Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Nun's Priest's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Nun's Priest's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Nun's Priest's Tale has 626 lines, and 6% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 63% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 31% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.09 strong matches and 3.06 weak matches.

Nun's Priest's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 4

This widwe, of which I telle yow my tale,
12

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I
12

Pardoner's Tale: 132

A moral tale yet I yow telle can,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 133

Which I am wont to preche, for to winne.
11

Hous of Fame 3: 353

Therfor was, lo, this pileer,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 354

Of which that I yow telle heer,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 710

And whan I herde him telle this tale
11

Book of the Duchesse: 711

Thus pitously, as I yow telle,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 650

'Were it a game or no, soth for to telle, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 651

Now am I glad, sin that yow list to dwelle.' [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 5

Sin thilke day that she was last a wyf,
10

Knight's Tale: 334

That felawe was un-to duk Theseus
10

Knight's Tale: 335

Sin thilke day that they were children lyte,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 267

O Satan, envious sin thilke day
10

Man of Law's Tale: 268

That thou were chased from our heritage,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 53

Sin thilke day that she was seven night old,
13

Legend of Lucretia: 191

Sin thilke day; and she was holden there
13

Legend of Lucretia: 192

A seint, and ever her day y-halwed dere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 651

[continues previous] Now am I glad, sin that yow list to dwelle.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 715

Ful ofte a day she sighte eek for destresse, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 6

In pacience ladde a ful simple lyf,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 118

Ther was also a Nonne, a Prioresse, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 119

That of hir smyling was ful simple and coy; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 216

That ladde hir lyf only by breed [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 95

For of hir lyf she was ful sore in drede, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 714

[continues previous] She ladde hir lyf, this woful creature. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 715

[continues previous] Ful ofte a day she sighte eek for destresse, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 7

For litel was hir catel and hir rente;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 119

[continues previous] That of hir smyling was ful simple and coy;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 375

For catel hadde they y-nogh and rente,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 376

And eek hir wyves wolde it wel assente;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 215

[continues previous] She was lyk thing for hungre deed,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 216

[continues previous] That ladde hir lyf only by breed
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 95

[continues previous] For of hir lyf she was ful sore in drede,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 714

[continues previous] She ladde hir lyf, this woful creature.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 9

She fond hir-self, and eek hir doghtren two.
11

Parlement of Foules: 551

Were sittingest for hir, if that hir leste; [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 552

And of these three she wot hir-self, I trowe, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 10

Three large sowes hadde she, and namo,
11

Parlement of Foules: 552

[continues previous] And of these three she wot hir-self, I trowe,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 12

Ful sooty was hir bour, and eek hir halle,
10

Reeve's Tale: 71

Ther was hir whete and eek hir malt y-grounde.
13

Hous of Fame 3: 96

And eek the halle, and every bour,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 319

So depe was hir wo bigonnen, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 320

And eek hir herte in angre ronnen, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 866

The pleye, the laughtre men was wont to finde [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 867

In hir, and eek hir Ioyes everychone, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 13

In which she eet ful many a sclendre meel.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 368

On many a sory meel now may she bayte; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 320

[continues previous] And eek hir herte in angre ronnen,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 867

[continues previous] In hir, and eek hir Ioyes everychone,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 14

Of poynaunt sauce hir neded never a deel.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 129

Ne wette hir fingres in hir sauce depe. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 130

Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 353

Wo was his cook, but-if his sauce were
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 354

Poynaunt and sharp, and redy al his gere.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 367

[continues previous] Of Marrok, as it was hir aventure;
11

Merchant's Tale: 99

She kepeth his good, and wasteth never a deel;
11

Merchant's Tale: 100

Al that hir housbonde lust, hir lyketh weel;
12

Prioress' Tale: 96

Twyës a day it passed thurgh his throte, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 15

No deyntee morsel passed thurgh hir throte;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 130

[continues previous] Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe,
12

Prioress' Tale: 96

[continues previous] Twyës a day it passed thurgh his throte, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 17

Repleccioun ne made hir never syk; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 18

Attempree dyete was al hir phisyk, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 16

Hir dyete was accordant to hir cote.
11

Prioress' Tale: 97

[continues previous] To scoleward and homward whan he wente;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 18

[continues previous] Attempree dyete was al hir phisyk,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 459

This was hir cote and hir mantel,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 460

No more was there, never a del,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 17

Repleccioun ne made hir never syk;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 15

No deyntee morsel passed thurgh hir throte; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 16

[continues previous] Hir dyete was accordant to hir cote. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 18

Attempree dyete was al hir phisyk,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 15

[continues previous] No deyntee morsel passed thurgh hir throte;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 16

[continues previous] Hir dyete was accordant to hir cote.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 21

Napoplexye shente nat hir heed;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 461

That with a staf birafte his wyf hir lyf, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 66

Ne on his heed cam rasour noon ne shere, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 22

No wyn ne drank she, neither whyt ne reed;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 462

[continues previous] For she drank wyn, thogh I hadde been his wyf, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 227

And yet, god wot, Sampsoun drank never no wyn.
15+

Monk's Tale: 65

[continues previous] This Sampson never sicer drank ne wyn,
15+

Monk's Tale: 66

[continues previous] Ne on his heed cam rasour noon ne shere,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 135

Hir rose-garlond whyt and reed, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 23

Hir bord was served most with whyt and blak,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 461

[continues previous] That with a staf birafte his wyf hir lyf,
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... in the fulle of the mone. And more-over, the wrecched swollen membres that they shewe thurgh the degysinge, in departinge of hir hoses in whyt and reed, semeth that half hir shameful privee membres weren flayn. And if so be that they departen hire hoses in othere colours, as is whyt and blak, or whyt and blew, or blak and reed, and so forth; thanne semeth it, as by variance of colour, that half the partie of hir privee membres were corrupt by the fyr of seint Antony, or by cancre, or by other swich meschaunce. Of the hindre part of hir buttokes, it is ful horrible for to see. ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 135

[continues previous] Hir rose-garlond whyt and reed,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 136

[continues previous] And hir comb to kembe hir heed,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 24

Milk and broun breed, in which she fond no lak,
10

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... the fulle of the mone. And more-over, the wrecched swollen membres that they shewe thurgh the degysinge, in departinge of hir hoses in whyt and reed, semeth that half hir shameful privee membres weren flayn. And if so be that they departen hire hoses in othere colours, as is whyt and blak, or whyt and blew, or blak and reed, and so forth; thanne semeth it, as by variance of colour, that half the partie of hir privee membres were corrupt by the fyr of seint Antony, or by cancre, or by other swich meschaunce. Of the hindre part of hir buttokes, it is ful horrible for to see. ...
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1177

Avysed word by word in every lyne, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1178

And fond no lak, she thoughte he coude good; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1179

And up it putte, and went hir in to dyne. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 25

Seynd bacoun, and somtyme an ey or tweye,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1178

[continues previous] And fond no lak, she thoughte he coude good;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1179

[continues previous] And up it putte, and went hir in to dyne.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 27

A yerd she hadde, enclosed al aboute
12

Merchant's Tale: 899

The gardin is enclosed al aboute;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 819

Hir folwede in the gardin al aboute. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 820

This yerd was large, and rayled alle the aleyes, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 28

With stikkes, and a drye dich with-oute,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 820

[continues previous] This yerd was large, and rayled alle the aleyes,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 30

In al the land of crowing nas his peer.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 33

Wel sikerer was his crowing in his logge, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 31

His vois was merier than the mery orgon
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 33

[continues previous] Wel sikerer was his crowing in his logge,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 34

[continues previous] Than is a clokke, or an abbey orlogge.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 33

Wel sikerer was his crowing in his logge,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 30

In al the land of crowing nas his peer. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 31

His vois was merier than the mery orgon [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 34

Than is a clokke, or an abbey orlogge.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 31

[continues previous] His vois was merier than the mery orgon
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 36

Of equinoxial in thilke toun;
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 15

To know which day is lyk to which day as of lengthe, &c. Loke whiche degrees ben y-lyke fer fro the hevedes of Cancer and Capricorn; and lok, whan the sonne is in any of thilke degrees, than ben the dayes y-lyke of lengthe. This is to seyn, that as long is that day in that monthe, as was swich a day in swich a month; ther varieth but lite. Also, yif thou take two dayes naturaly in the yer y-lyke fer fro eyther pointe of ... [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

... noon the nombre of his declinacion, and thanne hastow the heyghte of the hevedes of Aries and Libra. As thus: my sonne is, par aventure, in the firste degre of Leoun, 58 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte at noon and his declinacion is almost 20 degrees northward fro the equinoxial; abate thanne thilke 20 degrees of declinacion out of the altitude at noon, than leveth thee 38 degrees and odde minutes; lo ther the heved of Aries or Libra, and thyn equinoxial in that regioun. Also yif so be that the sonnes declinacioun be southward fro the equinoxial, adde thanne thilke declinacion to the altitude of ... [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 37

For whan degrees fiftene were ascended,
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 15

[continues previous] To know which day is lyk to which day as of lengthe, &c. Loke whiche degrees ben y-lyke fer fro the hevedes of Cancer and Capricorn; and lok, whan the sonne is in any of thilke degrees, than ben the dayes y-lyke of lengthe. This is to seyn, that as long is that day in that monthe, as was swich a day in swich a month; ther varieth but lite. Also, yif thou take two dayes naturaly in the yer y-lyke fer fro eyther pointe of the ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

[continues previous] ... the sonnes altitude at noon the nombre of his declinacion, and thanne hastow the heyghte of the hevedes of Aries and Libra. As thus: my sonne is, par aventure, in the firste degre of Leoun, 58 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte at noon and his declinacion is almost 20 degrees northward fro the equinoxial; abate thanne thilke 20 degrees of declinacion out of the altitude at noon, than leveth thee 38 degrees and odde minutes; lo ther the heved of Aries or Libra, and thyn equinoxial in that regioun. Also yif so be that the sonnes declinacioun be southward fro the equinoxial, adde thanne thilke declinacion to the altitude ...
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 38

Thanne crew he, that it mighte nat ben amended.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 362

Him thoughte his chois mighte nat ben amended. [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 363

For whan that he him-self concluded hadde, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 264

But of hir shape she mighte nat been amended.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 6

vigour and strengthe that it ne mighte nat ben empted; al were it
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 10

ther failede any thing, it mighte nat ben cleped sovereyn good:
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 11

for thanne were ther som good, out of this ilke sovereyn good, that
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 31

bettre than god, it may nat ben douted thanne that he, that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 38

naught; but yif this ne may nat ben don, thanne is it nat possible,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 39

that hap be any swich thing as I have diffinisshed a litel heer-biforn.'
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 39

His comb was redder than the fyn coral,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 362

[continues previous] Him thoughte his chois mighte nat ben amended.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 42

Lyk asur were his legges, and his toon;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 592

His top was dokked lyk a preest biforn. [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 593

Ful longe were his legges, and ful lene, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 43

His nayles whytter than the lilie flour,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 593

[continues previous] Ful longe were his legges, and ful lene,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 45

This gentil cok hadde in his governaunce
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 945

For I am here al in your governaunce.' [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 46

Sevene hennes, for to doon al his plesaunce,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 944

[continues previous] That I honour may have, and he plesaunce;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 945

[continues previous] For I am here al in your governaunce.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 564

In whiche he whylom hadde al his plesaunce. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 47

Whiche were his sustres and his paramours,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 564

[continues previous] In whiche he whylom hadde al his plesaunce.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 48

And wonder lyk to him, as of colours.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1280

As I, on whiche the faireste and the beste [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 49

Of whiche the faireste hewed on hir throte
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 66

This Chauntecleer gan gronen in his throte, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1280

[continues previous] As I, on whiche the faireste and the beste
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 50

Was cleped faire damoysele Pertelote.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 65

[continues previous] And next him sat this faire Pertelote,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1243

The whyte roket, rideled faire, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 51

Curteys she was, discreet, and debonaire,
11

Shipman's Tale: 4

And compaignable and revelous was she, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 65

... yeven to his brother ne to his freend the might of his body, by a strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1244

[continues previous] Bitokened, that ful debonaire
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1245

And swete was she that it bere.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 52

And compaignable, and bar hir-self so faire,
11

Shipman's Tale: 4

[continues previous] And compaignable and revelous was she,
10

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] ... to his brother ne to his freend the might of his body, by a strenger resoun he defendeth and forbedeth a man to yeven him-self to his enemy. And nathelees I conseille you, that ye mistruste nat my lord. For I wool wel and knowe verraily, that he is debonaire and meke, large, curteys, and nothing desyrous ne coveitous of good ne richesse. For ther nis no-thing in this world that he desyreth, save only worship and honour. Forther-more I knowe wel, and am right seur, that he shal no-thing doon in this nede with-outen my conseil. And I shal so werken in this cause, ...
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 53

Sin thilke day that she was seven night old,
10

Knight's Tale: 334

That felawe was un-to duk Theseus
10

Knight's Tale: 335

Sin thilke day that they were children lyte,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 267

O Satan, envious sin thilke day
10

Man of Law's Tale: 268

That thou were chased from our heritage,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 5

Sin thilke day that she was last a wyf,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 56

He loved hir so, that wel was him therwith.
10

Knight's Tale: 339

And he loved him as tendrely ageyn.
10

Knight's Tale: 340

So wel they loved, as olde bokes seyn,
11

Parson's Tale: 79

... can nat paciently suffre: but god made womman of the rib of Adam, for womman sholde be felawe un-to man. Man sholde bere him to his wyf in feith, in trouthe, and in love, as seith seint Paul: that 'a man sholde loven his wyf as Crist loved holy chirche, that loved it so wel that he deyde for it.' So sholde a man for his wyf, if it were nede.
10

Anelida and Arcite: 200

And was so meek, therfor he loved hir lyte;
14

Book of the Duchesse: 1014

These were hir maners every-del.
14

Book of the Duchesse: 1015

'Therwith she loved so wel right,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1018

She loved so wel hir owne name.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1287

'Therwith she was alway so trewe, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1288

Our Ioye was ever y-liche newe; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 57

But such a Ioye was it to here hem singe,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 57

That Ioye it was to here;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 37

Is comen, and that I here the foules singe, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1287

[continues previous] 'Therwith she was alway so trewe,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1288

[continues previous] Our Ioye was ever y-liche newe;
11

Compleynt of Mars: 71

The grete Ioye that was betwix hem two, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 217

Commendeden, it Ioye was to here.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

And after this, whan that hem bothe leste, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 58

Whan that the brighte sonne gan to springe,
12

Knight's Tale: 1633

And on the morwe, whan that day gan springe,
15+

Knight's Tale: 1664

Longe after that the sonne gan to springe.
14

Knight's Tale: 1665

The grete Theseus, that of his sleep awaked
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 1

Our Hoste sey wel that the brighte sonne
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 2

The ark of his artificial day had ronne
10

Franklin's Tale: 288

Til that the brighte sonne loste his hewe;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 373

Caste up his eyen to the brighte sonne, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 374

That in the signe of Taurus hadde y-ronne [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 38

[continues previous] And that the floures ginnen for to springe,
11

Compleynt of Mars: 71

[continues previous] The grete Ioye that was betwix hem two,
11

Compleynt of Mars: 72

[continues previous] Whan they be met, ther may no tunge telle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 764

But right as whan the sonne shyneth brighte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 765

In March, that chaungeth ofte tyme his face, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 516

[continues previous] They spaken of Crisëyde the brighte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

[continues previous] And after this, whan that hem bothe leste,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 59

In swete accord, 'my lief is faren in londe.'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 374

[continues previous] That in the signe of Taurus hadde y-ronne
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 765

[continues previous] In March, that chaungeth ofte tyme his face,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 60

For thilke tyme, as I have understonde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1186

And seyde, 'I understonde have al a-mis. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1187

For thilke night I last Criseyde say, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 61

Bestes and briddes coude speke and singe.
12

Miller's Tale: 212

For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.' [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 213

And so bifel it on a Saterday, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 41

I am non swich, I moot speke as I can. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 42

And so bifel that, whan this Cambinskan [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1186

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I understonde have al a-mis.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

And so bifel, that in a daweninge,
10

Knight's Tale: 151

And so bifel, that in the tas they founde,
12

Miller's Tale: 212

[continues previous] For Absolon may waille and singe 'allas.'
12

Miller's Tale: 213

[continues previous] And so bifel it on a Saterday,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 907

And so bifel that, in a day or two,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 543

And so bifel that ones, in a Lente,
11

Squire's Tale: 42

[continues previous] And so bifel that, whan this Cambinskan
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 180

That us governeth alle as in commune. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 181

And so bifel, that, longe er it were day, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 364

Thus royal, as a prince is in his halle, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 370

Sin March bigan, thritty dayes and two, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 371

Bifel that Chauntecleer, in al his pryde, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 453

And so bifel that, as he caste his yë, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1234

And so bifel that in his sleep him thoughte,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 180

[continues previous] That us governeth alle as in commune.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 363

[continues previous] And to him rennen thanne his wyves alle.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 364

[continues previous] Thus royal, as a prince is in his halle,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 371

[continues previous] Bifel that Chauntecleer, in al his pryde, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 372

[continues previous] His seven wyves walking by his syde, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 453

[continues previous] And so bifel that, as he caste his yë,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 454

[continues previous] Among the wortes, on a boterflye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 64

Sat on his perche, that was in the halle,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 371

[continues previous] Bifel that Chauntecleer, in al his pryde,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 372

[continues previous] His seven wyves walking by his syde,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 65

And next him sat this faire Pertelote,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 50

Was cleped faire damoysele Pertelote. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 462

This Chauntecleer, whan he gan him espye, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 66

This Chauntecleer gan gronen in his throte,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 49

[continues previous] Of whiche the faireste hewed on hir throte
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 461

[continues previous] Though he never erst had seyn it with his yë.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 462

[continues previous] This Chauntecleer, whan he gan him espye,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 502

This Chauntecleer his winges gan to bete, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 67

As man that in his dreem is drecched sore.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 503

[continues previous] As man that coude his tresoun nat espye,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 68

And whan that Pertelote thus herde him rore,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 373

Ney deed for smert, gan bresten out to rore, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 374

And with a sorwful noyse he seyde thus, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 69

She was agast, and seyde, 'O herte dere,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 212

And namelich of wommen? wol ye so? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1347

And seyde, 'O dere herte, may it be
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1493

And with a syk she seyde, 'O herte dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 374

[continues previous] And with a sorwful noyse he seyde thus,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 192

And seyde, 'O dere doughter myn, wel-come!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 193

She seyde eek, she was fayn with him to mete,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1457

She gan first smyle, and seyde, 'O brother dere,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 70

What eyleth yow, to grone in this manere?
10

Miller's Tale: 583

What eyleth yow? som gay gerl, god it woot, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

[continues previous] What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone?
10

Merchant's Tale: 1123

'O stronge lady store, what dostow?'
10

Merchant's Tale: 1124

And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow?
10

Shipman's Tale: 99

'What eyleth yow so rathe for to ryse?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 211

[continues previous] 'What eyleth yow to be thus wery sone,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 71

Ye been a verray sleper, fy for shame!'
10

Miller's Tale: 582

[continues previous] Why ryse ye so rathe, ey, benedicite!
11

Franklin's Tale: 797

For which in fewe wordes seyde he thus: [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 149

He fledde awey for verray sorwe and shame. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 150

'A!' quod the yeman, 'heer shal aryse game, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 854

O! fy! for shame! they that han been brent,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame,
11

Squire's Tale: 377

As is hir maistresse, answerde hir anoon, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 378

And seyde, 'madame, whider wil ye goon [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 379

Thus erly? for the folk ben alle on reste.' [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 238

And whan he saugh his tyme, he seyde thus:
11

Franklin's Tale: 239

'Madame,' quod he, 'by god that this world made,
12

Franklin's Tale: 280

And with a sorweful herte he thus answerde:
12

Franklin's Tale: 281

'Madame,' quod he, 'this were an inpossible!
10

Franklin's Tale: 595

For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 740

Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 797

[continues previous] For which in fewe wordes seyde he thus:
12

Franklin's Tale: 798

[continues previous] 'Madame, seyth to your lord Arveragus,
11

Franklin's Tale: 857

This philosophre sobrely answerde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 858

And seyde thus, whan he thise wordes herde:
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 149

[continues previous] He fledde awey for verray sorwe and shame.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 432

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 446

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 442

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 456

And seyde thus: 'Madame, the god above [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1277

And seyde, 'nece, I pray yow hertely, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1656

Pandare answerde, and seyde thus, that he
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 73

I pray yow, that ye take it nat a-grief:
12

Reeve's Prologue: 56

'I pray yow alle that ye nat yow greve,
11

Squire's Tale: 378

[continues previous] And seyde, 'madame, whider wil ye goon
10

Franklin's Tale: 594

[continues previous] Er ye me sleen by-cause that I yow love.
10

Franklin's Tale: 595

[continues previous] For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight;
11

Franklin's Tale: 740

[continues previous] Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse:
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 447

[continues previous] Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 457

[continues previous] Foryelde yow, that ye the god of love
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1277

[continues previous] And seyde, 'nece, I pray yow hertely,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1406

Quod Pandarus, 'I pray yow that ye be
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 74

By god, me mette I was in swich meschief
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 104

Me mette how I was in the medew tho,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 93

Swich vois, right as yow list, to laughe or pleyne. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 75

Right now, that yet myn herte is sore afright.
10

Knight's Tale: 238

But I was hurt right now thurgh-out myn
10

Knight's Tale: 239

In-to myn herte, that wol my bane be.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 121

Now is myn herte all hool, now is it oute; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 498

Ne never falshede in myn herte I mente. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 92

[continues previous] Right so mowe ye out of myn herte bringe
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 93

[continues previous] Swich vois, right as yow list, to laughe or pleyne.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1896

Made in myn herte a large sore,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1897

That in ful gret peyne I abood.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 12

For which right now myn herte ginneth blede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 13

And now my penne, allas! with which I wryte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 987

But trewely, as yet me list not pleye. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 988

Myn herte is now in tribulacioun, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 76

Now god,' quod he, 'my swevene recche aright,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 121

[continues previous] Now is myn herte all hool, now is it oute;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

[continues previous] So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

[continues previous] 'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 499

[continues previous] And sir,' quod he, 'now of my privetee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 632

[continues previous] Yow any-thing, than prey I yow,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

[continues previous] 'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

[continues previous] 'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

[continues previous] 'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 988

[continues previous] Myn herte is now in tribulacioun,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 77

And keep my body out of foul prisoun!
11

Parson's Tale: 19

... penaunce in water and in lond (in water by night and by day, in greet peril and in greet peyne, in lond, in famine, in thurst, in cold and clothlees, and ones stoned almost to the deeth) yet seyde he: 'allas! I, caytif man, who shal delivere me fro the prisoun of my caytif body?' And seint Ierome, whan he longe tyme hadde woned in desert, where-as he hadde no companye but of wilde bestes, where-as he ne hadde no mete but herbes and water to his drinke, ne no bed but the naked erthe, for which his flesh was blak as an Ethiopen for hete ... [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 78

Me mette, how that I romed up and doun
12

Knight's Tale: 211

Was in hir walk, and romed up and doun.
11

Parson's Tale: 19

[continues previous] ... after his grete penaunce in water and in lond (in water by night and by day, in greet peril and in greet peyne, in lond, in famine, in thurst, in cold and clothlees, and ones stoned almost to the deeth) yet seyde he: 'allas! I, caytif man, who shal delivere me fro the prisoun of my caytif body?' And seint Ierome, whan he longe tyme hadde woned in desert, where-as he hadde no companye but of wilde bestes, where-as he ne hadde no mete but herbes and water to his drinke, ne no bed but the naked erthe, for which his ...
14

Hous of Fame 1: 140

But as I romed up and doun, [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 1: 141

I fond that on a wal ther was [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 79

Withinne our yerde, wher-as I saugh a beste,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 140

[continues previous] But as I romed up and doun,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 141

[continues previous] I fond that on a wal ther was
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 80

Was lyk an hound, and wolde han maad areste
10

Franklin's Tale: 185

The odour of floures and the fresshe sighte [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 186

Wolde han maad any herte for to lighte [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 81

Upon my body, and wolde han had me deed.
10

Franklin's Tale: 185

[continues previous] The odour of floures and the fresshe sighte
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 82

His colour was bitwixe yelwe and reed;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 174

And wher my colour was bothe fresh and reed, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 83

And tipped was his tail, and bothe his eres,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 174

[continues previous] And wher my colour was bothe fresh and reed,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 371

And with thyn eres heren wel [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 372

Top and tail, and everydel, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 84

With blak, unlyk the remenant of his heres;
10

Hous of Fame 2: 371

[continues previous] And with thyn eres heren wel
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 86

Yet of his look for fere almost I deye;
11

Monk's Tale: 548

For fere almost out of his wit he breyde, [continues next]
11

Envoy to Scogan: 7

Of whiche errour I deye almost for drede.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 87

This caused me my groning, doutelees.'
11

Monk's Tale: 547

[continues previous] 'Wher is this false tyraunt, this Neroun?'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 493

Ye wol it holden trewly un-to me?' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.' [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 88

'Avoy!' quod she, 'fy on yow, hertelees!
12

Miller's Tale: 553

And seyde, 'fy! allas! what have I do?' [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 554

'Tehee!' quod she, and clapte the window to; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1144

'This thank have I for I have maad yow see; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1145

Allas!' quod she, 'that ever I was so kinde!' [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 627

'Allas,' quod she, 'on thee, Fortune, I pleyne, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 134

'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye; [continues next]
15+

Hous of Fame 3: 686

'Fy on yow,' quod she, 'everichoon! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 494

[continues previous] 'Ye, doutelees,' quod she, 'myn uncle dere.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1234

Ye wolde han slayn your-self anoon?' quod she. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1235

'Ye, douteless;' and she answerde, 'allas! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1604

'O mercy, god, what lyf is this?' quod she; [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 89

Allas!' quod she, 'for, by that god above,
12

Miller's Tale: 553

[continues previous] And seyde, 'fy! allas! what have I do?'
12

Miller's Tale: 554

[continues previous] 'Tehee!' quod she, and clapte the window to;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1085

Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde! [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1086

Now sir,' quod she, 'for aught that may bityde, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1144

[continues previous] 'This thank have I for I have maad yow see;
11

Merchant's Tale: 1145

[continues previous] Allas!' quod she, 'that ever I was so kinde!'
11

Franklin's Tale: 260

But after that in pley thus seyde she:
12

Franklin's Tale: 261

'Aurelie,' quod she, 'by heighe god above,
10

Franklin's Tale: 627

[continues previous] 'Allas,' quod she, 'on thee, Fortune, I pleyne,
10

Franklin's Tale: 628

[continues previous] That unwar wrapped hast me in thy cheyne;
11

Shipman's Tale: 134

[continues previous] 'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye;
11

Shipman's Tale: 135

[continues previous] By god and by this porthors, I yow swere,
14

Hous of Fame 3: 686

[continues previous] 'Fy on yow,' quod she, 'everichoon!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 878

For thing of nought! Now, by that god above, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1234

[continues previous] Ye wolde han slayn your-self anoon?' quod she.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1235

[continues previous] 'Ye, douteless;' and she answerde, 'allas!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1236

[continues previous] For, by that ilke lord that made me,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1604

[continues previous] 'O mercy, god, what lyf is this?' quod she;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1605

[continues previous] 'Allas, ye slee me thus for verray tene!
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 90

Now han ye lost myn herte and al my love;
10

Merchant's Tale: 223

And sin that ye han herd al myn entente,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1086

[continues previous] Now sir,' quod she, 'for aught that may bityde,
11

Squire's Tale: 533

I yaf him al myn herte and al my thoght — [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

And ever shal, til that myn herte dye; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye, [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 234

Right as him list, he laugheth at my peyne, [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 235

And I ne can myn herte not restreyne, [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 236

That I ne love him alwey, never-the-les; [continues next]
11

Compleint to His Lady: 19

Can I nat finde; and [fro] my sorwful herte, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1858

The God of Love, which al to-shar
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1859

Myn herte with his arwis kene,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4369

His absence at myn herte I fele; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4370

For al my Ioye and al myn hele [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4796

And yit I can it al parcuere. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4797

Myn herte foryetith therof right nought, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7320

Ther-under is al my trechery;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7321

Myn herte chaungeth never the mo
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 869

But I with al myn herte and al my might, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

My dere herte, and al myn owene knight, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 872

In which myn herte growen is so faste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 878

[continues previous] For thing of nought! Now, by that god above,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1001

Ben to yow trewe and hool, with al myn herte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1002

And dredelees, that shal be founde at preve. —
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1304

My ground of ese, and al myn herte dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 289

That knowest best myn herte and al my thought,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 290

What shal my sorwful lyf don in this cas
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 942

Him for to glade, I shal don al my peyne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 943

And in myn herte seken every veyne;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1574

Thus were al lost, y-wis, myn herte dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 706

I am but lost, al be myn herte trewe; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 707

Now mighty god, thou on my sorwe rewe!' [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 91

I can nat love a coward, by my feith.
11

Squire's Tale: 533

[continues previous] I yaf him al myn herte and al my thoght —
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 157

For it is ernest to me, by my feith; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

[continues previous] Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 235

[continues previous] And I ne can myn herte not restreyne,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 236

[continues previous] That I ne love him alwey, never-the-les;
11

Compleint to His Lady: 19

[continues previous] Can I nat finde; and [fro] my sorwful herte,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4369

[continues previous] His absence at myn herte I fele;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4796

[continues previous] And yit I can it al parcuere.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 869

[continues previous] But I with al myn herte and al my might,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 870

[continues previous] As I have seyd, wol love, un-to my laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 706

[continues previous] I am but lost, al be myn herte trewe;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 92

For certes, what so any womman seith,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 158

[continues previous] That fele I wel, what so any man seith.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 93

We alle desyren, if it mighte be,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 175

They wolde that hir housbondes sholde be [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 94

To han housbondes hardy, wyse, and free,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 175

[continues previous] They wolde that hir housbondes sholde be [continues next]
15+

Shipman's Tale: 176

[continues previous] Hardy, and wyse, and riche, and ther-to free, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 177

And buxom to his wyf, and fresh a-bedde. [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 95

And secree, and no nigard, ne no fool,
10

Summoner's Tale: 584

He nis no fool, ne no demoniak.
10

Summoner's Tale: 585

And Iankin hath y-wonne a newe goune. —
15+

Shipman's Tale: 176

[continues previous] Hardy, and wyse, and riche, and ther-to free,
12

Shipman's Tale: 177

[continues previous] And buxom to his wyf, and fresh a-bedde.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 96

Ne him that is agast of every tool,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 724

Ne avauntour, seyth men, certein, is he noon; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 97

Ne noon avauntour, by that god above!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 724

[continues previous] Ne avauntour, seyth men, certein, is he noon;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1565

That ye ne dorste come ayein for shame! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1566

And er that ye Iuparten so your name, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 98

How dorste ye seyn for shame unto your love,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1565

[continues previous] That ye ne dorste come ayein for shame! [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 99

That any thing mighte make yow aferd?
12

Compleint to His Lady: 128

Than for to any thing or thinke or seye
12

Compleint to His Lady: 129

That mighte yow offende in any tyme.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1565

[continues previous] That ye ne dorste come ayein for shame!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1566

[continues previous] And er that ye Iuparten so your name,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 100

Have ye no mannes herte, and han a berd?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 417

Ector, or any mannes creature,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 418

Ye nolde han had no mercy ne mesure
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 109

Which causeth folk to dreden in here dremes
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 252

And causeth most to dreden vyce and shame.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 114

Causeth ful many a man, in sleep, to crye,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 118

That werken many a man in sleep ful wo; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 188

This man out of his sleep for fere abrayde; [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 27

... to falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of his gentrye is ful greet folye; for ofte tyme the gentrye of the body binimeth the gentrye of the soule; and eek we ben alle of o fader and of o moder; and alle we been of o nature roten and ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1225

As it lay bare, and gan for fere crye, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

For fere of blake beres, or boles blake,
10

Franklin's Tale: 131

But whan she saugh the grisly rokkes blake,
10

Franklin's Tale: 132

For verray fere so wolde hir herte quake,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

For fere of blake beres, or boles blake, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 116

Or elles, blake develes wole hem take. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 117

[continues previous] Of othere humours coude I telle also,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 188

[continues previous] This man out of his sleep for fere abrayde;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 68

celestial moevinges of sterres, or elles by the vertu of angeles, or [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 69

elles by the dyverse subtilitee of develes, or elles by any of hem, [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 70

or elles by hem alle, the destinal ordinaunce is y-woven and [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6695

Or whyte monkes, or these blake[continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1090

The feling of his sorwe, or of his fere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1091

Or of ought elles, fled was out of towne; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1225

[continues previous] As it lay bare, and gan for fere crye,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 116

Or elles, blake develes wole hem take.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For fere of blake beres, or boles blake, [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 69

[continues previous] elles by the dyverse subtilitee of develes, or elles by any of hem, [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 70

[continues previous] or elles by hem alle, the destinal ordinaunce is y-woven and [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6695

[continues previous] Or whyte monkes, or these blake
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6696

[continues previous] (I wole no mo ensamplis make) —
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1090

[continues previous] The feling of his sorwe, or of his fere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1091

[continues previous] Or of ought elles, fled was out of towne;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 117

Of othere humours coude I telle also,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

[continues previous] For fere of blake beres, or boles blake, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 69

[continues previous] elles by the dyverse subtilitee of develes, or elles by any of hem,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 118

That werken many a man in sleep ful wo;
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 114

[continues previous] Causeth ful many a man, in sleep, to crye,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 815

For now she worcheth me ful wo, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1388

Ful lightly, cesse wind, it wol aryse; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 220

That gan ful lightly of the lettre passe, [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 119

But I wol passe as lightly as I can.
14

Knight's Tale: 602

His martirdom? for sothe, it am nat I;
14

Knight's Tale: 603

Therefore I passe as lightly as I may.
11

Knight's Tale: 1194

As shortly as I can I wol me haste,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 816

[continues previous] And I wol telle sone why so.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1388

[continues previous] Ful lightly, cesse wind, it wol aryse;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1389

[continues previous] But so nil not an ook whan it is cast;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 220

[continues previous] That gan ful lightly of the lettre passe,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 120

Lo Catoun, which that was so wys a man,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 852

And whan this gode man saugh it was so, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 853

As he that wys was and obedient [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 22

Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 394

A man, though that I walked in-to Inde, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 232

Medea, which that was so wys and fair
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 233

That fairer saw ther never man with yë,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 121

Seyde he nat thus, ne do no fors of dremes?
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 853

[continues previous] As he that wys was and obedient
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 249

'Ye, certainly,' quod he, 'no wonder is.' [continues next]
12

Friar's Tale: 213

And yet wol som men seye it was nat he;
12

Friar's Tale: 214

I do no fors of your divinitee.
10

Summoner's Tale: 480

Neither in market ne in your large halle.' [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 481

'No fors,' quod he, 'but tel me al your grief.' [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 22

[continues previous] Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys.
12

Merchant's Tale: 1096

'That I am blind.' 'Ye, sir, no fors,' quod she: [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 393

[continues previous] And seyde thus, 'for I ne can nat finde
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 804

'No fors,' quod he, 'now, sir, for goddes sake, [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 59

... forleten it and stinten; as doon they that han any wight to governe, and ne taken of him na-more kepe, anon as they finden any contrarie or any anoy. Thise been the newe shepherdes, that leten hir sheep witingly go renne to the wolf that is in the breres, or do no fors of hir owene governaunce. Of this comth poverte and destruccioun, bothe of spirituel and temporel thinges. Thanne comth a manere coldnesse, that freseth al the herte of man. Thanne comth undevocioun, thurgh which a man is so blent, as seith Seint Bernard, and hath swiche langour in soule, that he may neither rede ne singe ...
10

Hous of Fame 3: 820

'But now, no fors; for wel I see [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 542

'I do no fors therof,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 122

Now, sire,' quod she, 'whan we flee fro the bemes,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 249

[continues previous] 'Ye, certainly,' quod he, 'no wonder is.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

[continues previous] 'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this,
10

Summoner's Tale: 481

[continues previous] 'No fors,' quod he, 'but tel me al your grief.'
12

Merchant's Tale: 1096

[continues previous] 'That I am blind.' 'Ye, sir, no fors,' quod she:
11

Squire's Tale: 464

For goddes love, com fro the tree adoun; [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 208

'Now, elles god forbede, sire,' quod she,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 804

[continues previous] 'No fors,' quod he, 'now, sir, for goddes sake,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 819

[continues previous] That thou hast herd?' quod he to me;
10

Hous of Fame 3: 820

[continues previous] 'But now, no fors; for wel I see
11

Book of the Duchesse: 542

[continues previous] 'I do no fors therof,' quod he,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 123

For Goddes love, as tak som laxatyf;
12

Knight's Tale: 226

For Goddes love, tak al in pacience
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 204

For goddes love, as chees a newe requeste;
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 205

Tak al my good, and lat my body go.'
10

Merchant's Tale: 1128

As me was taught, to hele with your yën, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 464

[continues previous] For goddes love, com fro the tree adoun;
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 124

Up peril of my soule, and of my lyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 289

Up peril of my lyf, til that it dye.
11

Summoner's Tale: 99

Thanked be god, that yow yaf soule and lyf, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 563

And ye shul seen, up peril of my lyf,
13

Merchant's Tale: 1127

[continues previous] Up peril of my soule, I shal nat lyen,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 113

On peril of my lyf, I shal not lye, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 125

I counseille yow the beste, I wol nat lye,
13

Miller's Tale: 327

'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye;
13

Miller's Tale: 328

I have y-founde in myn astrologye,
12

Reeve's Tale: 56

But right fair was hir heer, I wol nat lye. [continues next]
12

Reeve's Tale: 57

The person of the toun, for she was feir, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye;
11

Summoner's Tale: 99

[continues previous] Thanked be god, that yow yaf soule and lyf,
11

Summoner's Tale: 100

[continues previous] Yet saugh I nat this day so fair a wyf
12

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 113

[continues previous] On peril of my lyf, I shal not lye,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 126

That bothe of colere and of malencolye
12

Reeve's Tale: 57

[continues previous] The person of the toun, for she was feir,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

[continues previous] Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 127

Ye purge yow; and for ye shul nat tarie,
10

Melibee's Tale: 50

... liven in swich wyse." By thise resons that I have seid un-to yow, and by manye othere resons that I coude seye, I graunte yow that richesses been goode to hem that geten hem wel, and to hem that wel usen tho richesses. And therfore wol I shewe yow how ye shul have yow, and how ye shul here yow in gaderinge of richesses, and in what manere ye shul usen hem.
11

Melibee's Tale: 69

Thanne was Prudence right glad and loyeful, and seyde, 'Certes, sir,' quod she, 'ye han wel and goodly answered. For right as by the conseil, assent, and help of your freendes, ye han been stired to venge yow and maken werre, right so with-outen hir conseil shul ye nat accorden yow, ne have pees with your adversaries. For the lawe seith: "ther nis no-thing so good by wey of kinde, as a thing to been unbounde by him that it was y-bounde."'
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 128

Though in this toun is noon apotecarie,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 913

Ne, pardee, harm may ther be noon ne sinne; [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 129

I shal my-self to herbes techen yow,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 914

[continues previous] I wol my-self be with yow al this night.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 131

And in our yerd tho herbes shal I finde,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 95

geten him sovereyn blisfulnesse; but that shal he nat finde in
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 96

tho thinges that I have shewed, that ne mowen nat yeven that
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 177

Half hir beautee shulde men nat finde [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 132

The whiche han of hir propretee, by kinde,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 178

[continues previous] In creature that formed is by kinde,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 179

Hir name was Alceste the debonayre;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 135

Ye been ful colerik of compleccioun.
10

Squire's Tale: 51

In Aries, the colerik hote signe. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 52

Ful lusty was the weder and benigne, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 136

Ware the sonne in his ascencioun
10

Squire's Tale: 50

[continues previous] In Martes face, and in his mansioun
10

Squire's Tale: 51

[continues previous] In Aries, the colerik hote signe.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 148

Be mery, housbond, for your fader kin!
11

Man of Law's Tale: 176

'Fader,' she sayde, 'thy wrecched child Custance, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 271

To take a yong wyf; by my fader kin,
11

Merchant's Tale: 272

Your herte hangeth on a Ioly pin.
12

Monk's Prologue: 43

Of what hous be ye, by your fader kin? [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1521

For I have kin and freendes elles-where [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 149

Dredeth no dreem; I can say yow na-more.'
11

Knight's Tale: 1202

Thus was it peynt, I can say yow no ferre;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 175

[continues previous] That knowen wyves, I dar say yow no more.
11

Summoner's Tale: 496

'Madame,' quod he, 'how thinketh yow her-by?' [continues next]
12

Monk's Prologue: 44

[continues previous] I vow to god, thou, hast a ful fair skin,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 98

God it amende, I can sey yow na-more.'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 99

'Ther-of no fors, good yeman,' quod our host;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1520

[continues previous] And hardily, ne dredeth no poverte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1521

[continues previous] For I have kin and freendes elles-where
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 150

'Madame,' quod he, 'graunt mercy of your lore.
11

Summoner's Tale: 496

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'how thinketh yow her-by?'
11

Shipman's Tale: 280

Graunt mercy of your cost and of your chere.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 603

'Graunt mercy,' quod the preest, and was ful glad,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 560

'Graunt mercy, goode frend,' quod he,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7504

Graunt mercy, swete sire dere!'
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7505

Quod alderfirst Dame Abstinence,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 649

'Y-wis, graunt mercy, nece!' quod he tho;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1660

'Graunt mercy, goode myn, y-wis,' quod she,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 153

Though that he bad no dremes for to drede,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 795

Theffect is this, that Alla, out of drede, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 243

Here may men seen that dremes been to drede. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6885

I wol you seyn, withouten drede, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 154

By god, men may in olde bokes rede
10

Man of Law's Tale: 796

[continues previous] His moder slow, that men may pleinly rede,
12

Squire's Tale: 211

As men may in thise olde gestes rede,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 243

[continues previous] Here may men seen that dremes been to drede.
13

Hous of Fame 1: 385

As men may ofte in bokes rede,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6886

[continues previous] What men may in the gospel rede
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1429

O blake night, as folk in bokes rede,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1430

That shapen art by god this world to hyde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 18

As she that niste what was best to rede.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 19

And trewely, as men in bokes rede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 20

Men wiste never womman han the care,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1753

As men may in these olde bokes rede,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 156

Than ever Catoun was, so mote I thee,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4841

That lasse harm is, so mote I thee, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4842

Disceyve them, than disceyved be; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1160

Pandare answerde, 'nay, so mote I thee! [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 157

Than al the revers seyn of his sentence,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4842

[continues previous] Disceyve them, than disceyved be;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1161

[continues previous] Al wrong, by god; what seystow, man, wher art?
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 158

And han wel founden by experience,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 14

that children han ben founden tormentours to hir fadres, I not [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 159

That dremes ben significaciouns,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 14

[continues previous] that children han ben founden tormentours to hir fadres, I not
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 160

As wel of Ioye as tribulaciouns
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 118

And seyde, 'y-wis, we Grekes con have Ioye [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 119

To honouren yow, as wel as folk of Troye.' [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 161

That folk enduren in this lyf present.
12

Knight's Tale: 1065

That loves servaunts in this lyf enduren;
12

Knight's Tale: 1066

The othes, that hir covenants assuren;
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... in your might and in your weeldinge. For a wys man repreveth the avaricious man, and seith thus, in two vers: "wherto and why burieth a man hise goodes by his grete avarice, and knoweth wel that nedes moste he dye; for deeth is the ende of every man as in this present lyf." And for what cause or enchesoun Ioyneth he him or knitteth he him so faste un-to hise goodes, that alle his wittes mowen nat disseveren him or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, he shal no-thing bere with him out ...
10

Parson's Tale: 10

... derknesse of deeth' been the sinnes that the wrecched man hath doon, whiche that destourben him to see the face of god; right as doth a derk cloude bitwixe us and the sonne. 'Lond of misese': by-cause that ther been three maneres of defautes, agayn three thinges that folk of this world han in this present lyf, that is to seyn, honours, delyces, and richesses. Agayns honour, have they in helle shame and confusion. For wel ye woot that men clepen 'honour' the reverence that man doth to man; but in helle is noon honour ne reverence. For certes, na-more reverence shal be doon there to a king than to a knave. For which god seith by the prophete Ieremye: 'thilke folk that me despysen shul been in despyt.' 'Honour' is eek cleped greet lordshipe; ther shal no man serven other but of harm and torment. 'Honour' is eek cleped greet dignitee and heighnesse; but in helle shul they been al fortroden of develes. And god seith: 'the horrible develes shulle goon and comen up-on the hevedes of the dampned folk.' And this is for-as-muche as, the hyer that they were in this present lyf, the more shulle they been abated and defouled in helle. Agayns the richesses of this world, shul they han misese of poverte; and this poverte shal been in foure thinges: in defaute of tresor, of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 11

... he hath lived, and eek as longe as he shal live, that no goodnesse ne hath to paye with his dette to god, to whom he oweth al his lyf. For trust wel, 'he shal yeven acountes,' as seith seint Bernard, 'of alle the godes that han be yeven him in this present lyf, and how he hath hem despended; in so muche that ther shal nat perisse an heer of his heed, ne a moment of an houre ne shal nat perisse of his tyme, that he ne shal yeve of it a rekening.' [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... Lecherie. And seint Paul yeveth hem the regne, that nis dewe to no wight but to hem that doon deedly sinne. Another sinne of Lecherie is to bireve a mayden of hir maydenhede; for he that so dooth, certes, he casteth a mayden out of the hyeste degree that is in this present lyf, and bireveth hir thilke precious fruit that the book clepeth 'the hundred fruit.' I ne can seye it noon other weyes in English, but in Latin it highte Centesimus fructus. Certes, he that so dooth is cause of manye damages and vileinyes, mo than any man can rekene; right as ...
10

Parson's Tale: 100

... man sholde eek thinke, that god seeth and wool alle hise thoghtes and alle hise werkes; to him may no thing been hid ne covered. Men sholden eek remembren hem of the shame that is to come at the day of dome, to hem that been nat penitent and shriven in this present lyf. For alle the creatures in erthe and in helle shullen seen apertly al that they hyden in this world.
11

Parson's Tale: 103

Thanne shal men understonde what is the fruit of penaunce; and, after the word of Iesu Crist, it is the endelees blisse of hevene, ther Ioye hath no contrarioustee of wo ne grevaunce, ther alle harmes been passed of this present lyf; ther-as is the sikernesse fro the peyne of helle; ther-as is the blisful companye that reioysen hem everemo, everich of otheres Ioye; ther-as the body of man, that whylom was foul and derk, is more cleer than the sonne; ther-as the body, that whylom was syk, freele, and feble, and ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 104

... Crist and his blisful moder, and alle the seintes of hevene; bisekinge hem that they from hennes-forth, un-to my lyves ende, sende me grace to biwayle my giltes, and to studie to the salvacioun of my soule: — and graunte me grace of verray penitence, confessioun and satisfaccioun to doon in this present lyf; thurgh the benigne grace of him that is king of kinges and preest over alle preestes, that boghte us with the precious blood of his herte; so that I may been oon of hem at the day of dome that shulle be saved: Qui cum patre, &c. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 119

[continues previous] To honouren yow, as wel as folk of Troye.'
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 162

Ther nedeth make of this noon argument;
10

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... 'The derknesse of deeth' been the sinnes that the wrecched man hath doon, whiche that destourben him to see the face of god; right as doth a derk cloude bitwixe us and the sonne. 'Lond of misese': by-cause that ther been three maneres of defautes, agayn three thinges that folk of this world han in this present lyf, that is to seyn, honours, delyces, and richesses. Agayns honour, have they in helle shame and confusion. For wel ye woot that men clepen 'honour' the reverence that man doth to man; but in helle is noon honour ne reverence. For certes, na-more reverence shal be doon there ...
11

Parson's Tale: 103

[continues previous] Thanne shal men understonde what is the fruit of penaunce; and, after the word of Iesu Crist, it is the endelees blisse of hevene, ther Ioye hath no contrarioustee of wo ne grevaunce, ther alle harmes been passed of this present lyf; ther-as is the sikernesse fro the peyne of helle; ther-as is the blisful companye that reioysen hem everemo, everich of otheres Ioye; ther-as the body of man, that whylom was foul and derk, is more cleer than the sonne; ther-as the body, that whylom was syk, freele, and ...
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 164

Oon of the gretteste auctours that men rede
10

Reeve's Tale: 134

"The gretteste clerkes been noght the wysest men," [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 50

... richesses ther comen manye goodes, right so by poverte come ther manye harmes and yveles. For greet poverte constreyneth a man to do manye yveles. And therfore clepeth Cassidore poverte "the moder of ruine," that is to seyn, the moder of overthrowinge or fallinge doun. And therfore seith Piers Alfonce: "oon of the gretteste adversitees of this world is whan a free man, by kinde or by burthe, is constreyned by poverte to eten the almesse of his enemy." And the same seith Innocent in oon of hise bokes; he seith: that "sorweful and mishappy is the condicioun of a povre begger; for if he axe ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 55

'Certes,' quod she, 'I conseille yow that ye accorde with youre adversaries, and that ye haue pees with hem. For seint Iame seith in hise epistles: that "by concord and pees the smale richesses wexen grete, and by debaat and discord the grete richesses fallen doun." And ye knowen wel that oon of the gretteste and most sovereyn thing, that is in this world, is unitee and pees. And therfore seyde oure lord Iesu Crist to hise apostles in this wyse: "wel happy and blessed been they that loven and purchacen pees; for they been called children of god."' 'A!' quod Melibee, 'now se I ...
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 165

Seith thus, that whylom two felawes wente
10

Reeve's Tale: 135

[continues previous] As whylom to the wolf thus spak the mare;
12

Melibee's Tale: 50

[continues previous] ... so as by richesses ther comen manye goodes, right so by poverte come ther manye harmes and yveles. For greet poverte constreyneth a man to do manye yveles. And therfore clepeth Cassidore poverte "the moder of ruine," that is to seyn, the moder of overthrowinge or fallinge doun. And therfore seith Piers Alfonce: "oon of the gretteste adversitees of this world is whan a free man, by kinde or by burthe, is constreyned by poverte to eten the almesse of his enemy." And the same seith Innocent in oon of hise bokes; he seith: that "sorweful and mishappy is the condicioun ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 166

On pilgrimage, in a ful good entente;
11

Knight's Tale: 100

And hem conforteth in ful good entente; [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 226

She thanked him ful ofte, in good entente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1188

And Pandarus, with a ful good entente, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 167

And happed so, thay come into a toun,
10

Knight's Tale: 100

[continues previous] And hem conforteth in ful good entente;
11

Knight's Tale: 101

[continues previous] And swoor his ooth, as he was trewe knight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1188

[continues previous] And Pandarus, with a ful good entente,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 168

Wher-as ther was swich congregacioun
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

And eek he was of swich discrecioun, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 169

Of peple, and eek so streit of herbergage,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 489

[continues previous] And eek he was of swich discrecioun,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 174

And ech of hem goth to his hostelrye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 306

To ech of hem his tyme and his sesoun, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 175

And took his logging as it wolde falle.
12

Summoner's Tale: 312

And as fortune wolde that it were so, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 306

[continues previous] To ech of hem his tyme and his sesoun,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 478

And al-so sone as that he was gon, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 161

natheles, that oon of hem, or it was y-doon, it bihoved by necessitee [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 176

That oon of hem was logged in a stalle,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 453

That oon of hem was blind, and mighte nat see
12

Summoner's Tale: 312

[continues previous] And as fortune wolde that it were so,
12

Summoner's Tale: 313

[continues previous] That oon of hem cam hoom, that other noght.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 478

[continues previous] And al-so sone as that he was gon,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 479

[continues previous] That oon of hem spak thus un-to that other,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 161

[continues previous] natheles, that oon of hem, or it was y-doon, it bihoved by necessitee
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 924

That oon of hem was of a tree
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 925

That bereth a fruyt of savour wikke;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 177

Fer in a yerd, with oxen of the plough;
11

Knight's Tale: 29

And wayke been the oxen in my plough.
11

Knight's Tale: 30

The remenant of the tale is long y-nough.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 180

That us governeth alle as in commune.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

And so bifel, that in a daweninge, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 181

And so bifel, that, longe er it were day,
10

Merchant's Tale: 652

As fresh as is the brighte someres day. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 653

And so bifel, how that this gode man [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 510

He maked him so conning and so souple
12

Monk's Tale: 511

That longe tyme it was er tirannye
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

[continues previous] And so bifel, that in a daweninge,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 182

This man mette in his bed, ther-as he lay,
11

Reeve's Tale: 338

Un-to the bed ther-as the miller lay.
11

Reeve's Tale: 339

He wende have cropen by his felawe Iohn;
14

Summoner's Tale: 451

And fette his felawe, ther-as lay his stoor. [continues next]
14

Summoner's Tale: 452

He looked as it were a wilde boor; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 653

[continues previous] And so bifel, how that this gode man
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 265

As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 292

And in the dawning ther I lay,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 293

Me mette thus, in my bed al naked: —
10

Parlement of Foules: 95

And in my slepe I mette, as I lay, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 96

How African, right in that selfe aray [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 556

Into his chaumbre, and fond how that he lay [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1615

And with that word doun in his bed he lay, [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 183

How that his felawe gan up-on him calle,
12

Knight's Tale: 1227

Ful pitously Lucyna gan she calle, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 302

Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas! [continues next]
14

Summoner's Tale: 451

[continues previous] And fette his felawe, ther-as lay his stoor.
13

Clerk's Tale: 152

Ianicula men of that throp him calle. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1085

Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde! [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 265

[continues previous] As for that day, he preyde him to abyde.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

[continues previous] His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 267

[continues previous] Gan for to laughe, and scorned him ful faste.
10

Parlement of Foules: 96

[continues previous] How African, right in that selfe aray
11

Parlement of Foules: 405

And therwith-al the tercel gan she calle, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 556

[continues previous] Into his chaumbre, and fond how that he lay
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 557

[continues previous] Up-on his bed; but man so sore grone
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1615

[continues previous] And with that word doun in his bed he lay,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 184

And seyde, 'allas! for in an oxes stalle
12

Knight's Tale: 1228

[continues previous] And seyde, 'help, for thou mayst best of alle.'
11

Miller's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Gan for to syke sore, and seyde, 'allas!
13

Clerk's Tale: 151

[continues previous] His grace in-to a litel oxes stalle:
15+

Clerk's Tale: 235

Bisyde the threshfold, in an oxes stalle,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 236

And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1084

[continues previous] This fresshe May, that is so bright and shene,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1085

[continues previous] Gan for to syke, and seyde, 'allas, my syde!
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 207

And whan that he cam to this oxes stalle, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 406

[continues previous] And seyde, 'my sone, the choys is to thee falle.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 185

This night I shal be mordred ther I lye.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 207

[continues previous] And whan that he cam to this oxes stalle,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 187

In alle haste com to me,' he sayde.
10

Merchant's Tale: 1154

He may nat sodeynly wel taken keep [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 188

This man out of his sleep for fere abrayde;
10

Merchant's Tale: 1153

[continues previous] But, sire, a man that waketh out of his sleep,
11

Monk's Tale: 547

'Wher is this false tyraunt, this Neroun?'
11

Monk's Tale: 548

For fere almost out of his wit he breyde,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 114

Causeth ful many a man, in sleep, to crye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 115

For fere of blake beres, or boles blake,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 875

And wel nigh with the word for fere he deyde. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 189

But whan that he was wakned of his sleep,
11

Knight's Tale: 532

As he was whan that Argus took his sleep; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 875

[continues previous] And wel nigh with the word for fere he deyde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 876

[continues previous] And whan that Pandare herde hir name nevene,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 190

He turned him, and took of this no keep;
11

Knight's Tale: 532

[continues previous] As he was whan that Argus took his sleep;
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 23

That al the world he sette at no value. [continues next]
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 24

Him thoughte, nas to him no thing so due [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 191

Him thoughte his dreem nas but a vanitee.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 258

Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 259

Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde,
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 24

[continues previous] Him thoughte, nas to him no thing so due
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 194

Cam, as him thoughte, and seide, 'I am now slawe;
10

Legend of Dido: 260

Seide as her thoughte, and somdel hit with-stood.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 195

Bihold my blody woundes, depe and wyde!
15+

Knight's Tale: 897

And sawe hir blody woundes wyde and sore;
14

Knight's Tale: 898

And alle cryden, bothe lasse and more,
13

Squire's Tale: 155

Al be his woundes never so depe and wyde.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 688

In Habradates woundes depe and wyde, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 689

And seyde, "my body, at the leeste way, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1899

Throughout my woundes large and wyde
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 196

Arys up erly in the morwe-tyde,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 688

[continues previous] In Habradates woundes depe and wyde,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 197

And at the west gate of the toun,' quod he,
10

Melibee's Tale: 12

... men sholden smyte, right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it ... [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 214

And forth he goth, no lenger wolde he lette,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 215

Unto the west gate of the toun, and fond
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 104

'In the suburbes of a toun,' quod he, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 198

'A carte ful of donge ther shaltow see,
10

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... smyte, right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. ...
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 104

[continues previous] 'In the suburbes of a toun,' quod he,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 201

My gold caused my mordre, sooth to sayn;'
11

Man of Law's Tale: 345

And, sooth to sayn, vitaille gret plentee [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 202

And tolde him every poynt how he was slayn,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 345

[continues previous] And, sooth to sayn, vitaille gret plentee
11

Hous of Fame 1: 253

Ther saw I grave, how Eneas
11

Hous of Fame 1: 254

Tolde Dido every cas,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 255

That him was tid upon the see.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 471

He sayde a lay, a maner song, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 203

With a ful pitous face, pale of hewe.
11

Clerk's Tale: 284

For which she loked with ful pale face.
12

Franklin's Tale: 625

With face pale and with ful sorweful chere, [continues next]
15+

Manciple's Tale: 172

Now lystow deed, with face pale of hewe,
15+

Manciple's Tale: 173

Ful giltelees, that dorste I swere, y-wis!
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1214

For ferde, and myn hewe al pale, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1215

Ful ofte I wex bothe pale and reed; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 420

With pale visage and pitous, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 421

And semeth a simple creature; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7410

Don on the cope of a frere, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7411

With chere simple, and ful pitous; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 379

This Pandarus, ful deed and pale of hewe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 380

Ful pitously answerde and seyde, 'yis! [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 204

And truste wel, his dreem he fond ful trewe;
10

Cook's Tale: 26

For often tyme he fond his box ful bare. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 624

[continues previous] But to hir-self she spak, and seyde thus,
12

Franklin's Tale: 625

[continues previous] With face pale and with ful sorweful chere,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 469

[continues previous] To have swich sorwe, and be not deed.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 470

[continues previous] Ful pitous, pale, and nothing reed,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1214

[continues previous] For ferde, and myn hewe al pale,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 420

[continues previous] With pale visage and pitous,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 421

[continues previous] And semeth a simple creature;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7411

[continues previous] With chere simple, and ful pitous;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 379

[continues previous] This Pandarus, ful deed and pale of hewe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 380

[continues previous] Ful pitously answerde and seyde, 'yis!
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 205

For on the morwe, as sone as it was day,
10

Cook's Tale: 27

[continues previous] For sikerly a prentis revelour,
11

Prioress' Tale: 136

For which, as sone as it was dayes light,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 519

On morwe, as sone as day bigan to clere, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 206

To his felawes in he took the way;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 710

And to the constable he the lettre took; [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 711

And whan that he this pitous lettre sey, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 519

[continues previous] On morwe, as sone as day bigan to clere,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 207

And whan that he cam to this oxes stalle,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 710

[continues previous] And to the constable he the lettre took;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 711

[continues previous] And whan that he this pitous lettre sey,
11

Clerk's Tale: 151

His grace in-to a litel oxes stalle: [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 235

Bisyde the threshfold, in an oxes stalle,
12

Clerk's Tale: 236

And doun up-on hir knees she gan to falle,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 184

And seyde, 'allas! for in an oxes stalle
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 185

This night I shal be mordred ther I lye.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 208

After his felawe he bigan to calle.
11

Clerk's Tale: 151

[continues previous] His grace in-to a litel oxes stalle:
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 209

The hostiler answered him anon,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 481

Thy profit wol I telle thee anon. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 463

He wolde han fled, but that the fox anon [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 210

And seyde, 'sire, your felawe is agon,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 482

[continues previous] Thou woost wel that our felawe is agon;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 483

And heer is gold, and that ful greet plentee,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 464

[continues previous] Seyde, 'Gentil sire, allas! wher wol ye gon?
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 211

As sone as day he wente out of the toun.'
12

Summoner's Tale: 145

Sone after that ye wente out of this toun.' [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 118

This mayde up-on a day wente in the toun [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 477

And forth toward the toun he wente anon.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 478

And al-so sone as that he was gon,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 100

For out of toun me list to gon [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 212

This man gan fallen in suspecioun,
12

Summoner's Tale: 145

[continues previous] Sone after that ye wente out of this toun.'
11

Physician's Tale: 118

[continues previous] This mayde up-on a day wente in the toun
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 99

[continues previous] And gan this nedle threde anon;
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 213

Remembring on his dremes that he mette,
11

Knight's Tale: 718

For ire he quook, no lenger wolde he byde. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 719

And whan that he had herd Arcites tale, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 562

Wolde go to bedde, he wolde no lenger tarie. [continues next]
14

Pardoner's Tale: 523

And forth he gooth, no lenger wolde he tarie, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 249

And with that word his countour-dore he shette, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 250

And doun he gooth, no lenger wolde he lette, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1332

No lenger wolde he that he kepte [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 214

And forth he goth, no lenger wolde he lette,
12

Knight's Tale: 718

[continues previous] For ire he quook, no lenger wolde he byde.
11

Knight's Tale: 719

[continues previous] And whan that he had herd Arcites tale,
14

Man of Law's Tale: 1019

The day goth faste, I wol no lenger lette. [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 28

He wente his wey, no lenger wolde he reste,
12

Merchant's Tale: 562

[continues previous] Wolde go to bedde, he wolde no lenger tarie.
12

Merchant's Tale: 563

[continues previous] He drinketh ipocras, clarree, and vernage
14

Pardoner's Tale: 523

[continues previous] And forth he gooth, no lenger wolde he tarie, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 249

[continues previous] And with that word his countour-dore he shette,
15+

Shipman's Tale: 250

[continues previous] And doun he gooth, no lenger wolde he lette,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 197

And at the west gate of the toun,' quod he, [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 215

Unto the west gate of the toun, and fond
14

Man of Law's Tale: 1019

[continues previous] The day goth faste, I wol no lenger lette.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 524

[continues previous] Into the toun, un-to a pothecarie,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 197

[continues previous] And at the west gate of the toun,' quod he,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1331

[continues previous] Unto him Swete-Loking clepte,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 217

That was arrayed in the same wyse
10

Knight's Tale: 882

But slee my felawe in the same wyse, [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 229

And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 508

To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye. [continues next]
10

Prioress' Tale: 208

This antem verraily in my deyinge, [continues next]
13

Melibee's Prologue: 41

And thogh I nat the same wordes seye [continues next]
14

Monk's Tale: 429

And putten him to prisoun in swich wyse [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 553

And comth here in the same wyse [continues next]
14

Legend of Phyllis: 65

Therfor I passe shortly in this wyse; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1546

But al for nought, he held forth ay the wyse [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 218

As ye han herd the dede man devyse;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 851

As ye han herd; what nedeth wordes mo?
10

Knight's Tale: 882

[continues previous] But slee my felawe in the same wyse,
10

Knight's Tale: 883

[continues previous] For bothe han we deserved to be slayn.'
13

Man of Law's Tale: 515

As heer-biforn that ye han herd devyse.
13

Man of Law's Tale: 516

The kinges herte of pitee gan agryse,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 783

As ye han herd, I can telle it no bettre,
11

Summoner's Tale: 491

As ye han herd biforn, ye woot wel what.
11

Franklin's Tale: 737

And told him al as ye han herd bifore;
10

Franklin's Tale: 770

And whan that ye han herd the tale, demeth.
11

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd;
11

Franklin's Tale: 865

And tolde him al, as ye han herd bifore;
12

Physician's Tale: 229

[continues previous] And tolde hir al the cas, as ye bifore
12

Physician's Tale: 230

[continues previous] Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 65

I preche, so as ye han herd bifore,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 508

[continues previous] To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
11

Prioress' Tale: 209

[continues previous] As ye han herd, and, whan that I had songe,
13

Melibee's Prologue: 41

[continues previous] And thogh I nat the same wordes seye
13

Melibee's Prologue: 42

[continues previous] As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... harm, and blesse him that seith to thee harm." And in manye othere places he amonesteth pees and accord. But now wol I speke to yow of the conseil which that was yeven to yow by the men of lawe and the wyse folk, that seyden alle by oon accord as ye han herd bifore; that, over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of ...
14

Monk's Tale: 430

[continues previous] As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde
10

Hous of Fame 2: 553

[continues previous] And comth here in the same wyse
10

Hous of Fame 2: 554

[continues previous] As I thee herde or this devyse;
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 106

To seen that flour, as ye han herd devyse.
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 107

Fair was this medew, as thoughte me overal;
14

Legend of Phyllis: 66

[continues previous] Ye han wel herd of Theseus devyse
13

Legend of Phyllis: 67

In the betraising of fair Adriane,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 277

That art so fair and goodly to devyse?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 966

As ye han herd bifore, al he him tolde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1546

[continues previous] But al for nought, he held forth ay the wyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1547

[continues previous] That ye han herd Pandare er this devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 56

God leve him werken as he gan devyse. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 80

Ye han er this wel herd it me devyse;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 807

Was to Criseyde, as ye han herd devyse,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 808

That for the beste it was accorded thus,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 219

And with an hardy herte he gan to crye
10

Miller's Prologue: 16

But in Pilates vois he gan to crye, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 628

As he were wood, for wo he gan to crye
10

Reeve's Tale: 158

'What? whilk way is he geen?' he gan to crye.
10

Merchant's Tale: 1122

'Out! help! allas! harrow!' he gan to crye,
10

Melibee's Tale: 4

Prudence his wyf, as ferforth as she dorste, bisoghte him of his weping for to stinte; but nat for-thy he gan to crye and wepen ever lenger the more. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 29

And whan that he was come, he gan to crye,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 511

A whyl, and than he gan to crye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 277

[continues previous] That art so fair and goodly to devyse?'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 278

[continues previous] Ther-with his herte gan to sprede and ryse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 56

[continues previous] God leve him werken as he gan devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 57

[continues previous] And lord, so that his herte gan to quappe,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 220

Vengeaunce and Iustice of this felonye: —
10

Miller's Prologue: 17

[continues previous] And swoor by armes and by blood and bones,
10

Melibee's Tale: 4

[continues previous] Prudence his wyf, as ferforth as she dorste, bisoghte him of his weping for to stinte; but nat for-thy he gan to crye and wepen ever lenger the more.
10

Hous of Fame 2: 511

[continues previous] A whyl, and than he gan to crye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 222

And in this carte he lyth gapinge upright.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1287

And kisseth him, ther he lyth on the grounde; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 223

I crye out on the ministres,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1286

[continues previous] And she for sorwe ginneth wepe and crye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1287

[continues previous] And kisseth him, ther he lyth on the grounde;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 225

Harrow! allas! her lyth my felawe slayn!'
10

Clerk's Tale: 592

Thogh that my doghter and my sone be slayn, [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 258

In him lyth al, to do me live or deye.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 524

'What, parde, rather than my felawe deye, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 226

What sholde I more un-to this tale sayn?
11

Man of Law's Tale: 276

What sholde I in this tale lenger tarie?
11

Clerk's Tale: 327

Of hir array what sholde I make a tale? [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 593

[continues previous] At your comandement, this is to sayn.
10

Clerk's Tale: 594

I have noght had no part of children tweyne
11

Franklin's Tale: 437

What sholde I make a lenger tale of this?
11

Franklin's Tale: 438

Un-to his brotheres bed he comen is,
12

Legend of Dido: 257

[continues previous] This is theffect; what sholde I more seye?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1622

What sholde I lenger in this tale tarien?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 525

[continues previous] Yet shal I som-what more un-to him seye:'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 227

The peple out-sterte, and caste the cart to grounde,
11

Clerk's Tale: 328

[continues previous] Unnethe the peple hir knew for hir fairnesse,
12

Legend of Thisbe: 122

His eyen to the grounde adoun he caste, [continues next]
12

Legend of Thisbe: 123

And in the sonde, as he beheld adoun, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 228

And in the middel of the dong they founde
12

Legend of Thisbe: 122

[continues previous] His eyen to the grounde adoun he caste,
12

Legend of Thisbe: 123

[continues previous] And in the sonde, as he beheld adoun,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 230

O blisful god, that art so Iust and trewe!
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 234

To god, that is so Iust and resonable,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 232

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day.
11

Prioress' Tale: 124

Mordre wol out, certein, it wol nat faille,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 237

Mordre wol out, this my conclusioun.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 233

Mordre is so wlatsom and abhominable
12

Manciple's Tale: 239

A Iangler is to god abhominable; [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 240

Reed Salomon, so wys and honurable; [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 234

To god, that is so Iust and resonable,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 230

O blisful god, that art so Iust and trewe!
12

Manciple's Tale: 239

[continues previous] A Iangler is to god abhominable;
12

Manciple's Tale: 240

[continues previous] Reed Salomon, so wys and honurable;
13

Parson's Tale: 55

Now comth Slouthe, that wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne no penaunce. For soothly, Slouthe is so tendre, and so delicat, as seith Salomon, that he wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne penaunce, and therfore he shendeth al that he dooth. Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour ... [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 231

And that is wonder, that so Iust a king [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 235

That he ne wol nat suffre it heled be;
10

Clerk's Prologue: 36

But deeth, that wol nat suffre us dwellen heer
15+

Parson's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Now comth Slouthe, that wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne no penaunce. For soothly, Slouthe is so tendre, and so delicat, as seith Salomon, that he wol nat suffre noon hardnesse ne penaunce, and therfore he shendeth al that he dooth. Agayns this roten-herted sinne of Accidie and Slouthe sholde men exercise hem-self to doon gode werkes, and manly and vertuously cacchen corage wel to doon; thinkinge that oure lord Iesu Crist quyteth every good dede, be it never so lyte. Usage of labour is a ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 56

[continues previous] Now comth wanhope, that is despeir of the mercy of god, that comth somtyme of to muche outrageous sorwe, and somtyme of to muche drede; imagininge that he hath doon so muche sinne, that it wol nat availlen him, though he wolde repenten him and forsake sinne: thurgh which despeir or drede he abaundoneth al his herte to every maner sinne, as seith seint Augustin. Which dampnable sinne, if that it continue un-to his ende, it is cleped sinning in the holy gost. This horrible sinne is ... [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 175

that he wol nat suffre that swich a man be moeved with any
11

Compleynt of Mars: 231

[continues previous] And that is wonder, that so Iust a king
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 236

Though it abyde a yeer, or two, or three,
10

Knight's Tale: 523

Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two
10

Knight's Tale: 568

A yeer or two he was in this servyse,
10

Squire's Tale: 574

This lasteth lenger than a yeer or two,
12

Franklin's Tale: 854

Two yeer or three for to respyten me,
11

Monk's Prologue: 80

To telle yow a tale, or two, or three.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 484

To lene a man a noble, or two or three,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 485

Or what thing were in my possessioun,
10

Parson's Tale: 56

[continues previous] Now comth wanhope, that is despeir of the mercy of god, that comth somtyme of to muche outrageous sorwe, and somtyme of to muche drede; imagininge that he hath doon so muche sinne, that it wol nat availlen him, though he wolde repenten him and forsake sinne: thurgh which despeir or drede he abaundoneth al his herte to every maner sinne, as seith seint Augustin. Which dampnable sinne, if that it continue un-to his ende, it is cleped sinning in the holy gost. This horrible sinne is so perilous, that ...
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 144

So that, within a day, or two, or three,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 106

And seyde, 'herof a draught, or two or three,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 411

If thou thus ligge a day, or two, or three, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 237

Mordre wol out, this my conclusioun.
11

Prioress' Tale: 124

Mordre wol out, certein, it wol nat faille,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 232

Mordre wol out, that see we day by day.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 412

[continues previous] The folk wol wene that thou, for cowardyse,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 238

And right anoon, ministres of that toun
11

Friar's Tale: 254

Herestow nat how that the carter seith? [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 239

Han hent the carter, and so sore him pyned,
11

Friar's Tale: 254

[continues previous] Herestow nat how that the carter seith?
11

Friar's Tale: 255

[continues previous] Hent it anon, for he hath yeve it thee,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 242

And were an-hanged by the nekke-boon.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1283

The experience of that is felt in me, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 243

Here may men seen that dremes been to drede.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 153

Though that he bad no dremes for to drede,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 154

By god, men may in olde bokes rede
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1282

[continues previous] Here may men seen that mercy passeth right;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 245

Right in the nexte chapitre after this,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 831

This is a long preamble of a tale!' [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 246

(I gabbe nat, so have I Ioye or blis,)
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 830

[continues previous] 'Now, dame,' quod he, 'so have I Ioye or blis,
11

Balade to Rosemounde: 12

Maketh my thoght in Ioye and blis habounde.
11

Balade to Rosemounde: 13

So curteisly I go, with lovë bounde,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1119

Or Anthenor, so have I Ioye, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 247

Two men that wolde han passed over see,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1120

[continues previous] The traytour that betraysed Troye,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 248

For certeyn cause, in-to a fer contree,
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 51

To senden him in-to som fer contree
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 249

If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie,
11

Squire's Tale: 213

I trowe som men of armes been ther-inne, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 250

That made hem in a citee for to tarie,
11

Squire's Tale: 214

[continues previous] That shapen hem this citee for to winne.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 253

The wind gan chaunge, and blew right as hem leste.
11

Melibee's Tale: 71

... wole trete of pees and of accord, that they shape hem, with-outen delay or tarying, to comen un-to us.' Which thing parfourned was in dede. And whanne thise trespassours and repentinge folk of hir folies, that is to seyn, the adversaries of Melibee, hadden herd what thise messagers seyden un-to hem, they weren right glad and Ioyeful, and answereden ful mekely and benignely, yeldinge graces and thankinges to hir lord Melibee and to al his companye; and shopen hem, with-outen delay, to go with the messagers, and obeye to the comandement of hir lord Melibee. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 517

And after this, whan that hem bothe leste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 254

Iolif and glad they wente un-to hir reste,
12

Knight's Tale: 1632

Unto hir reste wente they at night. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1633

And on the morwe, whan that day gan springe, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1779

For er the sonne un-to the reste wente,
11

Melibee's Tale: 71

[continues previous] ... they wole trete of pees and of accord, that they shape hem, with-outen delay or tarying, to comen un-to us.' Which thing parfourned was in dede. And whanne thise trespassours and repentinge folk of hir folies, that is to seyn, the adversaries of Melibee, hadden herd what thise messagers seyden un-to hem, they weren right glad and Ioyeful, and answereden ful mekely and benignely, yeldinge graces and thankinges to hir lord Melibee and to al his companye; and shopen hem, with-outen delay, to go with the messagers, and obeye to the comandement of hir lord Melibee. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 201

To goon to reste, and erly for to ryse, [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 241

This noble quene un-to her reste wente; [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 242

She syketh sore, and gan her-self turmente. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

[continues previous] They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 255

And casten hem ful erly for to saille;
11

Knight's Tale: 1633

[continues previous] And on the morwe, whan that day gan springe,
10

Melibee's Tale: 71

[continues previous] ... wole trete of pees and of accord, that they shape hem, with-outen delay or tarying, to comen un-to us.' Which thing parfourned was in dede. And whanne thise trespassours and repentinge folk of hir folies, that is to seyn, the adversaries of Melibee, hadden herd what thise messagers seyden un-to hem, they weren right glad and Ioyeful, and answereden ful mekely and benignely, yeldinge graces and thankinges to hir lord Melibee and to al his companye; and shopen hem, with-outen delay, to go with the messagers, and obeye to the comandement of hir lord Melibee.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 201

[continues previous] To goon to reste, and erly for to ryse,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 202

[continues previous] To seen this flour to sprede, as I devyse.
12

Legend of Dido: 242

[continues previous] She syketh sore, and gan her-self turmente.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 518

[continues previous] They spedde hem fro the soper un-to reste.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 257

That oon of hem, in sleping as he lay,
12

Monk's Tale: 581

Iudith, a womman, as he lay upright, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 582

Sleping, his heed of smoot, and from his tente [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 62

So wonderful a dreem as I [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 2: 9

Ne mette swich a dreem as this! [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 25

And fast I sleep; and in sleping, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 258

Him mette a wonder dreem, agayn the day;
11

Monk's Tale: 581

[continues previous] Iudith, a womman, as he lay upright,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 191

Him thoughte his dreem nas but a vanitee. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 61

[continues previous] Mette, I trowe stedfastly,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 62

[continues previous] So wonderful a dreem as I
12

Hous of Fame 2: 9

[continues previous] Ne mette swich a dreem as this!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 26

[continues previous] Me mette swiche a swevening,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 259

Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 690

Doun by his beddes syde sit she than, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 691

Confortinge him as goodly as she may. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 703

That on his beddes syde sit ful softe. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 191

[continues previous] Him thoughte his dreem nas but a vanitee.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde, [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 40

This noble wyf sat by her beddes syde [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 98

Was comen, and stood right at my beddes syde. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 236

Up roos, and on his beddes syde him sette, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

And doun upon his beddes syde him sette. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 233

And windowe eek, and tho this sorweful man [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 234

Up-on his beddes syde a-doun him sette, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 235

Ful lyk a deed image pale and wan; [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 260

And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 691

[continues previous] Confortinge him as goodly as she may.
11

Merchant's Tale: 703

[continues previous] That on his beddes syde sit ful softe.
11

Merchant's Tale: 704

[continues previous] He taketh hir, and kisseth hir ful ofte,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

[continues previous] His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 267

[continues previous] Gan for to laughe, and scorned him ful faste.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 39

[continues previous] And at the chambre-dore they abyde.
12

Parlement of Foules: 98

[continues previous] Was comen, and stood right at my beddes syde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 236

[continues previous] Up roos, and on his beddes syde him sette,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 237

[continues previous] And gan to speken in a sobre wyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1588

[continues previous] And Troilus ful sobrely he grette,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

[continues previous] And doun upon his beddes syde him sette.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 233

[continues previous] And windowe eek, and tho this sorweful man
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 234

[continues previous] Up-on his beddes syde a-doun him sette,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 261

And seyde him thus, 'if thou to-morwe wende,
11

Knight's Tale: 533

And seyde him thus: 'To Athenes shaltou wende; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 895

Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 440

To serven hir, how fer so that she wende; [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 262

Thou shalt be dreynt; my tale is at an ende.'
10

Knight's Tale: 534

[continues previous] Ther is thee shapen of thy wo an ende.' [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2108

And maken of my longe tale an ende. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 1018

But of my tale make an ende I shal;
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 1061

And fareth now weel, my tale is at an ende.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 896

[continues previous] I can na-more, my tale is at an ende.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 418

By that I of my tale have maad an ende.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 419

Ther is a chanoun of religioun
15+

Parlement of Foules: 441

[continues previous] Sey what yow list, my tale is at an ende.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 769

And whan my tale al brought is to an ende,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 263

He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette,
10

Knight's Tale: 535

[continues previous] And with that word Arcite wook and sterte.
10

Knight's Tale: 2108

[continues previous] And maken of my longe tale an ende.
10

Knight's Tale: 2109

[continues previous] By processe and by lengthe of certeyn yeres
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 265

As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 362

That, as he sat and wook, his spirit mette [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 363

That he hir saw a temple, and al the wyse [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 264

And preyde him his viage for to lette;
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 265

[continues previous] As for that day, he preyde him to abyde. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

[continues previous] His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 362

[continues previous] That, as he sat and wook, his spirit mette
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 265

As for that day, he preyde him to abyde.
10

Physician's Tale: 273

So preyde for him that he was exyled; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 182

This man mette in his bed, ther-as he lay, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 183

How that his felawe gan up-on him calle, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 263

He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 264

[continues previous] And preyde him his viage for to lette; [continues next]
13

Legend of Lucretia: 39

And at the chambre-dore they abyde. [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 690

Doun by his beddes syde sit she than,
11

Merchant's Tale: 703

That on his beddes syde sit ful softe.
10

Physician's Tale: 272

[continues previous] But that Virginius, of his pitee,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 182

[continues previous] This man mette in his bed, ther-as he lay, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 183

[continues previous] How that his felawe gan up-on him calle, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 259

Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 260

And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 263

[continues previous] He wook, and tolde his felawe what he mette,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 264

[continues previous] And preyde him his viage for to lette;
13

Legend of Lucretia: 40

[continues previous] This noble wyf sat by her beddes syde [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 236

Up roos, and on his beddes syde him sette, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

And doun upon his beddes syde him sette.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 234

Up-on his beddes syde a-doun him sette,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 267

Gan for to laughe, and scorned him ful faste.
10

Prioress' Tale: 186

Han sped hem for to burien him ful faste;
10

Prioress' Tale: 187

And whan they holy water on him caste,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 183

[continues previous] How that his felawe gan up-on him calle,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 260

[continues previous] And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde,
12

Second Nun's Tale: 462

Gan for to laughe, and to the Iuge seyde,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 718

That every wight gan on hem shoute,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 719

And for to laughe as they were wode;
11

Legend of Dido: 27

And to the see ful faste he gan him hye,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 41

[continues previous] Dischevele, for no malice she ne thoghte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 872

In which myn herte growen is so faste, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 236

[continues previous] Up roos, and on his beddes syde him sette,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 237

[continues previous] And gan to speken in a sobre wyse
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 268

'No dreem,' quod he, 'may so myn herte agaste,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 498

Ne never falshede in myn herte I mente. [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 499

And sir,' quod he, 'now of my privetee, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 150

For ever-mo, til that myn herte sterve. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4107

Myn herte, allas, wol brest a-two, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 872

[continues previous] In which myn herte growen is so faste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 979

Ne mighte me so gladen; lo, myn herte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 980

It spredeth so for Ioye, it wol to-sterte! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 632

Yow any-thing, than prey I yow,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1180

And beth wel war ye do no more amis.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1181

'Nay, dere herte myn,' quod he, 'y-wis.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

So that it may your herte and myn suffyse; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 269

That I wol lette for to do my thinges.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 498

[continues previous] Ne never falshede in myn herte I mente.
10

Legend of Ariadne: 149

[continues previous] That, as a wrecche unknowe, I wol yow serve
11

Legend of Ariadne: 150

[continues previous] For ever-mo, til that myn herte sterve.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 151

[continues previous] Forsake I wol at hoom myn heritage,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4106

[continues previous] Recover that I most desire.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4107

[continues previous] Myn herte, allas, wol brest a-two,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4108

[continues previous] For Bialacoil I wratthed so.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 980

[continues previous] It spredeth so for Ioye, it wol to-sterte!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1686

[continues previous] So that it may your herte and myn suffyse;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 270

I sette not a straw by thy dreminges,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 362

A straw for alle swevenes signifiaunce! [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 271

For swevenes been but vanitees and Iapes.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 362

[continues previous] A straw for alle swevenes signifiaunce!
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 274

Men dreme of thing that nevere was ne shal.
11

Clerk's Tale: 499

'Far weel, my child; I shal thee never see; [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 19

... peyne of concupiscence, it is impossible but he be tempted somtyme, and moeved in his flesh to sinne. And this thing may nat faille as longe as he liveth; it may wel wexe feble and faille, by vertu of baptesme and by the grace of god thurgh penitence; but fully ne shal it nevere quenche, that he ne shal som tyme be moeved in him-self, but-if he were al refreyded by siknesse, or by malefice of sorcerie or colde drinkes. For lo, what seith seint Paul: 'the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and the spirit agayn the flesh; they been so contrarie and so stryven, that a man may ... [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 275

But sith I see that thou wolt heer abyde,
11

Clerk's Tale: 499

[continues previous] 'Far weel, my child; I shal thee never see;
11

Clerk's Tale: 500

[continues previous] But, sith I thee have marked with the croys,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 297

Anon for myn allye heer take I thee,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 298

Sin that thou wolt thyn ydoles despyse.
12

Parson's Tale: 19

[continues previous] ... him the peyne of concupiscence, it is impossible but he be tempted somtyme, and moeved in his flesh to sinne. And this thing may nat faille as longe as he liveth; it may wel wexe feble and faille, by vertu of baptesme and by the grace of god thurgh penitence; but fully ne shal it nevere quenche, that he ne shal som tyme be moeved in him-self, but-if he were al refreyded by siknesse, or by malefice of sorcerie or colde drinkes. For lo, what seith seint Paul: 'the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and the spirit agayn the flesh; they been so contrarie and so stryven, that ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 997

And what it is, I wol now that thou see.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 998

I thenke, sith that love, of his goodnesse,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 277

God wot it reweth me; and have good day.'
11

Squire's Tale: 584

So on a day of me he took his leve, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 891

It is y-nogh, and farewel, have good day:' [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 892

And took his hors, and forth he gooth his way. [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 278

And thus he took his leve, and wente his way.
11

Squire's Tale: 584

[continues previous] So on a day of me he took his leve,
11

Franklin's Tale: 891

[continues previous] It is y-nogh, and farewel, have good day:'
12

Franklin's Tale: 892

[continues previous] And took his hors, and forth he gooth his way.
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 479

And took his leve, and wente forth his weye,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 480

And at the thridde day broghte his moneye,
11

Legend of Phyllis: 81

As fil to her honour and his also.
11

Legend of Phyllis: 82

And openly he took his leve tho,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 153

This messager took leve and wente
12

Book of the Duchesse: 154

Upon his wey, and never ne stente
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7418

As he were feble, his way he wente. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7419

But in his sleve he gan to thringe [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 209

He took his leve, and seyde, 'I wol go henne:'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 597

And lord, how he was glad and wel bigoon!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1302

And al was wel, he roos and took his leve.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1303

And on his wey ful faste homward he spedde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1536

Therwith he took his leve al softely,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 594

Whan al was wel, he roos and took his leve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 595

And she to souper com, whan it was eve,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 279

But er that he hadde halfe his cours y-seyled,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 8

Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
10

Legend of Dido: 349

And bere in his devyses, for her sake, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7418

[continues previous] As he were feble, his way he wente.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7419

[continues previous] But in his sleve he gan to thringe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 907

As he that hadde his dayes cours y-ronne;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 280

Noot I nat why, ne what mischaunce it eyled,
11

Squire's Tale: 501

So tendrely, that nothing eyled me,
11

Squire's Tale: 502

I niste nat what was adversitee,
11

Monk's Tale: 416

But why, ne how, noot I that thou were slawe.
11

Manciple's Prologue: 23

Noot I nat why, that me were lever slepe
10

Legend of Dido: 350

[continues previous] Noot I nat what; and songes wolde he make,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 409

If harme agree me, wher-to pleyne I thenne?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 410

I noot, ne why unwery that I feynte.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 289

That many a dreem ful sore is for to drede.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 437

'Your might,' quod she, 'ful litel is to drede;
10

Second Nun's Tale: 438

For every mortal mannes power nis
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 295

His norice him expouned every del
10

Knight's Tale: 967

I yow foryeve this trespas every del.' [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 968

And they him swore his axing fayre and wel, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 296

His sweven, and bad him for to kepe him wel
10

Knight's Tale: 968

[continues previous] And they him swore his axing fayre and wel,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 298

And therfore litel tale hath he told
10

Merchant's Tale: 155

With face sad, his tale he hath hem told;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 299

Of any dreem, so holy was his herte.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4082

Thurgh-out myn herte, in every veyne [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 300

By god, I hadde lever than my sherte
11

Knight's Tale: 708

That shapen was my deeth erst than my sherte. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Prologue: 10

I have a sone, and, by the Trinitee,
12

Franklin's Prologue: 11

I hadde lever than twenty pound worth lond,
11

Monk's Prologue: 4

And by the precious corpus Madrian,
11

Monk's Prologue: 5

I hadde lever than a barel ale [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4081

[continues previous] Lever I hadde, with swerdis tweyne,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 301

That ye had rad his legende, as have I.
11

Knight's Tale: 709

[continues previous] Ye sleen me with your eyen, Emelye;
11

Monk's Prologue: 6

[continues previous] That goode lief my wyf hadde herd this tale!
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 305

Affermeth dremes, and seith that they been
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 312

Warning of thinges that shul after falle. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 306

Warning of thinges that men after seen.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 312

[continues previous] Warning of thinges that shul after falle.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 313

[continues previous] Loke of Egipt the king, daun Pharao,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1083

For to seen yow in adversitee. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 307

And forther-more, I pray yow loketh wel
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 308

In the olde testament, of Daniel,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 247

Of victories in the olde testament,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1083

[continues previous] For to seen yow in adversitee.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 310

Reed eek of Ioseph, and ther shul ye see
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 312

Redeth Senek, and redeth eek Boëce,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 313

Ther shul ye seen expres that it no drede is,
10

Legend of Dido: 337

Wher see ye oon, that he ne hath laft his leef, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 311

Wher dremes ben somtyme (I sey nat alle)
11

Merchant's Prologue: 19

As for the more part, I sey nat alle. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 33

... rightful lord. This Ire is a ful greet plesaunce to the devel; for it is the develes fourneys, that is eschaufed with the fyr of helle. For certes, right so as fyr is more mighty to destroyen erthely thinges than any other element, right so Ire is mighty to destroyen alle spirituel thinges. Loke how that fyr of smale gledes, that been almost dede under asshen, wollen quike agayn whan they been touched with brimstoon; right so Ire wol everemo quiken agayn, whan it is touched by the pryde that is covered in mannes herte. For certes fyr ne may nat ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 36

O thou, what so ever thou be that knittest alle bondes of [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 2: 4

kepeth the grete world; and how she, bindinge, restreyneth alle [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 2: 5

thinges by a bonde that may nat ben unbounde. Al be it so that [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 34

good is in him. For yif god ne is swich, he ne may nat ben [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 35

prince of alle thinges; for certes som-thing possessing in it-self [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 33

thee nat that alle thinges ben doon a-right. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 193

have yeven ensaumple to othre folk, that vertu may nat ben overcomen [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 194

by adversitees; and of alle thinges ther nis no doute, that [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 7

of libertee. For yif so be that god loketh alle thinges biforn, ne [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 8

god ne may nat ben desseived in no manere, than mot it nedes [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 132

destinee, which that ne may nat ben inclyned, knitteth and streineth [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 133

alle thinges that men may desiren? Thanne sholde ther be doon [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 336

[continues previous] See ye nat alle, how they been for-sworn?
10

Legend of Dido: 337

[continues previous] Wher see ye oon, that he ne hath laft his leef,
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe Prologue: 1

... the conclusiouns that han ben founde, or elles possibly mighten be founde in so noble an instrument as an Astrolabie, ben un-knowe perfitly to any mortal man in this regioun, as I suppose. A-nother cause is this; that sothly, in any tretis of the Astrolabie that I have seyn, there ben some conclusions that wole nat in alle thinges performen hir bihestes; and some of hem ben to harde to thy tendre age of ten yeer to conseyve. This tretis, divided in fyve parties, wole I shewe thee under ful lighte rewles and naked wordes in English; for Latin ne canstow yit but smal, my lyte sone. But ... [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 21

... the smale poynt is cleped the Centre. And understond also that alle sterres sittinge with-in the zodiak of thyn Astrolabie ben cleped 'sterres of the north,' for they arysen by northe the est lyne. And alle the remenant fixed, out of the zodiak, ben cleped 'sterres of the south;' but I sey nat that they arysen alle by southe the est lyne; witnesse on Aldeberan and Algomeysa. Generally understond this rewle, that thilke sterres that ben cleped sterres of the north arysen rather than the degree of hir longitude, and alle the sterres of the south arysen after the degree of hir longitude; this is to seyn, ... [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 312

Warning of thinges that shul after falle.
11

Merchant's Prologue: 20

[continues previous] God shilde that it sholde so bifalle!
10

Melibee's Tale: 43

... an old vileinye, thou sompnest thyne adversaries to do thee a newe vileinye." And also, for my suffrance, men wolden do to me so muchel vileinye, that I mighte neither here it ne sustene; and so sholde I been put and holden over lowe. For men seyn: "in muchel suffringe shul manye thinges falle un-to thee whiche thou shalt nat mowe suffre."'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 305

Affermeth dremes, and seith that they been [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 306

Warning of thinges that men after seen. [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 33

[continues previous] ... This Ire is a ful greet plesaunce to the devel; for it is the develes fourneys, that is eschaufed with the fyr of helle. For certes, right so as fyr is more mighty to destroyen erthely thinges than any other element, right so Ire is mighty to destroyen alle spirituel thinges. Loke how that fyr of smale gledes, that been almost dede under asshen, wollen quike agayn whan they been touched with brimstoon; right so Ire wol everemo quiken agayn, whan it is touched by the pryde that is covered in mannes herte. For certes fyr ne may nat comen out of no-thing, but-if it were ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 36

[continues previous] O thou, what so ever thou be that knittest alle bondes of [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 37

[continues previous] thinges, loke on thise wrecchede erthes; we men that ben nat [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 2: 5

[continues previous] thinges by a bonde that may nat ben unbounde. Al be it so that
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 35

[continues previous] prince of alle thinges; for certes som-thing possessing in it-self
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 5: 33

[continues previous] thee nat that alle thinges ben doon a-right.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 194

[continues previous] by adversitees; and of alle thinges ther nis no doute, that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 7

[continues previous] of libertee. For yif so be that god loketh alle thinges biforn, ne
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 133

[continues previous] alle thinges that men may desiren? Thanne sholde ther be doon
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe Prologue: 1

[continues previous] ... possibly mighten be founde in so noble an instrument as an Astrolabie, ben un-knowe perfitly to any mortal man in this regioun, as I suppose. A-nother cause is this; that sothly, in any tretis of the Astrolabie that I have seyn, there ben some conclusions that wole nat in alle thinges performen hir bihestes; and some of hem ben to harde to thy tendre age of ten yeer to conseyve. This tretis, divided in fyve parties, wole I shewe thee under ful lighte rewles and naked wordes in English; for Latin ne canstow yit but smal, my lyte sone. But natheles, ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 21

[continues previous] ... is cleped the Centre. And understond also that alle sterres sittinge with-in the zodiak of thyn Astrolabie ben cleped 'sterres of the north,' for they arysen by northe the est lyne. And alle the remenant fixed, out of the zodiak, ben cleped 'sterres of the south;' but I sey nat that they arysen alle by southe the est lyne; witnesse on Aldeberan and Algomeysa. Generally understond this rewle, that thilke sterres that ben cleped sterres of the north arysen rather than the degree of hir longitude, and alle the sterres of the south arysen after the degree of hir longitude; this ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 313

Loke of Egipt the king, daun Pharao,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 306

[continues previous] Warning of thinges that men after seen.
10

Parson's Tale: 33

[continues previous] ... Ire is a ful greet plesaunce to the devel; for it is the develes fourneys, that is eschaufed with the fyr of helle. For certes, right so as fyr is more mighty to destroyen erthely thinges than any other element, right so Ire is mighty to destroyen alle spirituel thinges. Loke how that fyr of smale gledes, that been almost dede under asshen, wollen quike agayn whan they been touched with brimstoon; right so Ire wol everemo quiken agayn, whan it is touched by the pryde that is covered in mannes herte. For certes fyr ne may nat comen out of ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 5: 37

[continues previous] thinges, loke on thise wrecchede erthes; we men that ben nat
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 315

Wher they ne felte noon effect in dremes.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1178

For aught he woot, for breeth ne felte he noon;
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 318

Lo Cresus, which that was of Lyde king,
13

Monk's Tale: 737

This riche Cresus, whylom king of Lyde,
13

Monk's Tale: 738

Of whiche Cresus Cyrus sore him dradde,
15+

Hous of Fame 1: 104

As had of his avisioun [continues next]
15+

Hous of Fame 1: 105

Cresus, that was king of Lyde, [continues next]
15+

Hous of Fame 1: 106

That high upon a gebet dyde! [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 319

Mette he nat that he sat upon a tree,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1013

Lo heer he sit, the lechour, in the tree. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 105

[continues previous] Cresus, that was king of Lyde,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 106

[continues previous] That high upon a gebet dyde!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 362

That, as he sat and wook, his spirit mette
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 363

That he hir saw a temple, and al the wyse
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 320

Which signified he sholde anhanged be?
10

Merchant's Tale: 1013

[continues previous] Lo heer he sit, the lechour, in the tree. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 321

Lo heer Andromacha, Ectores wyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 628

Or winnen Emelye un-to his wyf; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1013

[continues previous] Lo heer he sit, the lechour, in the tree.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 322

That day that Ector sholde lese his lyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 627

[continues previous] And shortly, outher he wolde lese his lyf,
11

Knight's Tale: 628

[continues previous] Or winnen Emelye un-to his wyf;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 324

How that the lyf of Ector sholde be lorn, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 325

If thilke day he wente in-to bataille; [continues next]
13

Legend of Hypermnestra: 34

In malice, thogh she sholde lese her lyf. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 323

She dremed on the same night biforn,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 324

[continues previous] How that the lyf of Ector sholde be lorn, [continues next]
13

Legend of Hypermnestra: 34

[continues previous] In malice, thogh she sholde lese her lyf.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 324

How that the lyf of Ector sholde be lorn,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 322

That day that Ector sholde lese his lyf, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 323

[continues previous] She dremed on the same night biforn, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 325

If thilke day he wente in-to bataille;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 322

[continues previous] That day that Ector sholde lese his lyf,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 326

She warned him, but it mighte nat availle;
10

Friar's Tale: 26

That taughte him, wher that him mighte availle. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 550

For socour, but it mighte nat bityde. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 770

His royal trone mighte him nat availle.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 327

He wente for to fighte nathelees,
10

Friar's Tale: 27

[continues previous] He coude spare of lechours oon or two,
11

Monk's Tale: 549

[continues previous] And to his goddes pitously he preyde
11

Monk's Tale: 550

[continues previous] For socour, but it mighte nat bityde.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 329

But thilke tale is al to long to telle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

For al to long it were for to dwelle.' [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 330

And eek it is ny day, I may nat dwelle.
11

Franklin's Tale: 836

And been a begger; heer may I nat dwelle, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 33

And erthe, and soules that therinne dwelle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

[continues previous] For al to long it were for to dwelle.'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 331

Shortly I seye, as for conclusioun,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 221

To whiche thing shortly answere I shal; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 836

[continues previous] And been a begger; heer may I nat dwelle,
11

Parlement of Foules: 34

[continues previous] Of whiche, as shortly as I can hit trete, [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 620

But fynally, this is my conclusioun, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 95

If that I may, for somwhat shal I seye. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 96

For at the worste it may yet shorte our weye. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 332

That I shal han of this avisioun
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 221

[continues previous] To whiche thing shortly answere I shal;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

[continues previous] I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al,
11

Parlement of Foules: 33

[continues previous] And erthe, and soules that therinne dwelle,
10

Parlement of Foules: 34

[continues previous] Of whiche, as shortly as I can hit trete,
12

Parlement of Foules: 620

[continues previous] But fynally, this is my conclusioun,
12

Parlement of Foules: 621

[continues previous] That she hir-self shal han the eleccioun
12

Parlement of Foules: 622

Of whom hir list, who-so be wrooth or blythe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 95

[continues previous] If that I may, for somwhat shal I seye.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 335

For they ben venimous, I woot it wel;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 223

For god it woot, I chidde hem spitously. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 253

I never hem contraried, trewely; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 254

I woot wel that my lord can more than I. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 336

I hem defye, I love hem never a del.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 222

[continues previous] They were ful glad whan I spak to hem fayre;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 223

[continues previous] For god it woot, I chidde hem spitously.
10

Merchant's Tale: 253

[continues previous] I never hem contraried, trewely;
10

Merchant's Tale: 254

[continues previous] I woot wel that my lord can more than I.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7375

But she ne boughte hem never a del,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 337

Now let us speke of mirthe, and stinte al this;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 854

To make an ende of al hir hevinesse.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 855

Now lat us stinte of Custance but a throwe,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 856

And speke we of the Romain Emperour,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 831

This is a long preamble of a tale!' [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 338

Madame Pertelote, so have I blis,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 830

[continues previous] 'Now, dame,' quod he, 'so have I Ioye or blis,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 380

Madame Pertelote, my worldes blis,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 493

And I answerde, 'nay, sir, so have I blis,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 505

And I answerde, 'nay, sir, so have I blis,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 506

No more but that I see wel she is good.'
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 340

For whan I see the beautee of your face,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 914

And clepe ayein the beautee of your face, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 341

Ye ben so scarlet-reed about your yën,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 915

[continues previous] That ye with salte teres so deface.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 346

Womman is mannes Ioye and al his blis.
11

Knight's Tale: 826

And Theseus, with alle Ioye and blis,
11

Knight's Tale: 827

With his Ipolita, the fayre quene,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4370

For al my Ioye and al myn hele [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 347

For whan I fele a-night your softe syde,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4369

[continues previous] His absence at myn herte I fele;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4370

[continues previous] For al my Ioye and al myn hele
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 348

Al-be-it that I may nat on you ryde,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 3: 26

vyces); ne the herbes of Circes ne ben nat mighty. For al-be-it [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 3: 27

so that they may chaungen the limes of the body, algates yit [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 349

For that our perche is maad so narwe, alas!
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 3: 26

[continues previous] vyces); ne the herbes of Circes ne ben nat mighty. For al-be-it
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 350

I am so ful of Ioye and of solas
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3765

So was I ful of Ioye and blisse.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 351

That I defye bothe sweven and dreem.'
11

Hous of Fame 1: 9

Why this a dreem, why that a sweven, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 10

And nat to every man liche even; [continues next]
10

Complaint to My Lode-Sterre: 36

Swich lyf defye I, bothe in thoughte and worde,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 352

And with that word he fley doun fro the beem,
11

Knight's Tale: 714

And with that word he fil doun in a traunce
11

Hous of Fame 1: 9

[continues previous] Why this a dreem, why that a sweven,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 10

[continues previous] And nat to every man liche even;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 354

And with a chuk he gan hem for to calle,
10

Legend of Dido: 25

But, at the laste, whan he had hem founde, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 355

For he had founde a corn, lay in the yerd.
10

Legend of Dido: 25

[continues previous] But, at the laste, whan he had hem founde,
10

Legend of Dido: 26

[continues previous] He made him redy in a certein stounde,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 357

He fethered Pertelote twenty tyme,
10

Monk's Tale: 511

That longe tyme it was er tirannye [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 54

But ofte tyme, of thy benignitee, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 358

And trad as ofte, er that it was pryme.
10

Monk's Tale: 510

[continues previous] He maked him so conning and so souple
10

Monk's Tale: 511

[continues previous] That longe tyme it was er tirannye
10

Second Nun's Tale: 54

[continues previous] But ofte tyme, of thy benignitee,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 55

[continues previous] Ful frely, er that men thyn help biseche,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 359

He loketh as it were a grim leoun;
11

Knight's Tale: 798

In his fighting were a wood leoun, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 799

And as a cruel tygre was Arcite: [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 418

Somtyme hath semed come a grim leoun; [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 419

And somtyme floures springe as in a mede; [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 360

And on his toos he rometh up and doun,
14

Knight's Tale: 657

And in a path he rometh up and doun,
11

Knight's Tale: 683

And sette him doun with-outen any more: [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 798

[continues previous] In his fighting were a wood leoun,
11

Knight's Tale: 799

[continues previous] And as a cruel tygre was Arcite:
11

Miller's Tale: 537

This Absolon doun sette him on his knees, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 538

And seyde, 'I am a lord at alle degrees; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 297

And on his knowes bare he sette him doun, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 298

And in his raving seyde his orisoun. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 419

[continues previous] And somtyme floures springe as in a mede;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 359

He doun up-on his beddes feet him sette, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 360

And first he gan to syke, and eft to grone, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1064

And sette him doun, and wroot right in this wyse. — [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

And doun upon his beddes syde him sette. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 361

Him deyned not to sette his foot to grounde.
11

Knight's Tale: 682

[continues previous] Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke,
11

Knight's Tale: 683

[continues previous] And sette him doun with-outen any more:
11

Miller's Tale: 537

[continues previous] This Absolon doun sette him on his knees,
11

Franklin's Tale: 297

[continues previous] And on his knowes bare he sette him doun,
11

Franklin's Tale: 298

[continues previous] And in his raving seyde his orisoun.
12

Franklin's Tale: 541

Or elles they were sonken under grounde. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 359

[continues previous] He doun up-on his beddes feet him sette,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1063

[continues previous] Yif thou me wit my lettre to devyse:'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1064

[continues previous] And sette him doun, and wroot right in this wyse. —
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

[continues previous] And doun upon his beddes syde him sette.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 362

He chukketh, whan he hath a corn y-founde,
12

Franklin's Tale: 542

[continues previous] So atte laste he hath his tyme y-founde
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 363

And to him rennen thanne his wyves alle.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 364

Thus royal, as a prince is in his halle,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

[continues previous] And so bifel, that in a daweninge,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

[continues previous] As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 365

Leve I this Chauntecleer in his pasture;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 724

Whan we were in that hostelrye alight. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 366

And after wol I telle his aventure.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 726

And al the remenaunt of our pilgrimage.
10

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 321

But er thou go, o thing I wol thee telle, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 367

Whan that the month in which the world bigan,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 724

[continues previous] Whan we were in that hostelrye alight.
10

Knight's Tale: 497

[continues previous] Whan that Arcite to Thebes comen was,
11

Reeve's Tale: 322

[continues previous] Whan that thou wendest homward by the melle,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 368

That highte March, whan god first maked man,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 131

answered by the wordes of a man that highte Canius; for whan [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 827

And Troilus wel waxen was in highte, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 369

Was complet, and [y] -passed were also,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 132

[continues previous] he was accused by Gaius Cesar, Germeynes sone, that he
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 827

[continues previous] And Troilus wel waxen was in highte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 828

[continues previous] And complet formed by proporcioun
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 370

Sin March bigan, thritty dayes and two,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

And so bifel, that in a daweninge, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 371

Bifel that Chauntecleer, in al his pryde,
10

Monk's Tale: 619

God daunted al his pryde and al his bost. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

[continues previous] As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 64

Sat on his perche, that was in the halle, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 372

His seven wyves walking by his syde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 1116

Up to the tree he caste his eyen two, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 619

[continues previous] God daunted al his pryde and al his bost.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

[continues previous] As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 64

[continues previous] Sat on his perche, that was in the halle,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 725

And to Pandarus voys he lente his ere, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 726

And up his eyen caste he, that in fere [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 373

Caste up his eyen to the brighte sonne,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 1

Our Hoste sey wel that the brighte sonne [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 2

The ark of his artificial day had ronne [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 1116

[continues previous] Up to the tree he caste his eyen two,
11

Franklin's Tale: 288

Til that the brighte sonne loste his hewe; [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 58

Whan that the brighte sonne gan to springe, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 6: 2

bemes of Phebus, that is to seyn, whan that Phebus the sonne is [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 6: 3

in the signe of the Cancre, who-so yeveth thanne largely hise sedes [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 318

As I myn eyen gan up caste,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 338

And, in the signe of Taurus, men may see [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 339

The stones of her coroun shyne clere. — [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 6

... on the est side, and ley over thy label up-on the degree of the sonne, and with the point of thy label find in the bordure the ende of the evening, that is, verrey night. The nadir of the sonne is thilke degree that is opposit to the degree of the sonne, in the seventhe signe, as thus: every degree of Aries by ordre is nadir to every degree of Libra by ordre; and Taurus to Scorpion; Gemini to Sagittare; Cancer to Capricorne; Leo to Aquarie; Virgo to Pisces; and yif any degree in thy zodiak be dirk, his nadir shal declare him. And ... [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 14

... of thy zodiak acording with the prikke, this is to seyn, sittinge on the prikke; and in sooth, thou shalt finde but two degrees in al the zodiak of that condicioun; and yit thilke two degrees ben in diverse signes; than maistow lightly by the sesoun of the yere knowe the signe in whiche that is the sonne. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 725

[continues previous] And to Pandarus voys he lente his ere, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 726

[continues previous] And up his eyen caste he, that in fere [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 764

But right as whan the sonne shyneth brighte, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 374

That in the signe of Taurus hadde y-ronne
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 1

[continues previous] Our Hoste sey wel that the brighte sonne
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] The ark of his artificial day had ronne
11

Franklin's Tale: 288

[continues previous] Til that the brighte sonne loste his hewe;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 58

[continues previous] Whan that the brighte sonne gan to springe,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 59

[continues previous] In swete accord, 'my lief is faren in londe.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 6: 2

[continues previous] bemes of Phebus, that is to seyn, whan that Phebus the sonne is
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Metre 6: 3

[continues previous] in the signe of the Cancre, who-so yeveth thanne largely hise sedes
12

Legend of Ariadne: 338

[continues previous] And, in the signe of Taurus, men may see [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 339

[continues previous] The stones of her coroun shyne clere. — [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 6

[continues previous] ... almikanteras on the est side, and ley over thy label up-on the degree of the sonne, and with the point of thy label find in the bordure the ende of the evening, that is, verrey night. The nadir of the sonne is thilke degree that is opposit to the degree of the sonne, in the seventhe signe, as thus: every degree of Aries by ordre is nadir to every degree of Libra by ordre; and Taurus to Scorpion; Gemini to Sagittare; Cancer to Capricorne; Leo to Aquarie; Virgo to Pisces; and yif any degree in thy zodiak be dirk, his nadir shal declare him. And for the ...
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 14

[continues previous] ... of thy zodiak acording with the prikke, this is to seyn, sittinge on the prikke; and in sooth, thou shalt finde but two degrees in al the zodiak of that condicioun; and yit thilke two degrees ben in diverse signes; than maistow lightly by the sesoun of the yere knowe the signe in whiche that is the sonne. And for the more declaracioun, lo here thy figure.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 726

[continues previous] And up his eyen caste he, that in fere
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 764

[continues previous] But right as whan the sonne shyneth brighte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 765

[continues previous] In March, that chaungeth ofte tyme his face,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 375

Twenty degrees and oon, and somwhat more;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 379

Fourty degrees and oon, and more, y-wis. [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 338

[continues previous] And, in the signe of Taurus, men may see
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 376

And knew by kynde, and by noon other lore,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 379

[continues previous] Fourty degrees and oon, and more, y-wis.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 378

'The sonne,' he sayde, 'is clomben up on hevene
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 12

Degrees was fyve and fourty clombe on highte; [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 379

Fourty degrees and oon, and more, y-wis.
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 11

[continues previous] That Phebus, which that shoon so clere and brighte,
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 12

[continues previous] Degrees was fyve and fourty clombe on highte;
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 13

[continues previous] And for that day, as in that latitude,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 375

Twenty degrees and oon, and somwhat more;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 376

And knew by kynde, and by noon other lore,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 380

Madame Pertelote, my worldes blis,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 338

Madame Pertelote, so have I blis,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 381

Herkneth thise blisful briddes how they singe,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 37

Whan that I here the smale foules singe, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 37

Is comen, and that I here the foules singe, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 382

And see the fresshe floures how they springe;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 90

Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede. [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 38

[continues previous] And that the floures ginne for to springe,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 38

[continues previous] And that the floures ginnen for to springe,
10

Parlement of Foules: 259

Garlondes ful of fresshe floures newe. [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 260

And in a privee corner, in disporte, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4120

So fer the fresshe floures fro, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4121

To me ful welcome were the deeth; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 383

Ful is myn herte of revel and solas.'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 90

[continues previous] Al ful of fresshe floures, whyte and rede.
11

Franklin's Tale: 286

And no-thing wiste of this conclusioun, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 287

But sodeinly bigonne revel newe [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 259

[continues previous] Garlondes ful of fresshe floures newe.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4121

[continues previous] To me ful welcome were the deeth;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 384

But sodeinly him fil a sorweful cas;
11

Franklin's Tale: 287

[continues previous] But sodeinly bigonne revel newe
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 385

For ever the latter ende of Ioye is wo.
14

Man of Law's Tale: 325

Thende of the Ioye of our worldly labour; [continues next]
14

Man of Law's Tale: 326

Wo occupieth the fyn of our gladnesse. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 827

Now if he woot that Ioye is transitorie, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 828

As every Ioye of worldly thing mot flee, [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 386

God woot that worldly Ioye is sone ago;
14

Man of Law's Tale: 325

[continues previous] Thende of the Ioye of our worldly labour;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 827

[continues previous] Now if he woot that Ioye is transitorie, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 828

[continues previous] As every Ioye of worldly thing mot flee, [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

And if a rethor coude faire endyte,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 94

Wel coude he sitte on hors, and faire ryde. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 95

He coude songes make and wel endyte, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 327

Therto he coude endyte, and make a thing, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 328

Ther coude no wight pinche at his wryting; [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 38

It moste been a rethor excellent, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 39

That coude his colours longing for that art, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 827

[continues previous] Now if he woot that Ioye is transitorie,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 388

He in a cronique saufly mighte it wryte,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 95

[continues previous] He coude songes make and wel endyte,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 327

[continues previous] Therto he coude endyte, and make a thing,
10

Squire's Tale: 38

[continues previous] It moste been a rethor excellent,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 393

That wommen holde in ful gret reverence.
11

Friar's Tale: 226

I am a yeman, knowen is ful wyde; [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 227

My trouthe wol I holde as in this cas. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 224

Hir preyer is of ful gret reverence;
10

Prioress' Tale: 112

Which is agayn your lawes reverence?' [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 38

... holy chirche. For which they been acursed, til they come to amendement, that on swich filthe setten hir bileve. Charmes for woundes or maladye of men, or of bestes, if they taken any effect, it may be peraventure that god suffreth it, for folk sholden yeve the more feith and reverence to his name. [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 394

Now wol I torne agayn to my sentence.
11

Knight's Tale: 630

Now wol I torne un-to Arcite ageyn,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 224

And turne I wol agayn to my matere.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 483

But turne I wol agayn to my matere.
11

Friar's Tale: 227

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I holde as in this cas.
10

Prioress' Tale: 111

[continues previous] In your despyt, and singe of swich sentence,
10

Prioress' Tale: 112

[continues previous] Which is agayn your lawes reverence?'
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 554

Now wol I torne to my tale agayn:
10

Parson's Tale: 38

[continues previous] ... chirche. For which they been acursed, til they come to amendement, that on swich filthe setten hir bileve. Charmes for woundes or maladye of men, or of bestes, if they taken any effect, it may be peraventure that god suffreth it, for folk sholden yeve the more feith and reverence to his name.
10

Parson's Tale: 39

[continues previous] Now wol I speken of lesinges, which generally is fals significacioun of word, in entente to deceyven his evene-cristene. Som lesinge is of which ther comth noon avantage to no wight: and som lesinge turneth to the ese or profit of o man, and to disese and damage of another man. Another lesinge ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 401

And in a bed of wortes stille he lay,
11

Shipman's Tale: 88

And thus he sit til it was passed pryme. [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 23

Til they comen to him ther he lay stille [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 265

And on a bed of golde she lay to reste, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 402

Til it was passed undern of the day,
12

Clerk's Tale: 204

The tyme of undern of the same day [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 88

[continues previous] And thus he sit til it was passed pryme.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 23

[continues previous] Til they comen to him ther he lay stille
11

Parlement of Foules: 266

[continues previous] Til that the hote sonne gan to weste.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 403

Wayting his tyme on Chauntecleer to falle,
12

Clerk's Tale: 204

[continues previous] The tyme of undern of the same day
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 404

As gladly doon thise homicydes alle,
12

Monk's Tale: 736

Witnesse on alle thise conqueroures stronge. [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 35

... seye we eek of wommen that mordren hir children for drede of worldly shame? Certes, an horrible homicyde. Homicyde is eek if a man approcheth to a womman by desir of lecherye, thurgh which the child is perissed, or elles smyteth a womman witingly, thurgh which she leseth hir child. Alle thise been homicydes and horrible deedly sinnes. Yet comen ther of Ire manye mo sinnes, as wel in word as in thoght and in dede; as he that arretteth upon god, or blameth god, of thing of which he is him-self gilty; or despyseth god and alle hise halwes, as doon thise cursede hasardours in diverse contrees. This cursed sinne doon they, whan they felen in hir hertes ful wikkedly of god and of hise halwes. Also, whan they treten unreverently the sacrement of the auter, thilke sinne is so greet, that unnethe may it been relesed, but that the mercy of ... [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 405

That in awayt liggen to mordre men.
12

Monk's Tale: 735

[continues previous] But have hir in awayt for ever-mo.
11

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... horrible deedly sinnes. Yet comen ther of Ire manye mo sinnes, as wel in word as in thoght and in dede; as he that arretteth upon god, or blameth god, of thing of which he is him-self gilty; or despyseth god and alle hise halwes, as doon thise cursede hasardours in diverse contrees. This cursed sinne doon they, whan they felen in hir hertes ful wikkedly of god and of hise halwes. Also, whan they treten unreverently the sacrement of the auter, thilke sinne is so greet, that unnethe may it been relesed, but that the mercy of god passeth alle ...
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 408

False dissimilour, O Greek Sinon,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 152

Of Troye, through the Greek Sinoun, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 153

[That] with his false forsweringe, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 409

That broghtest Troye al outrely to sorwe!
11

Hous of Fame 1: 152

[continues previous] Of Troye, through the Greek Sinoun,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 153

[continues previous] [That] with his false forsweringe,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 410

O Chauntecleer, acursed be that morwe,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 434

To walken in the yerd upon that morwe [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 435

That he had met the dreem, that I yow tolde. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 411

That thou into that yerd flough fro the bemes!
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 434

[continues previous] To walken in the yerd upon that morwe
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 435

[continues previous] That he had met the dreem, that I yow tolde.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 414

But what that god forwoot mot nedes be,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 43

soverein good is verray blisfulnesse: thanne mot it nedes be,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 44

that verray blisfulnesse is set in soverein god.'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 34

that the effect nis nat naturelly diverse, nedes the substance mot [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 48

'Yis, thus it mot nedes be,' quod I.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 73

'It mot nedes be so,' quod I; 'for the reaume ne sholde nat
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 68

every man over other men; thanne mot it nedes be that shrewes,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 109

of the unmoevable purviaunce, it mot nedes be that they [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 110

ne be nat mutable. And thus ben the thinges ful wel y-governed, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 20

Hath shapen her that she mot nedes be
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1520

Agayns his wil, sin it mot nedes be,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 415

After the opinioun of certeyn clerkis.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 34

[continues previous] that the effect nis nat naturelly diverse, nedes the substance mot
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 109

[continues previous] of the unmoevable purviaunce, it mot nedes be that they
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 417

That in scole is gret altercacioun
12

Merchant's Tale: 229

As al day falleth altercacioun [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 418

In this matere, and greet disputisoun,
12

Merchant's Tale: 230

[continues previous] Bitwixen freendes in disputisoun,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 420

But I ne can not bulte it to the bren,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 477

The flour is goon, ther is na-more to telle, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 478

The bren, as I best can, now moste I selle; [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 421

As can the holy doctour Augustyn,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 478

[continues previous] The bren, as I best can, now moste I selle;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 425

(Nedely clepe I simple necessitee);
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 49

is signe of this necessitee; or elles, yif ther nere no necessitee, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 426

Or elles, if free choys be graunted me
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 49

[continues previous] is signe of this necessitee; or elles, yif ther nere no necessitee,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 429

Or if his witing streyneth nevere a del
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6635

I wol not entremete a del; [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 430

But by necessitee condicionel.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6636

[continues previous] But I trowe that the book seith wel, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 431

I wol not han to do of swich matere;
11

Franklin's Prologue: 55

My spirit feleth noght of swich matere. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6635

[continues previous] I wol not entremete a del;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6636

[continues previous] But I trowe that the book seith wel,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 432

My tale is of a cok, as ye may here,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 55

[continues previous] My spirit feleth noght of swich matere.
11

Franklin's Prologue: 56

[continues previous] But if yow list, my tale shul ye here.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 434

To walken in the yerd upon that morwe
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 410

O Chauntecleer, acursed be that morwe, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 411

That thou into that yerd flough fro the bemes! [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 435

That he had met the dreem, that I yow tolde.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 410

[continues previous] O Chauntecleer, acursed be that morwe,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 411

[continues previous] That thou into that yerd flough fro the bemes!
11

Parlement of Foules: 16

On bokes rede I ofte, as I yow tolde. [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 17

But wherfor that I speke al this? not yore [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 436

Wommennes counseils been ful ofte colde;
11

Knight's Tale: 726

As I ful ofte have told thee heer-biforn, [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 16

[continues previous] On bokes rede I ofte, as I yow tolde.
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 437

Wommannes counseil broghte us first to wo,
11

Knight's Tale: 725

[continues previous] And art my blood, and to my counseil sworn,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 178

Fro Paradys to labour and to wo [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 438

And made Adam fro paradys to go,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 177

[continues previous] Adam our fader, and his wyf also,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 178

[continues previous] Fro Paradys to labour and to wo
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 439

Ther-as he was ful mery, and wel at ese.
11

Legend of Dido: 176

He never beter at ese was his lyve.
11

Legend of Dido: 177

Ful was the feste of deyntees and richesse,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 835

Ful yong he was, and mery of thought,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 836

And in samyt, with briddes wrought,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1094

With-outen hir, and ferd ful wel at ese? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1095

Artow for hir and for non other born? [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 440

But for I noot, to whom it mighte displese,
12

Clerk's Tale: 641

If thise assayes mighte nat suffyse? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1095

[continues previous] Artow for hir and for non other born?
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 441

If I counseil of wommen wolde blame,
12

Clerk's Tale: 640

[continues previous] But now of wommen wolde I axen fayn,
12

Clerk's Tale: 641

[continues previous] If thise assayes mighte nat suffyse?
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 443

Rede auctours, wher they trete of swich matere,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 309

Cristen and hethen, trete of swich matere; [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 444

And what thay seyn of wommen ye may here.
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

... lyke. For the trouthe of thinges and the profit been rather founden in fewe folk that been wyse and ful of resoun, than by greet multitude of folk, ther every man cryeth and clatereth what that him lyketh. Soothly swich multitude is nat honeste. As to the seconde resoun, where-as ye seyn that "alle wommen been wikke," save your grace, certes ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, for the grete bountee that is in wommen, our lord Iesu Crist, whan he was risen fro deeth to lyve, appeered rather to a womman than to his apostles. And though that Salomon seith, that "he ne fond never womman good," it folweth nat therfore that alle wommen ben wikke. For though that he ne fond no good womman, certes, ful many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, it is nat so. For if it were so, that no man sholde be conseilled but only of hem that hadden lordshipe and maistrie of his persone, men wolden nat be conseilled so ofte. For soothly, thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is ... [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 309

[continues previous] Cristen and hethen, trete of swich matere;
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 445

Thise been the cokkes wordes, and nat myne;
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... thinges and the profit been rather founden in fewe folk that been wyse and ful of resoun, than by greet multitude of folk, ther every man cryeth and clatereth what that him lyketh. Soothly swich multitude is nat honeste. As to the seconde resoun, where-as ye seyn that "alle wommen been wikke," save your grace, certes ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And after that, for the grete bountee that is in wommen, our lord Iesu Crist, whan he was risen fro deeth to lyve, appeered rather to a womman than to his apostles. And though that Salomon seith, that "he ne fond never womman good," it folweth nat therfore that alle wommen ben wikke. For though that he ne fond no good womman, certes, ful many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, it is nat so. For if it were so, that no man sholde be conseilled but only of hem that hadden lordshipe and maistrie of his persone, men wolden nat be conseilled so ofte. For soothly, thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And ...
12

Second Nun's Tale: 511

For in effect they been nat worth a myte.'
12

Second Nun's Tale: 512

Thise wordes and swiche othere seyde she,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 452

How that they singen wel and merily.
10

Manciple's Tale: 14

Coude never singen half so wel as he. [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 34

Singen so wonder merily and weel. [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 453

And so bifel that, as he caste his yë,
12

Knight's Tale: 1949

But on his lady yet caste he his yë; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1950

His laste word was, 'mercy, Emelye!' [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 123

And so bifel, this Iuge his eyen caste
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

And so bifel, that in a daweninge, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 13

[continues previous] That with his singing walled that citee,
10

Manciple's Tale: 14

[continues previous] Coude never singen half so wel as he.
12

Manciple's Tale: 34

[continues previous] Singen so wonder merily and weel.
11

Compleynt of Mars: 39

That when hir deyned caste on him her yë, [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 40

He took in pacience to live or dye; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 554

Ther-with he caste on Pandarus his yë [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 454

Among the wortes, on a boterflye,
12

Knight's Tale: 1949

[continues previous] But on his lady yet caste he his yë;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 63

[continues previous] As Chauntecleer among his wyves alle
11

Compleynt of Mars: 39

[continues previous] That when hir deyned caste on him her yë,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 554

[continues previous] Ther-with he caste on Pandarus his yë
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 455

He was war of this fox that lay ful lowe.
10

Knight's Tale: 1165

Under the wheel ful lowe he lay adoun.
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 456

No-thing ne liste him thanne for to crowe,
15+

Miller's Tale: 501

Whan that the firste cok hath crowe, anon [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 457

But cryde anon, 'cok, cok,' and up he sterte,
15+

Miller's Tale: 501

[continues previous] Whan that the firste cok hath crowe, anon
15+

Miller's Tale: 502

[continues previous] Up rist this Ioly lover Absolon,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 710

This Eolus anon up sterte,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 711

And with his blakke clarioun
11

Hous of Fame 3: 712

He gan to blasen out a soun,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 461

Though he never erst had seyn it with his yë.
13

Reeve's Tale: 381

But as she saugh a whyt thing in hir yë. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 888

That never was ther seyn with mannes
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 66

This Chauntecleer gan gronen in his throte, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 502

This Chauntecleer his winges gan to bete, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 541

Whan they had seyn of Chauntecleer the sighte. [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 63

That no wight coude remedie of his care. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 462

This Chauntecleer, whan he gan him espye,
13

Reeve's Tale: 382

[continues previous] And whan she gan the whyte thing espye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

Whan that he wolde han my bele chose, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 65

[continues previous] And next him sat this faire Pertelote,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 66

[continues previous] This Chauntecleer gan gronen in his throte,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 502

[continues previous] This Chauntecleer his winges gan to bete,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 541

[continues previous] Whan they had seyn of Chauntecleer the sighte.
11

Hous of Fame 2: 86

But he that bar me gan espye [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 64

[continues previous] And whan the olde Creon gan espye
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3815

For whan that he me gan espye, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3816

He swoor, afferming sikirly, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 463

He wolde han fled, but that the fox anon
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

[continues previous] And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

[continues previous] Whan that he wolde han my bele chose,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 798

He was agast, and wolde han fled his way,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 209

The hostiler answered him anon, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 586

In al his drede, un-to the fox he spak, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 587

And seyde, 'sire, if that I were as ye, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 86

[continues previous] But he that bar me gan espye
11

Hous of Fame 2: 87

[continues previous] That I so thoghte, and seyde this: —
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3815

[continues previous] For whan that he me gan espye,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3816

[continues previous] He swoor, afferming sikirly,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 464

Seyde, 'Gentil sire, allas! wher wol ye gon?
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 210

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sire, your felawe is agon,
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 587

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sire, if that I were as ye,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 465

Be ye affrayed of me that am your freend?
14

Manciple's Tale: 215

My sone, keep wel thy tonge and keep thy freend. [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 466

Now certes, I were worse than a feend,
11

Friar's Tale: 362

The feend, that yow wolde make thral and bonde. [continues next]
14

Manciple's Tale: 216

[continues previous] A wikked tonge is worse than a feend.
12

Manciple's Tale: 217

My sone, from a feend men may hem blesse;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 437

Were wel sitting, if that I were a feend, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 467

If I to yow wolde harm or vileinye.
11

Friar's Tale: 361

[continues previous] Disposeth ay your hertes to withstonde