Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Miller's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Miller's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Miller's Tale has 668 lines, and 9% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 67% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 24% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.12 strong matches and 3.43 weak matches.

Miller's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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14

Miller's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 287

A Clerk ther was of Oxenford also, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 4

With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 1

Whilom ther was dwellinge in my contree
14

Merchant's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge in Lumbardye [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 1

A marchant whylom dwelled at Seint Denys, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 2

That riche was, for which men helde him wys; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 2

A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 287

[continues previous] A Clerk ther was of Oxenford also,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 288

[continues previous] That un-to logik hadde longe y-go.
11

Miller's Tale: 4

[continues previous] With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler,
14

Merchant's Tale: 2

[continues previous] A worthy knight, that born was of Pavye,
11

Shipman's Tale: 2

[continues previous] That riche was, for which men helde him wys;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

[continues previous] Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

[continues previous] Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 3

And of his craft he was a Carpenter.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 531

With him ther was a Plowman, was his brother, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

[continues previous] Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

[continues previous] Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 4

With him ther was dwellinge a povre scoler,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 262

With a thredbar cope, as is a povre scoler, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 263

But he was lyk a maister or a pope. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 531

[continues previous] With him ther was a Plowman, was his brother,
11

Miller's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge at Oxenford
11

Miller's Tale: 2

A riche gnof, that gestes heeld to bord,
10

Friar's Tale: 1

Whilom ther was dwellinge in my contree
10

Merchant's Tale: 1

Whylom ther was dwellinge in Lumbardye
10

Merchant's Tale: 2

A worthy knight, that born was of Pavye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 64

[continues previous] Now fil it so, that in the toun ther was
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 65

[continues previous] Dwellinge a lord of greet auctoritee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 66

[continues previous] A gret devyn that cleped was Calkas,
13

Miller's Tale: 5

Had lerned art, but al his fantasye
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 263

[continues previous] But he was lyk a maister or a pope.
11

Miller's Tale: 6

Was turned for to lerne astrologye,
11

Parlement of Foules: 20

And ther-upon, a certeyn thing to lerne, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 7

And coude a certeyn of conclusiouns
11

Parlement of Foules: 20

[continues previous] And ther-upon, a certeyn thing to lerne, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 8

To demen by interrogaciouns,
10

Parlement of Foules: 20

[continues previous] And ther-upon, a certeyn thing to lerne,
14

Miller's Tale: 9

If that men axed him in certein houres,
12

Miller's Tale: 11

Or if men axed him what sholde bifalle [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 117

This is to seyn, in foure and twenty houres, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 47

... And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme venial sinne, yet sholde men douten hem; for we shul yeve rekeninge of hem bifore god. Now comth Ianglinge, that may nat been withoute sinne. And, as seith Salomon, 'it is a sinne of apert folye.' And therfore a philosophre seyde, whan men axed him how that men sholde plese the peple; and he answerde, 'do many gode werkes, and spek fewe Iangles.' After this comth the sinne of Iaperes, that been the develes apes; for they maken folk to laughe at hir Iaperie, as folk doon at the gaudes of an ape. Swiche Iaperes deffendeth seint Paul. ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 90

they voidede the citee of Ravenne by certein day assigned, that [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 10

Whan that men sholde have droghte or elles shoures,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 1

Whan that Aprille with his shoures sote
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 2

The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote,
12

Miller's Tale: 11

[continues previous] Or if men axed him what sholde bifalle [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 34

Or elles coude he shewe wel swich matere, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 118

[continues previous] Wher-so yow list, in droghte or elles shoures, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 47

[continues previous] ... profit. And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme venial sinne, yet sholde men douten hem; for we shul yeve rekeninge of hem bifore god. Now comth Ianglinge, that may nat been withoute sinne. And, as seith Salomon, 'it is a sinne of apert folye.' And therfore a philosophre seyde, whan men axed him how that men sholde plese the peple; and he answerde, 'do many gode werkes, and spek fewe Iangles.' After this comth the sinne of Iaperes, that been the develes apes; for they maken folk to laughe at hir Iaperie, as folk doon at the gaudes of an ape. Swiche Iaperes deffendeth seint Paul. Loke ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 90

[continues previous] they voidede the citee of Ravenne by certein day assigned, that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 91

[continues previous] men sholde merken hem on the forheved with an hoot yren and
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1361

Nought swiche sorwful sykes as men make
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1362

For wo, or elles whan that folk ben syke,
15+

Miller's Tale: 11

Or if men axed him what sholde bifalle
12

Miller's Tale: 9

If that men axed him in certein houres,
12

Miller's Tale: 10

[continues previous] Whan that men sholde have droghte or elles shoures,
10

Miller's Tale: 273

Up-on the sterres, what ther sholde bifalle,
11

Clerk's Tale: 33

[continues previous] That he sholde telle him what his peple mente,
11

Clerk's Tale: 34

[continues previous] Or elles coude he shewe wel swich matere,
15+

Squire's Tale: 118

[continues previous] Wher-so yow list, in droghte or elles shoures,
12

Parson's Tale: 47

[continues previous] ... And al-be-it that ydel wordes been som tyme venial sinne, yet sholde men douten hem; for we shul yeve rekeninge of hem bifore god. Now comth Ianglinge, that may nat been withoute sinne. And, as seith Salomon, 'it is a sinne of apert folye.' And therfore a philosophre seyde, whan men axed him how that men sholde plese the peple; and he answerde, 'do many gode werkes, and spek fewe Iangles.' After this comth the sinne of Iaperes, that been the develes apes; for they maken folk to laughe at hir Iaperie, as folk doon at the gaudes of an ape. Swiche Iaperes deffendeth seint Paul. Loke ...
12

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas;
11

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas
10

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 200

She loveth so this hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 214

This carpenter was goon til Osenay;
11

Miller's Tale: 215

And hende Nicholas and Alisoun
12

Miller's Tale: 276

Me reweth sore of hende Nicholas. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas
10

Miller's Tale: 467

And thus lyth Alison and Nicholas, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 556

'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas,
10

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!'
11

Miller's Tale: 645

For whan he spak, he was anon bore doun [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 646

With hende Nicholas and Alisoun. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
11

Reeve's Prologue: 2

Of Absolon and hende Nicholas, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 628

This Ioly clerk Iankin, that was so hende,
12

Miller's Tale: 14

Of derne love he coude and of solas;
12

Miller's Tale: 276

[continues previous] Me reweth sore of hende Nicholas.
12

Miller's Tale: 277

[continues previous] He shal be rated of his studying,
10

Miller's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And thus lyth Alison and Nicholas,
10

Miller's Tale: 468

[continues previous] In bisinesse of mirthe and of solas,
11

Miller's Tale: 645

[continues previous] For whan he spak, he was anon bore doun
11

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
11

Cook's Tale: 22

That fairer coude caste a paire of dys [continues next]
12

Cook's Tale: 23

Than Perkin coude, and ther-to he was free [continues next]
12

Cook's Tale: 24

Of his dispense, in place of privetee. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 15

And ther-to be was sleigh and ful privee,
12

Cook's Tale: 23

[continues previous] Than Perkin coude, and ther-to he was free
11

Miller's Tale: 16

And lyk a mayden meke for to see.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 586

This mayden, semely for to see, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 17

A chambre hadde he in that hostelrye
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 23

At night was come in-to that hostelrye [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 24

Wel nyne and twenty in a companye, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 720

In Southwerk, at this gentil hostelrye, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 721

That highte the Tabard, faste by the Belle.
14

Knight's Tale: 1920

Now with his love, now in his colde grave [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 585

[continues previous] Whan that this dore hadde opened me
15+

Miller's Tale: 18

Allone, with-outen any companye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Wel nyne and twenty in a companye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 719

[continues previous] Why that assembled was this companye
15+

Knight's Tale: 1921

[continues previous] Allone, with-outen any companye.
15+

Melibee's Tale: 50

... hir ne refusen hir." And this Pamphilles seith also: "if thou be right happy, that is to seyn, if thou be right riche, thou shalt find a greet nombre of felawes and freendes. And if thy fortune change that thou wexe povre, farewel freendshipe and felaweshipe; for thou shalt be allone with-outen any companye, but-if it be the companye of povre folk." And yet seith this Pamphilles moreover: that "they that been thralle and bonde of linage shullen been maad worthy and noble by the richesses." And right so as by richesses ther comen manye goodes, right so by poverte come ther manye harmes and yveles. For greet poverte ...
14

Miller's Tale: 21

Of licorys, or any cetewale.
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 50

The lycorys and cetewale, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 22

His Almageste and bokes grete and smale,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 49

[continues previous] Ther springen herbes grete and smale,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 50

[continues previous] The lycorys and cetewale,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 51

[continues previous] And many a clowe-gilofre;
13

Miller's Tale: 23

His astrelabie, longinge for his art,
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 83

He thoughte on his londes that layen unsawe, [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 84

And his faire okes that down were y-drawe; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 24

His augrim-stones layen faire a-part
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 83

[continues previous] He thoughte on his londes that layen unsawe, [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And his faire okes that down were y-drawe; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 25

On shelves couched at his beddes heed:
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 295

For him was lever have at his beddes heed [continues next]
13

Gamelyn's Tale: 83

[continues previous] He thoughte on his londes that layen unsawe,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 84

[continues previous] And his faire okes that down were y-drawe;
10

Legend of Dido: 411

Right at her beddes heed, so gan he hye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1696

And fond, as hap was, at his beddes heed, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 26

His presse y-covered with a falding reed.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 295

[continues previous] For him was lever have at his beddes heed
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 296

[continues previous] Twenty bokes, clad in blak or reed,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1696

[continues previous] And fond, as hap was, at his beddes heed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1697

[continues previous] The copie of a tretis and a lettre,
13

Miller's Tale: 27

And al above ther lay a gay sautrye,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 298

Than robes riche, or fithele, or gay sautrye.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 299

But al be that he was a philosophre,
11

Miller's Tale: 30

And Angelus ad virginem he song;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 471

He sayde a lay, a maner song, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 472

Withoute note, withoute song, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 31

And after that he song the kinges note;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 471

[continues previous] He sayde a lay, a maner song,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 472

[continues previous] Withoute note, withoute song,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 473

[continues previous] And hit was this; for wel I can
11

Miller's Tale: 33

And thus this swete clerk his tyme spente
11

Knight's Tale: 586

But honestly and slyly he it spente, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 618

And ther-with spak this clerk, this Absolon,
11

Miller's Tale: 619

'Spek, swete brid, I noot nat wher thou art.'
11

Miller's Tale: 34

After his freendes finding and his rente.
11

Knight's Tale: 585

[continues previous] From yeer to yeer, ful prively, his rente;
11

Knight's Tale: 586

[continues previous] But honestly and slyly he it spente,
15+

Miller's Tale: 35

This Carpenter had wedded newe a wyf
15+

Manciple's Tale: 35

Now had this Phebus in his hous a wyf, [continues next]
15+

Hous of Fame 1: 175

How Creusa, daun Eneas wyf, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 36

Which that he lovede more than his lyf;
15+

Manciple's Tale: 35

[continues previous] Now had this Phebus in his hous a wyf,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 36

[continues previous] Which that he lovede more than his lyf,
15+

Hous of Fame 1: 176

[continues previous] Which that he lovede as his lyf,
13

Miller's Tale: 37

Of eightetene yeer she was of age.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 82

Of twenty yeer of age he was, I gesse. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 83

Of his stature he was of evene lengthe, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 603

Sin that his lord was twenty yeer of age; [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 680

Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 681

He to the court of Rome, in subtil wyse [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 422

The eldeste scarsly fyf yeer was of age. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 423

Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 850

That from she was twelve yeer of age, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 851

She of hir love graunt him made. [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 38

Ialous he was, and heeld hir narwe in cage,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 82

[continues previous] Of twenty yeer of age he was, I gesse.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 603

[continues previous] Sin that his lord was twenty yeer of age;
11

Clerk's Tale: 680

[continues previous] Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age,
12

Clerk's Tale: 681

[continues previous] He to the court of Rome, in subtil wyse
10

Squire's Tale: 441

And heeld hir lappe abrood, for wel she wiste [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 423

[continues previous] Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee
11

Manciple's Tale: 40

Ialous he was, and wolde have hept hir fayn;
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 850

[continues previous] That from she was twelve yeer of age,
10

Miller's Tale: 39

For she was wilde and yong, and he was old
10

Squire's Tale: 441

[continues previous] And heeld hir lappe abrood, for wel she wiste
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1030

For yong she was, and hewed bright,
10

Miller's Tale: 40

And demed him-self ben lyk a cokewold.
10

Parson's Tale: 40

... Salomon seith, that 'flaterie is wors than detraccioun.' For som-tyme detraccion maketh an hautein man be the more humble, for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce. Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of him-self be lyk that he nis nat lyk. They been lyk to Iudas that bitraysed [god; and thise flatereres bitraysen] a man to sellen him to his enemy, that is, to the devel. Flatereres been the develes chapelleyns, that singen evere Placebo. I rekene flaterye in the vyces of Ire; for ofte tyme, if o man be wrooth ... [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 41

He knew nat Catoun, for his wit was rude,
10

Parson's Tale: 40

[continues previous] ... is wors than detraccioun.' For som-tyme detraccion maketh an hautein man be the more humble, for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce. Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of him-self be lyk that he nis nat lyk. They been lyk to Iudas that bitraysed [god; and thise flatereres bitraysen] a man to sellen him to his enemy, that is, to the devel. Flatereres been the develes chapelleyns, that singen evere Placebo. I rekene flaterye in the vyces of Ire; for ofte tyme, if o man be ...
11

Miller's Tale: 43

Men sholde wedden after hir estaat,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 835

Considereth, sirs, how that, in ech estaat, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 44

For youthe and elde is often at debaat.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 836

[continues previous] Bitwixe men and gold ther is debaat
15+

Miller's Tale: 49

A ceynt she werede barred al of silk,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 359

An anlas and a gipser al of silk [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1195

For through hir smokke, wrought with silk, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 50

A barmclooth eek as whyt as morne milk
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 360

[continues previous] Heng at his girdel, whyt as morne milk. [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 361

A shirreve hadde he been, and a countour;
10

Miller's Tale: 138

As whyt as is the blosme up-on the rys. [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1196

[continues previous] The flesh was seen, as whyt as milk.
11

Miller's Tale: 51

Up-on hir lendes, ful of many a gore.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 359

[continues previous] An anlas and a gipser al of silk
10

Miller's Tale: 138

[continues previous] As whyt as is the blosme up-on the rys.
10

Clerk's Tale: 1071

Than was the revel of hir mariage. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 1072

Ful many a yeer in heigh prosperitee [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 52

Whyt was hir smok, and brouded al bifore
10

Clerk's Tale: 839

And in hir smok, with heed and foot al bare, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 1071

[continues previous] Than was the revel of hir mariage.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 221

As she were al with dogges torn; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 222

And bothe bihinde and eek biforn [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 327

And al to-torn lay eek hir here [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 53

And eek bihinde, on hir coler aboute,
13

Miller's Tale: 56

Were of the same suyte of hir coler; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 57

Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye: [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 839

[continues previous] And in hir smok, with heed and foot al bare,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 222

[continues previous] And bothe bihinde and eek biforn
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 327

[continues previous] And al to-torn lay eek hir here
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 328

[continues previous] Aboute hir shuldres, here and there,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 811

Doun by hir coler at hir bak bihinde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1660

As he that on the coler fond with-inne [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 54

Of col-blak silk, with-inne and eek with-oute.
12

Miller's Tale: 56

[continues previous] Were of the same suyte of hir coler;
13

Miller's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1660

[continues previous] As he that on the coler fond with-inne
13

Miller's Tale: 56

Were of the same suyte of hir coler;
11

Knight's Tale: 2015

And of the same suyte he cladde Arcite;
13

Miller's Tale: 53

And eek bihinde, on hir coler aboute, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 54

Of col-blak silk, with-inne and eek with-oute. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 79

A brooch she baar up-on hir lowe coler, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 811

Doun by hir coler at hir bak bihinde, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 57

Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 137

And sikerly she was of greet disport, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 138

And ful plesaunt, and amiable of port, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 153

Hir mouth ful smal, and ther-to softe and reed; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 53

[continues previous] And eek bihinde, on hir coler aboute,
13

Miller's Tale: 54

[continues previous] Of col-blak silk, with-inne and eek with-oute.
12

Miller's Tale: 79

[continues previous] A brooch she baar up-on hir lowe coler,
12

Miller's Tale: 80

[continues previous] As brood as is the bos of a bocler.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 811

[continues previous] Doun by hir coler at hir bak bihinde,
12

Miller's Tale: 58

And sikerly she hadde a likerous yë.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 137

[continues previous] And sikerly she was of greet disport,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 138

[continues previous] And ful plesaunt, and amiable of port,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 153

[continues previous] Hir mouth ful smal, and ther-to softe and reed;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 154

[continues previous] But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed;
13

Miller's Tale: 59

Ful smale y-pulled were hir browes two,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 629

With scalled browes blake, and piled berd; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 861

Bente were hir browes two, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 862

Hir yën greye, and gladde also, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 60

And tho were bent, and blake as any sloo.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 628

[continues previous] As hoot he was, and lecherous, as a sparwe;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 629

[continues previous] With scalled browes blake, and piled berd;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 861

[continues previous] Bente were hir browes two,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 862

[continues previous] Hir yën greye, and gladde also,
12

Miller's Tale: 64

And by hir girdel heeng a purs of lether
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 359

An anlas and a gipser al of silk [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 360

Heng at his girdel, whyt as morne milk. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 639

And in a purs of silk, heng on his sherte, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 65

Tasseld with silk, and perled with latoun.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 359

[continues previous] An anlas and a gipser al of silk
12

Merchant's Tale: 639

[continues previous] And in a purs of silk, heng on his sherte,
15+

Miller's Tale: 66

In al this world, to seken up and doun,
13

Knight's Tale: 1728

With baner whyt, and hardy chere and face.
15+

Knight's Tale: 1729

In al the world, to seken up and doun, [continues next]
12

Lak of Stedfastnesse: 5

Ben no-thing lyk, for turned up so doun
12

Lak of Stedfastnesse: 6

Is al this world for mede and wilfulnesse,
13

Miller's Tale: 67

There nis no man so wys, that coude thenche
11

Knight's Tale: 511

So feble eek were his spirits, and so lowe, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 512

And chaunged so, that no man coude knowe [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 1730

[continues previous] So even with-outen variacioun,
11

Knight's Tale: 1732

For ther nas noon so wys that coude seye, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 508

But in our bed he was so fresh and gay, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 970

So wel, that no man coude hir prys amende. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4758

Ne no man founden [is] so wys, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4759

Ne noon so high is of parage, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 68

So gay a popelote, or swich a wenche.
11

Knight's Tale: 511

[continues previous] So feble eek were his spirits, and so lowe,
11

Knight's Tale: 512

[continues previous] And chaunged so, that no man coude knowe
11

Knight's Tale: 1732

[continues previous] For ther nas noon so wys that coude seye,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 508

[continues previous] But in our bed he was so fresh and gay,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

[continues previous] And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose,
10

Clerk's Tale: 970

[continues previous] So wel, that no man coude hir prys amende.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4759

[continues previous] Ne noon so high is of parage,
10

Miller's Tale: 69

Ful brighter was the shyning of hir hewe
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 4

thy lawe; so that the mone som-tyme shyning with hir ful hornes,
11

Miller's Tale: 71

But of hir song, it was as loude and yerne
10

Pardoner's Tale: 70

Myn hondes and my tonge goon so yerne, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 591

And north, as loude as any thunder, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 72

As any swalwe sittinge on a berne.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 69

[continues previous] As doth a dowve sitting on a berne.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 591

[continues previous] And north, as loude as any thunder,
12

Miller's Tale: 79

A brooch she baar up-on hir lowe coler,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 472

Y-wimpled wel, and on hir heed an hat [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 56

Were of the same suyte of hir coler; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 57

Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye: [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 80

As brood as is the bos of a bocler.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 473

[continues previous] As brood as is a bokeler or a targe;
12

Miller's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Hir filet brood of silk, and set ful hye:
10

Miller's Tale: 81

Hir shoes were laced on hir legges hye;
10

Knight's Tale: 1265

Somme woln ben armed on hir legges weel,
14

Miller's Tale: 85

Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 19

Bifel that, in that seson on a day, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 216

And so bifel, by aventure or cas, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 199

But what availleth him as in this cas? [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 201

That Absolon may blowe the bukkes horn; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 339

And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?' [continues next]
13

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 907

And so bifel that, in a day or two, [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 77

And so bifel, that ones on a day [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 5

And so bifel, that on a day this frere [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 160

And so bifel sone after, on a day, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 53

But so bifel, this marchant on a day [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 271

And up-on cas bifel, that thorugh a route [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 19

[continues previous] Bifel that, in that seson on a day,
11

Knight's Tale: 217

[continues previous] That thurgh a window, thikke of many a barre
11

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas; [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 199

[continues previous] But what availleth him as in this cas? [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 200

[continues previous] She loveth so this hende Nicholas, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 201

[continues previous] That Absolon may blowe the bukkes horn; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 215

And hende Nicholas and Alisoun [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 216

Acorded been to this conclusioun, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 339

[continues previous] And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?'
13

Miller's Tale: 340

[continues previous] 'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 556

'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 646

With hende Nicholas and Alisoun. [continues next]
13

Reeve's Prologue: 1

[continues previous] Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas
13

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 907

[continues previous] And so bifel that, in a day or two,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 908

[continues previous] This senatour is to king Alla go
13

Friar's Tale: 77

[continues previous] And so bifel, that ones on a day
13

Friar's Tale: 78

[continues previous] This Somnour, ever waiting on his pray,
13

Summoner's Tale: 5

[continues previous] And so bifel, that on a day this frere
12

Physician's Tale: 160

[continues previous] And so bifel sone after, on a day,
12

Physician's Tale: 161

[continues previous] This false Iuge, as telleth us the storie,
13

Shipman's Tale: 53

[continues previous] But so bifel, this marchant on a day
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 271

[continues previous] And up-on cas bifel, that thorugh a route
11

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
10

Miller's Tale: 13

[continues previous] This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas;
11

Miller's Tale: 199

[continues previous] But what availleth him as in this cas?
11

Miller's Tale: 200

[continues previous] She loveth so this hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 216

[continues previous] Acorded been to this conclusioun,
10

Miller's Tale: 285

[continues previous] In-to the floor the dore fil anon.
10

Miller's Tale: 286

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
11

Miller's Tale: 474

With companye, him to disporte and pleye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 557

[continues previous] 'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!'
11

Miller's Tale: 646

[continues previous] With hende Nicholas and Alisoun.
10

Reeve's Tale: 38

That with hir dorste rage or ones pleye, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 876

He bringeth hir to Rome, and to his wyf [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 877

He yaf hir, and hir yonge sone also; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 145

Housbond and wyf, what so men Iape or pleye, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 5

... that destourbeth the moder to wepen in the deeth of hir child, til she have wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with ... [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 88

Whyl that hir housbond was at Oseneye,
11

Miller's Tale: 473

[continues previous] Up-on the Monday was at Oseneye
10

Reeve's Tale: 38

[continues previous] That with hir dorste rage or ones pleye,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 877

[continues previous] He yaf hir, and hir yonge sone also;
11

Merchant's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Housbond and wyf, what so men Iape or pleye,
10

Melibee's Tale: 5

[continues previous] ... moder to wepen in the deeth of hir child, til she have wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a ...
11

Miller's Tale: 90

And prively he caughte hir by the queynte,
11

Shipman's Tale: 202

And with that word he caughte hir by the flankes, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 203

And hir embraceth harde, and kiste hir ofte. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 91

And seyde, 'y-wis, but if ich have my wille,
10

Shipman's Tale: 202

[continues previous] And with that word he caughte hir by the flankes,
11

Shipman's Tale: 203

[continues previous] And hir embraceth harde, and kiste hir ofte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 870

Gan in him-self assure, and thus he seyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 871

'If ich aright have taken of yow hede,
11

Miller's Tale: 97

And with hir heed she wryed faste awey,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 285

And with hir heed she touched hevene,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4358

For [in] a twinkling tourneth hir wheel.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4359

She can wrythe hir heed awey,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 561

At whiche she lough, and gan hir faste excuse, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 98

And seyde, 'I wol nat kisse thee, by my fey,
10

Knight's Tale: 268

'Nay,' quod Arcite, 'in ernest, by my fey! [continues next]
11

Cook's Prologue: 32

'Thou seist ful sooth,' quod Roger, 'by my fey, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 802

Er I be deed, yet wol I kisse thee."
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 803

And neer he cam, and kneled faire adoun,
10

Friar's Tale: 237

'I graunte,' quod the devel, 'by my fey.' [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 103

'Algates wel-come be ye, by my fey!' [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 976

'Right wel,' quod she, 'my lord; for, in good fey, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 283

And seyde, 'ther wol I nat lese my name;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 495

That, by my trouthe, I wol thee nat biwreye.'
11

Manciple's Prologue: 13

For he shal telle a tale, by my fey! [continues next]
11

Manciple's Prologue: 14

Al-though it be nat worth a botel hey. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 561

[continues previous] At whiche she lough, and gan hir faste excuse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 562

[continues previous] And seyde, 'it rayneth; lo, how sholde I goon?'
13

Miller's Tale: 99

Why, lat be,' quod she, 'lat be, Nicholas,
10

Knight's Tale: 268

[continues previous] 'Nay,' quod Arcite, 'in ernest, by my fey!
12

Miller's Tale: 327

'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye; [continues next]
11

Cook's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] 'Thou seist ful sooth,' quod Roger, 'by my fey,
10

Friar's Tale: 237

[continues previous] 'I graunte,' quod the devel, 'by my fey.'
13

Summoner's Tale: 102

[continues previous] 'Ye, god amende defautes, sir,' quod she,
13

Summoner's Tale: 103

[continues previous] 'Algates wel-come be ye, by my fey!'
10

Clerk's Tale: 976

[continues previous] 'Right wel,' quod she, 'my lord; for, in good fey,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] Al-though it be nat worth a botel hey.
13

Hous of Fame 2: 484

'Lat be,' quod he, 'thy fantasye; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 100

Or I wol crye out "harrow" and "allas."
12

Miller's Tale: 327

[continues previous] 'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye;
13

Merchant's Tale: 1122

'Out! help! allas! harrow!' he gan to crye,
13

Hous of Fame 2: 483

[continues previous] With that this egle gan to crye:
12

Miller's Tale: 101

Do wey your handes for your curteisye!'
12

Miller's Prologue: 15

Ne abyde no man for his curteisye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 302

Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas! [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 102

This Nicholas gan mercy for to crye,
11

Knight's Tale: 1484

That she was wel ny mad, and gan to crye, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1485

For she ne wiste what it signifyed; [continues next]
12

Miller's Prologue: 16

[continues previous] But in Pilates vois he gan to crye,
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas! [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1076

And pitously gan mercy for to crye; [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 103

And spak so faire, and profred hir so faste,
11

Knight's Tale: 1484

[continues previous] That she was wel ny mad, and gan to crye,
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
11

Hous of Fame 3: 585

Al esely, and not to faste, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5126

Fro Love, that hath thee so faste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 673

For I sey nought that she so sodeynly [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 674

Yaf him hir love, but that she gan enclyne [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1076

[continues previous] And pitously gan mercy for to crye;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1077

[continues previous] And after that he seyde, and ley ful loude,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 580

She graunted him, sith he hir that bisoughte, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 104

That she hir love him graunted atte laste,
10

Reeve's Tale: 186

Til in a dich they caughte him atte laste. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 748

Wel rather than han graunted him hir grace; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 749

And hem reioysen in hir cruel pryde, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1069

That I wolde graunten him his sighte ageyn, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 444

A longe while to wayten hir she stood
12

Squire's Tale: 445

Till atte laste she spak in this manere
12

Shipman's Tale: 381

And wantounly agayn with him she pleyde;
12

Shipman's Tale: 382

Til, atte laste, that this Marchant seyde,
12

Melibee's Tale: 44

... comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 280

To no man deigned hir for to be bonde. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 366

He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 367

And fettred hir, and eek hir children tweye, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... god yeven in helle to hem that been dampned; but the light and the cleernesse shal be yeven in hevene to hise children'; right as the gode man yeveth flesh to hise children, and bones to his houndes. And for they shullen have noon hope to escape, seith seint Iob atte laste: that 'ther shal horrour and grisly drede dwellen with-outen ende.' Horrour is alwey drede of harm that is to come, and this drede shal evere dwelle in the hertes of hem that been dampned. And therefore han they lorn al hir hope, for sevene causes. First, for god that is ... [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 447

Til Iupiter, lo, atte laste, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 448

Him slow, and fro the carte caste. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 586

[continues previous] That hit be knowen atte laste.'
11

Anelida and Arcite: 188

For she ne graunted him in hir livinge
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5125

[continues previous] And if thou scape yit, atte laste,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 5126

[continues previous] Fro Love, that hath thee so faste
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 673

[continues previous] For I sey nought that she so sodeynly
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 674

[continues previous] Yaf him hir love, but that she gan enclyne
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 580

[continues previous] She graunted him, sith he hir that bisoughte, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 105

And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent,
10

Knight's Tale: 101

And swoor his ooth, as he was trewe knight,
10

Miller's Tale: 239

And seyde, 'I am adrad, by seint Thomas,
10

Miller's Tale: 275

He saugh nat that. But yet, by seint Thomas,
10

Reeve's Tale: 187

[continues previous] Wery and weet, as beste is in the reyn,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 18

I seye sooth, by seint Thomas of Inde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 748

[continues previous] Wel rather than han graunted him hir grace;
10

Merchant's Tale: 749

[continues previous] And hem reioysen in hir cruel pryde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1068

[continues previous] I yeve it up; but sith I swoor myn ooth
12

Melibee's Tale: 44

[continues previous] ... comandeth and biddeth him do sinne." And the Iuges and sovereyns mighten in hir land so muchel suffre of the shrewes and misdoeres, that they sholden by swich suffrance, by proces of tyme, wexen of swich power and might, that they sholden putte out the Iuges and the sovereyns from hir places, and atte laste maken hem lesen hir lordshipes.
11

Monk's Tale: 280

[continues previous] To no man deigned hir for to be bonde.
11

Monk's Tale: 281

[continues previous] But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
12

Monk's Tale: 366

[continues previous] He made hir flee, and atte laste hir hente,
12

Monk's Tale: 367

[continues previous] And fettred hir, and eek hir children tweye,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... world shal god yeven in helle to hem that been dampned; but the light and the cleernesse shal be yeven in hevene to hise children'; right as the gode man yeveth flesh to hise children, and bones to his houndes. And for they shullen have noon hope to escape, seith seint Iob atte laste: that 'ther shal horrour and grisly drede dwellen with-outen ende.' Horrour is alwey drede of harm that is to come, and this drede shal evere dwelle in the hertes of hem that been dampned. And therefore han they lorn al hir hope, for sevene causes. First, for god that is hir Iuge shal be with-outen ...
10

Hous of Fame 2: 448

[continues previous] Him slow, and fro the carte caste.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 41

Thoughte I, 'By Seynt Thomas of Kent!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 581

[continues previous] And, as his nece, obeyed as hir oughte.
11

Miller's Tale: 107

Whan that she may hir leyser wel espye.
10

Clerk's Tale: 230

And than I may at leyser hir biholde,
10

Clerk's Tale: 231

If she this wey un-to the castel holde.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 184

And if myn housbond eek it mighte espye, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 318

Whan that she leyser hadde, and for to entende
11

Legend of Dido: 426

And, whan she mighte her tyme wel espye,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4259

Whan that she hereth, or may espye,
11

Miller's Tale: 108

'Myn housbond is so ful of Ialousye,
10

Merchant's Tale: 236

Conseil to axe of any that is here; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 237

But that ye been so ful of sapience, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 184

[continues previous] And if myn housbond eek it mighte espye,
12

Miller's Tale: 109

That but ye wayte wel and been privee,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 661

But wel I woot he lyed right in dede; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 202

This knight answerde, 'allas! and weylawey! [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 203

I woot right wel that swich was my biheste. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 237

[continues previous] But that ye been so ful of sapience,
10

Franklin's Tale: 599

Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me; [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 600

And in myn hand your trouthe plighten ye [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 610

But wel I woot the rokkes been aweye!' [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.' [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4523

But wel I woot I was in rage, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde; [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 110

I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 661

[continues previous] But wel I woot he lyed right in dede;
12

Knight's Tale: 264

I nam but deed; ther nis namore to seye.'
12

Knight's Tale: 416

I nam but deed; ther nis no remedye.'
12

Reeve's Tale: 369

Myn herte is broken, help, I nam but deed;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] That gentil text can I wel understonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 149

'My leve mooder,' quod this knight certeyn,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 150

'I nam but deed, but-if that I can seyn
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 203

[continues previous] I woot right wel that swich was my biheste.
11

Friar's Tale: 295

I may nat go so fer,' quod she, 'ne ryde,
11

Friar's Tale: 296

But I be deed, so priketh it in my syde.
11

Franklin's Tale: 272

'No, by that lord,' quod she, 'that maked me!
11

Franklin's Tale: 273

For wel I woot that it shal never bityde.
10

Franklin's Tale: 599

[continues previous] Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me;
11

Franklin's Tale: 610

[continues previous] But wel I woot the rokkes been aweye!'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

[continues previous] mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.'
10

Legend of Dido: 66

'I nam no goddes, soothly,' quod she tho;
13

Book of the Duchesse: 204

For certes, swete, I nam but deed; [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1188

And, but I telle hir, I nam but deed;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1189

And if I telle hir, to seye sooth,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 30

That no wight woot that she is deed, but I;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4523

[continues previous] But wel I woot I was in rage,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

[continues previous] For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 338

[continues previous] Therfore I dar this fully undertake.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1498

So thenk I nam but deed, with-oute more.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1246

I nam but deed, ther nis non other bote!
13

Miller's Tale: 111

'Ye moste been ful derne, as in this cas.'
11

Miller's Tale: 339

And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?' [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 59

Y-tukked up, with arwes in her cas?' [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 60

'Nay, soothly, lady,' quod this Eneas; [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 205

[continues previous] Ye shul me never on lyve y-see.
11

Miller's Tale: 112

'Nay ther-of care thee noght,' quod Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 340

[continues previous] 'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
11

Legend of Dido: 60

[continues previous] 'Nay, soothly, lady,' quod this Eneas;
12

Miller's Tale: 113

'A clerk had litherly biset his whyle,
12

Clerk's Tale: 195

Wol he nat wedde? allas, allas the whyle! [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 114

But-if he coude a Carpenter bigyle.'
12

Clerk's Tale: 196

[continues previous] Why wol he thus him-self and us bigyle?' [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 115

And thus they been acorded and y-sworn
12

Clerk's Tale: 196

[continues previous] Why wol he thus him-self and us bigyle?'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 507

And thus acorded been thise shrewes tweye [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 116

To wayte a tyme, as I have told biforn.
12

Knight's Tale: 290

To forthre me, as I have told biforn.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 639

And walke I wolde, as I had doon biforn, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 535

To wayte a tyme of his conclusioun;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 508

[continues previous] To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1100

This Troilus, as I biforn have told, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1101

Thus dryveth forth, as wel as he hath might. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 117

Whan Nicholas had doon thus everydeel,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 639

[continues previous] And walke I wolde, as I had doon biforn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1101

[continues previous] Thus dryveth forth, as wel as he hath might.
11

Miller's Tale: 123

This gode wyf wente on an haliday;
11

Reeve's Tale: 309

And on this gode wyf he leyth on sore.
11

Miller's Tale: 124

Hir forheed shoon as bright as any day,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 503

Hit was of golde, and shoon so bright, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 125

So was it wasshen whan she leet hir werk.
11

Hous of Fame 1: 503

[continues previous] Hit was of golde, and shoon so bright,
10

Miller's Tale: 127

The which that was y-cleped Absolon.
10

Franklin's Tale: 210

Which that y-cleped was Aurelius,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 129

Which that y-cleped was Valerian, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 130

And day was comen of hir mariage, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 654

Which that y-cleped was Oënone,
10

Miller's Tale: 128

Crul was his heer, and as the gold it shoon,
10

Franklin's Tale: 518

That in his hote declinacioun
10

Franklin's Tale: 519

Shoon as the burned gold with stremes brighte;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 129

[continues previous] Which that y-cleped was Valerian,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 130

[continues previous] And day was comen of hir mariage,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 296

Hir heer, that oundy was and crips,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 297

As burned gold hit shoon to see.
12

Miller's Tale: 131

His rode was reed, his eyen greye as goos;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 151

Ful semely hir wimpel pinched was;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 152

Hir nose tretys; hir eyen greye as glas;
11

Miller's Tale: 134

Y-clad he was ful smal and proprely,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 890

For nought y-clad in silk was he, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 135

Al in a kirtel of a light wachet;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 890

[continues previous] For nought y-clad in silk was he,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 891

[continues previous] But al in floures and flourettes,
11

Miller's Tale: 136

Ful faire and thikke been the poyntes set.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 566

A rose gerland had she set. [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 137

And ther-up-on he hadde a gay surplys
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 361

A shirreve hadde he been, and a countour; [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 156

As whyt as is a lily-flour, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 157

In which he wol debate. [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 5

And undernethe he hadde a whyt surplys. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 567

[continues previous] She hadde [in honde] a gay mirour,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 568

And with a riche gold tressour
15+

Miller's Tale: 138

As whyt as is the blosme up-on the rys.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 360

[continues previous] Heng at his girdel, whyt as morne milk.
10

Miller's Tale: 50

A barmclooth eek as whyt as morne milk
10

Miller's Tale: 51

Up-on hir lendes, ful of many a gore.
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 156

[continues previous] As whyt as is a lily-flour,
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 5

[continues previous] And undernethe he hadde a whyt surplys.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1015

As whyt as lilie or rose in rys,
12

Miller's Tale: 139

A mery child he was, so god me save,
11

Cook's Tale: 6

Dauncen he coude so wel and Iolily, [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 7

That he was cleped Perkin Revelour. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

Whan that he wolde han my bele chose, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 434

He was, so wel dissimulen he coude. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 140

Wel coude he laten blood and clippe and shave,
11

Cook's Tale: 6

[continues previous] Dauncen he coude so wel and Iolily,
11

Cook's Tale: 7

[continues previous] That he was cleped Perkin Revelour.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

[continues previous] And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

[continues previous] Whan that he wolde han my bele chose,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 434

[continues previous] He was, so wel dissimulen he coude.
12

Miller's Tale: 142

In twenty manere coude he trippe and daunce
11

Squire's Tale: 312

This hors anoon bigan to trippe and daunce,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5678

For he suffrith in pacience.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5679

They laugh and daunce, trippe and singe,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5680

And ley not up for her living,
11

Miller's Tale: 144

And with his legges casten to and fro,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 513

And casten with our dartes to and fro, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 145

And pleyen songes on a small rubible;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 513

[continues previous] And casten with our dartes to and fro,
15+

Miller's Tale: 147

And as wel coude he pleye on his giterne.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 110

Of wode-craft wel coude he al the usage. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 111

Upon his arm he bar a gay bracer, [continues next]
15+

Cook's Tale: 32

Al conne he pleye on giterne or ribible. [continues next]
12

Cook's Tale: 33

Revel and trouthe, as in a low degree, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 961

'Therto she coude so wel pleye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 960

But Pandarus, that so wel coude fele [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 961

In every thing, to pleye anoon bigan, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 288

For in his herte he coude wel devyne, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 429

'That we may pleye us best in al this toun?' [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 148

In al the toun nas brewhous ne taverne
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 110

[continues previous] Of wode-craft wel coude he al the usage.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 605

Ther nas baillif, ne herde, ne other hyne, [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 2

In al the route nas ther yong ne old [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 3

That he ne seyde it was a noble storie, [continues next]
15+

Cook's Tale: 32

[continues previous] Al conne he pleye on giterne or ribible.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 342

For nother cold nor hoot hit nas,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 343

Ne in al the welken was a cloude.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 961

[continues previous] In every thing, to pleye anoon bigan,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 289

[continues previous] That Troilus al night for sorwe wook;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 429

[continues previous] 'That we may pleye us best in al this toun?'
11

Miller's Tale: 149

That he ne visited with his solas,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 605

[continues previous] Ther nas baillif, ne herde, ne other hyne,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 606

[continues previous] That he ne knew his sleighte and his covyne;
11

Miller's Prologue: 3

[continues previous] That he ne seyde it was a noble storie,
10

Miller's Tale: 150

Ther any gaylard tappestere was.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 118

And somdel lasse it was than Seine, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 151

But sooth to seyn, he was somdel squaymous
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 286

But sooth to seyn, I noot how men him calle.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 117

[continues previous] As any welle is, sooth to seyne;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 118

[continues previous] And somdel lasse it was than Seine,
11

Miller's Tale: 153

This Absolon, that Iolif was and gay,
11

Miller's Tale: 169

And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 502

Up rist this Ioly lover Absolon,
10

Miller's Tale: 503

And him arrayeth gay, at point-devys.
11

Shipman's Tale: 209

And forth she gooth, as Iolif as a pye, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 210

And bad the cokes that they sholde hem hye, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 109

Iolif and gay, ful of gladnesse, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 154

Gooth with a sencer on the haliday,
11

Miller's Tale: 169

[continues previous] And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous,
11

Shipman's Tale: 209

[continues previous] And forth she gooth, as Iolif as a pye,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 108

[continues previous] To singe on bowes blosmed fayre.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 110

[continues previous] Toward a river I gan me dresse,
11

Miller's Tale: 156

And many a lovely look on hem he caste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 314

On other thing his look som-tyme he caste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 315

And eft on hir, whyl that servyse laste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1259

And up his look debonairly he caste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 157

And namely on this carpenteres wyf.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 315

[continues previous] And eft on hir, whyl that servyse laste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

[continues previous] And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste.
11

Miller's Tale: 158

To loke on hir him thoughte a mery lyf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 401

That I shal lede now so mery a lyf, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 487

Saugh never his lyf so mery a wedded man. [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 378

To loke on hir, and ofte hir bek to kisse.
11

Miller's Tale: 159

She was so propre and swete and likerous.
10

Clerk's Tale: 255

And al that lyketh me, I dar wel seyn [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 256

It lyketh thee, and specially therfore [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 401

[continues previous] That I shal lede now so mery a lyf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 402

[continues previous] So delicat, with-outen wo and stryf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 485

And certeinly, I dar right wel seyn this, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 487

[continues previous] Saugh never his lyf so mery a wedded man.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1002

And I dar seyn and swere hit wel — [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1767

The sight only, and the savour, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 160

I dar wel seyn, if she had been a mous,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 144

She wolde wepe, if that she sawe a mous [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 145

Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 293

Or elles artow fals, I dar wel seyn.'
12

Knight's Tale: 1028

I dar wel seyn that in this world ther nas.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 929

I dar wel seyn hir hadde lever a knyf
12

Summoner's Tale: 148

I dar wel seyn that, er that half an hour
12

Clerk's Tale: 255

[continues previous] And al that lyketh me, I dar wel seyn
11

Merchant's Tale: 485

[continues previous] And certeinly, I dar right wel seyn this,
12

Franklin's Tale: 521

Wher-as he shoon ful pale, I dar wel seyn.
12

Physician's Tale: 15

Or grave, or peynte; for I dar wel seyn,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 971

For I dar sweren, if that she
10

Book of the Duchesse: 972

Had among ten thousand be,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1002

[continues previous] And I dar seyn and swere hit wel
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1766

[continues previous] For certeinly, I dar wel seyn,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1266

Yet were al lost, that dar I wel seyn, certes,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1296

And see now why; for this I dar wel seyn,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1297

That if so is that she untrewe be,
14

Miller's Tale: 161

And he a cat, he wolde hir hente anon.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 144

[continues previous] She wolde wepe, if that she sawe a mous
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 145

[continues previous] Caught in a trappe, if it were deed or bledde.
12

Miller's Tale: 186

So woweth hir, that him is wo bigon. [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 501

Whan that the firste cok hath crowe, anon [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 162

This parish-clerk, this Ioly Absolon,
12

Miller's Tale: 185

[continues previous] Fro day to day this Ioly Absolon
13

Miller's Tale: 471

This parish-clerk, this amorous Absolon,
11

Miller's Tale: 485

This Absolon ful Ioly was and light,
14

Miller's Tale: 502

[continues previous] Up rist this Ioly lover Absolon, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 163

Hath in his herte swich a love-longinge,
14

Miller's Tale: 501

[continues previous] Whan that the firste cok hath crowe, anon
11

Miller's Tale: 519

Y-wis, lemman, I have swich love-longinge, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 520

That lyk a turtel trewe is my moorninge; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 901

Thou hast me wounded in myn herte, o wyf! [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 25

... be he lasse worth than that other is, per-aventure; and eek he waiteth or desyreth to sitte, or elles to goon above him in the wey, or kisse pax, or been encensed, or goon to offring biforn his neighebore, and swiche semblable thinges; agayns his duetee, per-aventure, but that he hath his herte and his entente in swich a proud desyr to be magnifyed and honoured biforn the peple.
11

Miller's Tale: 164

That of no wyf ne took he noon offringe;
11

Miller's Tale: 520

[continues previous] That lyk a turtel trewe is my moorninge;
11

Merchant's Tale: 901

[continues previous] Thou hast me wounded in myn herte, o wyf!
11

Merchant's Tale: 902

[continues previous] No spot of thee ne knew I al my lyf.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4256

Unto hir husbonde a trewe wyf;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4257

Ne noon so ful of honestee,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4258

That she nil laughe and mery be
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 202

To chambre he wente; of no-thing took he hede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 203

Ne noon to him dar speke a word for drede.
11

Miller's Tale: 165

For curteisye, he seyde, he wolde noon.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 649

And al his sorwe he to the mone tolde; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 650

And seyde, 'y-wis, whan thou art horned newe, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 166

The mone, whan it was night, ful brighte shoon,
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 11

That Phebus, which that shoon so clere and brighte, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 12

Degrees was fyve and fourty clombe on highte; [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 133

Of oon that shoon ful brighte. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 163

For sekirly his face shoon so brighte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 649

[continues previous] And al his sorwe he to the mone tolde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 650

[continues previous] And seyde, 'y-wis, whan thou art horned newe,
11

Miller's Tale: 167

And Absolon his giterne hath y-take,
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 11

[continues previous] That Phebus, which that shoon so clere and brighte,
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 12

[continues previous] Degrees was fyve and fourty clombe on highte;
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 132

[continues previous] For paramour and Iolitee
11

Miller's Tale: 168

For paramours, he thoghte for to wake.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 163

[continues previous] For sekirly his face shoon so brighte,
14

Miller's Tale: 169

And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous,
11

Miller's Tale: 153

This Absolon, that Iolif was and gay,
11

Miller's Tale: 154

Gooth with a sencer on the haliday,
12

Miller's Tale: 509

And stille he stant under the shot-windowe; [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 268

Toforn him gooth the loude minstralcye, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 269

Til he cam to his chambre of parements, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 605

And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 209

And forth she gooth, as Iolif as a pye,
11

Shipman's Tale: 210

And bad the cokes that they sholde hem hye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 301

Til he cam in-to Brugges merily. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 302

Now gooth this marchant faste and bisily [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 170

Til he cam to the carpenteres hous
11

Miller's Tale: 507

For ther-by wende he to ben gracious.
12

Miller's Tale: 508

[continues previous] He rometh to the carpenteres hous,
12

Miller's Tale: 509

[continues previous] And stille he stant under the shot-windowe;
11

Miller's Tale: 636

Ne breed ne ale, til he cam to the celle
10

Reeve's Prologue: 7

By-cause he was of carpenteres craft. [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 57

So longe he wente hous by hous, til he
13

Summoner's Tale: 58

Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be
14

Squire's Tale: 268

[continues previous] Toforn him gooth the loude minstralcye,
14

Squire's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Til he cam to his chambre of parements,
13

Squire's Tale: 605

[continues previous] And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 441

Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde
12

Shipman's Tale: 301

[continues previous] Til he cam in-to Brugges merily.
10

Miller's Tale: 171

A litel after cokkes hadde y-crowe;
10

Reeve's Prologue: 8

[continues previous] A litel ire is in his herte y-laft,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 1

After this she stinte a litel; and, after that she hadde gadered [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 172

And dressed him up by a shot-windowe
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 1

[continues previous] After this she stinte a litel; and, after that she hadde gadered
12

Miller's Tale: 173

That was up-on the carpenteres wal.
12

Knight's Tale: 1110

The portreiture, that was up-on the wal
11

Knight's Tale: 1111

With-inne the temple of mighty Mars the rede?
12

Miller's Tale: 601

And wente un-to the carpenteres wal. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 174

He singeth in his vois gentil and smal,
11

Miller's Tale: 601

[continues previous] And wente un-to the carpenteres wal.
12

Miller's Tale: 602

[continues previous] He cogheth first, and knokketh ther-with-al
12

Miller's Tale: 175

'Now, dere lady, if thy wille be,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1602

If yourë wille be, as I yow preyde, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 176

I preye yow that ye wol rewe on me,'
10

Miller's Prologue: 32

Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye;
10

Miller's Prologue: 33

For I wol telle a legende and a lyf
11

Clerk's Tale: 513

But o thing wol I preye yow of your grace,
11

Clerk's Tale: 514

That, but my lord forbad yow, atte leste
13

Second Nun's Tale: 77

Now help, for to my werk I wol me dresse.
13

Second Nun's Tale: 78

Yet preye I yow that reden that I wryte,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 101

That, thogh ye never wil upon me rewe,
11

Compleint to His Lady: 102

I moste yow love, and ever been as trewe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 460

Ye wolden on me rewe er that I deyde!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1601

[continues previous] And seyde to Deiphebus, 'wole ye goon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1602

[continues previous] If yourë wille be, as I yow preyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1531

But afterward, ful sore it wol us rewe. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1532

And help me god so at my moste nede [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1624

As for a freend, ye may in me assure.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1625

Yet preye I yow on yvel ye ne take,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1626

That it is short which that I to yow wryte;
12

Miller's Tale: 177

Ful wel acordaunt to his giterninge.
11

Miller's Tale: 630

This carpenter out of his slomber sterte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1531

[continues previous] But afterward, ful sore it wol us rewe.
11

Miller's Tale: 178

This carpenter awook, and herde him singe,
11

Miller's Tale: 630

[continues previous] This carpenter out of his slomber sterte,
11

Miller's Tale: 631

[continues previous] And herde oon cryen 'water' as he were wood,
10

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 773

And to him spak, and thus seyde in his game, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 179

And spak un-to his wyf, and seyde anon,
10

Miller's Tale: 534

'Thanne make thee redy,' quod she, 'I come anon;'
10

Miller's Tale: 535

And un-to Nicholas she seyde stille,
10

Friar's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
10

Friar's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 586

In al his drede, un-to the fox he spak,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 587

And seyde, 'sire, if that I were as ye,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 773

[continues previous] And to him spak, and thus seyde in his game,
10

Miller's Tale: 181

That chaunteth thus under our boures wal?'
10

Miller's Tale: 491

That stant ful lowe up-on his boures wal.
10

Miller's Tale: 182

And she answerde hir housbond ther-with-al,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 505

And I answerde ageyn, and seyde, 'yis, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 506

Now knowe I hir! And is this good Alceste, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 183

'Yis, god wot, Iohn, I here it every-del.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 729

And in the croslet hastily it fel. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 273

Yis! god wot, sixty bokes olde and newe
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 505

[continues previous] And I answerde ageyn, and seyde, 'yis,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 506

[continues previous] Now knowe I hir! And is this good Alceste,
15+

Miller's Tale: 184

This passeth forth; what wol ye bet than wel?
11

Shipman's Tale: 414

For I wol paye yow wel and redily [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 730

[continues previous] Now gode sirs, what wol ye bet than wel? [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 731

Whan that this preest thus was bigyled ageyn, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 481

To lyken hir the bet for his renoun; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 126

It is a thing wel bet than swiche fyve.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that?
15+

Miller's Tale: 185

Fro day to day this Ioly Absolon
12

Miller's Tale: 162

This parish-clerk, this Ioly Absolon, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 471

This parish-clerk, this amorous Absolon, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 485

This Absolon ful Ioly was and light,
12

Miller's Tale: 502

Up rist this Ioly lover Absolon, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 415

[continues previous] Fro day to day; and, if so be I faille,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 731

[continues previous] Whan that this preest thus was bigyled ageyn,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 482

[continues previous] Fro day to day in armes so he spedde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 961

Fro day to day, til this day, by the morwe,
15+

Miller's Tale: 186

So woweth hir, that him is wo bigon.
12

Miller's Tale: 161

[continues previous] And he a cat, he wolde hir hente anon.
15+

Miller's Tale: 472

[continues previous] That is for love alwey so wo bigon,
12

Miller's Tale: 503

[continues previous] And him arrayeth gay, at point-devys.
11

Franklin's Tale: 588

Noght wolde I telle how me is wo bigon;
10

Miller's Tale: 189

He woweth hir by menes and brocage,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 491

He woweth hir, but it availleth noght,
12

Miller's Tale: 190

And swoor he wolde been hir owne page;
11

Anelida and Arcite: 101

And swoor he wolde dyen for distresse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 112

Comaunde it him, and seyde he doon it wolde. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 113

For trewely he swoor hir, as a knight, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 191

He singeth, brokkinge as a nightingale;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 112

[continues previous] Comaunde it him, and seyde he doon it wolde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 113

[continues previous] For trewely he swoor hir, as a knight,
10

Miller's Tale: 194

And for she was of toune, he profred mede.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 12

mede ne may ben dissevered fro good folk. For no wight as by [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 195

For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 260

And som, for gentillesse and daliaunce; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 261

Som, for hir handes and hir armes smale; [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 83

And som for veyne glorie, and som for hate. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 84

For, whan I dar non other weyes debate, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 12

[continues previous] mede ne may ben dissevered fro good folk. For no wight as by
15+

Miller's Tale: 196

And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

[continues previous] Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

[continues previous] Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse;
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 260

[continues previous] And som, for gentillesse and daliaunce;
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 261

[continues previous] Som, for hir handes and hir armes smale;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 83

[continues previous] And som for veyne glorie, and som for hate.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 84

[continues previous] For, whan I dar non other weyes debate,
10

Legend of Dido: 209

Som for to were, and som for to presente [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 197

Somtyme, to shewe his lightnesse and maistrye,
10

Legend of Dido: 209

[continues previous] Som for to were, and som for to presente
15+

Miller's Tale: 199

But what availleth him as in this cas?
14

Miller's Tale: 85

Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 339

And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?' [continues next]
15+

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 200

She loveth so this hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas;
14

Miller's Tale: 86

[continues previous] That on a day this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 87

[continues previous] Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 211

Now bere thee wel, thou hende Nicholas! [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas
13

Miller's Tale: 339

[continues previous] And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?'
13

Miller's Tale: 340

[continues previous] 'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
10

Miller's Tale: 556

'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas,
10

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!'
15+

Reeve's Prologue: 1

[continues previous] Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 201

That Absolon may blowe the bukkes horn;
11

Miller's Tale: 85

[continues previous] Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas,
14

Miller's Tale: 86

[continues previous] That on a day this hende Nicholas
15+

Miller's Tale: 212

[continues previous] For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.'
15+

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 345

Me thoughte I herde an hunte blowe [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 346

Tassaye his horn, and for to knowe [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 202

He ne hadde for his labour but a scorn;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 346

[continues previous] Tassaye his horn, and for to knowe
15+

Miller's Tale: 205

Ful sooth is this proverbe, it is no lye,
14

Reeve's Tale: 399

And therfore this proverbe is seyd ful sooth,
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

... folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."'
15+

Monk's Tale: 256

This proverbe is ful sooth and ful commune.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 203

As in a woman; and this is no lye. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 206

Men seyn right thus, 'alwey the nye slye
11

Legend of Lucretia: 204

[continues previous] And as of men, loketh which tirannye
10

Miller's Tale: 207

Maketh the ferre leve to be looth.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 308

For to be deed, though me were looth to deye.' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 208

For though that Absolon be wood or wrooth,
11

Friar's Tale: 278

I wol han twelf pens, though that she be wood,
11

Friar's Tale: 279

Or I wol sompne hir un-to our offyce;
10

Clerk's Tale: 308

[continues previous] For to be deed, though me were looth to deye.'
11

Miller's Tale: 209

By-cause that he fer was from hir sighte,
11

Miller's Tale: 257

And at the laste he hadde of him a sighte. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 233

By-cause that he was hir neighebour,
10

Franklin's Tale: 234

And was a man of worship and honour,
11

Miller's Tale: 210

This nye Nicholas stood in his lighte.
11

Miller's Tale: 258

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat gaping ever up-righte,
15+

Miller's Tale: 211

Now bere thee wel, thou hende Nicholas!
15+

Miller's Tale: 200

She loveth so this hende Nicholas, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 340

'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 341

'If thou wolt werken after lore and reed; [continues next]
14

Reeve's Prologue: 2

Of Absolon and hende Nicholas, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 212

For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.'
15+

Miller's Tale: 201

[continues previous] That Absolon may blowe the bukkes horn;
10

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
11

Miller's Tale: 340

[continues previous] 'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
14

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
12

Shipman's Tale: 118

For I may singe "allas" and "weylawey, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 61

Bestes and briddes coude speke and singe. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

And so bifel, that in a daweninge, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4104

For him ful oft I singe 'allas!'
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4105

For I ne may nought, thurgh his ire,
12

Miller's Tale: 213

And so bifel it on a Saterday,
11

Friar's Tale: 77

And so bifel, that ones on a day [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 5

And so bifel, that on a day this frere [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 160

And so bifel sone after, on a day, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 52

Na more of this as now, for it suffyseth. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 53

But so bifel, this marchant on a day [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 118

[continues previous] For I may singe "allas" and "weylawey,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 61

[continues previous] Bestes and briddes coude speke and singe.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

[continues previous] And so bifel, that in a daweninge,
15+

Miller's Tale: 214

This carpenter was goon til Osenay;
11

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!' [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 645

For whan he spak, he was anon bore doun [continues next]
10

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 78

[continues previous] This Somnour, ever waiting on his pray,
11

Summoner's Tale: 5

[continues previous] And so bifel, that on a day this frere
11

Physician's Tale: 161

[continues previous] This false Iuge, as telleth us the storie,
11

Shipman's Tale: 53

[continues previous] But so bifel, this marchant on a day
15+

Miller's Tale: 215

And hende Nicholas and Alisoun
11

Miller's Tale: 13

[continues previous] This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas;
11

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas! [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 556

[continues previous] 'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 557

[continues previous] 'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!' [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 646

[continues previous] With hende Nicholas and Alisoun.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1311

And that anoon, these ilke lordes two; [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 216

Acorded been to this conclusioun,
11

Miller's Tale: 86

[continues previous] That on a day this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 87

[continues previous] Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
10

Miller's Tale: 557

[continues previous] 'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!'
10

Reeve's Prologue: 1

[continues previous] Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1309

A sothe of al; ther is no more to done.'
15+

Miller's Tale: 217

That Nicholas shal shapen him a wyle
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1311

[continues previous] And that anoon, these ilke lordes two;
11

Miller's Tale: 220

She sholde slepen in his arm al night,
11

Shipman's Tale: 315

That for thise hundred frankes he sholde al night
11

Shipman's Tale: 316

Have hir in his armes bolt-upright;
14

Miller's Tale: 221

For this was his desyr and hir also.
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 811

And I wol erly shape me therfore.' [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 634

And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two, [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 703

And do ther-with as ye han doon er this [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 222

And right anon, with-outen wordes mo,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 810

[continues previous] Tel me anon, with-outen wordes mo,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 811

[continues previous] And I wol erly shape me therfore.'
12

Miller's Tale: 464

With-outen wordes mo, they goon to bedde
13

Miller's Tale: 633

[continues previous] He sit him up with-outen wordes mo,
13

Miller's Tale: 634

[continues previous] And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 30

'Telle on thy tale with-outen wordes mo.'
13

Pardoner's Tale: 350

And wente his wey with-outen wordes mo. [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 702

[continues previous] 'Of quik-silver, with-outen wordes mo,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 703

[continues previous] And do ther-with as ye han doon er this
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1405

To telle in short, with-outen wordes mo,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 234

To telle in short, with-oute wordes mo, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 235

This Pandarus, with-outen any lette, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 500

With-outen wordes mo, I wol be deed.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 764

For which, with-outen any wordes mo,
15+

Miller's Tale: 223

This Nicholas no lenger wolde tarie,
11

Friar's Tale: 305

Yif me twelf pens, I may no lenger tarie.'
14

Merchant's Tale: 562

Wolde go to bedde, he wolde no lenger tarie.
11

Franklin's Tale: 505

Ye tarie us heer no lenger than to-morwe.'
13

Pardoner's Tale: 351

[continues previous] He hath a thousand slayn this pestilence:
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 523

And forth he gooth, no lenger wolde he tarie, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 250

And doun he gooth, no lenger wolde he lette, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1332

No lenger wolde he that he kepte
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 235

[continues previous] This Pandarus, with-outen any lette,
15+

Miller's Tale: 224

But doth ful softe un-to his chambre carie
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 524

[continues previous] Into the toun, un-to a pothecarie,
10

Shipman's Tale: 251

[continues previous] But hastily a messe was ther seyd,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1330

The God of Love ful hastely
11

Miller's Tale: 225

Bothe mete and drinke for a day or tweye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 729

Thus pleyned Dorigene a day or tweye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 60

With him and with his wyf a day or tweye,
10

Shipman's Tale: 74

This marchant and this monk, a day or tweye.
10

Shipman's Tale: 75

The thridde day, this marchant up aryseth,
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been in defaute of clothing: ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1413

And doon my reed with-inne a day or tweye, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 226

And to hir housbonde bad hir for to seye,
12

Franklin's Tale: 14

To take him for hir housbonde and hir lord,
10

Franklin's Tale: 88

That loveth hir housbonde as hir hertes lyf. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 89

For his absence wepeth she and syketh, [continues next]
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

Whanne dame Prudence, ful debonairly and with greet pacience, hadde herd al that hir housbonde lyked for to seye, thanne axed she of him licence for to speke, and seyde in this wyse. 'My lord,' quod she, 'as to your firste resoun, certes it may lightly been answered. For I seye, that it is no folie to chaunge conseil whan the thing is chaunged; or elles whan the thing ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1414

[continues previous] I wol to yow oblige me to deye.'
13

Miller's Tale: 227

If that he axed after Nicholas,
10

Franklin's Tale: 88

[continues previous] That loveth hir housbonde as hir hertes lyf.
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Whanne dame Prudence, ful debonairly and with greet pacience, hadde herd al that hir housbonde lyked for to seye, thanne axed she of him licence for to speke, and seyde in this wyse. 'My lord,' quod she, 'as to your firste resoun, certes it may lightly been answered. For I seye, that it is no folie to chaunge conseil whan the thing is ...
13

Miller's Tale: 228

She sholde seye she niste where he was,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 286

So glad he was, he niste what to seye;
13

Man of Law's Tale: 287

She kiste hir sone, and hoom she gooth hir weye.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 874

She was in swich array; ne she nil seye [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 875

Of hir estaat, althogh she sholde deye. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 234

Or elles lost, he niste where;
11

Hous of Fame 1: 235

How she gan him comforte tho,
11

Miller's Tale: 229

Of al that day she saugh him nat with yë;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 875

[continues previous] Of hir estaat, althogh she sholde deye.
11

Franklin's Tale: 464

The gretteste that ever were seyn with yë. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 465

He saugh of hem an hondred slayn with houndes, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 230

She trowed that he was in maladye,
11

Franklin's Tale: 464

[continues previous] The gretteste that ever were seyn with yë.
11

Franklin's Tale: 465

[continues previous] He saugh of hem an hondred slayn with houndes,
10

Miller's Tale: 231

For, for no cry, hir mayde coude him calle;
10

Squire's Tale: 421

That nolde han wept, if that he wepe coude, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 232

He nolde answere, for no-thing that mighte falle.
11

Knight's Tale: 1845

Al be it that this aventure was falle, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1846

He nolde noght disconforten hem alle. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 421

[continues previous] That nolde han wept, if that he wepe coude,
10

Squire's Tale: 422

[continues previous] For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude.
11

Miller's Tale: 233

This passeth forth al thilke Saterday,
11

Knight's Tale: 1845

[continues previous] Al be it that this aventure was falle,
12

Miller's Tale: 235

And eet and sleep, or dide what him leste,
10

Merchant's Tale: 929

I yeve it yow, maketh chartres as yow leste; [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 282

Til he have caught that what him leste; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 236

Til Sonday, that the sonne gooth to reste.
11

Miller's Tale: 414

Go, save our lyf, and that I thee biseche.' [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 429

Him thinketh verraily that he may see [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 930

[continues previous] This shal be doon to-morwe er sonne reste.
12

Hous of Fame 1: 282

[continues previous] Til he have caught that what him leste;
13

Parlement of Foules: 265

And on a bed of golde she lay to reste,
13

Parlement of Foules: 266

Til that the hote sonne gan to weste.
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 7

To knowe the arch of the day, that some folk callen the day artificial, from the sonne arysing til hit go to reste. Set the degree of thy sonne up-on thyn est orisonte, and ley thy label on the degree of the sonne, and at the poynt of thy label in the bordure set a prikke. Turn thanne thy riet aboute til the degree of the sonne sit up-on the west orisonte, and ley thy ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 12

Special declaracioun of the houres of planetes. Understond wel, that evere-mo, fro the arysing of the sonne til it go to reste, the nadir of the sonne shal shewe the houre of the planete, and fro that tyme forward al the night til the sonne aryse; than shal the verrey degree of the sonne shewe the houre of the planete. Ensample as thus. The 13 day of March fil up-on a Saterday per aventure, and, at the arising of the sonne, I fond the secounde degree of Aries sitting up-on myn est orisonte, al-be-it that it was but lite; than fond I the 2 degree of Libra, nadir of my sonne, dessending on my west orisonte, up-on which west orisonte every day generally, at the sonne ariste, entreth the houre of any planete, after which planete the day bereth his name; and endeth in the nexte stryk of the plate under the forseide west orisonte; and evere, as the sonne climbeth uppere and uppere, so goth his nadir dounere and dounere, teching by swich strykes the houres of planetes by ordre as they sitten in the hevene. The first houre inequal of every Satterday is to Saturne; and the secounde, to Iupiter; the 3, to Mars; the 4, to the Sonne; the 5, to Venus; the 6, to Mercurius; the 7, to the Mone; and thanne agayn, the 8 is to Saturne; the 9, to Iupiter; the 10, to Mars; the 11, to the Sonne; the 12, to Venus; and now is my sonne gon to reste as for that Setterday. Thanne sheweth the verrey degree of the sonne the houre of Mercurie entring under my west orisonte at eve; and next him succedeth the Mone; and so forth by ordre, planete after planete, in houre after houre, al the night longe til the sonne aryse. Now ryseth the sonne that Sonday by the morwe; and the nadir of the sonne, up-on the west orizonte, sheweth me the entring of the houre of the forseide sonne. And in this maner succedeth planete under planete, fro Saturne un-to the Mone, and fro the Mone up a-gayn to Saturne, houre after houre generaly. And thus knowe I this conclusioun. ...
11

Miller's Tale: 237

This sely carpenter hath greet merveyle
11

Miller's Tale: 415

[continues previous] This sely carpenter goth forth his wey.
11

Miller's Tale: 428

[continues previous] This sely carpenter biginneth quake;
11

Miller's Tale: 239

And seyde, 'I am adrad, by seint Thomas,
10

Miller's Tale: 105

And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent,
11

Miller's Tale: 275

He saugh nat that. But yet, by seint Thomas, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 667

Why that I rente out of his book a leef,
10

Merchant's Prologue: 18

I seye sooth, by seint Thomas of Inde, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 240

It stondeth nat aright with Nicholas.
11

Miller's Tale: 275

[continues previous] He saugh nat that. But yet, by seint Thomas,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] As for the more part, I sey nat alle. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Prologue: 20

God shilde that it sholde so bifalle! [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 241

God shilde that he deyde sodeynly!
10

Knight's Tale: 1988

'In al this world, that som tyme he ne deyde. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Prologue: 20

[continues previous] God shilde that it sholde so bifalle!
10

Miller's Tale: 242

This world is now ful tikel, sikerly;
10

Knight's Tale: 1988

[continues previous] 'In al this world, that som tyme he ne deyde.
10

Knight's Tale: 1989

[continues previous] This world nis but a thurghfare ful of wo,
11

Miller's Tale: 244

That now, on Monday last, I saugh him wirche.
11

Miller's Tale: 478

And seyde, 'I noot, I saugh him here nat wirche
10

Miller's Tale: 479

Sin Saterday; I trow that he be went
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 651

And whan this alkamistre saugh his tyme, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 245

Go up,' quod he un-to his knave anoon,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 338

That oon of hem gan callen to his knave,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 339

'Go bet,' quod he, 'and axe redily,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 651

[continues previous] And whan this alkamistre saugh his tyme,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 652

[continues previous] 'Rys up,' quod he, 'sir preest, and stondeth by me;
11

Miller's Tale: 247

Loke how it is, and tel me boldely.'
11

Summoner's Tale: 522

To every man y-lyke? tel me how?
11

Summoner's Tale: 523

It is an inpossible, it may nat be!
13

Miller's Tale: 250

He cryde and knokked as that he were wood:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 638

Thanne wolde he speke, and crye as he were wood.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 639

And whan that he wel dronken hadde the wyn,
13

Friar's Tale: 244

The carter smoot, and cryde, as he were wood,
12

Miller's Tale: 251

'What! how! what do ye, maister Nicholay?
12

Miller's Tale: 291

'What! Nicholay! what, how! what! loke adoun! [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 393

And thou wolt seyn, "hayl, maister Nicholay!
13

Miller's Tale: 252

How may ye slepen al the longe day?'
11

Knight's Tale: 1162

The cook y-scalded, for al his longe ladel. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 291

[continues previous] 'What! Nicholay! what, how! what! loke adoun!
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 668

What sholde I tarien al the longe day? [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 669

He took the chalk, and shoop it in the wyse [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 545

And seyde, "a-wake, ye slepen al to longe;
11

Miller's Tale: 253

But al for noght, he herde nat a word;
11

Knight's Tale: 1162

[continues previous] The cook y-scalded, for al his longe ladel.
11

Knight's Tale: 1163

[continues previous] Noght was foryeten by the infortune of Marte;
11

Knight's Tale: 1790

But al for noght, he was broght to the stake.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 668

[continues previous] What sholde I tarien al the longe day?
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 669

[continues previous] He took the chalk, and shoop it in the wyse
11

Book of the Duchesse: 324

Ful clere, and nat an hole y-crased, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 510

Made him that he ne herde me noght;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 511

For he had wel nigh lost his minde,
11

Miller's Tale: 254

An hole he fond, ful lowe up-on a bord,
11

Miller's Tale: 491

That stant ful lowe up-on his boures wal.
10

Squire's Tale: 85

And up he rydeth to the heighe bord. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 267

Roos fro his bord, ther that he sat ful hye. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 324

[continues previous] Ful clere, and nat an hole y-crased,
11

Miller's Tale: 255

Ther as the cat was wont in for to crepe;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 17

For ther as wont to walken was an elf,
10

Squire's Tale: 86

[continues previous] In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
11

Squire's Tale: 267

[continues previous] Roos fro his bord, ther that he sat ful hye.
11

Miller's Tale: 257

And at the laste he hadde of him a sighte.
11

Miller's Tale: 209

By-cause that he fer was from hir sighte, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 258

This Nicholas sat gaping ever up-righte,
11

Miller's Tale: 210

[continues previous] This nye Nicholas stood in his lighte.
11

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 287

And ever gaped upward in-to the eir. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 259

As he had kyked on the newe mone.
11

Miller's Tale: 286

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 558

His newe sorwe, and eek his Ioyes olde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 649

And al his sorwe he to the mone tolde; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 260

Adoun he gooth, and tolde his maister sone
12

Parson's Tale: 52

A philosophre up-on a tyme, that wolde have beten his disciple for his grete trespas, for which he was greetly amoeved, and broghte a yerde to scourge the child; and whan this child saugh the yerde, he seyde to his maister, 'what thenke ye to do?' 'I wol bete thee,' quod the maister, 'for thy correccion.' 'For sothe,' quod the child, 'ye oghten first correcte youre-self, that han lost al youre pacience for the gilt of a child.' 'For sothe,' quod the maister al wepinge, 'thou seyst sooth; have thou the ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 557

[continues previous] Ay as he rood, to Pandarus he tolde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 558

[continues previous] His newe sorwe, and eek his Ioyes olde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 649

[continues previous] And al his sorwe he to the mone tolde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 650

[continues previous] And seyde, 'y-wis, whan thou art horned newe,
12

Miller's Tale: 261

In what array he saugh this ilke man.
12

Parson's Tale: 52

[continues previous] A philosophre up-on a tyme, that wolde have beten his disciple for his grete trespas, for which he was greetly amoeved, and broghte a yerde to scourge the child; and whan this child saugh the yerde, he seyde to his maister, 'what thenke ye to do?' 'I wol bete thee,' quod the maister, 'for thy correccion.' 'For sothe,' quod the child, 'ye oghten first correcte youre-self, that han lost al youre pacience for the gilt of a child.' 'For sothe,' quod the maister al wepinge, 'thou seyst sooth; have thou the yerde, ...
12

Miller's Tale: 264

A man woot litel what him shal bityde.
10

Franklin's Tale: 273

For wel I woot that it shal never bityde.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5620

He cast nought what shal him bityde.
10

Miller's Tale: 266

In som woodnesse or in som agonye;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7656

Or som man in som maner wyse
11

Miller's Tale: 267

I thoghte ay wel how that it sholde be!
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 59

establisshed or cryed grevous and inplitable coempcioun, that men [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 60

sayen wel it sholde greetly turmenten and endamagen al the [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 126

studies of men, who is he to whom it sholde seme that he ne [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 127

sholde nat only leven thise thinges, but eek gladly herkne [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 74

For wel, thoghte he, she sholde nat be geten [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 75

And ay the more that he was in dispair, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 268

Men sholde nat knowe of goddes privetee.
12

Miller's Prologue: 55

An housbond shal nat been inquisitif
12

Miller's Prologue: 56

Of goddes privetee, nor of his wyf.
11

Miller's Tale: 372

I wol nat tellen goddes privetee.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 59

[continues previous] establisshed or cryed grevous and inplitable coempcioun, that men
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 126

[continues previous] studies of men, who is he to whom it sholde seme that he ne
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 127

[continues previous] sholde nat only leven thise thinges, but eek gladly herkne
11

Legend of Lucretia: 74

[continues previous] For wel, thoghte he, she sholde nat be geten
12

Miller's Tale: 269

Ye, blessed be alwey a lewed man,
12

Friar's Tale: 47

His maister knew nat alwey what he wan.
12

Friar's Tale: 48

With-outen mandement, a lewed man
12

Miller's Tale: 272

He walked in the feeldes for to prye
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 564

I seye, that in the feeldes walked we, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 273

Up-on the sterres, what ther sholde bifalle,
10

Miller's Tale: 11

Or if men axed him what sholde bifalle
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 564

[continues previous] I seye, that in the feeldes walked we,
11

Miller's Tale: 275

He saugh nat that. But yet, by seint Thomas,
10

Miller's Tale: 105

And swoor hir ooth, by seint Thomas of Kent,
11

Miller's Tale: 239

And seyde, 'I am adrad, by seint Thomas,
11

Miller's Tale: 240

It stondeth nat aright with Nicholas.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 667

Why that I rente out of his book a leef,
10

Merchant's Prologue: 18

I seye sooth, by seint Thomas of Inde,
12

Miller's Tale: 276

Me reweth sore of hende Nicholas.
12

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 14

Of derne love he coude and of solas; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas
12

Miller's Tale: 302

Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
11

Merchant's Epilogue: 14

Me reweth sore I am un-to hir teyd. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 277

He shal be rated of his studying,
12

Miller's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Of derne love he coude and of solas;
12

Miller's Tale: 281

He shal out of his studying, as I gesse' — [continues next]
10

Merchant's Epilogue: 13

[continues previous] But, wite ye what? in conseil be it seyd,
13

Miller's Tale: 278

If that I may, by Iesus, hevene king!
11

Miller's Tale: 281

[continues previous] He shal out of his studying, as I gesse' —
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 325

May understonde that Iesus, hevene king, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 279

Get me a staf, that I may underspore,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 325

[continues previous] May understonde that Iesus, hevene king,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 326

[continues previous] Ne wolde nat chese a vicious living.
12

Miller's Tale: 281

He shal out of his studying, as I gesse' —
12

Miller's Tale: 277

He shal be rated of his studying,
11

Miller's Tale: 278

If that I may, by Iesus, hevene king!
12

Miller's Tale: 282

And to the chambre-dore he gan him dresse.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1002

The morwe cam, and Alla gan him dresse, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1003

And eek his wyf, this emperour to mete; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 719

To him anon, and his pouder caste in [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1773

And for to shete gan him dresse; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1774

The arowis name was Simplesse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 71

And gan to calle, and dresse him up to ryse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 37

Whan Diomede on horse gan him dresse,
15+

Miller's Tale: 283

His knave was a strong carl for the nones,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 547

The Miller was a stout carl, for the nones, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 565

For he was yong and mighty for the nones, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 566

And ther-to be was strong and big of bones [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1003

[continues previous] And eek his wyf, this emperour to mete;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 718

[continues previous] This chanoun with his stikke gan him dresse
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 719

[continues previous] To him anon, and his pouder caste in
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1772

[continues previous] Another arowe into his bowe,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1774

[continues previous] The arowis name was Simplesse.
12

Miller's Tale: 284

And by the haspe he haf it up atones;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 547

[continues previous] The Miller was a stout carl, for the nones,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 548

[continues previous] Ful big he was of braun, and eek of bones;
11

Knight's Tale: 566

[continues previous] And ther-to be was strong and big of bones
11

Miller's Tale: 285

In-to the floor the dore fil anon.
10

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 313

This Nicholas his dore faste shette, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 534

'Thanne make thee redy,' quod she, 'I come anon;' [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 620

This Nicholas anon leet flee a fart, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
10

Miller's Tale: 86

[continues previous] That on a day this hende Nicholas
10

Miller's Tale: 87

[continues previous] Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 258

This Nicholas sat gaping ever up-righte, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 259

As he had kyked on the newe mone. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 313

[continues previous] This Nicholas his dore faste shette,
11

Miller's Tale: 535

[continues previous] And un-to Nicholas she seyde stille,
10

Miller's Tale: 620

[continues previous] This Nicholas anon leet flee a fart,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 730

This sely man sat stille, as he were deed;
10

Summoner's Tale: 492

The lady of the hous ay stille sat,
13

Clerk's Tale: 65

In crepeth age alwey, as stille as stoon, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 275

Iustinus, that ay stille sat and herde, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 276

Right in this wyse to Placebo answerde: [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 574

The bryde was broght a-bedde as stille as stoon; [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 171

Stant in the court, as stille as any stoon.
13

Squire's Tale: 172

This knight is to his chambre lad anon,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 263

Gamelyn in the place stood as stille as stoon,
14

Gamelyn's Tale: 423

Adam took Gamelyn as stille as ony stoon, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 235

Abood, to knowen what this peple mente,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 236

As stille as any stoon; til at the laste,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 309

Abood, to knowen what this peple mente,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 310

As stille as any stoon; til at the laste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 600

And sette here doun as stille as any stoon, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1494

To Troilus, as stille as any stoon, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1495

And al this thing he tolde him, word and ende; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 699

And stille as stoon, with-outen lenger lette, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 354

In-to the derke chaumbre, as stille as stoon, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1729

As stille as stoon; a word ne coude he seye.
14

Miller's Tale: 287

And ever gaped upward in-to the eir.
11

Miller's Tale: 258

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat gaping ever up-righte,
13

Clerk's Tale: 66

[continues previous] And deeth manaceth every age, and smit
12

Merchant's Tale: 275

[continues previous] Iustinus, that ay stille sat and herde,
13

Merchant's Tale: 575

[continues previous] And whan the bed was with the preest y-blessed,
14

Gamelyn's Tale: 424

[continues previous] And ladde him in-to spence rapely and anon,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 600

[continues previous] And sette here doun as stille as any stoon,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 601

[continues previous] And every word gan up and doun to winde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1495

[continues previous] And al this thing he tolde him, word and ende;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 699

[continues previous] And stille as stoon, with-outen lenger lette,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 354

[continues previous] In-to the derke chaumbre, as stille as stoon,
12

Miller's Tale: 291

'What! Nicholay! what, how! what! loke adoun!
12

Miller's Tale: 251

'What! how! what do ye, maister Nicholay?
12

Miller's Tale: 252

How may ye slepen al the longe day?'
12

Miller's Tale: 297

'Iesu Crist, and seynt Benedight,
12

Friar's Tale: 263

'Heyt, now!' quod he, 'ther Iesu Crist yow blesse, [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 264

And al his handwerk, bothe more and lesse! [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 298

Blesse this hous from every wikked wight,
12

Friar's Tale: 263

[continues previous] 'Heyt, now!' quod he, 'ther Iesu Crist yow blesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1065

For every wight that hath an hous to founde [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 299

For nightes verye, the white pater-noster!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1065

[continues previous] For every wight that hath an hous to founde
12

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 13

This clerk was cleped hende Nicholas;
11

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 87

Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 102

This Nicholas gan mercy for to crye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 103

And spak so faire, and profred hir so faste, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 200

She loveth so this hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 211

Now bere thee wel, thou hende Nicholas! [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 212

For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 214

This carpenter was goon til Osenay; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 215

And hende Nicholas and Alisoun [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 216

Acorded been to this conclusioun, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 276

Me reweth sore of hende Nicholas. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 339

And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 340

'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 556

'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!' [continues next]
11

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
12

Reeve's Prologue: 2

Of Absolon and hende Nicholas, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 794

I gan biholde; til atte laste [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 302

Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
10

Knight's Tale: 498

Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde 'allas,' [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 499

For seen his lady shal he never-mo. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 87

[continues previous] Fil with this yonge wyf to rage and pleye,
11

Miller's Tale: 101

[continues previous] Do wey your handes for your curteisye!'
11

Miller's Tale: 102

[continues previous] This Nicholas gan mercy for to crye,
11

Miller's Tale: 103

[continues previous] And spak so faire, and profred hir so faste,
11

Miller's Tale: 212

[continues previous] For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.'
11

Miller's Tale: 215

[continues previous] And hende Nicholas and Alisoun
11

Miller's Tale: 216

[continues previous] Acorded been to this conclusioun,
12

Miller's Tale: 276

[continues previous] Me reweth sore of hende Nicholas.
11

Miller's Tale: 340

[continues previous] 'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
10

Miller's Tale: 557

[continues previous] 'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!'
11

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
12

Reeve's Prologue: 3

[continues previous] Diverse folk diversely they seyde;
12

Reeve's Prologue: 4

But, for the more part, they loughe and pleyde,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 1084

This fresshe May, that is so bright and shene,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 1085

Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde!
10

Monk's Tale: 454

For wo his armes two he gan to byte,
10

Monk's Tale: 455

And seyde, 'allas, fortune! and weylaway!
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 183

How that his felawe gan up-on him calle,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 184

And seyde, 'allas! for in an oxes stalle
11

Hous of Fame 2: 376

And with this word upper to sore
11

Hous of Fame 2: 377

He gan, and seyde, 'By Seynt Iame!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 794

[continues previous] I gan biholde; til atte laste
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 795

[continues previous] A lady gan me for to espye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 192

Gan for to syke, or lete his eyen bayten
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 751

'Awake!' he gan to syke wonder sore,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 752

And seyde, 'freend, though that I stille lye,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 827

And with that thought he gan ful sore syke,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 828

And seyde, 'allas! what is me best to do?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 884

Quod tho Criseyde, and gan ther-with to syke,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 885

And seyde, 'lord, is there swich blisse among
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 812

And with that word she gan ful sore syke.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1172

And seyde, 'allas! upon my sorwes syke
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun,
11

Miller's Tale: 303

Shal al the world be lost eftsones now?'
10

Knight's Tale: 499

[continues previous] For seen his lady shal he never-mo.
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... hise sinnes, whiche sinnes openly been shewed biforn god and biforn every creature. And on the left syde, mo develes than herte may bithinke, for to harie and drawe the sinful soules to the pyne of helle. And with-inne the hertes of folk shal be the bytinge conscience, and with-oute-forth shal be the world al brenninge. Whider shal thanne the wrecched sinful man flee to hyden him? Certes, he may nat hyden him; he moste come forth and shewen him.' For certes, as seith seint Ierome: 'the erthe shal casten him out of him, and the see also; and the eyr also, that shal be ful of thonder-clappes ...
11

Miller's Tale: 304

This carpenter answerde, 'what seystow?
11

Miller's Tale: 336

This carpenter answerde, 'allas, my wyf!
11

Miller's Tale: 657

For what so that this carpenter answerde, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 305

What! thenk on god, as we don, men that swinke.'
11

Miller's Tale: 657

[continues previous] For what so that this carpenter answerde,
13

Miller's Tale: 307

And after wol I speke in privetee
12

Squire's Tale: 663

And after wol I speke of Algarsyf, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 667

And after wol I speke of Cambalo, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 668

That faught in listes with the bretheren two [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 47

I lerned never rethoryk certeyn; [continues next]
13

Franklin's Prologue: 48

Thing that I speke, it moot be bare and pleyn. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 62

After Accidie wol I speke of Avarice and of Coveitise, of which sinne seith seint Paule, that 'the rote of alle harmes is Coveitise': Ad Timotheum, sexto capitulo. For soothly, whan the herte of a man is confounded in it-self and troubled, and that the soule hath lost the confort of god, thanne seketh he an ydel solas ... [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6102

And this thing wot I wel, certeyn, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6103

If I speke ought to peire hir loos, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 308

Of certeyn thing that toucheth me and thee;
13

Reeve's Tale: 321

But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle, [continues next]
13

Reeve's Tale: 322

Whan that thou wendest homward by the melle, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 663

[continues previous] And after wol I speke of Algarsyf,
11

Squire's Tale: 666

[continues previous] Ne hadde he ben holpen by the stede of bras;
12

Squire's Tale: 667

[continues previous] And after wol I speke of Cambalo,
13

Franklin's Prologue: 47

[continues previous] I lerned never rethoryk certeyn;
13

Franklin's Prologue: 48

[continues previous] Thing that I speke, it moot be bare and pleyn.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 319

How that the second heste of god is that. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 320

And forther over, I wol thee telle al plat, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 481

Thy profit wol I telle thee anon. [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 62

[continues previous] After Accidie wol I speke of Avarice and of Coveitise, of which sinne seith seint Paule, that 'the rote of alle harmes is Coveitise': Ad Timotheum, sexto capitulo. For soothly, whan the herte of a man is confounded in it-self and troubled, and that the soule hath lost the confort of god, thanne seketh he an ydel solas of ...
10

Hous of Fame 2: 78

Wher Ioves wol me stellifye, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 93

I wol thee telle what I am, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 552

'But er I go, thus muche I wol thee telle, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4989

'Where Elde abit, I wol thee telle [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6102

[continues previous] And this thing wot I wel, certeyn,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6774

For I wol speke, and telle it thee, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1662

Eek other thing, that toucheth not to here, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 309

I wol telle it non other man, certeyn.'
13

Reeve's Tale: 321

[continues previous] But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle,
12

Franklin's Tale: 379

For to non other creature certeyn [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 320

[continues previous] And forther over, I wol thee telle al plat,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 481

[continues previous] Thy profit wol I telle thee anon.
10

Hous of Fame 2: 77

[continues previous] Shal I non other weyes dye?
10

Hous of Fame 2: 78

[continues previous] Wher Ioves wol me stellifye,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 93

[continues previous] I wol thee telle what I am,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 552

[continues previous] 'But er I go, thus muche I wol thee telle,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4989

[continues previous] 'Where Elde abit, I wol thee telle
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6774

[continues previous] For I wol speke, and telle it thee,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6775

[continues previous] Al shulde I dye, and be put doun,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

[continues previous] He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now,
12

Miller's Tale: 310

This carpenter goth doun, and comth ageyn,
10

Miller's Tale: 415

This sely carpenter goth forth his wey.
12

Franklin's Tale: 378

[continues previous] He knew of al this wo and al this werk.
12

Franklin's Tale: 380

[continues previous] Of this matere he dorste no word seyn.
12

Miller's Tale: 312

And whan that ech of hem had dronke his part,
11

Knight's Tale: 764

When ech of hem had leyd his feith to borwe.
10

Merchant's Tale: 446

Han take hir leve, and ech of hem of other.
10

Merchant's Tale: 447

For whan they sawe it moste nedes be,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 15

Fayn he wolde it were dressed among hem alle,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 16

That ech of hem hadde his part as it mighte falle.
12

Miller's Tale: 313

This Nicholas his dore faste shette,
11

Miller's Tale: 285

In-to the floor the dore fil anon.
11

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
11

Miller's Tale: 448

He shette his dore with-oute candel-light, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 85

For which ful faste his countour-dore he shette; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 589

And his maister shette the dore anon, [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 257

Ther as this Minotaur hath his dwelling, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 258

Right faste by the dore, at his entring. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 232

He rist him up, and every dore he shette [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 233

And windowe eek, and tho this sorweful man [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 314

And doun the carpenter by him he sette.
10

Knight's Tale: 682

Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 683

And sette him doun with-outen any more: [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 449

[continues previous] And dressed al thing as it sholde be.
12

Miller's Tale: 476

Ful prively after Iohn the carpenter; [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 477

And he drough him a-part out of the chirche, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 537

This Absolon doun sette him on his knees, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 412

And doun anon he sette him on his knee.
10

Franklin's Tale: 297

And on his knowes bare he sette him doun,
10

Franklin's Tale: 298

And in his raving seyde his orisoun.
10

Shipman's Tale: 86

[continues previous] And eek he nolde that no man sholde him lette
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

... sermon hem anoyeth. For Iesus Syrak seith: that "musik in wepinge is anoyous thing;" this is to seyn: as muche availleth to speken bifore folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."' [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 589

[continues previous] And his maister shette the dore anon,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 590

[continues previous] And to hir labour speedily they gon.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 258

[continues previous] Right faste by the dore, at his entring.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 259

[continues previous] And Theseus is lad unto his deeth,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1228

And doun she sette hir by him on a stoon
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 232

[continues previous] He rist him up, and every dore he shette
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 233

[continues previous] And windowe eek, and tho this sorweful man
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 849

Welcomed him, and doun by hir him sette; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 850

And he was ethe y-nough to maken dwelle. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 315

He seyde, 'Iohn, myn hoste lief and dere,
10

Knight's Tale: 682

[continues previous] Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke,
12

Miller's Tale: 476

[continues previous] Ful prively after Iohn the carpenter;
12

Miller's Tale: 477

[continues previous] And he drough him a-part out of the chirche,
11

Miller's Tale: 538

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I am a lord at alle degrees;
10

Shipman's Tale: 98

'O dere cosin myn, daun Iohn,' she sayde,
10

Shipman's Tale: 282

Answerde, and seyde, 'o cosin myn, daun Iohn,
11

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... sermon hem anoyeth. For Iesus Syrak seith: that "musik in wepinge is anoyous thing;" this is to seyn: as muche availleth to speken bifore folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 217

And to him-self right thus he spak, and seyde:
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 218

'Wher is myn owene lady lief and dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 850

[continues previous] And he was ethe y-nough to maken dwelle.
10

Miller's Tale: 316

Thou shall up-on thy trouthe swere me here,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 753

Yis, sir.' 'Swere thy trouthe ther-to.'
12

Miller's Tale: 317

That to no wight thou shalt this conseil wreye;
12

Melibee's Tale: 20

... that thou ne mayst nat thyn owene conseil hyde, how darstou prayen any other wight thy conseil secreely to kepe?" But nathelees, if thou wene sikerly that the biwreying of thy conseil to a persone wol make thy condicioun to stonden in the bettre plyt, thanne shaltou tellen him thy conseil in this wyse. First, thou shalt make no semblant whether thee were lever pees or werre, or this or that, ne shewe him nat thy wille and thyn entente; for trust wel, that comunly thise conseillours been flatereres, namely the conseillours of grete lordes; for they enforcen hem alwey rather to speken plesante wordes, enclyninge to the lordes ...
10

Parson's Tale: 44

Speke we now of wikked conseil; for he that wikked conseil yeveth is a traytour. For he deceyveth him that trusteth in him, ut Achitofel ad Absolonem. But natheless, yet is his wikked conseil first agayn him-self. For, as seith the wyse man, every fals livinge hath this propertee in him-self, that he that wole anoye another man, he anoyeth first ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 284

That is to seye, that thou us never wreye; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 318

For it is Cristes conseil that I seye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 26

And take this for a general reule, that every conseil that is affermed so strongly that it may nat be chaunged, for no condicioun that may bityde, I seye that thilke conseil is wikked.'
10

Parson's Tale: 44

[continues previous] Speke we now of wikked conseil; for he that wikked conseil yeveth is a traytour. For he deceyveth him that trusteth in him, ut Achitofel ad Absolonem. But natheless, yet is his wikked conseil first agayn him-self. For, as seith the wyse man, every fals livinge hath this propertee in him-self, that he that wole anoye another man, he anoyeth first him-self. And ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 284

[continues previous] That is to seye, that thou us never wreye;
13

Miller's Tale: 323

Quod tho this sely man, 'I nam no labbe,
10

Knight's Tale: 1953

Therfor I stinte, I nam no divinistre; [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 88

... or never a deel. I seye nat that if thou be assigned to the penitauncer for certein sinne, that thou art bounde to shewen him al the remenaunt of thy sinnes, of whiche thou hast be shriven to thy curat, but-if it lyke to thee of thyn humilitee; this is no departinge of shrifte. Ne I seye nat, ther-as I speke of divisioun of confessioun, that if thou have lycence for to shryve thee to a discreet and an honeste preest, where thee lyketh, and by lycence of thy curat, that thou ne mayst wel shryve thee to him of alle ... [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 66

'I nam no goddes, soothly,' quod she tho;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 499

In storye noon, ne no man here, I wene; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 324

Ne, though I seye, I nam nat lief to gabbe.
10

Knight's Tale: 1952

[continues previous] As I cam never, I can nat tellen wher.
10

Knight's Tale: 1953

[continues previous] Therfor I stinte, I nam no divinistre;
10

Knight's Tale: 1954

[continues previous] Of soules finde I nat in this registre,
10

Merchant's Tale: 327

To my purpos; Placebo, what sey ye?' [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 328

'I seye, it is a cursed man,' quod he, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 47

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, ...
10

Parson's Tale: 88

[continues previous] ... I seye nat that if thou be assigned to the penitauncer for certein sinne, that thou art bounde to shewen him al the remenaunt of thy sinnes, of whiche thou hast be shriven to thy curat, but-if it lyke to thee of thyn humilitee; this is no departinge of shrifte. Ne I seye nat, ther-as I speke of divisioun of confessioun, that if thou have lycence for to shryve thee to a discreet and an honeste preest, where thee lyketh, and by lycence of thy curat, that thou ne mayst wel shryve thee to him of alle thy sinnes. But lat no blotte be bihinde; lat ...
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 121

hath it. Gabbe I of this?. Thou wolt seye "nay." Certes, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 59

they han deserved, than yif no peyne of Iustice ne chastysede
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 60

hem. Ne this ne seye I nat now, for that any man mighte
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 499

[continues previous] In storye noon, ne no man here, I wene;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 500

[continues previous] And though I wolde I coude not, y-wis;
13

Miller's Tale: 325

Sey what thou wolt, I shal it never telle
10

Merchant's Tale: 327

[continues previous] To my purpos; Placebo, what sey ye?'
11

Franklin's Tale: 256

Ne shal I never been untrewe wyf [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 108

wold it, that is to seyn, the savacioun of the senat, ne I shal never [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 109

leten to wilne it, and that I confesse and am aknowe; but the [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 4

'Axe me,' quod I, 'at thy wille, what thou wolt, and I shal
13

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 121

[continues previous] hath it. Gabbe I of this?. Thou wolt seye "nay." Certes,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1009

With the nones that thou wolt do so,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1010

That I shal never fro thee go,
15+

Miller's Tale: 326

To child ne wyf, by him that harwed helle!'
15+

Summoner's Tale: 399

Now help, Thomas, for him that harwed helle! [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 256

[continues previous] Ne shal I never been untrewe wyf
11

Franklin's Tale: 257

[continues previous] In word ne werk, as fer as I have wit:
11

Melibee's Tale: 14

... governed me by thy conseil, it sholde seme that I hadde yeve to thee over me the maistrie; and god forbede that it so were. For Iesus Syrak seith; "that if the wyf have maistrie, she is contrarious to hir housbonde." And Salomon seith: "never in thy lyf, to thy wyf, ne to thy child, ne to thy freend, ne yeve no power over thy-self. For bettre it were that thy children aske of thy persone thinges that hem nedeth, than thou see thy-self in the handes of thy children." And also, if I wolde werke by thy conseilling, certes my conseilling moste som tyme be secree, ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 108

[continues previous] wold it, that is to seyn, the savacioun of the senat, ne I shal never
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 109

[continues previous] leten to wilne it, and that I confesse and am aknowe; but the
15+

Miller's Tale: 327

'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye;
12

Miller's Tale: 99

Why, lat be,' quod she, 'lat be, Nicholas,
12

Miller's Tale: 100

Or I wol crye out "harrow" and "allas."
11

Reeve's Tale: 56

But right fair was hir heer, I wol nat lye. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye; [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 399

[continues previous] Now help, Thomas, for him that harwed helle!
13

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 495

That, by my trouthe, I wol thee nat biwreye.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 496

'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 125

I counseille yow the beste, I wol nat lye, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye, [continues next]
10

Legend of Lucretia: 173

'Be as be may,' quod she, 'of forgiving, [continues next]
10

Legend of Lucretia: 174

I wol nat have no forgift for no-thing.' [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 328

I have y-founde in myn astrologye,
11

Reeve's Tale: 56

[continues previous] But right fair was hir heer, I wol nat lye.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

[continues previous] He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye;
13

Franklin's Tale: 842

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 495

[continues previous] That, by my trouthe, I wol thee nat biwreye.'
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 125

[continues previous] I counseille yow the beste, I wol nat lye,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

[continues previous] Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 174

[continues previous] I wol nat have no forgift for no-thing.'
11

Miller's Tale: 331

Shal falle a reyn and that so wilde and wood,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1008

A wilde fyr and corrupt pestilence
11

Merchant's Tale: 1009

So falle up-on your bodies yet to-night!
13

Miller's Tale: 332

That half so greet was never Noës flood.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 676

Was never trompe of half so greet a soun. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 1987

Right so ther livede never man,' he seyde, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 430

Noës flood come walwing as the see [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 333

This world,' he seyde, 'in lasse than in an hour
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 677

[continues previous] This pardoner hadde heer as yelow as wex,
12

Knight's Tale: 1987

[continues previous] Right so ther livede never man,' he seyde,
12

Knight's Tale: 1988

[continues previous] 'In al this world, that som tyme he ne deyde.
11

Miller's Tale: 429

[continues previous] Him thinketh verraily that he may see
10

Pardoner's Tale: 537

Ye, sterve he shal, and that in lasse whyle [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 538

Than thou wolt goon a paas nat but a myle; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 334

Shal al be dreynt, so hidous is the shour;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 537

[continues previous] Ye, sterve he shal, and that in lasse whyle
11

Miller's Tale: 335

Thus shal mankynde drenche and lese hir lyf.'
11

Miller's Prologue: 33

For I wol telle a legende and a lyf [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 336

This carpenter answerde, 'allas, my wyf!
14

Knight's Tale: 1917

Allas, myn hertes quene! allas, my wyf! [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1918

Myn hertes lady, endere of my lyf! [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 34

[continues previous] Bothe of a Carpenter, and of his wyf, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 304

This carpenter answerde, 'what seystow?
11

Miller's Tale: 657

For what so that this carpenter answerde,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 531

She knew myn herte and eek my privetee [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 337

And shal she drenche? allas! myn Alisoun!'
14

Knight's Tale: 1917

[continues previous] Allas, myn hertes quene! allas, my wyf!
14

Knight's Tale: 1918

[continues previous] Myn hertes lady, endere of my lyf!
11

Miller's Prologue: 34

[continues previous] Bothe of a Carpenter, and of his wyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 530

[continues previous] God have hir soule! hir name was Alisoun.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 531

[continues previous] She knew myn herte and eek my privetee
11

Envoy to Scogan: 12

That with hir teres she wol drenche us here. [continues next]
11

Envoy to Scogan: 13

Allas, Scogan! this is for thyn offence! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 613

For sorwe of which myn herte shal to-cleve. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 614

And hider hoom I com whan it was eve; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 338

For sorwe of this he fil almost adoun,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 793

That in our fyr he fil bakward adoun. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 794

And he up-stirte as dooth a wood leoun, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 352

And with that word in swowne he fil adoun, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 353

And longe tyme he lay forth in a traunce. [continues next]
11

Envoy to Scogan: 13

[continues previous] Allas, Scogan! this is for thyn offence!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 406

Nece, I bidde wisshe yow no more sorwe.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 407

With this he stente, and caste adoun the heed, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1592

To Pandarus on kneës fil adoun, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1593

And er that he wolde of the place aryse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 613

[continues previous] For sorwe of which myn herte shal to-cleve.
15+

Miller's Tale: 339

And seyde, 'is ther no remedie in this cas?'
13

Miller's Tale: 85

Now sire, and eft sire, so bifel the cas, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 86

That on a day this hende Nicholas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 111

'Ye moste been ful derne, as in this cas.' [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 199

But what availleth him as in this cas? [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 200

She loveth so this hende Nicholas, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

And atte laste this hende Nicholas [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 557

'By goddes corpus, this goth faire and weel!' [continues next]
13

Reeve's Prologue: 1

Whan folk had laughen at this nyce cas [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 794

[continues previous] And he up-stirte as dooth a wood leoun,
10

Franklin's Tale: 353

[continues previous] And longe tyme he lay forth in a traunce.
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 199

'Goode man,' seyde Gamelyn 'why makestow this fare? [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 200

Is ther no man that may you helpe out of this care?' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 407

[continues previous] With this he stente, and caste adoun the heed,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 841

Quod Pandarus, 'thus fallen is this cas.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1593

[continues previous] And er that he wolde of the place aryse,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 61

Ther nis non other remedie in this cas.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 62

What wonder is though that hir sore smerte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1270

Sin that ther is no remedie in this cas,
14

Miller's Tale: 340

'Why, yis, for gode,' quod hende Nicholas,
13

Miller's Tale: 86

[continues previous] That on a day this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 112

[continues previous] 'Nay ther-of care thee noght,' quod Nicholas,
13

Miller's Tale: 200

[continues previous] She loveth so this hende Nicholas,
11

Miller's Tale: 211

Now bere thee wel, thou hende Nicholas! [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 212

For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 301

[continues previous] And atte laste this hende Nicholas
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
13

Miller's Tale: 556

[continues previous] 'A berd, a berd!' quod hende Nicholas,
13

Reeve's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Of Absolon and hende Nicholas,
14

Merchant's Tale: 116

For which, if thou wolt werken as the wyse, [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 199

[continues previous] 'Goode man,' seyde Gamelyn 'why makestow this fare?
12

Hous of Fame 2: 492

'Yis, pardee,' quod he; 'wostow why? [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 2: 493

For whan thou redest poetrye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

[continues previous] 'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
14

Miller's Tale: 341

'If thou wolt werken after lore and reed;
11

Miller's Tale: 211

[continues previous] Now bere thee wel, thou hende Nicholas!
13

Miller's Tale: 344

"Werk al by conseil, and thou shalt nat rewe." [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 345

And if thou werken wolt by good conseil, [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 116

[continues previous] For which, if thou wolt werken as the wyse, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 73

and yit thou mayst nat chaunge hir? [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 178

that thou mayst chaunge thy purpos, and whether thou [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 179

wolt chaunge it or no, and whiderward that thou torne it, thou ne [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 2: 493

[continues previous] For whan thou redest poetrye,
15+

Miller's Tale: 342

Thou mayst nat werken after thyn owene heed.
13

Miller's Tale: 344

[continues previous] "Werk al by conseil, and thou shalt nat rewe."
14

Miller's Tale: 345

[continues previous] And if thou werken wolt by good conseil,
13

Merchant's Tale: 116

[continues previous] For which, if thou wolt werken as the wyse,
14

Melibee's Tale: 20

... thou biwreyest thy conseil to any wight, he holdeth thee in his snare." And therefore yow is bettre to hyde your conseil in your herte, than praye him, to whom ye han biwreyed your conseil, that he wole kepen it cloos and stille. For Seneca seith: "if so be that thou ne mayst nat thyn owene conseil hyde, how darstou prayen any other wight thy conseil secreely to kepe?" But nathelees, if thou wene sikerly that the biwreying of thy conseil to a persone wol make thy condicioun to stonden in the bettre plyt, thanne shaltou tellen him thy conseil in this wyse. First, thou shalt ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

... to hem to whiche thou hast had som-tyme werre or enmitee, ne telle hem nat thy conseil." And Seneca telleth the cause why. "It may nat be," seith he, "that, where greet fyr hath longe tyme endured, that ther ne dwelleth som vapour of warmnesse." And therfore seith Salomon: "in thyn olde foo trust never." For sikerly, though thyn enemy be reconsiled and maketh thee chere of humilitee, and louteth to thee with his heed, ne trust him never. For certes, he maketh thilke feyned humilitee more for his profit than for any love of thy persone; by-cause that he demeth ... [continues next]
14

Manciple's Prologue: 19

So that thou mayst nat holden up thyn heed?'
10

Manciple's Tale: 242

My sone, spek nat, but with thyn heed thou bekke.
15+

Parson's Tale: 35

... by the word of seint Mathew: 'Nolite iurare omnino: ne wol ye nat swere in alle manere; neither by hevene, for it is goddes trone; ne by erthe, for it is the bench of his feet; ne by Ierusalem, for it is the citee of a greet king; ne by thyn heed, for thou mayst nat make an heer whyt ne blak. But seyeth by youre word, "ye, ye," and "nay, nay"; and what that is more, it is of yvel,' seith Crist. For Cristes sake, ne swereth nat so sinfully, in dismembringe of Crist by soule, herte, bones, and body. For certes, it semeth that ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 72

[continues previous] in that, and makest Fortune wroth and aspere by thyn inpatience,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 73

[continues previous] and yit thou mayst nat chaunge hir?
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 178

[continues previous] that thou mayst chaunge thy purpos, and whether thou
15+

Miller's Tale: 343

For thus seith Salomon, that was ful trewe,
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 153

Was al y-wroght of Iewes werk, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 154

Ful strong it was of plate; [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 6

... governe yow by sapience, put awey sorwe out of your herte. Remembre yow that Iesus Syrak seith: "a man that is Ioyous and glad in herte, it him conserveth florisshing in his age; but soothly sorweful herte maketh his bones drye." He seith eek thus: "that sorwe in herte sleeth ful many a man." Salomon seith: "that, right as motthes in the shepes flees anoyeth to the clothes, and the smale wormes to the tree, right so anoyeth sorwe to the herte." Wherfore us oghte, as wel in the deeth of our children as in the losse of our goodes temporels, have pacience. [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 7

... ther-to profitable; but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."' [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] I seye that first ye shul clepe to your conseil your freendes that been trewe. For Salomon seith: that "right as the herte of a man delyteth in savour that is sote, right so the conseil of trewe freendes yeveth swetenesse to the soule." He seith also: "ther may no-thing be lykned to the trewe freend." For certes, gold ne silver beth nat so muche worth as the gode ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 23

[continues previous] ... "ne trust nat to hem to whiche thou hast had som-tyme werre or enmitee, ne telle hem nat thy conseil." And Seneca telleth the cause why. "It may nat be," seith he, "that, where greet fyr hath longe tyme endured, that ther ne dwelleth som vapour of warmnesse." And therfore seith Salomon: "in thyn olde foo trust never." For sikerly, though thyn enemy be reconsiled and maketh thee chere of humilitee, and louteth to thee with his heed, ne trust him never. For certes, he maketh thilke feyned humilitee more for his profit than for any love of thy persone; by-cause that he demeth to have victorie over thy ...
15+

Melibee's Tale: 63

... after the sawe of David the prophete; for the reconsilinge which we been nat worthy to have in no manere, but we oghte requeren it with greet contricioun and humilitee, ye of your grete goodnesse have presented unto us. Now see we wel that the science and the conninge of Salomon is ful trewe; for he seith: that "swete wordes multiplyen and encresen freendes, and maken shrewes to be debonaire and meke."
15+

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... word of seint Mathew: 'Nolite iurare omnino: ne wol ye nat swere in alle manere; neither by hevene, for it is goddes trone; ne by erthe, for it is the bench of his feet; ne by Ierusalem, for it is the citee of a greet king; ne by thyn heed, for thou mayst nat make an heer whyt ne blak. But seyeth by youre word, "ye, ye," and "nay, nay"; and what that is more, it is of yvel,' seith Crist. For Cristes sake, ne swereth nat so sinfully, in dismembringe of Crist by soule, herte, bones, and body. For certes, ...
14

Miller's Tale: 344

"Werk al by conseil, and thou shalt nat rewe."
13

Miller's Tale: 341

'If thou wolt werken after lore and reed; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 342

Thou mayst nat werken after thyn owene heed. [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 153

[continues previous] Was al y-wroght of Iewes werk,
14

Melibee's Tale: 7

[continues previous] ... but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow governe after hir sentence. Salomon seith: "werk alle thy thinges by conseil, and thou shalt never repente."'
11

Melibee's Tale: 8

[continues previous] Thanne, by the conseil of his wyf Prudence, this Melibeus leet callen a greet congregacioun of folk; as surgiens, phisiciens, olde folk and yonge, and somme of hise olde enemys reconsiled as by hir semblaunt to his love and in-to his grace; and ther-with-al ther comen somme of hise neighebores that diden ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] I seye that first ye shul clepe to your conseil your freendes that been trewe. For Salomon seith: that "right as the herte of a man delyteth in savour that is sote, right so the conseil of trewe freendes yeveth swetenesse to the soule." He seith also: "ther may no-thing be lykned to the trewe freend." For certes, gold ne ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... that thou have knowe him of a lenger tyme. And if so be that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. ... [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 268

Which thou shalt seen, if that thou wolt reneye [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1933

If thou wolt yelde thee hastily, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1934

Thou shalt [the] rather have mercy. [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 345

And if thou werken wolt by good conseil,
14

Miller's Tale: 341

[continues previous] 'If thou wolt werken after lore and reed;
14

Miller's Tale: 342

[continues previous] Thou mayst nat werken after thyn owene heed.
13

Merchant's Tale: 116

For which, if thou wolt werken as the wyse,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... so be that thou have knowe him of a lenger tyme. And if so be that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 65

... that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 268

[continues previous] Which thou shalt seen, if that thou wolt reneye
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1933

[continues previous] If thou wolt yelde thee hastily,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1934

[continues previous] Thou shalt [the] rather have mercy.
11

Miller's Tale: 346

I undertake, with-outen mast and seyl,
11

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.' [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 347

Yet shal I saven hir and thee and me
11

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, that, by grace of our lord god, ye shul been reconsiled un-to us.'
11

Miller's Tale: 348

Hastow nat herd how saved was Noë,
11

Miller's Tale: 352

'Hastow nat herd,' quod Nicholas, 'also
11

Miller's Tale: 353

The sorwe of Noë with his felawshipe,
10

Clerk's Tale: 441

That day that maked was our mariage.' [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 442

Whan she had herd al this, she noght ameved [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 349

Whan that our lord had warned him biforn
10

Clerk's Tale: 441

[continues previous] That day that maked was our mariage.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 442

[continues previous] Whan she had herd al this, she noght ameved
11

Miller's Tale: 350

That al the world with water sholde be lorn?'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 48

'Yis, thus it mot nedes be,' quod I. [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 351

'Yis,' quod this carpenter, 'ful yore ago.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 322

'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd? [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 393

I have,' quod he, 'herd seyd, ful yore ago, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 47

[continues previous] nede of any help, he ne sholde nat have no ful suffisaunce?'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 48

[continues previous] 'Yis, thus it mot nedes be,' quod I.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 13

For that he seigh it nat of yore ago. [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 346

But as the swan, I have herd seyd ful yore, [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 1

Pite, that I have sought so yore ago,
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 2

With herte sore, and ful of besy peyne,
15+

Miller's Tale: 352

'Hastow nat herd,' quod Nicholas, 'also
11

Miller's Tale: 348

Hastow nat herd how saved was Noë, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 321

[continues previous] I prey yow that ye be nat yvel apayd.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 322

[continues previous] 'Wel,' quod this Ianuarie, 'and hastow sayd?
15+

Merchant's Tale: 393

[continues previous] I have,' quod he, 'herd seyd, ful yore ago,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 13

[continues previous] For that he seigh it nat of yore ago.
10

Anelida and Arcite: 346

[continues previous] But as the swan, I have herd seyd ful yore,
11

Miller's Tale: 353

The sorwe of Noë with his felawshipe,
11

Miller's Tale: 348

[continues previous] Hastow nat herd how saved was Noë,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 100

Had he, er that he mighte his lady winne, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 354

Er that he mighte gete his wyf to shipe?
11

Man of Law's Tale: 928

Of worldly wommen, mayden, nor of wyf; [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 669

For Canacee, er that he mighte hir winne.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 100

[continues previous] Had he, er that he mighte his lady winne,
14

Miller's Tale: 355

Him had be lever, I dar wel undertake,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 929

[continues previous] I dar wel seyn hir hadde lever a knyf
11

Book of the Duchesse: 221

For thus moche dar I saye wel,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 222

I had be dolven everydel,
12

Former Age: 27

But cursed was the tyme, I dar wel seye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 338

Therfore I dar this fully undertake.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1658

He feleth other weyes, dar I leye, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 356

At thilke tyme, than alle hise wetheres blake,
12

Former Age: 27

[continues previous] But cursed was the tyme, I dar wel seye,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1659

[continues previous] Than thilke tyme he first herde of it seye.
10

Miller's Tale: 358

And ther-fore, wostou what is best to done?
10

Knight's Tale: 1919

What is this world? what asketh men to have? [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 359

This asketh haste, and of an hastif thing
10

Knight's Tale: 1919

[continues previous] What is this world? what asketh men to have?
13

Miller's Tale: 362

A kneding-trogh, or elles a kimelin,
13

Miller's Tale: 434

He gooth and geteth him a kneding-trogh,
13

Miller's Tale: 435

And after that a tubbe and a kimelin,
11

Miller's Tale: 369

But Robin may nat wite of this, thy knave,
11

Clerk's Tale: 968

This mayde and eek hir brother to commende [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 370

Ne eek thy mayde Gille I may nat save;
10

Friar's Tale: 297

May I nat axe a libel, sir Somnour, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 967

[continues previous] In al this mene whyle she ne stente
11

Clerk's Tale: 968

[continues previous] This mayde and eek hir brother to commende
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 8

in sikernesse that may nat ben over-comen. Knowest thou me [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 371

Axe nat why, for though thou aske me,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

And if thou canst nat tellen it anon, [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 297

[continues previous] May I nat axe a libel, sir Somnour,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 8

[continues previous] in sikernesse that may nat ben over-comen. Knowest thou me
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 2: 9

[continues previous] nat? Why art thou stille? Is it for shame or for astoninge?
12

Miller's Tale: 372

I wol nat tellen goddes privetee.
11

Knight's Tale: 2105

I wol nat tellen eek how that they goon
11

Miller's Prologue: 55

An housbond shal nat been inquisitif
11

Miller's Prologue: 56

Of goddes privetee, nor of his wyf.
11

Miller's Tale: 268

Men sholde nat knowe of goddes privetee.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

[continues previous] And if thou canst nat tellen it anon, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 52

[continues previous] Yet wol I yeve thee leve for to gon [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 67

I wol nat tellen of hir strange sewes,
11

Miller's Tale: 373

Suffiseth thee, but if thy wittes madde,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

[continues previous] And if thou canst nat tellen it anon,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 52

[continues previous] Yet wol I yeve thee leve for to gon
10

Miller's Tale: 374

To han as greet a grace as Noë hadde.
10

Miller's Tale: 396

Of al the world, as Noë and his wyf. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 375

Thy wyf shal I wel saven, out of doute,
10

Miller's Tale: 396

[continues previous] Of al the world, as Noë and his wyf.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 484

To forthren thee, and wel thy labour quyte; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 494

To forthren thee, and wel thy labour quyte; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5110

Or he shal greve thee, out of doute;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5111

For to thy profit it wol turne,
11

Miller's Tale: 376

Go now thy wey, and speed thee heer-aboute.
11

Miller's Tale: 410

Go now thy wey, I have no lenger space
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 484

[continues previous] To forthren thee, and wel thy labour quyte;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 485

[continues previous] Go now thy wey, thy penance is but lyte.'
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 494

[continues previous] To forthren thee, and wel thy labour quyte;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 495

[continues previous] Go now thy wey, this penance is but lyte.
15+

Miller's Tale: 378

Y-geten us thise kneding-tubbes three,
15+

Miller's Tale: 650

He hadde y-boght him kneding-tubbes three, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 379

Than shaltow hange hem in the roof ful hye,
15+

Miller's Tale: 651

[continues previous] And hadde hem hanged in the roof above;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 778

Bet is," quod he, "hye in the roof abyde
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 779

Than with an angry wyf doun in the hous;
11

Miller's Tale: 381

And whan thou thus hast doon as I have seyd,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 166

Than wol I doon as thou hast preyed me;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 167

And if thou love another man, for sothe
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2387

Whan thou hast yeven thyn herte, as I
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2388

Have seid thee here [al] openly,
13

Miller's Tale: 383

And eek an ax, to smyte the corde atwo
11

Miller's Tale: 634

And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 635

And doun goth al; he fond neither to selle, [continues next]
13

Legend of Ariadne: 114

That nis nat derk, and hath roum eek and space
13

Legend of Ariadne: 115

To welde an ax or swerd or staf or knyf,
11

Miller's Tale: 384

When that the water comth, that we may go,
11

Miller's Tale: 634

[continues previous] And with his ax he smoot the corde a-two,
11

Miller's Tale: 385

And broke an hole an heigh, up-on the gable,
11

Franklin's Tale: 121

Hir to disporte up-on the bank an heigh,
12

Miller's Tale: 387

That we may frely passen forth our way
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6918

Whan that they passen thurgh the strete, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 388

Whan that the grete shour is goon away —
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6917

[continues previous] And willen that folk hem loute and grete,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6918

[continues previous] Whan that they passen thurgh the strete,
10

Miller's Tale: 393

And thou wolt seyn, "hayl, maister Nicholay!
10

Miller's Tale: 251

'What! how! what do ye, maister Nicholay?
10

Miller's Tale: 396

Of al the world, as Noë and his wyf.
10

Miller's Tale: 374

To han as greet a grace as Noë hadde.
10

Miller's Tale: 375

Thy wyf shal I wel saven, out of doute,
12

Miller's Tale: 397

But of o thyng I warne thee ful right,
12

Friar's Tale: 214

I do no fors of your divinitee.
12

Friar's Tale: 215

But o thing warne I thee, I wol nat Iape,
12

Hous of Fame 2: 560

But o thinge I wil warne thee
12

Hous of Fame 2: 561

Of the which thou wolt have wonder.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2009

And first of o thing warne I thee,
12

Miller's Tale: 398

Be wel avysed, on that ilke night
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 723

How that we baren us that ilke night, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 724

Whan we were in that hostelrye alight. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 399

That we ben entred in-to shippes bord,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 723

[continues previous] How that we baren us that ilke night,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 724

[continues previous] Whan we were in that hostelrye alight.
12

Miller's Tale: 400

That noon of us ne speke nat a word,
11

Merchant's Tale: 855

That ever was; for neither night ne day [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 856

Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 36

... your hastif wilfulnesse; for trewely, alle tho that conseilleden yow to maken sodeyn werre ne been nat your freendes. Lat us now considere whiche been they, that ye holde so greetly your freendes as to your persone. For al-be-it so that ye be mighty and riche, certes ye ne been nat but allone. For certes, ye ne han no child but a doghter; ne ye ne han bretheren ne cosins germayns, ne noon other neigh kinrede, wherfore that your enemys, for drede, sholde stinte to plede with yow or to destroye your persone. Ye knowen also, that your richesses moten been ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... with-outen ende.' Horrour is alwey drede of harm that is to come, and this drede shal evere dwelle in the hertes of hem that been dampned. And therefore han they lorn al hir hope, for sevene causes. First, for god that is hir Iuge shal be with-outen mercy to hem; ne they may nat plese him, ne noon of hise halwes; ne they ne may yeve no-thing for hir raunson; ne they have no vois to speke to him; ne they may nat flee fro peyne; ne they have no goodnesse in hem, that they mowe shewe to delivere hem fro peyne. And therfore seith Salomon: 'the wikked man dyeth; and whan ... [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 164

But I ne clepe nat innocence folye, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 165

Ne fals pitee, for 'vertu is the mene,' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 203

Ne noon to him dar speke a word for drede. [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 401

Ne clepe, ne crye, but been in his preyere;
11

Merchant's Tale: 855

[continues previous] That ever was; for neither night ne day
11

Merchant's Tale: 856

[continues previous] Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May,
10

Melibee's Tale: 36

[continues previous] ... consenteden to your hastif wilfulnesse; for trewely, alle tho that conseilleden yow to maken sodeyn werre ne been nat your freendes. Lat us now considere whiche been they, that ye holde so greetly your freendes as to your persone. For al-be-it so that ye be mighty and riche, certes ye ne been nat but allone. For certes, ye ne han no child but a doghter; ne ye ne han bretheren ne cosins germayns, ne noon other neigh kinrede, wherfore that your enemys, for drede, sholde stinte to plede with yow or to destroye your persone. Ye knowen also, that your richesses moten been dispended in diverse parties; and whan ...
11

Monk's Tale: 772

Ne can in singing crye ne biwaille,
11

Monk's Tale: 773

But for that fortune alwey wol assaille
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... that alle oure werkes shullen openly be knowe. And as seith Seint Bernard: 'ther ne shal no pledinge availle, ne no sleighte; we shullen yeven rekeninge of everich ydel word.' Ther shul we han a Iuge that may nat been deceived ne corrupt. And why? For, certes, alle our thoghtes been discovered as to him; ne for preyere ne for mede he shal nat been corrupt. And therfore seith Salomon: 'the wratthe of god ne wol nat spare no wight, for preyere ne for yifte'; and therfore, at the day of doom, ther nis noon hope to escape. Wherfore, as seith Seint Anselm: 'ful greet angwissh shul the sinful folk have at that tyme; ther shal the sterne and wrothe Iuge sitte above, and under him the horrible put of helle open to destroyen him that moot biknowen hise sinnes, whiche sinnes openly been shewed biforn god and biforn every creature. And on the left syde, mo develes than herte may bithinke, for to harie and drawe the sinful soules to the pyne of helle. And with-inne the hertes of folk shal be the bytinge conscience, and with-oute-forth shal be the world al brenninge. Whider shal thanne the wrecched sinful man flee to hyden him? Certes, he may nat hyden him; he moste come forth and shewen him.' For certes, as seith seint Ierome: 'the erthe shal casten him out of him, and the see also; and the eyr also, that shal be ful of thonder-clappes and lightninges.' Now sothly, who-so wel remembreth him of thise thinges, I gesse that his sinne shal nat turne him in-to delyt, but to greet sorwe, for drede of the peyne of helle. And therfore seith Iob to god: 'suffre, lord, that I may a whyle biwaille and wepe, er I go with-oute returning to the derke lond, covered with the derknesse of deeth; to the lond of misese and of derknesse, where-as is the shadwe of deeth; where-as ther is noon ordre or ordinance, but grisly drede that evere shal laste.' Lo, here may ye seen that Iob preyde respyt a whyle, to biwepe and waille his trespas; for soothly oon day of respyt is bettre than al the tresor of the world. And for-as-muche as a man may acquiten him-self biforn god by penitence in this world, and nat by tresor, therfore sholde he preye to god to yeve him respyt a whyle, to biwepe and biwaillen his trespas. For certes, al the sorwe that a man mighte make fro the beginning of the world, nis but a litel thing at regard of the sorwe of helle. The cause why that Iob clepeth helle 'the lond of derknesse'; under-stondeth that he clepeth it 'londe' or erthe, for it is stable, and nevere shal faille; 'derk,' for he that is in helle hath defaute of light material. For certes, the derke light, that shal come out of the fyr that evere shal brenne, shal turne him al to peyne that is in helle; for it sheweth him to the horrible develes that him tormenten. 'Covered with the derknesse of deeth': that is to seyn, that he that is in helle shal have defaute of the sighte of god; for certes, the sighte of god is the lyf perdurable. 'The derknesse of deeth' been the sinnes that the wrecched man hath doon, whiche that destourben him to see the face of god; right as doth a derk cloude bitwixe us and the sonne. 'Lond of misese': by-cause that ther been three maneres of defautes, agayn three thinges that folk of this world han in this present lyf, that is to seyn, honours, delyces, and richesses. Agayns honour, have they in helle shame and confusion. For wel ye woot that men clepen 'honour' the reverence that man doth to man; but in helle is noon honour ne reverence. For certes, na-more reverence shal be doon there to a king than to a knave. For which god seith by the prophete Ieremye: 'thilke folk that me despysen shul been in despyt.' 'Honour' is eek cleped greet lordshipe; ther shal no man serven other but of harm and torment. 'Honour' is eek cleped greet dignitee and heighnesse; but in helle shul they been al fortroden of develes. And god seith: 'the horrible develes shulle goon and comen up-on the hevedes of the dampned folk.' And this is for-as-muche as, the hyer that they were in this present lyf, the more shulle they been abated and defouled in helle. Agayns the richesses of this world, shul they han misese of poverte; and this poverte shal been in foure thinges: in defaute of tresor, of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of the dragon hir morsels.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been in defaute of clothing: for they shulle be naked in body as of clothing, save the fyr in which they brenne and othere filthes; and naked shul they been of soule, of alle manere vertues, which that is the clothing of the soule. Where been thanne the gaye robes and the softe shetes and the smale shertes? Lo, what seith god of hem by the prophete Isaye: 'that under hem shul been strawed motthes, and hir covertures shulle been of wormes of helle.' And forther-over, hir miseise shal been in defaute of freendes; for he nis nat povre that hath goode freendes, but there is no freend; for neither god ne no creature shal been freend to hem, and everich of hem shal haten other with deedly hate. 'The sones and the doghtren shullen rebellen agayns fader and mooder, and kinrede agayns kinrede, and chyden and despysen everich of hem other,' bothe day and night, as god seith by the prophete Michias. And the lovinge children, that whylom loveden so fleshly everich other, wolden everich of hem eten other if they mighte. For how sholden they love hem togidre in the peyne of helle, whan they hated ech of hem other in the prosperitee of this lyf? For truste wel, hir fleshly love was deedly hate; as seith the prophete David: 'who-so that loveth wikkednesse he hateth his soule.' And who-so hateth his owene soule, certes, he may love noon other wight in no manere. And therefore, in helle is no solas ne no frendshipe, but evere the more fleshly kinredes that been in helle, the more cursinges, the more chydinges, and the more deedly hate ther is among hem. And forther-over, they shul have defaute of alle manere delyces; for certes, delyces been after the appetytes of the fyve wittes, as sighte, heringe, smellinge, savoringe, and touchinge. But in helle hir sighte shal be ful of derknesse and of smoke, and therfore ful of teres; and hir heringe, ful of waymentinge and of grintinge of teeth, as seith Iesu Crist; hir nosethirles shullen be ful of stinkinge stink. And as seith Isaye the prophete: 'hir savoring shal be ful of bitter galle.' And touchinge of al hir body, y-covered with 'fyr that nevere shal quenche, and with wormes that nevere shul dyen,' as god seith by the mouth of Isaye. And for-as-muche as they shul nat wene that they may dyen for peyne, and by hir deeth flee fro peyne, that may they understonden by the word of Iob, that seith: 'ther-as is the shadwe of deeth.' Certes, a shadwe hath the lyknesse of the thing of which it is shadwe, but shadwe is nat the same thing of which it is shadwe. Right so fareth the peyne of helle; it is lyk deeth for the horrible anguissh, and why? For it peyneth hem evere, as though they sholde dye anon; but certes they shal nat dye. For as seith Seint Gregorie: 'to wrecche caytives shal be deeth with-oute deeth, and ende with-outen ende, and defaute with-oute failinge. For hir deeth shal alwey liven, and hir ende shal everemo biginne, and hir defaute shal nat faille.' And therfore seith Seint Iohn the Evangelist: 'they shullen folwe deeth, and they shul nat finde him; and they shul desyren to dye, and deeth shal flee fro hem.' And eek Iob seith: that 'in helle is noon ordre of rule.' And al-be-it so that god hath creat alle thinges in right ordre, and no-thing with-outen ordre, but alle thinges been ordeyned and nombred; yet nathelees they that been dampned been no-thing in ordre, ne holden noon ordre. For the erthe ne shal bere hem no fruit. For, as the prophete David seith: 'god shal destroie the fruit of the erthe as fro hem;' ne water ne shal yeve hem no moisture; ne the eyr no refresshing, ne fyr no light. For as seith seint Basilie: 'the brenninge of the fyr of this world shal god yeven in helle to hem that been dampned; but the light and the cleernesse shal be yeven in hevene to hise children'; right as the gode man yeveth flesh to hise children, and bones to his houndes. And for they shullen have noon hope to escape, seith seint Iob atte laste: that 'ther shal horrour and grisly drede dwellen with-outen ende.' Horrour is alwey drede of harm that is to come, and this drede shal evere dwelle in the hertes of hem that been dampned. And therefore han they lorn al hir hope, for sevene causes. First, for god that is hir Iuge shal be with-outen mercy to hem; ne they may nat plese him, ne noon of hise halwes; ne they ne may yeve no-thing for hir raunson; ne they have no vois to speke to him; ne they may nat flee fro peyne; ne they have no goodnesse in hem, that they mowe shewe to delivere hem fro peyne. And therfore seith Salomon: 'the wikked man dyeth; and whan ...
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 164

[continues previous] But I ne clepe nat innocence folye,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 165

[continues previous] Ne fals pitee, for 'vertu is the mene,'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 203

[continues previous] Ne noon to him dar speke a word for drede.
13

Miller's Tale: 402

For it is goddes owne heste dere.
13

Merchant's Tale: 920

Than thee offende, trewe dere wyf! [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 921

For goddes sake, thenk how I thee chees, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 403

Thy wyf and thou mote hange fer a-twinne,
13

Merchant's Tale: 920

[continues previous] Than thee offende, trewe dere wyf!
10

Miller's Tale: 404

For that bitwixe yow shal be no sinne
10

Legend of Lucretia: 22

No man did ther no more than his wyf; [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 405

No more in looking than ther shal in dede;
10

Legend of Lucretia: 22

[continues previous] No man did ther no more than his wyf;
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 86

Your renoun is fordo than in a throwe;
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 87

Ther shal no man wite wel what Pite is.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4458

That aftirward ther shal in dede
13

Miller's Tale: 406

This ordinance is seyd, go, god thee spede!
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4460

This put me in confusioun.
13

Miller's Tale: 407

Tomorwe at night, whan men ben alle aslepe,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 322

Wher that we goon, we wol ben at our large. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 323

Of alle men y-blessed moot he be, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 65

weren whylom men; wher-for, whan they ben perverted and [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 408

In-to our kneding-tubbes wol we crepe,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 322

[continues previous] Wher that we goon, we wol ben at our large.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 66

[continues previous] torned in-to malice, certes, than han they forlorn the nature of
11

Miller's Tale: 410

Go now thy wey, I have no lenger space
11

Miller's Tale: 376

Go now thy wey, and speed thee heer-aboute.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 485

Go now thy wey, thy penance is but lyte.'
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 495

Go now thy wey, this penance is but lyte.
10

Miller's Tale: 413

Thou art so wys, it nedeth thee nat teche;
10

Envoy to Bukton: 21

And if that holy writ may nat suffyse,
10

Envoy to Bukton: 22

Experience shal thee teche, so may happe,
11

Miller's Tale: 414

Go, save our lyf, and that I thee biseche.'
11

Miller's Tale: 236

Til Sonday, that the sonne gooth to reste. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 429

Him thinketh verraily that he may see [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 86

Telle me that, and that I thee biseche.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 282

Yet eft I thee biseche and fully seye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 283

That privetee go with us in this cas,
12

Miller's Tale: 415

This sely carpenter goth forth his wey.
11

Miller's Tale: 237

[continues previous] This sely carpenter hath greet merveyle
10

Miller's Tale: 310

This carpenter goth doun, and comth ageyn,
11

Miller's Tale: 428

[continues previous] This sely carpenter biginneth quake;
12

Miller's Tale: 527

And lat me slepe, a twenty devel wey!' [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 204

'Goth now your wey,' quod he, 'al stille and softe, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 87

[continues previous] 'Why?' quod this yeman, 'wherto axe ye me?
15+

Miller's Tale: 416

Ful ofte he seith 'allas' and 'weylawey,'
10

Knight's Tale: 498

Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde 'allas,' [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 528

[continues previous] 'Allas,' quod Absolon, 'and weylawey! [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 563

But Absolon, that seith ful ofte, 'allas!
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 712

Ful ofte he seyde 'allas!' and 'weylawey!' [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 713

'Lord Crist,' quod he, 'how may this world endure? [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 780

And axeth wher his wyf and his child is. [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 125

For to hir-self ful ofte 'allas!' seith she, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 203

[continues previous] And hir embraceth harde, and kiste hir ofte.
12

Shipman's Tale: 204

[continues previous] 'Goth now your wey,' quod he, 'al stille and softe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 606

And to him-self ful ofte he seyde 'allas! [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 417

And to his wyf he tolde his privetee;
10

Knight's Tale: 498

[continues previous] Ful ofte a day he swelte and seyde 'allas,'
10

Knight's Tale: 553

That knew his privetee and al his cas, [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 56

Of goddes privetee, nor of his wyf.
11

Miller's Prologue: 57

So he may finde goddes foyson there,
12

Miller's Tale: 528

[continues previous] 'Allas,' quod Absolon, 'and weylawey!
13

Man of Law's Tale: 712

[continues previous] Ful ofte he seyde 'allas!' and 'weylawey!'
10

Man of Law's Tale: 779

[continues previous] Unto his castel of the which I tolde, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 780

[continues previous] And axeth wher his wyf and his child is. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 531

She knew myn herte and eek my privetee [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 125

[continues previous] For to hir-self ful ofte 'allas!' seith she,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 606

[continues previous] And to him-self ful ofte he seyde 'allas!
13

Miller's Tale: 418

And she was war, and knew it bet than he,
10

Knight's Tale: 553

[continues previous] That knew his privetee and al his cas,
10

Knight's Tale: 554

[continues previous] Which was disgysed povrely, as he was,
11

Reeve's Tale: 375

And knew the estres bet than dide this Iohn, [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 376

And by the wal a staf she fond, anon, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 780

[continues previous] And axeth wher his wyf and his child is.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 531

[continues previous] She knew myn herte and eek my privetee
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 532

[continues previous] Bet than our parisshe-preest, so moot I thee!
11

Miller's Tale: 419

What al this queynte cast was for to seye.
11

Reeve's Tale: 375

[continues previous] And knew the estres bet than dide this Iohn,
11

Clerk's Tale: 1003

She herde nat what thing he to hir seyde; [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 420

But nathelees she ferde as she wolde deye,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 427

For foul ne fair, thogh that she shulde deye. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 428

She seyde, she was so mased in the see [continues next]
14

Clerk's Tale: 1004

[continues previous] She ferde as she had stert out of a sleep, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 730

Purposinge ever that she wolde deye.
14

Franklin's Tale: 731

But nathelees, upon the thridde night,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1211

With swerd at herte, al redy for to deye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1212

But as god wolde, of swough ther-with she abreyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 58

Ful sorwfully she sighte, and seyde 'allas!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 59

But forth she moot, for ought that may bityde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 188

And trusten him she wolde, and wel she mighte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 189

As seyde she, and from hir hors she alighte. [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 421

And seyde, 'allas! go forth thy wey anon,
11