by day, myn owene herte dere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1451

Tho sleightes yet that I have herd yow stere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 217

And to him-self right thus he spak, and seyde: — [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1402

I woot that, whan ye next up-on me see, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 244

Myn owene dere brother and my lord,
13

Knight's Tale: 1005

And God so wisly on my soule rewe, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 963

So wisly on my soule as have mercy, [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 39

Ne spareth nat, myn owene maister dere.'
15+

Friar's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Heer may ye see, myn owene dere brother,
11

Friar's Tale: 328

'Now Mabely, myn owene moder dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 87

[continues previous] 'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 765

The heighe god take I for my witnesse, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 766

And also wisly he my soule glade — [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 825

Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 931

So wisly god my soule bringe in blisse, [continues next]
12

Physician's Epilogue: 15

[continues previous] But trewely, myn owene mayster dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 196

'Now, trewely, myn owene lady dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 279

And fare-now wel, myn owene cosin dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 363

Grete wel our dame, myn owene nece swete,
11

Shipman's Tale: 364

And fare-wel, dere cosin, til we mete!'
11

Shipman's Tale: 425

Forgive it me, myn owene spouse dere;
11

Shipman's Tale: 426

Turne hiderward and maketh bettre chere.'
11

Melibee's Prologue: 4

That, also wisly god my soule blesse, [continues next]
14

Second Nun's Tale: 321

This lyf to lese, myn owene dere brother,
14

Manciple's Tale: 117

And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother, [continues next]
11

Amorous Compleint: 72

Were me, as wisly god my soule save! [continues next]
13

Anelida and Arcite: 287

For god so wisly on my soule rewe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 51

[continues previous] As though I were hir owene brother dere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 870

As I have seyd, wol love, un-to my laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

My dere herte, and al myn owene knight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1747

[continues previous] Than dar ye nought, and why? for she, and she
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1748

[continues previous] Spak swich a word; thus loked he, and he;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 239

'Myn alderlevest lord, and brother dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 240

God woot, and thou, that it sat me so sore,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 926

My sowle bringe, as me is for him wo! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1500

That, though I wolde it turne out of my thought, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1501

As wisly verray god my soule save, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 405

For-thy be glad, myn owene dere brother,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1311

[continues previous] That day by day, myn owene herte dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1364

For which, as wisly god my soule rede, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1450

[continues previous] For trewely, myn owene lady dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 217

[continues previous] And to him-self right thus he spak, and seyde: —
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 218

[continues previous] 'Wher is myn owene lady lief and dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 307

My swerd, myn helm, and, leve brother dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 308

My sheld to Pallas yef, that shyneth clere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 467

Wel-come, y-wis, myn owene lady dere.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 521

And to Pandare, his owene brother dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1401

[continues previous] Y-wis, myn owene dere herte trewe,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 245

So wisly god my soule bringe at reste,
14

Knight's Tale: 1005

[continues previous] And God so wisly on my soule rewe, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 963

[continues previous] So wisly on my soule as have mercy,
11

Clerk's Prologue: 30

I prey to god so yeve his soule reste! [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 765

[continues previous] The heighe god take I for my witnesse,
11

Clerk's Tale: 766

[continues previous] And also wisly he my soule glade —
13

Clerk's Tale: 825

[continues previous] Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 930

[continues previous] This shal be doon to-morwe er sonne reste.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 931

[continues previous] So wisly god my soule bringe in blisse,
12

Melibee's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] That, also wisly god my soule blesse,
11

Manciple's Tale: 117

[continues previous] And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother,
11

A. B. C.: 147

To you my soule penitent I bringe. [continues next]
12

Amorous Compleint: 72

[continues previous] Were me, as wisly god my soule save!
14

Anelida and Arcite: 287

[continues previous] For god so wisly on my soule rewe,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 925

[continues previous] Cryseyde answerde, 'as wisly god at reste
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 926

[continues previous] My sowle bringe, as me is for him wo!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 966

Ther god your hertes bringe sone at reste!' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1500

[continues previous] That, though I wolde it turne out of my thought,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1501

[continues previous] As wisly verray god my soule save,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1517

As fayn wolde I as ye, it were so,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1518

As wisly god myn herte bringe at reste!'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1599

Thou hast in hevene y-brought my soule at reste
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1364

[continues previous] For which, as wisly god my soule rede, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1444

And, god! so wisly thou me, woful wrecche,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1445

To reste bringe out of this cruel sorwe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1637

I may you seen, that ye may bringe at reste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

Myn herte, which that is at point to breste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 522

[continues previous] 'For love of god,' ful pitously he seyde,
13

Merchant's Tale: 246

I hold your owene conseil is the beste.
13

Knight's Tale: 1006

[continues previous] As I shal even Iuge been and trewe.
11

Clerk's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] I prey to god so yeve his soule reste!
11

A. B. C.: 147

[continues previous] To you my soule penitent I bringe.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 966

[continues previous] Ther god your hertes bringe sone at reste!'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 967

[continues previous] Can I not seyn, for she bad him not ryse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1365

[continues previous] I can not seen wher-of ye sholden drede.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

[continues previous] Myn herte, which that is at point to breste.
11

Merchant's Tale: 248

I have now been a court-man al my lyf.
11

Knight's Tale: 1446

Chaste goddesse, wel wostow that I
11

Knight's Tale: 1447

Desire to been a mayden al my lyf,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1481

And of my lyf, god woot, how that shal be, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 249

And god it woot, though I unworthy be,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1481

[continues previous] And of my lyf, god woot, how that shal be,
10

Merchant's Tale: 250

I have stonden in ful greet degree
10

Monk's Prologue: 87

Of him that stood in greet prosperitee [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 88

And is y-fallen out of heigh degree [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 251

Abouten lordes of ful heigh estaat;
12

Clerk's Tale: 867

Ne of hir heigh estaat no remembraunce [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 88

[continues previous] And is y-fallen out of heigh degree
11

Monk's Tale: 708

That ever hadde of his hye estaat envye, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 709

Ful prively hath maad conspiracye [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 252

Yet hadde I never with noon of hem debaat.
11

Clerk's Tale: 867

[continues previous] Ne of hir heigh estaat no remembraunce
12

Clerk's Tale: 868

[continues previous] Ne hadde she, as by hir countenaunce.
11

Monk's Tale: 708

[continues previous] That ever hadde of his hye estaat envye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 175

Nil noon of hem, as I shal, til I sterve.' [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 253

I never hem contraried, trewely;
10

Franklin's Tale: 273

For wel I woot that it shal never bityde. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 335

For they ben venimous, I woot it wel; [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 336

I hem defye, I love hem never a del. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 174

[continues previous] So lowly ne so trewely you serve
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 175

[continues previous] Nil noon of hem, as I shal, til I sterve.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 254

I woot wel that my lord can more than I.
10

Franklin's Tale: 273

[continues previous] For wel I woot that it shal never bityde.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 335

[continues previous] For they ben venimous, I woot it wel;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 336

[continues previous] I hem defye, I love hem never a del.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 447

For ought I wot, no more than was he; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 448

That can I deme of possibilitee. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 255

What that he seith, I holde it ferme and stable;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 607

Al your plesaunce ferme and stable I holde; [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 608

For wiste I that my deeth wolde do yow ese, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1500

Therefor god held it ferme and stable:
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5226

But-if he be so ferme and stable,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5227

That fortune chaunge him not, ne blinde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 447

[continues previous] For ought I wot, no more than was he;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 448

[continues previous] That can I deme of possibilitee.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 256

I seye the same, or elles thing semblable.
15+

Clerk's Tale: 607

[continues previous] Al your plesaunce ferme and stable I holde;
15+

Clerk's Tale: 608

[continues previous] For wiste I that my deeth wolde do yow ese,
10

Franklin's Tale: 727

The same thing I seye of Bilia, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 257

A ful gret fool is any conseillour,
10

Franklin's Tale: 726

[continues previous] To alle wyves may a mirour be.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1171

A ful gret fool is he, y-wis, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 258

That serveth any lord of heigh honour,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1172

[continues previous] That bothe riche and nigard is.
13

Merchant's Tale: 261

Nay, lordes been no foles, by my fay;
10

Clerk's Tale: 45

Yet for as muche as ye, my lord so dere, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 746

Ye shul your trouthe holden, by my fay! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1001

It sholde be your-selven, by my trouthe! [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 262

Ye han your-selven shewed heer to-day
10

Clerk's Tale: 45

[continues previous] Yet for as muche as ye, my lord so dere, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 46

[continues previous] Han alwey shewed me favour and grace, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 242

Of which right now ye han your-selven herd.
13

Franklin's Tale: 745

[continues previous] It may be wel, paraventure, yet to-day.
13

Franklin's Tale: 746

[continues previous] Ye shul your trouthe holden, by my fay!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1000

[continues previous] If that I sholde of any Greek han routhe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1001

[continues previous] It sholde be your-selven, by my trouthe!
11

Merchant's Tale: 263

So heigh sentence, so holily and weel,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 537

And to my nece, which that I loved weel, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 539

And so I dide ful often, god it woot, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 45

[continues previous] Yet for as muche as ye, my lord so dere,
11

Merchant's Tale: 264

That I consente and conferme every-deel
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 538

[continues previous] I wolde han told his conseil every-deel.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 539

[continues previous] And so I dide ful often, god it woot,
12

Merchant's Tale: 265

Your wordes alle, and your opinioun.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 194

by adversitees; and of alle thinges ther nis no doute, that [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 266

By god, ther nis no man in al this toun
11

Man of Law's Tale: 212

Was ther no philosophre in al thy toun?
11

Man of Law's Tale: 213

Is no tyme bet than other in swich cas?
12

Squire's Tale: 72

Ther nis no man that may reporten al.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 334

Ne seydestow right now in this manere,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 335

Ther nis but o god, lord in soothfastnesse;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 109

is every blisful man god; but certes, by nature, ther nis but
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 92

ne ther nis no man that ne wot wel that they ne
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 194

[continues previous] by adversitees; and of alle thinges ther nis no doute, that
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 177

In al this world ther nis a bettre knight
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte
14

Merchant's Tale: 267

Nin al Itaille, that coude bet han sayd;
13

Merchant's Tale: 322

'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd? [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 533

[continues previous] In al this world ther nis no creature,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 367

Whan that our pot is broke, as I have sayd, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 268

Crist halt him of this conseil wel apayd.
13

Merchant's Tale: 321

[continues previous] I prey yow that ye be nat yvel apayd.'
13

Merchant's Tale: 322

[continues previous] 'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd?
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 368

[continues previous] Every man chit, and halt him yvel apayd. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 897

Wot ye not wel that noble and heigh corage [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 269

And trewely, it is an heigh corage
11

Knight's Tale: 1355

With holy herte, and with an heigh corage
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 368

[continues previous] Every man chit, and halt him yvel apayd.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 897

[continues previous] Wot ye not wel that noble and heigh corage
12

Merchant's Tale: 271

To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin,
12

Reeve's Tale: 118

Yet saugh I never, by my fader kin,
12

Merchant's Tale: 27

Than sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir,
10

Merchant's Tale: 313

And namely with a yong wyf and a fair.
10

Merchant's Tale: 314

By him that made water, erthe, and air,
12

Monk's Prologue: 43

Of what hous be ye, by your fader kin? [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 148

Be mery, housbond, for your fader kin! [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 276

And Venus coper, by my fader kin!
12

Merchant's Tale: 272

Your herte hangeth on a Ioly pin.
12

Monk's Prologue: 43

[continues previous] Of what hous be ye, by your fader kin?
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 148

[continues previous] Be mery, housbond, for your fader kin!
15+

Merchant's Tale: 273

Doth now in this matere right as yow leste,
13

Clerk's Tale: 49

And ye, my lord, to doon right as yow leste. [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 266

Right as yow lust governeth this matere.'
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 449

Al lyth in yow, doth with him as yow leste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1110

Game in myn hood, but herkneth, if yow leste;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1111

Ther is right now come in-to toune a geste,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 846

For ye may quenche al this, if that yow leste, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 847

And doth right so, for I holde it the beste.' [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 274

For finally I holde it for the beste.'
10

Summoner's Tale: 492

The lady of the hous ay stille sat, [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 50

[continues previous] For certes, lord, so wel us lyketh yow
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 847

[continues previous] And doth right so, for I holde it the beste.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 848

[continues previous] 'So shal I do to-morwe, y-wis,' quod she,
12

Merchant's Tale: 275

Iustinus, that ay stille sat and herde,
12

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 287

And ever gaped upward in-to the eir. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 492

[continues previous] The lady of the hous ay stille sat,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 386

Criseyde, which that herde him in this wyse, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 276

Right in this wyse to Placebo answerde:
12

Miller's Tale: 286

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
10

Shipman's Tale: 195

This gentil monk answerde in this manere; [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 169

Cecile answerde anon right in this wyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 386

[continues previous] Criseyde, which that herde him in this wyse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1527

Criseyde, with a syk, right in this wyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1528

Answerde, 'y-wis, my dere herte trewe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 277

'Now brother myn, be pacient, I preye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 223

And sin that ye han herd al myn entente, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 224

I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.' [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 196

[continues previous] 'Now, trewely, myn owene lady dere,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 457

And beth no-thing displesed, I yow preye, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 458

But in this cas herkneth what I shal seye. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 109

Now herkneth, as I have you seyd, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 110

What that I mette, or I abreyd. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 278

Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 857

Now lat us ryde, and herkneth what I seye.'
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 858

And with that word we riden forth our weye;
12

Knight's Tale: 1924

For love of God, and herkneth what I seye.
12

Knight's Tale: 1925

I have heer with my cosin Palamon
12

Friar's Prologue: 9

Ye han seyd muchel thing right wel, I seye;
11

Merchant's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And sin that ye han herd al myn entente,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
10

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
12

Melibee's Prologue: 47

And therfor herkneth what that I shal seye,
12

Melibee's Prologue: 48

And lat me tellen al my tale, I preye.'
11

Melibee's Tale: 7

... Melibeus un-to his wyf Prudence: 'Alle thy wordes,' quod he, 'been sothe, and ther-to profitable; but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 457

[continues previous] And beth no-thing displesed, I yow preye,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 458

[continues previous] But in this cas herkneth what I shal seye.
12

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
11

Hous of Fame 1: 109

[continues previous] Now herkneth, as I have you seyd,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 110

[continues previous] What that I mette, or I abreyd.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 121

I noot nought what ye wilne that I seye.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 122

'I? what?' quod he, 'that ye han on him routhe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 279

Senek among his othere wordes wyse
10

Summoner's Tale: 310

As seith Senek, that, duringe his estaat, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... wys man dredeth his enemy. And Salomon seith: "weleful is he that of alle hath drede; for certes, he that thurgh the hardinesse of his herte and thurgh the hardinesse of him-self hath to greet presumpcioun, him shal yvel bityde." Thanne shul ye evermore countrewayte embusshements and alle espiaille. For Senek seith: that "the wyse man that dredeth harmes escheweth harmes; ne he ne falleth in-to perils, that perils escheweth." And al-be-it so that it seme that thou art in siker place, yet shaltow alwey do thy diligence in kepinge of thy persone; this is to seyn, ne be nat necligent to kepe thy persone, ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 35

... custumes and taillages. Of whiche seith Salomon, 'Leon rorynge and bere hongry been lyke to the cruel lordshipes,' in withholdinge or abregginge of the shepe (or the hyre), or of the wages of servaunts, or elles in usure or in withdrawinge of the almesse of povre folk. For which the wyse man seith, 'fedeth him that almost dyeth for honger'; for soothly, but-if thou fede him, thou sleest him; and alle thise been deadly sinnes. Bodily manslaughtre is, whan thow sleest him with thy tonge in other manere; as whan thou comandest to sleen a man, or elles yevest him conseil ... [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 280

Seith, that a man oghte him right wel avyse,
12

Cook's Prologue: 9

Wel oghte a man avysed for to be [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 310

[continues previous] As seith Senek, that, duringe his estaat,
10

Summoner's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Up-on a day out riden knightes two,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 282

And sin I oghte avyse me right wel [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... man dredeth his enemy. And Salomon seith: "weleful is he that of alle hath drede; for certes, he that thurgh the hardinesse of his herte and thurgh the hardinesse of him-self hath to greet presumpcioun, him shal yvel bityde." Thanne shul ye evermore countrewayte embusshements and alle espiaille. For Senek seith: that "the wyse man that dredeth harmes escheweth harmes; ne he ne falleth in-to perils, that perils escheweth." And al-be-it so that it seme that thou art in siker place, yet shaltow alwey do thy diligence in kepinge of thy persone; this is to seyn, ne be nat necligent to kepe thy persone, nat only ...
11

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... and taillages. Of whiche seith Salomon, 'Leon rorynge and bere hongry been lyke to the cruel lordshipes,' in withholdinge or abregginge of the shepe (or the hyre), or of the wages of servaunts, or elles in usure or in withdrawinge of the almesse of povre folk. For which the wyse man seith, 'fedeth him that almost dyeth for honger'; for soothly, but-if thou fede him, thou sleest him; and alle thise been deadly sinnes. Bodily manslaughtre is, whan thow sleest him with thy tonge in other manere; as whan thou comandest to sleen a man, or elles yevest him conseil to sleen a man. Manslaughtre ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 586

And wel avyse him whom he broughte there; [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 281

To whom he yeveth his lond or his catel.
12

Cook's Prologue: 9

[continues previous] Wel oghte a man avysed for to be
12

Cook's Prologue: 10

[continues previous] Whom that he broghte in-to his privetee.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 283

[continues previous] To whom I yeve my good awey fro me,
12

Parson's Tale: 69

But for-as-muche as som folk been unmesurable, men oghten eschue fool-largesse, that men clepen wast. Certes, he that is fool-large ne yeveth nat his catel, but he leseth his catel. Soothly, what thing that he yeveth for veyne glorie, as to minstrals and to folk, for to beren his renoun in the world, he hath sinne ther-of and noon almesse. Certes, he leseth foule his good, that ne seketh with the yifte of his good no-thing but sinne. He is lyk to an hors that seketh ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 586

[continues previous] And wel avyse him whom he broughte there;
15+

Merchant's Tale: 282

And sin I oghte avyse me right wel
15+

Merchant's Tale: 280

Seith, that a man oghte him right wel avyse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1411

Yet pray I god, so yeve yow right good day. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1412

And fareth wel, goodly fayre fresshe may, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 283

To whom I yeve my good awey fro me,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 309

The keyes of thy cheste awey fro me? [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 310

It is my good as wel as thyn, pardee. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 281

[continues previous] To whom he yeveth his lond or his catel.
11

Merchant's Tale: 285

To whom I yeve my body; for alwey
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1411

[continues previous] Yet pray I god, so yeve yow right good day.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 284

Wel muchel more I oghte avysed be
15+

Cook's Prologue: 9

Wel oghte a man avysed for to be [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 310

[continues previous] It is my good as wel as thyn, pardee.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 285

To whom I yeve my body; for alwey
15+

Cook's Prologue: 9

[continues previous] Wel oghte a man avysed for to be
15+

Cook's Prologue: 10

[continues previous] Whom that he broghte in-to his privetee.
11

Merchant's Tale: 283

To whom I yeve my good awey fro me,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere, [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 286

I warne yow wel, it is no childes pley
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 320

Swich supposing and hope is sharp and hard; [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 321

I warne yow wel, it is to seken ever; [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 801

[continues previous] 'By our lady,' quod this chanoun, 'it is dere,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

[continues previous] I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere,
13

Merchant's Tale: 287

To take a wyf with-oute avysement.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 321

[continues previous] I warne yow wel, it is to seken ever;
11

Parson's Tale: 37

... of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fyr, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep. I can nat seye but ... [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 288

Men moste enquere, this is myn assent,
11

Parson's Tale: 37

[continues previous] What seye we eek of hem that delyten hem in swering, and holden it a gentrie or a manly dede to swere grete othes? And what of hem that, of verray usage, ne cesse nat to swere grete othes, al be the cause nat worth a straw? Certes, this is horrible sinne. Sweringe sodeynly with-oute avysement is eek a sinne. But lat us go now to thilke horrible swering of adiuracioun and coniuracioun, as doon thise false enchauntours or nigromanciens in bacins ful of water, or in a bright swerd, in a cercle, or in a fyr, or in a shulder-boon of a sheep. I can nat ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 289

Wher she be wys, or sobre, or dronkelewe,
10

Summoner's Tale: 335

Irous Cambyses was eek dronkelewe, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 167

And a man which that is dronkelewe, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 85

... or savouringe, and felinge. Now is it good to understonde that that agreggeth muchel every sinne. Thou shall considere what thou art that doost the sinne, whether thou be male or femele, yong or old, gentil or thral, free or servant, hool or syk, wedded or sengle, ordred or unordred, wys or fool, clerk or seculer; if she be of thy kinrede, bodily or goostly, or noon; if any of thy kinrede have sinned with hir or noon, and manye mo thinges. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 299

That fair, or worthy were, or wys, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 300

Or elles stood in folkes prys. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 820

She sobre was, eek simple, and wys with-al,
12

Merchant's Tale: 290

Or proud, or elles other-weys a shrewe;
10

Summoner's Tale: 336

[continues previous] And ay delyted him to been a shrewe.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 168

[continues previous] But that woodnesse, y-fallen in a shrewe,
10

Parson's Tale: 85

[continues previous] ... Now is it good to understonde that that agreggeth muchel every sinne. Thou shall considere what thou art that doost the sinne, whether thou be male or femele, yong or old, gentil or thral, free or servant, hool or syk, wedded or sengle, ordred or unordred, wys or fool, clerk or seculer; if she be of thy kinrede, bodily or goostly, or noon; if any of thy kinrede have sinned with hir or noon, and manye mo thinges.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 299

[continues previous] That fair, or worthy were, or wys,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 300

[continues previous] Or elles stood in folkes prys.
12

Merchant's Tale: 293

Al-be-it so that no man finden shal
12

Parson's Tale: 22

... do thinges that he may nat perfourne. Eke whan that he, by lightnesse or folie, misseyeth or scorneth his neighebore. Eke whan he hath any wikked suspecion of thing, ther he ne woot of it no soothfastnesse. Thise thinges and mo with-oute nombre been sinnes, as seith seint Augustin. Now shal men understonde, that al-be-it so that noon erthely man may eschue alle venial sinnes, yet may he refreyne him by the brenninge love that he hath to oure lord Iesu Crist, and by preyeres and confession and othere gode werkes, so that it shal but litel greve. For, as seith seint Augustin: 'if a man love god in swiche ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 29

wormes in-to the privetees of mannes body? But wher shal man
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 6: 30

finden any man that may exercen or haunten any right up-on
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 53

'That is sooth,' quod I, 'al-be-it so that no man dar confesse it
12

Legend of Ariadne: 162

That in this world ther shal no man me knowe, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 294

Noon in this world that trotteth hool in al,
11

Knight's Tale: 1988

'In al this world, that som tyme he ne deyde. [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 22

[continues previous] ... Eke whan that he, by lightnesse or folie, misseyeth or scorneth his neighebore. Eke whan he hath any wikked suspecion of thing, ther he ne woot of it no soothfastnesse. Thise thinges and mo with-oute nombre been sinnes, as seith seint Augustin. Now shal men understonde, that al-be-it so that noon erthely man may eschue alle venial sinnes, yet may he refreyne him by the brenninge love that he hath to oure lord Iesu Crist, and by preyeres and confession and othere gode werkes, so that it shal but litel greve. For, as seith seint Augustin: 'if a man love god ...
11

Parson's Tale: 76

... grace, that is, the body and the soule, for which Crist shal destroyen hem, as seith Seint Paul. Soothly of this thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm ... [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 70

nis non, ne the thing al hool that they ne desire nat.' [continues next]
12

Legend of Ariadne: 162

[continues previous] That in this world ther shal no man me knowe,
12

Merchant's Tale: 295

Ne man ne beest, swich as men coude devyse;
11

Knight's Tale: 1988

[continues previous] 'In al this world, that som tyme he ne deyde.
11

Merchant's Tale: 789

Ne coude of it the beautee wel devyse;
11

Merchant's Tale: 790

Ne Priapus ne mighte nat suffyse,
12

Franklin's Tale: 146

Ther nis y-fostred man, ne brid, ne beest;
11

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... soule, for which Crist shal destroyen hem, as seith Seint Paul. Soothly of this thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is ...
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 70

[continues previous] nis non, ne the thing al hool that they ne desire nat.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 296

But nathelees, it oghte y-nough suffise
10

Shipman's Tale: 100

'Nece,' quod he, 'it oghte y-nough suffyse
11

Monk's Prologue: 94

Lo! this declaring oughte y-nough suffise. [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 468

Of this Tragedie it oghte y-nough suffyse.
10

Monk's Tale: 469

Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse,
11

Merchant's Tale: 297

With any wyf, if so were that she hadde
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 578

Of maistres hadde he mo than thryes ten, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 579

That were of lawe expert and curious; [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 95

[continues previous] Now herkneth, if yow lyketh for to here;
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 16

To alle gode thewes born was she, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 298

Mo gode thewes than hir vyces badde;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 578

[continues previous] Of maistres hadde he mo than thryes ten,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 16

[continues previous] To alle gode thewes born was she,
12

Merchant's Tale: 300

For god it woot, I have wept many a tere
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 223

For god it woot, I chidde hem spitously.
12

Franklin's Tale: 454

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere. [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 406

For, god it woot, I wende, withouten doute,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 301

Ful prively, sin I have had a wyf.
12

Franklin's Tale: 454

[continues previous] For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

[continues previous] For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
13

Merchant's Tale: 302

Preyse who-so wole a wedded mannes lyf,
13

Merchant's Tale: 419

Ye may repente of wedded mannes lyf, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 303

Certein, I finde in it but cost and care,
13

Merchant's Tale: 420

[continues previous] In which ye seyn ther is no wo ne stryf.
12

Merchant's Tale: 305

And yet, god woot, my neighebores aboute,
12

Squire's Tale: 381

No lenger for to slepe, and walke aboute.' [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 273

Her yonge knightes hoven al aboute, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 306

And namely of wommen many a route,
12

Squire's Tale: 382

[continues previous] Hir maistresse clepeth wommen a gret route,
12

Squire's Tale: 383

And up they rysen, wel a ten or twelve;
12

Legend of Dido: 274

[continues previous] And of her wommen eek an huge route.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 682

So to Criseyde of wommen com a route
11

Merchant's Tale: 307

Seyn that I have the moste stedefast wyf,
11

Parson's Tale: 14

... have foryifnesse of the remenaunt of hise othere sinnes? Nay. And forther-over, contricion sholde be wonder sorweful and anguissous, and therfore yeveth him god pleynly his mercy; and therfore, whan my soule was anguissous with-inne me, I hadde remembrance of god that my preyere mighte come to him. Forther-over, contricion moste be continuel, and that man have stedefast purpos to shryven him, and for to amenden him of his lyf. For soothly, whyl contricion lasteth, man may evere have hope of foryifnesse; and of this comth hate of sinne, that destroyeth sinne bothe in himself, and eek in other folk, at his power. For which seith David: 'ye ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1080

The gentileste, and eek the moste free, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1081

The thriftieste and oon the beste knight, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 308

And eek the mekeste oon that bereth lyf.
11

Parson's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... the remenaunt of hise othere sinnes? Nay. And forther-over, contricion sholde be wonder sorweful and anguissous, and therfore yeveth him god pleynly his mercy; and therfore, whan my soule was anguissous with-inne me, I hadde remembrance of god that my preyere mighte come to him. Forther-over, contricion moste be continuel, and that man have stedefast purpos to shryven him, and for to amenden him of his lyf. For soothly, whyl contricion lasteth, man may evere have hope of foryifnesse; and of this comth hate of sinne, that destroyeth sinne bothe in himself, and eek in other folk, at his power. For ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1080

[continues previous] The gentileste, and eek the moste free,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1081

[continues previous] The thriftieste and oon the beste knight,
12

Merchant's Tale: 310

Ye mowe, for me, right as yow lyketh do;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 371

Now chese your-selven, whether that yow lyketh.' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 379

For as yow lyketh, it suffiseth me.' [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 255

And over al this, avyseth yow right wel [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 27

... answerde in this wyse. 'Dame,' quod he, 'as yet in-to this tyme ye han wel and covenably taught me as in general, how I shal governe me in the chesinge and in the withholdinge of my conseillours. But now wolde I fayn that ye wolde condescende in especial, and telle me how lyketh yow, or what semeth yow, by our conseillours that we han chosen in our present nede.' [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 57

... of thinges that I seye; for ye knowe wel that I am angry and wrooth, and that is no wonder; and they that been wrothe witen nat wel what they doon, ne what they seyn. Therfore the prophete seith: that "troubled eyen han no cleer sighte." But seyeth and conseileth me as yow lyketh; for I am redy to do right as ye wol desyre; and if ye repreve me of my folye, I am the more holden to love yow and to preyse yow. For Salomon seith: that "he that repreveth him that doth folye, he shal finde gretter grace than he that deceyveth him by swete wordes."' [continues next]
10

Compleint to His Lady: 65

Why lyketh yow to do me al this wo,
11

Parlement of Foules: 401

After your kinde, everich as yow lyketh, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 402

And, as your hap is, shul ye winne or lese; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 311

Avyseth yow, ye been a man of age,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 371

[continues previous] Now chese your-selven, whether that yow lyketh.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

[continues previous] This knight avyseth him and sore syketh,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 379

[continues previous] For as yow lyketh, it suffiseth me.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 255

[continues previous] And over al this, avyseth yow right wel
10

Melibee's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... wyse. 'Dame,' quod he, 'as yet in-to this tyme ye han wel and covenably taught me as in general, how I shal governe me in the chesinge and in the withholdinge of my conseillours. But now wolde I fayn that ye wolde condescende in especial, and telle me how lyketh yow, or what semeth yow, by our conseillours that we han chosen in our present nede.'
12

Melibee's Tale: 57

[continues previous] ... that I seye; for ye knowe wel that I am angry and wrooth, and that is no wonder; and they that been wrothe witen nat wel what they doon, ne what they seyn. Therfore the prophete seith: that "troubled eyen han no cleer sighte." But seyeth and conseileth me as yow lyketh; for I am redy to do right as ye wol desyre; and if ye repreve me of my folye, I am the more holden to love yow and to preyse yow. For Salomon seith: that "he that repreveth him that doth folye, he shal finde gretter grace than he ...
11

Parson's Tale: 21

... nat be necligent to deschargen us of venial sinnes. For the proverbe seith: that manye smale maken a greet. And herkne this ensample. A greet wawe of the see comth som-tyme with so greet a violence that it drencheth the ship. And the same harm doth som-tyme the smale dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace in-to the thurrok, and in-to the botme of the ship, if men be so necligent that they ne descharge hem nat by tyme. And therfore, al-thogh ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchinge, algates the ship is dreynt. Right so fareth it somtyme of deedly ... [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 401

[continues previous] After your kinde, everich as yow lyketh,
11

Merchant's Tale: 312

How that ye entren in-to mariage,
11

Parson's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... necligent to deschargen us of venial sinnes. For the proverbe seith: that manye smale maken a greet. And herkne this ensample. A greet wawe of the see comth som-tyme with so greet a violence that it drencheth the ship. And the same harm doth som-tyme the smale dropes of water, that entren thurgh a litel crevace in-to the thurrok, and in-to the botme of the ship, if men be so necligent that they ne descharge hem nat by tyme. And therfore, al-thogh ther be a difference bitwixe thise two causes of drenchinge, algates the ship is dreynt. Right so fareth it somtyme of deedly sinne, and of ...
12

Merchant's Tale: 313

And namely with a yong wyf and a fair.
12

Merchant's Tale: 27

Than sholde he take a yong wyf and a feir,
10

Merchant's Tale: 271

To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 314

By him that made water, erthe, and air,
10

Merchant's Tale: 271

[continues previous] To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin,
11

Merchant's Tale: 316

Is bisy y-nogh to bringen it aboute
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1275

Now that I shal wel bringen it aboute [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1276

To come ayein, sone after that I go, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1294

Thorugh which thou shalt wel bringen it aboute, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1295

To knowe a sooth of that thou art in doute. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 317

To han his wyf allone, trusteth me.
11

Knight's Tale: 1938

And if that ever ye shul been a wyf, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 462

For she drank wyn, thogh I hadde been his wyf, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 463

He sholde nat han daunted me fro drinke; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 435

The lustes of your wyf attemprely, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 36

... wilfulnesse; for trewely, alle tho that conseilleden yow to maken sodeyn werre ne been nat your freendes. Lat us now considere whiche been they, that ye holde so greetly your freendes as to your persone. For al-be-it so that ye be mighty and riche, certes ye ne been nat but allone. For certes, ye ne han no child but a doghter; ne ye ne han bretheren ne cosins germayns, ne noon other neigh kinrede, wherfore that your enemys, for drede, sholde stinte to plede with yow or to destroye your persone. Ye knowen also, that your richesses moten been dispended in diverse parties; and whan that ... [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 147

So that ye swere ye shul me nat biwreye.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1276

[continues previous] To come ayein, sone after that I go,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1295

[continues previous] To knowe a sooth of that thou art in doute.
13

Merchant's Tale: 318

Ye shul nat plese hir fully yeres three,
11

Knight's Tale: 1938

[continues previous] And if that ever ye shul been a wyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 1939

[continues previous] Foryet nat Palamon, the gentil man.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 463

[continues previous] He sholde nat han daunted me fro drinke;
13

Merchant's Tale: 436

[continues previous] And that ye plese hir nat to amorously,
12

Merchant's Tale: 437

And that ye kepe yow eek from other sinne.
10

Melibee's Tale: 36

[continues previous] ... your hastif wilfulnesse; for trewely, alle tho that conseilleden yow to maken sodeyn werre ne been nat your freendes. Lat us now considere whiche been they, that ye holde so greetly your freendes as to your persone. For al-be-it so that ye be mighty and riche, certes ye ne been nat but allone. For certes, ye ne han no child but a doghter; ne ye ne han bretheren ne cosins germayns, ne noon other neigh kinrede, wherfore that your enemys, for drede, sholde stinte to plede with yow or to destroye your persone. Ye knowen also, that your richesses moten been dispended in diverse parties; and ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 69

Thanne was Prudence right glad and loyeful, and seyde, 'Certes, sir,' quod she, 'ye han wel and goodly answered. For right as by the conseil, assent, and help of your freendes, ye han been stired to venge yow and maken werre, right so with-outen hir conseil shul ye nat accorden yow, ne have pees with your adversaries. For the lawe seith: "ther nis no-thing so good by wey of kinde, as a thing to been unbounde by him that it was y-bounde."'
11

Second Nun's Tale: 147

[continues previous] So that ye swere ye shul me nat biwreye.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 319

This is to seyn, to doon hir ful plesaunce.
11

Shipman's Tale: 44

As in that hous; and ful of diligence
11

Shipman's Tale: 45

To doon plesaunce, and also greet costage.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 368

And therto is a king ful depe y-sworn, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 369

Ful many an hundred winter heer-biforn; [continues next]
11

Amorous Compleint: 41

[And] yet alwey two thinges doon me dyë,
11

Amorous Compleint: 42

That is to seyn, hir beutee and myn yë.
11

Merchant's Tale: 320

A wyf axeth ful many an observaunce.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1164

Ful many a man weneth to seen a thing, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 368

[continues previous] And therto is a king ful depe y-sworn,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 369

[continues previous] Ful many an hundred winter heer-biforn;
15+

Merchant's Tale: 321

I prey yow that ye be nat yvel apayd.'
10

Miller's Tale: 352

'Hastow nat herd,' quod Nicholas, 'also [continues next]
11

Friar's Prologue: 18

I praye that noon of you be yvel apayd.
13

Summoner's Tale: 106

I wolde prey yow that ye nat yow greve,
13

Summoner's Tale: 107

I wol with Thomas speke a litel throwe.
13

Summoner's Tale: 140

I prey yow, dame, ye be nat anoyed,
13

Summoner's Tale: 141

Though I so freendly yow my conseil shewe;
10

Summoner's Tale: 537

Of alle thinges of which I have yow sayd. [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 538

'My lord,' quod he, 'be ye nat yvel apayd; [continues next]
14

Summoner's Tale: 539

I coude telle, for a goune-clooth, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 268

Crist halt him of this conseil wel apayd. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 1106

Ladies, I prey yow that ye be nat wrooth;
14

Merchant's Tale: 1107

I can nat glose, I am a rude man.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1163

[continues previous] Beth war, I prey yow; for, by hevene king,
12

Franklin's Tale: 861

'Hastow nat had thy lady as thee lyketh?' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 637

I prey yow that ye kisse the pardoner.
11

Shipman's Tale: 260

I prey yow, cosin, wysly that ye ryde;
13

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 17

'Hoste,' quod I, 'ne beth nat yvel apayd, [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 18

For other tale certes can I noon, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 40

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I see wel that ye enforce yow muchel by wordes to overcome me in swich manere, that I shal nat venge me of myne enemys; shewinge me the perils and the yveles that mighten falle of this vengeance. But who-so wolde considere in alle vengeances the perils and yveles that mighte sewe of vengeance-takinge, a man wolde ... [continues next]
15+

Melibee's Tale: 57

Whanne Melibee hadde herd dame Prudence maken semblant of wratthe, he seyde in this wyse, 'dame, I prey yow that ye be nat displesed of thinges that I seye; for ye knowe wel that I am angry and wrooth, and that is no wonder; and they that been wrothe witen nat wel what they doon, ne what they seyn. Therfore the prophete seith: that "troubled eyen han no cleer sighte." But seyeth and conseileth me as yow ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 77

... that in this necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For ...
10

Second Nun's Tale: 84

And prey yow, that ye wol my werk amende.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 368

Every man chit, and halt him yvel apayd. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 496

That ther was never man yet yvel apayd [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 80

For-bereth me, and beth nat evel apayd,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 81

Sin that ye see I do hit in the honour
12

Legend of Thisbe: 61

Yit oghte we with thee ben wel apayd.' [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 306

Wher be ye, that I may nat with yow mete,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 322

'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd?
10

Miller's Tale: 351

[continues previous] 'Yis,' quod this carpenter, 'ful yore ago.'
10

Miller's Tale: 352

[continues previous] 'Hastow nat herd,' quod Nicholas, 'also
10

Summoner's Tale: 537

[continues previous] Of alle thinges of which I have yow sayd.
15+

Summoner's Tale: 538

[continues previous] 'My lord,' quod he, 'be ye nat yvel apayd;
13

Merchant's Tale: 267

[continues previous] Nin al Itaille, that coude bet han sayd;
13

Merchant's Tale: 268

[continues previous] Crist halt him of this conseil wel apayd.
12

Franklin's Tale: 860

[continues previous] 'Yes, certes, wel and trewely,' quod he.
12

Franklin's Tale: 861

[continues previous] 'Hastow nat had thy lady as thee lyketh?'
13

Sir Thopas' Prologue: 17

[continues previous] 'Hoste,' quod I, 'ne beth nat yvel apayd,
10

Melibee's Tale: 40

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I see wel that ye enforce yow muchel by wordes to overcome me in swich manere, that I shal nat venge me of myne enemys; shewinge me the perils and the yveles that mighten falle of this vengeance. But who-so wolde considere in alle vengeances the perils and yveles that mighte sewe of ...
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 367

[continues previous] Whan that our pot is broke, as I have sayd,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 368

[continues previous] Every man chit, and halt him yvel apayd.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 495

[continues previous] God thanke I, and in good tyme be it sayd,
12

Legend of Thisbe: 61

[continues previous] Yit oghte we with thee ben wel apayd.'
12

Legend of Thisbe: 62

[continues previous] And whan thise ydel wordes weren sayd,
12

Merchant's Tale: 325

Of scole-termes; wyser men than thow,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1002

I woot wel that thow wyser art than I
10

Merchant's Tale: 327

To my purpos; Placebo, what sey ye?'
10

Miller's Tale: 324

Ne, though I seye, I nam nat lief to gabbe. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 325

Sey what thou wolt, I shal it never telle [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 328

'I seye, it is a cursed man,' quod he,
10

Miller's Tale: 324

[continues previous] Ne, though I seye, I nam nat lief to gabbe.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 806

'Y-wis,' quod he, 'it is ful dere, I seye;
12

Merchant's Tale: 331

And been assented fully, that he sholde
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 12

That by the same ensample taughte he me [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 13

That I ne sholde wedded be but ones. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3056

Is fully assented that it be, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3057

And grauntid hir, at hir request, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 332

Be wedded whanne him list and wher he wolde.
10

Knight's Tale: 469

Goon at his large, and wher him list may turne.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 13

[continues previous] That I ne sholde wedded be but ones.
10

Clerk's Tale: 127

He graunted hem a day, swich as him leste,
10

Clerk's Tale: 128

On which he wolde be wedded sikerly,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3056

[continues previous] Is fully assented that it be,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 206

And wher him list, best felawshipe can
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 949

And wher him list upon his wey he spedde;
12

Merchant's Tale: 333

Heigh fantasye and curious bisinesse
10

Squire's Tale: 642

She dooth hir bisinesse and al hir might. [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 10

... that whan twey men han everich wounded other, oon same surgien heleth hem bothe; wherefore un-to our art it is nat pertinent to norice werre, ne parties to supporte. But certes, as to the warisshinge of your doghter, al-be-it so that she perilously be wounded, we shullen do so ententif bisinesse fro day to night, that with the grace of god she shal be hool and sound as sone as is possible.' Almost right in the same wyse the phisiciens answerden, save that they seyden a fewe wordes more: 'That, right as maladyes been cured by hir contraries, right so shul ... [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 334

Fro day to day gan in the soule impresse
10

Squire's Tale: 641

[continues previous] To helen with this hauk; fro day to night
12

Melibee's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... whan twey men han everich wounded other, oon same surgien heleth hem bothe; wherefore un-to our art it is nat pertinent to norice werre, ne parties to supporte. But certes, as to the warisshinge of your doghter, al-be-it so that she perilously be wounded, we shullen do so ententif bisinesse fro day to night, that with the grace of god she shal be hool and sound as sone as is possible.' Almost right in the same wyse the phisiciens answerden, save that they seyden a fewe wordes more: 'That, right as maladyes been cured by hir contraries, right so shul men warisshe werre by vengeaunce.' His neighebores, ...
10

Merchant's Tale: 338

As who-so toke a mirour polished bright,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6259

'Who-so toke a wethers skin,
12

Merchant's Tale: 341

By his mirour; and, in the same wyse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1548

Criseyde also, right in the same wyse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1549

Of Troilus gan in hir herte shette [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 342

Gan Ianuarie inwith his thoght devyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1549

[continues previous] Of Troilus gan in hir herte shette
11

Merchant's Tale: 343

Of maydens, whiche that dwelten him bisyde.
11

Clerk's Tale: 1049

Doun ran of hem that stoden hir bisyde; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 658

His squyeres, whiche that stoden ther bisyde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 659

Excused him by-cause of his siknesse,
11

Merchant's Tale: 344

He wiste nat wher that he mighte abyde.
11

Clerk's Tale: 1050

[continues previous] Unnethe abouten hir mighte they abyde.
10

Physician's Tale: 137

That wel he wiste he mighte hir never winne
10

Monk's Tale: 568

Til that his heed was of, er that he wiste.
10

Monk's Tale: 569

Nat only that this world hadde him in awe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 665

To sleen swich oon, if that he mente trouthe. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 666

Now mighte som envyous Iangle thus, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 823

That in the hous he mighte unnethe abyde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 824

As he that pitee felte on every syde.
12

Merchant's Tale: 345

For if that oon have beaute in hir face,
12

Compleynt of Mars: 268

That putte suche a beaute in hir face,
11

Compleynt of Mars: 269

That made me to covete and purchace
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 665

[continues previous] To sleen swich oon, if that he mente trouthe.
11

Merchant's Tale: 347

For hir sadnesse, and hir benignitee,
11

Merchant's Tale: 360

Hir wommanly beringe and hir sadnesse. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 361

And whan that he on hir was condescended, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 361

Shewen his peple pleyn benignitee, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 362

And wel to here hir excusaciouns, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 348

That of the peple grettest voys hath she.
10

Knight's Tale: 1703

The voys of peple touchede the hevene,
11

Merchant's Tale: 361

[continues previous] And whan that he on hir was condescended,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 361

[continues previous] Shewen his peple pleyn benignitee,
13

Merchant's Tale: 349

And somme were riche, and hadden badde name.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 196

As three of hem were gode and two were badde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 197

The three men were gode, and riche, and olde;
13

Clerk's Tale: 676

To been a mordrer is an hateful name. [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 99

O thou Bachus, y-blessed be thy name, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 350

But nathelees, bitwixe ernest and game,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

This knight avyseth him and sore syketh, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere, [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 677

[continues previous] But natheles, for ernest ne for game [continues next]
10

Manciple's Prologue: 100

[continues previous] That so canst turnen ernest in-to game!
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1220

Hit nas no game, hit sat me sore. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 254

Bitwixen game and ernest, swich a mene
13

Merchant's Tale: 351

He atte laste apoynted him on oon,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

[continues previous] This knight avyseth him and sore syketh, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

[continues previous] But atte laste he seyde in this manere, [continues next]
11

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
11

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
12

Clerk's Tale: 25

As for to hauke and hunte on every syde; [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 678

[continues previous] He of his cruel purpos nolde stente;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1221

[continues previous] 'So atte laste, sooth to seyn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 462

And lyf is lost, but ye wole on me rewe.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 463

Alle othere dredes weren from him fledde, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 352

And leet alle othere from his herte goon,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

[continues previous] This knight avyseth him and sore syketh,
12

Clerk's Tale: 26

[continues previous] Wel ny alle othere cures leet he slyde, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 27

And eek he nolde, and that was worst of alle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 463

[continues previous] Alle othere dredes weren from him fledde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 929

And dide his herte in-to hir brest to goon, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 353

And chees hir of his owene auctoritee;
11

Clerk's Tale: 27

[continues previous] And eek he nolde, and that was worst of alle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 929

[continues previous] And dide his herte in-to hir brest to goon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 930

[continues previous] Of which she nought agroos ne no-thing smerte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 865

For love of Troilus, hir owene knight, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 354

For love is blind al day, and may nat see.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 69

Was in the see, thus in this wyse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 865

[continues previous] For love of Troilus, hir owene knight,
12

Merchant's Tale: 355

And whan that he was in his bed y-broght,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 228

Whan he was with his wyf a-bedde y-broght; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 229

He walweth, and he turneth to and fro. [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 68

[continues previous] To tellen shortly, whan that he
10

Book of the Duchesse: 69

[continues previous] Was in the see, thus in this wyse,
12

Merchant's Tale: 356

He purtreyed, in his herte and in his thoght,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 228

[continues previous] Whan he was with his wyf a-bedde y-broght;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 229

[continues previous] He walweth, and he turneth to and fro.
12

Merchant's Tale: 357

Hir fresshe beautee and hir age tendre,
12

Merchant's Tale: 382

Suffyseth him hir youthe and hir beautee. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 981

And for to speke of hir in special, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 982

Hir beautee to bithinken and hir youthe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1247

Hir armes smale, hir streyghte bak and softe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1248

Hir sydes longe, fleshly, smothe, and whyte [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 358

Hir myddel smal, hir armes longe and sclendre,
12

Merchant's Tale: 381

[continues previous] Al were it so she were of smal degree;
12

Merchant's Tale: 382

[continues previous] Suffyseth him hir youthe and hir beautee.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 981

[continues previous] And for to speke of hir in special,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 982

[continues previous] Hir beautee to bithinken and hir youthe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 215

Of hir, in preysing of hir excellence, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 216

Hir governaunce, hir wit; and hir manere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1247

[continues previous] Hir armes smale, hir streyghte bak and softe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1248

[continues previous] Hir sydes longe, fleshly, smothe, and whyte [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 359

Hir wyse governaunce, hir gentillesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 215

[continues previous] Of hir, in preysing of hir excellence, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 216

[continues previous] Hir governaunce, hir wit; and hir manere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1247

[continues previous] Hir armes smale, hir streyghte bak and softe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1248

[continues previous] Hir sydes longe, fleshly, smothe, and whyte
11

Merchant's Tale: 360

Hir wommanly beringe and hir sadnesse.
11

Merchant's Tale: 347

For hir sadnesse, and hir benignitee, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 215

[continues previous] Of hir, in preysing of hir excellence,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 216

[continues previous] Hir governaunce, hir wit; and hir manere
12

Merchant's Tale: 361

And whan that he on hir was condescended,
11

Merchant's Tale: 347

[continues previous] For hir sadnesse, and hir benignitee,
11

Merchant's Tale: 348

[continues previous] That of the peple grettest voys hath she.
10

Merchant's Tale: 607

But god wot what that May thoughte in hir herte, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 608

Whan she him saugh up sittinge in his sherte, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 677

So ful was his corage of heigh empryse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 453

On hir was ever al that his herte thoughte. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 362

Him thoughte his chois mighte nat ben amended.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 128

Whan that he saugh he mighte nat come therby, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 607

[continues previous] But god wot what that May thoughte in hir herte,
10

Merchant's Tale: 608

[continues previous] Whan she him saugh up sittinge in his sherte,
11

Monk's Tale: 264

But of hir shape she mighte nat been amended.
11

Monk's Tale: 550

For socour, but it mighte nat bityde. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 551

For drede of this, him thoughte that he deyde, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 675

That al the world welded in his demeyne,
13

Monk's Tale: 676

[continues previous] And yit him thoughte it mighte nat suffyse?
12

Monk's Tale: 677

[continues previous] So ful was his corage of heigh empryse.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 38

Thanne crew he, that it mighte nat ben amended. [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 39

His comb was redder than the fyn coral, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 42

cleernesse he mighte nat graunten of him-self, so that, for lakke [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 453

[continues previous] On hir was ever al that his herte thoughte.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 363

For whan that he him-self concluded hadde,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 128

[continues previous] Whan that he saugh he mighte nat come therby,
12

Franklin's Tale: 473

On which him-self he daunced, as him thoughte. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 474

And whan this maister, that this magik wroughte, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 551

[continues previous] For drede of this, him thoughte that he deyde,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 38

[continues previous] Thanne crew he, that it mighte nat ben amended.
12

Second Nun's Tale: 371

Him-self he weep, for pitee that he hadde.
12

Second Nun's Tale: 372

Whan Maximus had herd the seintes lore,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 42

[continues previous] cleernesse he mighte nat graunten of him-self, so that, for lakke
12

Merchant's Tale: 364

Him thoughte ech other mannes wit so badde,
12

Franklin's Tale: 473

[continues previous] On which him-self he daunced, as him thoughte.
12

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 365

That inpossible it were to replye
12

Franklin's Tale: 821

[continues previous] That it were inpossible me to wryte;
11

Merchant's Tale: 366

Agayn his chois, this was his fantasye.
11

Merchant's Tale: 153

And for his freendes on a day he sente, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 461

Was absent, lo, this was his fantasye,
13

Merchant's Tale: 367

His freendes sente he to at his instaunce,
10

Miller's Tale: 436

And prively he sente hem to his in, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 153

[continues previous] And for his freendes on a day he sente, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 154

[continues previous] To tellen hem theffect of his entente. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1441

For to be holpen, what at your instaunce,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1442

What with hir othere freendes governaunce.'
11

Merchant's Tale: 368

And preyed hem to doon him that plesaunce,
10

Miller's Tale: 436

[continues previous] And prively he sente hem to his in,
10

Miller's Tale: 437

[continues previous] And heng hem in the roof in privetee.
11

Merchant's Tale: 153

[continues previous] And for his freendes on a day he sente,
10

Merchant's Tale: 370

He wolde abregge hir labour, alle and some.
10

Merchant's Tale: 413

And for he wolde his longe tale abregge,
10

Merchant's Tale: 414

He wolde noon auctoritee allegge,
12

Merchant's Tale: 371

Nedeth na-more for him to go ne ryde,
12

Knight's Tale: 110

No neer Athenës wolde he go ne ryde, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 111

Ne take his ese fully half a day, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 372

He was apoynted ther he wolde abyde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 549

That proved wel, for over-al ther he cam, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 550

At wrastling he wolde have alwey the ram. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 110

[continues previous] No neer Athenës wolde he go ne ryde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 514

And been descended ther they wolde abyde; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 515

And this was, as the bokes me remembre, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 373

Placebo cam, and eek his freendes sone,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 549

[continues previous] That proved wel, for over-al ther he cam,
11

Franklin's Tale: 515

[continues previous] And this was, as the bokes me remembre,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 448

And somme of hem she graunted sone, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 374

And alderfirst he bad hem alle a bone,
10

Knight's Tale: 1850

That of hem alle was ther noon y-slayn, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 14

... thy conseil, for many causes and resouns. For certes every wight wolde holde me thanne a fool; this is to seyn, if I, for thy conseilling, wolde chaungen thinges that been ordeyned and affermed by so manye wyse. Secoundly I seye, that alle wommen been wikke and noon good of hem alle. For "of a thousand men," seith Salomon, "I fond a good man: but certes, of alle wommen, good womman fond I never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For ... [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 201

A feste he made un-to his lordes alle
11

Monk's Tale: 202

Up-on a tyme, and bad hem blythe be,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 447

[continues previous] Ech of us, of thy grace, a bone!'
11

Hous of Fame 3: 448

[continues previous] And somme of hem she graunted sone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 68

And with a chaunged face hem bad a bone, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 375

That noon of hem none argumentes make
10

Knight's Tale: 1850

[continues previous] That of hem alle was ther noon y-slayn,
10

Melibee's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... 'to werke by thy conseil, for many causes and resouns. For certes every wight wolde holde me thanne a fool; this is to seyn, if I, for thy conseilling, wolde chaungen thinges that been ordeyned and affermed by so manye wyse. Secoundly I seye, that alle wommen been wikke and noon good of hem alle. For "of a thousand men," seith Salomon, "I fond a good man: but certes, of alle wommen, good womman fond I never." And also certes, if I governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 68

[continues previous] And with a chaunged face hem bad a bone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 69

[continues previous] For love of god, to don that reverence,
14

Merchant's Tale: 379

He seyde, ther was a mayden in the toun,
11

Physician's Tale: 121

Now was ther thanne a Iustice in that toun, [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 140

He sente after a cherl, was in the toun, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 759

As other folk hadde in the toun, [continues next]
14

Legend of Thisbe: 5

Ther weren dwellinge in this noble toun [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 380

Which that of beautee hadde greet renoun,
11

Physician's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Now was ther thanne a Iustice in that toun,
11

Physician's Tale: 122

[continues previous] That governour was of that regioun.
11

Physician's Tale: 141

[continues previous] Which that he knew for subtil and for bold.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 759

[continues previous] As other folk hadde in the toun,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 760

[continues previous] Al-thogh they were of greet renoun
14

Legend of Thisbe: 6

[continues previous] Two lordes, which that were of greet renoun, [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 51

That in his tyme was of greet renoun, [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 52

No man so greet in al his regioun; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

[continues previous] Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was
12

Merchant's Tale: 381

Al were it so she were of smal degree;
12

Mer