Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Squire's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Squire's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Squire's Tale has 672 lines, and 6% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 72% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 22% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.11 strong matches and 3.43 weak matches.

Squire's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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11

Squire's Tale: 1

'Squier, com neer, if it your wille be,
11

Clerk's Tale: 54

Save o thing, lord, if it your wille be,
11

Physician's Tale: 165

And seyde, 'lord, if that it be your wille,
11

Physician's Tale: 189

Yeld me my thral, if that it be your wille.'
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 38

If any thing shal wel reported be. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 909

'Of that water, if that it be your wille?' [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 569

'Sey to Gamelyn and Adam if here wille be, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2989

Passe, if [it] your wille be,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1688

Quod Pandarus, 'and it your wille be, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 2

And sey somwhat of love; for, certes, ye
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 39

[continues previous] Sir, sey somwhat of hunting, I yow preye.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 909

[continues previous] 'Of that water, if that it be your wille?'
11

Parson's Tale: 21

... that may nat chaunge, and yeveth his herte to thing that may chaunge and flitte'; and certes, that is every thing, save god of hevene. For sooth is, that if a man yeve his love, the which that he oweth al to god with al his herte, un-to a creature, certes, as muche of his love as he yeveth to thilke creature, so muche he bireveth fro god; and therfore doth he sinne. For he, that is dettour to god, ne yeldeth nat to god al his dette, that is to seyn, al the love of his herte. [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 569

[continues previous] 'Sey to Gamelyn and Adam if here wille be,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1688

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'and it your wille be,
11

Squire's Tale: 3

Connen ther-on as muche as any man.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 488

To swich a man I can never seye nay.' [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... may nat chaunge, and yeveth his herte to thing that may chaunge and flitte'; and certes, that is every thing, save god of hevene. For sooth is, that if a man yeve his love, the which that he oweth al to god with al his herte, un-to a creature, certes, as muche of his love as he yeveth to thilke creature, so muche he bireveth fro god; and therfore doth he sinne. For he, that is dettour to god, ne yeldeth nat to god al his dette, that is to seyn, al the love of his herte.
12

Squire's Tale: 4

'Nay, sir,' quod he, 'but I wol seye as I can
11

Franklin's Prologue: 31

'Gladly, sir host,' quod he, 'I wol obeye
12

Pardoner's Tale: 629

So wrooth he was, no word ne wolde he seye.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 630

'Now,' quod our host, 'I wol no lenger pleye
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 488

[continues previous] To swich a man I can never seye nay.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 489

[continues previous] 'What!' quod this chanoun, 'sholde I be untrewe?
11

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
10

Squire's Tale: 5

With hertly wille; for I wol nat rebelle
10

Knight's Tale: 1619

I am thin ayel, redy at thy wille; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1620

Weep thou namore, I wol thy lust fulfille.' [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 6

Agayn your lust; a tale wol I telle.
10

Knight's Tale: 1620

[continues previous] Weep thou namore, I wol thy lust fulfille.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale.
13

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 951

But to Grisilde agayn wol I me dresse,
10

Clerk's Tale: 952

And telle hir constance and hir bisinesse. —
11

Pardoner's Tale: 127

Your lyking is that I shal telle a tale. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 128

Now, have I dronke a draughte of corny ale, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 332

But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 554

Now wol I torne to my tale agayn:
13

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 91

For he wol telle a tale long y-now.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 225

Of this tale next before:
12

Book of the Duchesse: 226

And I wol telle yow wherfore;
11

Squire's Tale: 7

Have me excused if I speke amis,
11

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
11

Pardoner's Tale: 128

[continues previous] Now, have I dronke a draughte of corny ale,
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
10

Squire's Tale: 10

Ther dwelte a king, that werreyed Russye,
10

Clerk's Tale: 148

Amonges thise povre folk ther dwelte a man [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 149

Which that was holden povrest of hem alle; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 101

And we han herd how that king Laius deyde [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 11

Thurgh which ther deyde many a doughty man.
10

Clerk's Tale: 148

[continues previous] Amonges thise povre folk ther dwelte a man
10

Clerk's Tale: 149

[continues previous] Which that was holden povrest of hem alle;
10

Squire's Tale: 27

That ther was nowher swich another man. [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 338

Thus glad and blythe, this noble doughty king [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 636

Hath ther nat many a noble wyf, er this, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 80

But it wolde lasten al to longe a whyle. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1210

[Had] cast doun many a doughty man.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 101

[continues previous] And we han herd how that king Laius deyde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 102

[continues previous] Thurgh Edippus his sone, and al that dede;
13

Squire's Tale: 12

This noble king was cleped Cambinskan,
10

Squire's Tale: 28

[continues previous] This noble king, this Tartre Cambinskan
13

Squire's Tale: 338

[continues previous] Thus glad and blythe, this noble doughty king
10

Franklin's Tale: 636

[continues previous] Hath ther nat many a noble wyf, er this,
10

Legend of Dido: 81

[continues previous] This noble queen, that cleped was Dido,
15+

Squire's Tale: 13

Which in his tyme was of so greet renoun
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 250

Curteys he was, and lowly of servyse. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous. [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 252

He was the beste beggere in his hous; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 320

So greet a purchasour was no-wher noon. [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 321

Al was fee simple to him in effect, [continues next]
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 3

And fillen so that ther nas no remedie [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 106

Singen his workes laude and heigh renoun;
12

Monk's Tale: 107

For in his tyme of strengthe he was the flour.
12

Legend of Thisbe: 6

Two lordes, which that were of greet renoun, [continues next]
12

Legend of Thisbe: 7

And woneden so nigh, upon a grene, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 61

That had a flees of gold, that shoon so brighte, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 62

That no-wher was ther swich an-other sighte; [continues next]
15+

Legend of Phyllis: 51

That in his tyme was of greet renoun, [continues next]
15+

Legend of Phyllis: 52

No man so greet in al his regioun; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4883

Which in his tyme was ful sage,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4884

In a boke he made of Age,
15+

Squire's Tale: 14

That ther nas no-wher in no regioun
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 320

[continues previous] So greet a purchasour was no-wher noon.
11

Knight's Tale: 589

And bar him so in pees and eek in werre,
11

Knight's Tale: 590

Ther nas no man that Theseus hath derre.
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 311

Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 3

[continues previous] And fillen so that ther nas no remedie [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 491

That him in song or wisdom mighte passe.
12

Legend of Thisbe: 6

[continues previous] Two lordes, which that were of greet renoun,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 61

[continues previous] That had a flees of gold, that shoon so brighte,
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 62

[continues previous] That no-wher was ther swich an-other sighte;
15+

Legend of Phyllis: 51

[continues previous] That in his tyme was of greet renoun, [continues next]
12

Legend of Phyllis: 52

[continues previous] No man so greet in al his regioun; [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 15

So excellent a lord in alle thing;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

[continues previous] Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

[continues previous] No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas,
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

[continues previous] In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave,
10

Monk's Tale: 3

[continues previous] And fillen so that ther nas no remedie
12

Legend of Phyllis: 52

[continues previous] No man so greet in al his regioun;
10

Squire's Tale: 16

Him lakked noght that longeth to a king.
10

Knight's Tale: 1422

Ther lakked noght to doon hir sacrifyse. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 17

As of the secte of which that he was born
10

Knight's Tale: 1421

[continues previous] The hornes fulle of meth, as was the gyse;
11

Squire's Tale: 18

He kepte his lay, to which that he was sworn;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 407

Hardy he was, and wys to undertake; [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche. — [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 19

And ther-to be was hardy, wys, and riche,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 407

[continues previous] Hardy he was, and wys to undertake;
14

Shipman's Tale: 175

They wolde that hir housbondes sholde be [continues next]
14

Shipman's Tale: 176

Hardy, and wyse, and riche, and ther-to free, [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 177

And buxom to his wyf, and fresh a-bedde. [continues next]
15+

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

[continues previous] And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche.[continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 20

Pitous and Iust, and ever-more y-liche
14

Shipman's Tale: 176

[continues previous] Hardy, and wyse, and riche, and ther-to free,
12

Shipman's Tale: 177

[continues previous] And buxom to his wyf, and fresh a-bedde.
15+

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 161

[continues previous] And he was wys, hardy, secree, and riche. —
11

Squire's Tale: 24

As any bacheler of al his hous.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 27

Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 398

That was that tyme a bacheler of lawe, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 399

Al were he ther to lerne another craft, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 25

A fair persone he was and fortunat,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 27

[continues previous] Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 28

[continues previous] That on a day cam rydinge fro river;
10

Franklin's Tale: 398

[continues previous] That was that tyme a bacheler of lawe,
10

Franklin's Tale: 399

[continues previous] Al were he ther to lerne another craft,
12

Squire's Tale: 26

And kepte alwey so wel royal estat,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 205

Which that so wel corven was [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 130

Kepte hir estat, and bothe of yonge and olde [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1667

For trusteth wel, that your estat royal [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 27

That ther was nowher swich another man.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 695

Ne was ther swich another pardoner.
10

Squire's Tale: 11

Thurgh which ther deyde many a doughty man. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 588

For swich another was ther noon as he.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 205

[continues previous] Which that so wel corven was
10

Hous of Fame 3: 206

[continues previous] That never swich another nas;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 129

[continues previous] And whyl she was dwellinge in that citee,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1667

[continues previous] For trusteth wel, that your estat royal
12

Squire's Tale: 28

This noble king, this Tartre Cambinskan
10

Squire's Tale: 12

[continues previous] This noble king was cleped Cambinskan,
12

Squire's Tale: 266

Whan that this Tartre king, this Cambynskan,
11

Monk's Tale: 305

Two sones by this Odenake hadde she, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 29

Hadde two sones on Elpheta his wyf,
10

Squire's Tale: 664

How that he wan Theodora to his wyf, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 305

[continues previous] Two sones by this Odenake hadde she,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 31

amenused. What shal I seyn eek of thy two sones, conseilours, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 30

Of whiche the eldeste highte Algarsyf,
10

Squire's Tale: 663

[continues previous] And after wol I speke of Algarsyf, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 57

Iohan, myn eldeste sone schal have plowes fyve, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 31

[continues previous] amenused. What shal I seyn eek of thy two sones, conseilours,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 32

[continues previous] of whiche, as of children of hir age, ther shyneth the lyknesse of
11

Squire's Tale: 31

That other sone was cleped Cambalo.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 271

This worthy limitour was cleped Huberd. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 272

A Marchant was ther with a forked berd, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 664

[continues previous] How that he wan Theodora to his wyf,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Iohan, myn eldeste sone schal have plowes fyve,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 58

[continues previous] That was my fadres heritage whyl he was on lyve;
11

Legend of Thisbe: 12

That other hadde a doghter, the faireste, [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 13

That estward in the world was tho dwellinge. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 32

A doghter hadde this worthy king also,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 271

[continues previous] This worthy limitour was cleped Huberd.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 272

[continues previous] A Marchant was ther with a forked berd,
11

Physician's Tale: 5

This knight a doghter hadde by his wyf,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 12

[continues previous] That other hadde a doghter, the faireste,
14

Squire's Tale: 34

But for to telle yow al hir beautee,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 37

Me thinketh it acordaunt to resoun, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 38

To telle yow al the condicioun [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1195

To telle yow al the descripcioun.
14

Merchant's Tale: 502

I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee; [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 503

But thus muche of hir beautee telle I may, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 719

How that he wroghte, I dar nat to yow telle; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 720

Or whether hir thoughte it paradys or helle; [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 67

... commune profit mighte nat han be kept, ne pees and reste in erthe, but-if god hadde ordeyned that som men hadde hyer degree and som men lower: therfore was sovereyntee ordeyned to kepe and mayntene and deffenden hir underlinges or hir subgets in resoun, as ferforth as it lyth in hir power; and nat to destroyen hem ne confounde. Wherfore I seye, that thilke lordes that been lyk wolves, that devouren the possessiouns or the catel of povre folk wrongfully, with-outen mercy or mesure, they shul receyven, by the same mesure that they han mesured to povre folk, the mercy of ... [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 439

Al lyth in yow, doth with him what yow leste [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 449

Al lyth in yow, doth with him as yow leste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1070

He gan him recomaunde un-to hir grace; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1071

To telle al how, it axeth muchel space. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

For al to long it were for to dwelle.' [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 35

It lyth nat in my tonge, nin my conning;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 37

[continues previous] Me thinketh it acordaunt to resoun,
14

Merchant's Tale: 502

[continues previous] I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee;
12

Merchant's Tale: 719

[continues previous] How that he wroghte, I dar nat to yow telle;
12

Merchant's Tale: 720

[continues previous] Or whether hir thoughte it paradys or helle;
12

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... be, ne the commune profit mighte nat han be kept, ne pees and reste in erthe, but-if god hadde ordeyned that som men hadde hyer degree and som men lower: therfore was sovereyntee ordeyned to kepe and mayntene and deffenden hir underlinges or hir subgets in resoun, as ferforth as it lyth in hir power; and nat to destroyen hem ne confounde. Wherfore I seye, that thilke lordes that been lyk wolves, that devouren the possessiouns or the catel of povre folk wrongfully, with-outen mercy or mesure, they shul receyven, by the same mesure that they han mesured to povre folk, the mercy of Iesu Crist, but-if ...
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 60

But wo is me, hit lyth nat in my might!
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 438

[continues previous] I may ne wol nat warne your requeste;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 439

[continues previous] Al lyth in yow, doth with him what yow leste
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 448

[continues previous] I may ne wol nat werne your requeste;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 449

[continues previous] Al lyth in yow, doth with him as yow leste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1071

[continues previous] To telle al how, it axeth muchel space.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

[continues previous] For al to long it were for to dwelle.'
11

Squire's Tale: 36

I dar nat undertake so heigh a thing.
11

Parson's Tale: 55

... to werke any gode werkes; for certes, he that is enclyned to sinne, him thinketh it is so greet an empryse for to undertake to doon werkes of goodnesse, and casteth in his herte that the circumstaunces of goodnesse been so grevouse and so chargeaunt for to suffre, that he dar nat undertake to do werkes of goodnesse, as seith seint Gregorie.
10

Squire's Tale: 38

It moste been a rethor excellent,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

And if a rethor coude faire endyte, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 388

He in a cronique saufly mighte it wryte, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 39

That coude his colours longing for that art,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 387

[continues previous] And if a rethor coude faire endyte,
12

Squire's Tale: 41

I am non swich, I moot speke as I can.
12

Merchant's Tale: 1061

I am a womman, nedes moot I speke,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 61

Bestes and briddes coude speke and singe. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 42

And so bifel that, whan this Cambinskan
10

Squire's Tale: 58

This Cambinskan, of which I have yow told, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 61

[continues previous] Bestes and briddes coude speke and singe.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 62

[continues previous] And so bifel, that in a daweninge,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 811

Twenty winter that his lady wiste, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 43

Hath twenty winter born his diademe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 599

That al myn herte I yaf un-to his hold. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 600

He was, I trowe, a twenty winter old, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 57

[continues previous] Agayn the swerd of winter kene and cold.
11

Parlement of Foules: 472

For wo, as he that hath ben languisshing [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 473

Thise twenty winter, and wel happen may [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 810

[continues previous] What! many a man hath love ful dere y-bought
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 811

[continues previous] Twenty winter that his lady wiste,
14

Squire's Tale: 44

As he was wont fro yeer to yeer, I deme,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 600

[continues previous] He was, I trowe, a twenty winter old,
14

Friar's Tale: 134

Fro yeer to yeer I winne al my dispence.
11

Friar's Tale: 135

I can no bettre telle feithfully.'
13

Parlement of Foules: 321

As they were wont alwey fro yeer to yere,
11

Parlement of Foules: 472

[continues previous] For wo, as he that hath ben languisshing
10

Squire's Tale: 48

Phebus the sonne ful Iory was and cleer;
10

Knight's Tale: 204

Bright was the sonne, and cleer that morweninge,
10

Knight's Tale: 205

And Palamon, this woful prisoner,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 751

Hir vois ful cleer was and ful swete. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 752

She was nought rude ne unmete, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 49

For he was neigh his exaltacioun
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 751

[continues previous] Hir vois ful cleer was and ful swete.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 752

[continues previous] She was nought rude ne unmete,
10

Squire's Tale: 50

In Martes face, and in his mansioun
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 136

Ware the sonne in his ascencioun [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 51

In Aries, the colerik hote signe.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 135

[continues previous] Ye been ful colerik of compleccioun. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 917

In al hir face a wikked signe; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 52

Ful lusty was the weder and benigne,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 135

[continues previous] Ye been ful colerik of compleccioun.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 918

[continues previous] For hit was sad, simple, and benigne. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 919

'And which a goodly softe speche [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 53

For which the foules, agayn the sonne shene,
11

Squire's Tale: 397

What for the seson and the morweninge, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 398

And for the foules that she herde singe; [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 117

And clothed him in grene al newe agayn. [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 118

The smale foules, of the seson fayn, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 129

That naked was, and clad hit new agayn. [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 130

The smale foules, of the seson fayn, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 918

[continues previous] For hit was sad, simple, and benigne.
13

Squire's Tale: 54

What for the seson and the yonge grene,
11

Squire's Tale: 397

[continues previous] What for the seson and the morweninge,
11

Squire's Tale: 398

[continues previous] And for the foules that she herde singe;
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 118

[continues previous] The smale foules, of the seson fayn,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 130

[continues previous] The smale foules, of the seson fayn,
11

Squire's Tale: 55

Ful loude songen hir affecciouns;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 8

that ben preysed falsly, they moten nedes han shame of hir [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 10

by hir desertes, what thing hath thilke prys eched or [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 56

Him semed han geten hem protecciouns
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 9

[continues previous] preysinges. And yif that folk han geten hem thonk or preysinge
10

Squire's Tale: 57

Agayn the swerd of winter kene and cold.
10

Squire's Tale: 43

Hath twenty winter born his diademe, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 58

This Cambinskan, of which I have yow told,
10

Squire's Tale: 42

[continues previous] And so bifel that, whan this Cambinskan
12

Melibee's Tale: 22

Now sith that I have told yow of which folk ye sholde been counseilled, now wol I teche yow which conseil ye oghte to eschewe. First ye shul eschewe the conseilling of foles; for Salomon seith: "taak no conseil of a fool, for he ne can noght conseille but after his owene lust and his affeccioun." The book seith: ...
12

Hous of Fame 2: 21

This egle, of which I have yow told,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 695

In this matere of which I have yow told, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 59

In royal vestiment sit on his deys,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 695

[continues previous] In this matere of which I have yow told,
11

Squire's Tale: 61

And halt his feste, so solempne and so riche
11

Clerk's Tale: 1069

For more solempne in every mannes sight [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 1070

This feste was, and gretter of costage, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 62

That in this world ne was ther noon it liche.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 452

That to the offring bifore hir sholde goon;
11

Knight's Tale: 1130

For windowe on the wal ne was ther noon, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 337

Ne ther was Surrien noon that was converted
10

Man of Law's Tale: 338

That of the conseil of the sowdan woot,
11

Clerk's Tale: 1069

[continues previous] For more solempne in every mannes sight
11

Clerk's Tale: 1070

[continues previous] This feste was, and gretter of costage,
11

Franklin's Tale: 50

Ye shul it lerne, wher-so ye wole or noon.
11

Franklin's Tale: 51

For in this world, certein, ther no wight is,
12

Monk's Tale: 167

Wher-as in Chaldey clerk ne was ther noon
12

Monk's Tale: 168

That wiste to what fyn his dremes souned.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 331

Whan he was in this world, declared here
10

Second Nun's Tale: 332

That ther was other lyf ther men may wone.'
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 162

Of thise three pointes ther nas noon him liche; [continues next]
14

Legend of Philomela: 63

And of array that ther was noon her liche, [continues next]
11

Legend of Philomela: 64

And yit of bountee was she two so riche, [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 76

For, as of trouthe, is ther noon hir liche, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 518

Ne ther was noon to teche me;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 712

By ordre tellen you it al. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 946

But iren was ther noon ne steel;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 947

For al was gold, men mighte it see,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1073

For in this world is noon it liche,
15+

Romaunt of the Rose: 1074

Ne by a thousand deel so riche,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1646

For in this world ther liveth lady noon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1647

If that ye were untrewe, as god defende!
14

Squire's Tale: 63

Of which if I shal tellen al tharray,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 413

[continues previous] With us ther was a Doctour of Phisyk,
10

Knight's Tale: 1024

If I foryete to tellen the dispence [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1131

[continues previous] Thurgh which men mighten any light discerne.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 219

To tellen yow the Ioye and al tharray
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 162

[continues previous] Of thise three pointes ther nas noon him liche;
12

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 163

[continues previous] Of freedom passed he, and lustihede,
14

Legend of Philomela: 63

[continues previous] And of array that ther was noon her liche,
14

Legend of Philomela: 64

[continues previous] And yit of bountee was she two so riche,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 76

[continues previous] For, as of trouthe, is ther noon hir liche,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 77

[continues previous] Of al the women in this worlde riche.
11

Squire's Tale: 64

Than wolde it occupye a someres day;
10

Knight's Tale: 1023

[continues previous] I trowe men wolde deme it necligence,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 712

[continues previous] By ordre tellen you it al.
11

Squire's Tale: 65

And eek it nedeth nat for to devyse
11

Summoner's Tale: 13

Ne ther it nedeth nat for to be yive,
11

Summoner's Tale: 14

As to possessioners, that mowen live,
11

Merchant's Epilogue: 19

Of whom, it nedeth nat for to declare,
11

Squire's Tale: 453

Of other harm it nedeth nat to speke.
11

Squire's Tale: 454

For ye your-self upon your-self yow wreke,
11

Physician's Tale: 230

Han herd; nat nedeth for to telle it more.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 243

Nat nedeth it for to reherce hem alle,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 76

semeth to ben right cleer and renomed. For certes, it nedeth nat
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 77

to seye, that blisfulnesse be [nat] anguissous ne drery, ne subgit to
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 16

it nedeth nat to tellen it thee, that hast or this tyme assayed [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 66

At every cours the ordre of hir servyse.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 15

[continues previous] how manye: of whiche children how bytinge is every condicioun,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 712

By ordre tellen you it al. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 713

Ful fair servyse and eek ful swete [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4959

But yvel she spendith hir servyse, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4960

For no man wol hir love, ne pryse; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 67

I wol nat tellen of hir strange sewes,
11

Knight's Tale: 2105

I wol nat tellen eek how that they goon
11

Miller's Tale: 372

I wol nat tellen goddes privetee.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 116

slepen. For certes, in the beestes, the love of hir livinges ne [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 117

of hir beinges ne comth nat of the wilninges of the sowle, but [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 712

[continues previous] By ordre tellen you it al.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4959

[continues previous] But yvel she spendith hir servyse,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4960

[continues previous] For no man wol hir love, ne pryse;
12

Squire's Tale: 68

Ne of hir swannes, ne of hir heronsewes.
10

Clerk's Tale: 864

That neither by hir wordes ne hir face [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 865

Biforn the folk, ne eek in hir absence, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 866

Ne shewed she that hir was doon offence; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 116

[continues previous] slepen. For certes, in the beestes, the love of hir livinges ne
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 117

[continues previous] of hir beinges ne comth nat of the wilninges of the sowle, but
12

Hous of Fame 3: 813

Ne eek of hir descripcioun, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 814

Ne also hir condicioun, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 815

Ne the ordre of hir dome,
12

Squire's Tale: 69

Eek in that lond, as tellen knightes olde,
12

Knight's Tale: 1

Whylom, as olde stories tellen us, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 2

Ther was a duk that highte Theseus; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1260

With him ther wenten knightes many oon; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 865

[continues previous] Biforn the folk, ne eek in hir absence,
11

Clerk's Tale: 866

[continues previous] Ne shewed she that hir was doon offence;
12

Hous of Fame 3: 813

[continues previous] Ne eek of hir descripcioun,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1478

Of which, as olde bokes tellen us, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 70

Ther is som mete that is ful deyntee holde,
12

Knight's Tale: 2

[continues previous] Ther was a duk that highte Theseus;
10

Knight's Tale: 1260

[continues previous] With him ther wenten knightes many oon;
10

Knight's Tale: 1261

[continues previous] Som wol ben armed in an habergeoun,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1479

[continues previous] Ther roos a contek and a greet envye;
11

Squire's Tale: 71

That in this lond men recche of it but smal;
10

Knight's Tale: 416

I nam but deed; ther nis no remedye.' [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1266

And have an ax, and somme a mace of steel. [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1267

Ther nis no newe gyse, that it nas old. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 497

But certeyn, ther nis no comparisoun [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 879

But it be with his brother knowleching. [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 56

But god it woot, ther may no man embrace [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Metre 3: 7

to-gidere? But ther nis no discord to the verray thinges, but they [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 143

But thou shalt fele as wel the blood of me [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 422

But ther nis no misaventure [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 673

Ther nis no more, but here-after sone, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 72

Ther nis no man that may reporten al.
10

Knight's Tale: 416

[continues previous] I nam but deed; ther nis no remedye.'
10

Knight's Tale: 1267

[continues previous] Ther nis no newe gyse, that it nas old.
10

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 266

By god, ther nis no man in al this toun
10

Merchant's Tale: 502

I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 588

'Ther nis no werkman, what-so-ever he be,
11

Merchant's Tale: 589

That may bothe werke wel and hastily;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 533

In al this world ther nis no creature,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 534

That ete or dronke hath of this confiture
11

Melibee's Tale: 28

'My lord,' quod she, 'I biseke yow in al humblesse, that ye wol nat wilfully replye agayn my resouns, ne distempre your herte thogh I speke thing that yow displese. For god wot that, as in myn entente, I speke it for your beste, for your honour and for your profite eke. And soothly, I hope that your benignitee wol taken ... [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 497

[continues previous] But certeyn, ther nis no comparisoun
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 878

[continues previous] 'Ther may no man Mercurie mortifye,
11

Manciple's Tale: 56

[continues previous] But god it woot, ther may no man embrace
10

Manciple's Tale: 107

I am a boistous man, right thus seye I, [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 108

Ther nis no difference, trewely, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 5: 23

ther nis no drede that he may deserve to ben exiled. But who-so
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 74

of renoun, oughte that to ben despised? Certes, ther may no
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 2: 75

man forsake, that al thing that is right excellent and noble, that it ne
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 24

veyn and inparfit, ther may no man doute that ther nis som
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 25

blisfulnesse that is sad, stedefast, and parfit.'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 92

ne ther nis no man that ne wot wel that they ne
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 23

ther nis no wight that may merveylen y-nough, ne compleine,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Metre 3: 7

[continues previous] to-gidere? But ther nis no discord to the verray thinges, but they
10

Legend of Thisbe: 142

[continues previous] And seide, 'wimpel, allas! ther nis no more
12

Legend of Philomela: 161

For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 376

That ther nis man that thinke may
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 377

What tyme that now present is:
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 422

[continues previous] But ther nis no misaventure
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 423

[continues previous] That she ne thenketh in hir corage.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 673

[continues previous] Ther nis no more, but here-after sone,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

For al to long it were for to dwelle.' [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 73

I wol nat tarien yow, for it is pryme,
10

Merchant's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde;
10

Merchant's Tale: 166

[continues previous] And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 502

[continues previous] I may yow nat devyse al hir beautee;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 590

For that is best; I wol yow nat deceyve.
11

Melibee's Tale: 28

[continues previous] 'My lord,' quod she, 'I biseke yow in al humblesse, that ye wol nat wilfully replye agayn my resouns, ne distempre your herte thogh I speke thing that yow displese. For god wot that, as in myn entente, I speke it for your beste, for your honour and for your profite eke. And soothly, I hope that your benignitee wol taken it in pacience. ...
10

Manciple's Tale: 107

[continues previous] I am a boistous man, right thus seye I,
12

Legend of Philomela: 160

[continues previous] Ye may be war of men, yif that yow liste.
12

Legend of Philomela: 161

[continues previous] For, al be that he wol nat, for his shame,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

[continues previous] Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1484

[continues previous] For al to long it were for to dwelle.'
12

Squire's Tale: 74

And for it is no fruit but los of tyme;
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 28

But los of tyme shendeth us," quod he. [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 29

It wol nat come agayn, with-outen drede, [continues next]
12

Legend of Dido: 74

Hit nedeth nat; hit nere but los of tyme.
12

Legend of Dido: 75

For this is al and som, it was Venus,
12

Squire's Tale: 75

Un-to my firste I wol have my recours.
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] It wol nat come agayn, with-outen drede,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 870

As I have seyd, wol love, un-to my laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

My dere herte, and al myn owene knight,
10

Squire's Tale: 76

And so bifel that, after the thridde cours,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 140

After hir cours, ay whyl they were wrothe. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 77

Whyl that this king sit thus in his nobleye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 140

[continues previous] After hir cours, ay whyl they were wrothe.
11

Squire's Tale: 79

Biforn him at the bord deliciously,
11

Squire's Tale: 85

And up he rydeth to the heighe bord. [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 80

In at the halle-dore al sodeynly
11

Squire's Tale: 86

[continues previous] In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 89

This strange knight, that cam thus sodeynly, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 90

Al armed save his heed ful richely, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 81

Ther cam a knight up-on a stede of bras,
11

Knight's Tale: 1298

The grete Emetreus, the king of Inde, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1299

Up-on a stede bay, trapped in steel, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 86

[continues previous] In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
14

Squire's Tale: 89

[continues previous] This strange knight, that cam thus sodeynly,
11

Squire's Tale: 115

This stede of bras, that esily and wel [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 666

Ne hadde he ben holpen by the stede of bras; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1073

But up anoon up-on his stede bay, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 82

And in his hand a brood mirour of glas.
11

Knight's Tale: 1299

[continues previous] Up-on a stede bay, trapped in steel,
11

Squire's Tale: 115

[continues previous] This stede of bras, that esily and wel
11

Squire's Tale: 116

[continues previous] Can, in the space of o day naturel,
11

Squire's Tale: 667

[continues previous] And after wol I speke of Cambalo,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1073

[continues previous] But up anoon up-on his stede bay,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1074

[continues previous] And in the feld he pleyde tho leoun;
15+

Squire's Tale: 83

Upon his thombe he hadde of gold a ring,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 111

Upon his arm he bar a gay bracer, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 195

And, for to festne his hood under his chin,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 196

He hadde of gold y-wroght a curious pin:
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde; [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 565

And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee. [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 566

A whyt cote and a blew hood wered he. [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 41

And in his honde a launcegay, [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 42

A long swerd by his syde. [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 43

He priketh thurgh a fair forest, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 84

And by his syde a naked swerd hanging;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

[continues previous] A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde; [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 561

[continues previous] His mouth as greet was as a greet forneys. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 564

[continues previous] Wel coude he stelen corn, and tollen thryes;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 565

[continues previous] And yet he hadde a thombe of gold, pardee.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 566

[continues previous] A whyt cote and a blew hood wered he.
13

Squire's Tale: 156

This naked swerd, that hangeth by my syde,
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 41

[continues previous] And in his honde a launcegay,
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 42

[continues previous] A long swerd by his syde.
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 43

[continues previous] He priketh thurgh a fair forest,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... that he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ... [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 85

And up he rydeth to the heighe bord.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 112

[continues previous] And by his syde a swerd and a bokeler,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 560

[continues previous] A swerd and bokeler bar he by his syde;
10

Miller's Tale: 254

An hole he fond, ful lowe up-on a bord, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 650

Whan that the heighe masse was y-doon, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 79

Biforn him at the bord deliciously, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 98

And after this, biforn the heighe bord, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 99

He with a manly voys seith his message, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... he falle in-to thy companye paraventure withouten thyn assent, enquere thanne, as subtilly as thou mayst, of his conversacioun and of his lyf bifore, and feyne thy wey; seye that thou goost thider as thou wolt nat go; and if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 561

Fro thennesforth he rydeth up and doun,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 562

And every thing com him to remembraunce
12

Squire's Tale: 86

In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon
10

Miller's Tale: 255

[continues previous] Ther as the cat was wont in for to crepe;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde,
11

Merchant's Tale: 650

[continues previous] Whan that the heighe masse was y-doon,
11

Merchant's Tale: 651

[continues previous] In halle sit this Ianuarie, and May
11

Squire's Tale: 80

[continues previous] In at the halle-dore al sodeynly
11

Squire's Tale: 81

Ther cam a knight up-on a stede of bras,
12

Squire's Tale: 98

[continues previous] And after this, biforn the heighe bord,
12

Squire's Tale: 87

For merveille of this knight; him to biholde
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 190

And in his walk ful fast he gan to wayten [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 191

If knight or squyer of his companye [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 88

Ful bisily ther wayten yonge and olde.
11

Merchant's Tale: 22

Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys. [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

[continues previous] Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche
11

Hous of Fame 3: 143

Ther saugh I famous, olde and yonge,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 130

Kepte hir estat, and bothe of yonge and olde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 131

Ful wel beloved, and wel men of hir tolde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 190

[continues previous] And in his walk ful fast he gan to wayten
14

Squire's Tale: 89

This strange knight, that cam thus sodeynly,
11

Merchant's Tale: 22

[continues previous] Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys.
14

Squire's Tale: 80

In at the halle-dore al sodeynly [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 81

Ther cam a knight up-on a stede of bras, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1574

With that his arm al sodeynly he thriste [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 90

Al armed save his heed ful richely,
14

Squire's Tale: 80

[continues previous] In at the halle-dore al sodeynly
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 624

This Troilus sat on his baye stede,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 625

Al armed, save his heed, ful richely, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 626

And wounded was his hors, and gan to blede, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1573

[continues previous] Have here a swerd, and smyteth of myn heed.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1574

[continues previous] With that his arm al sodeynly he thriste
15+

Squire's Tale: 91

Saluëth king and queen, and lordes alle,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 626

[continues previous] And wounded was his hors, and gan to blede,
11

Squire's Tale: 92

By ordre, as they seten in the halle,
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 12

... houre of any planete, after which planete the day bereth his name; and endeth in the nexte stryk of the plate under the forseide west orisonte; and evere, as the sonne climbeth uppere and uppere, so goth his nadir dounere and dounere, teching by swich strykes the houres of planetes by ordre as they sitten in the hevene. The first houre inequal of every Satterday is to Saturne; and the secounde, to Iupiter; the 3, to Mars; the 4, to the Sonne; the 5, to Venus; the 6, to Mercurius; the 7, to the Mone; and thanne agayn, the 8 is to Saturne; the 9, to Iupiter; the 10, ...
14

Squire's Tale: 93

With so heigh reverence and obeisaunce
12

Squire's Tale: 544

Fil on his knees with so devout humblesse, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 545

With so heigh reverence, and, as by his chere, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 546

So lyk a gentil lovere of manere, [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 26

... of man; and that othere speces of pryde been with-oute. But natheles that oon of thise speces of pryde is signe of that other, right as the gaye leefsel atte taverne is signe of the wyn that is in the celer. And this is in manye thinges: as in speche and contenaunce, and in outrageous array of clothing; for certes, if ther ne hadde be no sinne in clothing, Crist wolde nat have noted and spoken of the clothing of thilke riche man in the gospel. And, as seith Seint Gregorie, that precious clothing is coupable for the derthe of it, and for ... [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 94

As wel in speche as in contenaunce,
14

Squire's Tale: 545

[continues previous] With so heigh reverence, and, as by his chere,
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

... noyse, and seyden: that, right so as whyl that iren is hoot, men sholden smyte, right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 26

[continues previous] ... pryde that is in the herte of man; and that othere speces of pryde been with-oute. But natheles that oon of thise speces of pryde is signe of that other, right as the gaye leefsel atte taverne is signe of the wyn that is in the celer. And this is in manye thinges: as in speche and contenaunce, and in outrageous array of clothing; for certes, if ther ne hadde be no sinne in clothing, Crist wolde nat have noted and spoken of the clothing of thilke riche man in the gospel. And, as seith Seint Gregorie, that precious clothing is coupable for the derthe of it, and for his ...
12

Squire's Tale: 95

That Gawain, with his olde curteisye,
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... olde wyse men, and bigonnen to make noyse, and seyden: that, right so as whyl that iren is hoot, men sholden smyte, right so, men sholde wreken hir wronges whyle that they been fresshe and newe; and with loud voys they cryden, 'werre! werre!' Up roos tho oon of thise olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and ...
10

Squire's Tale: 96

Though he were come ageyn out of Fairye,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 5

of okes. They ne coude nat medly the yifte of Bachus to the [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 97

Ne coude him nat amende with a word.
15+

Squire's Tale: 197

Nature ne art ne coude him nat amende
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 4

[continues previous] weren wont lightly to slaken hir hunger at even with acornes
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 5

[continues previous] of okes. They ne coude nat medly the yifte of Bachus to the
13

Legend of Phyllis: 25

That carpenter ne coude hit nat amende.
12

Squire's Tale: 98

And after this, biforn the heighe bord,
12

Squire's Tale: 85

And up he rydeth to the heighe bord. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 86

In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 99

He with a manly voys seith his message,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 179

But to his questioun anon answerde
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 180

With manly voys, that al the court it herde:
12

Squire's Tale: 85

[continues previous] And up he rydeth to the heighe bord.
11

Squire's Tale: 101

With-outen vyce of sillable or of lettre;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 28

agast than they dreden him, and that is put in the handes of [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 29

his servaunts for he sholde seme mighty? But of familieres [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 30

or servaunts of kinges what sholde I telle thee anything, sin [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 102

And, for his tale sholde seme the bettre,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 28

[continues previous] agast than they dreden him, and that is put in the handes of
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 5: 29

[continues previous] his servaunts for he sholde seme mighty? But of familieres
11

Squire's Tale: 103

Accordant to his wordes was his chere,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 183

For drede of Loves wordes and his chere, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 280

For drede of Loves wordes and his chere; [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 239

And at his hertly wordes, and his chere,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 240

And to her suster seide in this manere,
10

Squire's Tale: 104

As techeth art of speche hem that it lere;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 183

[continues previous] For drede of Loves wordes and his chere,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 184

[continues previous] As, whan tyme is, her-after ye shal here.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 280

[continues previous] For drede of Loves wordes and his chere;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 281

[continues previous] As, when tyme is, her-after ye shal here.
12

Squire's Tale: 105

Al-be-it that I can nat soune his style,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 7: 49

name of Rome may nat climben ne passen? And eek, seestow nat [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 106

Ne can nat climben over so heigh a style,
11

Clerk's Prologue: 17

Kepe hem in stoor til so be ye endyte [continues next]
11

Clerk's Prologue: 18

Heigh style, as whan that men to kinges wryte. [continues next]
13

Clerk's Prologue: 41

I seye that first with heigh style he endyteth, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 7: 49

[continues previous] name of Rome may nat climben ne passen? And eek, seestow nat
13

Squire's Tale: 107

Yet seye I this, as to commune entente,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 844

The peple of god? I seye, for this entente,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 845

That, right as god spirit of vigour sente
11

Clerk's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] Heigh style, as whan that men to kinges wryte.
13

Clerk's Prologue: 40

[continues previous] That taughte me this tale, as I bigan,
13

Clerk's Prologue: 41

[continues previous] I seye that first with heigh style he endyteth,
10

Franklin's Tale: 290

This is as muche to seye as it was night. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here: [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 999

As helpe me Pallas with hir heres clere, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 108

Thus muche amounteth al that ever he mente,
10

Franklin's Tale: 290

[continues previous] This is as muche to seye as it was night.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 433

Tok litel hede of al that ever he mente; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

[continues previous] And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here:
13

Squire's Tale: 109

If it so be that I have it in minde.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 434

[continues previous] Oon ere it herde, at the other out it wente: —
11

Squire's Tale: 115

This stede of bras, that esily and wel
11

Squire's Tale: 81

Ther cam a knight up-on a stede of bras, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 82

And in his hand a brood mirour of glas. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 666

Ne hadde he ben holpen by the stede of bras;
11

Squire's Tale: 667

And after wol I speke of Cambalo,
11

Squire's Tale: 116

Can, in the space of o day naturel,
11

Squire's Tale: 82

[continues previous] And in his hand a brood mirour of glas.
14

Squire's Tale: 117

This is to seyn, in foure and twenty houres,
14

Miller's Tale: 9

If that men axed him in certein houres, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1045

But, for my devoir and your hertes reste, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 118

Wher-so yow list, in droghte or elles shoures,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 1

Whan that Aprille with his shoures sote
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 2

The droghte of Marche hath perced to the rote,
15+

Miller's Tale: 10

[continues previous] Whan that men sholde have droghte or elles shoures,
15+

Miller's Tale: 11

Or if men axed him what sholde bifalle
11

Summoner's Tale: 40

Or elles what yow list, we may nat chese;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1046

[continues previous] Wher-so yow list, by ordal or by ooth,
13

Squire's Tale: 121

With-outen wem of yow, thurgh foul or fair;
13

Monk's Prologue: 80

To telle yow a tale, or two, or three. [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 81

And if yow list to herkne hiderward, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 259

Loud or privee, foul or fair, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1716

Rys, take with yow your nece Antigone, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1717

Or whom yow list, or no fors, hardily; [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 122

Or, if yow list to fleen as hye in the air
13

Monk's Prologue: 80

[continues previous] To telle yow a tale, or two, or three.
13

Monk's Prologue: 81

[continues previous] And if yow list to herkne hiderward,
10

Monk's Prologue: 82

[continues previous] I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward;
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 437

And if yow list to yeve me audience,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 503

I wol yow shewe, and, if yow list to lere,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 504

I wol yow teche pleynly the manere,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 259

[continues previous] Loud or privee, foul or fair,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 93

Swich vois, right as yow list, to laughe or pleyne.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1716

[continues previous] Rys, take with yow your nece Antigone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1717

[continues previous] Or whom yow list, or no fors, hardily;
10

Squire's Tale: 124

This same stede shal bere yow ever-more
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 198

And lat see which of yow shal bere the belle
11

Squire's Tale: 125

With-outen harm, til ye be ther yow leste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1110

Game in myn hood, but herkneth, if yow leste;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1111

Ther is right now come in-to toune a geste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 965

And seyde, 'kneleth now, whyl that yow leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 966

Ther god your hertes bringe sone at reste!' [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 126

Though that ye slepen on his bak or reste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 965

[continues previous] And seyde, 'kneleth now, whyl that yow leste,
11

Squire's Tale: 127

And turne ayeyn, with wrything of a pin.
11

Knight's Tale: 1230

With many a florin he the hewes boghte. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 128

He that it wroghte coude ful many a gin;
11

Knight's Tale: 1229

[continues previous] Wel couthe he peynten lyfly that it wroghte, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1230

[continues previous] With many a florin he the hewes boghte. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 129

He wayted many a constellacioun
11

Knight's Tale: 1229

[continues previous] Wel couthe he peynten lyfly that it wroghte,
11

Knight's Tale: 1230

[continues previous] With many a florin he the hewes boghte.
10

Squire's Tale: 130

Er he had doon this operacioun;
10

Franklin's Tale: 562

Acordaunt to his operacioun, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 131

And knew ful many a seel and many a bond.
10

Franklin's Tale: 563

[continues previous] And knew also his othere observaunces
13

Squire's Tale: 132

This mirour eek, that I have in myn hond,
13

Franklin's Prologue: 12

Though it right now were fallen in myn hond, [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 43

A compleynt hadde I, writen, in myn hond,
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 44

For to have put to Pite as a bille,
13

Squire's Tale: 133

Hath swich a might, that men may in it see
13

Franklin's Prologue: 13

[continues previous] He were a man of swich discrecioun
13

Squire's Tale: 138

Hath set hir herte on any maner wight,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 114

That touched love, from any maner wight, [continues next]
13

Parlement of Foules: 627

Shal have right him on whom hir herte is set,
13

Parlement of Foules: 628

And he hir that his herte hath on hir knet.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1248

In whom I trusted most of any wight,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1249

She elles-where hath now hir herte apayed;
10

Squire's Tale: 139

If he be fals, she shal his treson see,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 115

[continues previous] That she ne shewed hit him, er hit was brent;
11

Squire's Tale: 140

His newe love and al his subtiltee
10

Compleynt of Venus: 36

That al nis harm in hir imagening. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1606

Ther may no-thing ben his socour [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 141

So openly, that ther shal no-thing hyde.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 436

Nat for your boost he wol him no-thing hyde.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 437

See ye that ook? right ther ye shul him finde.
10

Compleynt of Venus: 35

[continues previous] Ther doth no wight no-thing so resonable,
10

Compleynt of Venus: 36

[continues previous] That al nis harm in hir imagening.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1606

[continues previous] Ther may no-thing ben his socour
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1607

[continues previous] That he ne shal ther seen som thing
13

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 11

... turne thy riet aboute ioyntly with thy label, and with the point of it rekne in the bordure fro the sonne aryse un-to the same place ther thou desirest, by day as by nighte. This conclusioun wol I declare in the laste chapitre of the 4 partie of this tretis so openly, that ther shal lakke no worde that nedeth to the declaracioun. And for the more declaracioun, lo here the figure. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 142

Wherfor, ageyn this lusty someres tyde,
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 11

[continues previous] ... on it; turne thy riet aboute ioyntly with thy label, and with the point of it rekne in the bordure fro the sonne aryse un-to the same place ther thou desirest, by day as by nighte. This conclusioun wol I declare in the laste chapitre of the 4 partie of this tretis so openly, that ther shal lakke no worde that nedeth to the declaracioun. And for the more declaracioun, lo here the figure.
10

Squire's Tale: 143

This mirour and this ring, that ye may see,
10

Knight's Tale: 2168

Than may ye see that al this thing hath ende. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 369

Both of hir queynte ring and hir mirour,
10

Squire's Tale: 370

That twenty tyme she changed hir colour;
10

Squire's Tale: 144

He hath sent to my lady Canacee,
10

Knight's Tale: 2168

[continues previous] Than may ye see that al this thing hath ende.
10

Squire's Tale: 145

Your excellente doghter that is here.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 125

The remenant of the tale if ye wol here, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 146

The vertu of the ring, if ye wol here,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 125

[continues previous] The remenant of the tale if ye wol here,
11

Squire's Tale: 148

Up-on hir thombe, or in hir purs it bere,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 576

As ther is any in your purs or myn, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 577

Or elleswher, and make it malliable; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 149

Ther is no foul that fleeth under the hevene
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 325

May understonde that Iesus, hevene king, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 576

[continues previous] As ther is any in your purs or myn,
10

Parson's Tale: 13

... Iesus is to seyn 'saveour' or 'salvacion,' on whom men shul hope to have foryifnesse of sinnes, which that is proprely salvacion of sinnes. And therfore seyde the aungel to Ioseph: 'thou shall clepen his name Iesus, that shal saven his peple of hir sinnes.' And heer-of seith seint Peter: 'ther is noon other name under hevene that is yeve to any man, by which a man may be saved, but only Iesus.' Nazarenus is as muche for to seye as 'florisshinge,' in which a man shal hope, that he that yeveth him remission of sinnes shal yeve him eek grace wel for to do. For in the flour ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 8

he shal wel understonde that the issues of delices ben sorwful [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 150

That she ne shal wel understonde his stevene,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 325

[continues previous] May understonde that Iesus, hevene king,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 326

[continues previous] Ne wolde nat chese a vicious living.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 7: 8

[continues previous] he shal wel understonde that the issues of delices ben sorwful
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1260

To do hir knowe and understonde [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1261

My wo; and she wel understood [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 151

And knowe his mening openly and pleyn,
12

Squire's Tale: 436

And coude answere him in his ledene ageyn, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1260

[continues previous] To do hir knowe and understonde
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1261

[continues previous] My wo; and she wel understood
13

Squire's Tale: 152

And answere him in his langage ageyn.
13

Squire's Tale: 436

[continues previous] And coude answere him in his ledene ageyn, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 153

And every gras that groweth up-on rote
12

Squire's Tale: 436

[continues previous] And coude answere him in his ledene ageyn,
13

Squire's Tale: 155

Al be his woundes never so depe and wyde.
10

Knight's Tale: 897

And sawe hir blody woundes wyde and sore; [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 688

In Habradates woundes depe and wyde,
13

Franklin's Tale: 689

And seyde, "my body, at the leeste way,
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 195

Bihold my blody woundes, depe and wyde!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1047

Whan that she saugh his wyde woundes blede;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1048

And that she took to kepen him good hede,
13

Squire's Tale: 156

This naked swerd, that hangeth by my syde,
10

Knight's Tale: 896

[continues previous] And no-thing but for love was this debat;
13

Squire's Tale: 84

And by his syde a naked swerd hanging;
10

Squire's Tale: 161

Shal never be hool til that yow list, of grace,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1005

Thorugh grace of god, that list hem to him drawe, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 162

To stroke him with the platte in thilke place
14

Squire's Tale: 164

Ye mote with the platte swerd ageyn
14

Squire's Tale: 165

Stroke him in the wounde, and it wol close;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1005

[continues previous] Thorugh grace of god, that list hem to him drawe,
14

Squire's Tale: 163

Ther he is hurt: this is as muche to seyn,
11

Knight's Tale: 258

Arcite is hurt as muche as he, or more.
10

Franklin's Tale: 290

This is as muche to seye as it was night.
14

Melibee's Tale: 12

... by resons, wel ny alle at-ones bigonne they to ryse for to breken his tale, and beden him ful ofte his wordes for to abregge. For soothly, he that precheth to hem that listen nat heren his wordes, his sermon hem anoyeth. For Iesus Syrak seith: that "musik in wepinge is anoyous thing;" this is to seyn: as muche availleth to speken bifore folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see ...
14

Squire's Tale: 164

Ye mote with the platte swerd ageyn
14

Squire's Tale: 162

To stroke him with the platte in thilke place [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 165

Stroke him in the wounde, and it wol close;
14

Squire's Tale: 162

[continues previous] To stroke him with the platte in thilke place
10

Squire's Tale: 166

This is a verray sooth, with-outen glose,
10

Merchant's Tale: 939

For verray love; this is with-outen doute.
13

Squire's Tale: 168

And whan this knight hath thus his tale told,
13

Miller's Prologue: 1

Whan that the Knight had thus his tale y-told,
11

Merchant's Tale: 155

With face sad, his tale he hath hem told; [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 142

This Iuge un-to this cherl his tale hath told
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 52

And right anon his tale he hath attamed, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

And thus he seyde un-to us everichon, [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 25

For every man, save thou, hath told his tale,
12

Squire's Tale: 169

He rydeth out of halle, and doun he lighte.
11

Merchant's Tale: 155

[continues previous] With face sad, his tale he hath hem told;
11

Merchant's Tale: 156

[continues previous] He seyde, 'freendes, I am hoor and old,
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 52

[continues previous] And right anon his tale he hath attamed,
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 53

[continues previous] And thus he seyde un-to us everichon,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 196

He lighte doun of his steede and stood on the gras, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 170

His stede, which that shoon as sonne brighte,
10

Knight's Tale: 1579

As fayn as fowel is of the brighte sonne. [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 168

His brydel as the sonne shoon, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 169

Or as the mone light. [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 196

[continues previous] He lighte doun of his steede and stood on the gras,
12

Hous of Fame 1: 506

Al newe of golde another sonne; [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 507

So shoon the egles fethres brighte, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 163

For sekirly his face shoon so brighte,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 164

That with the gleem a-stoned was the sighte;
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 232

Therwith me thoughte his face shoon so brighte
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 233

That wel unnethes mighte I him beholde;
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 29

... and sowth. Take the altitude of thy sonne whan thee list, and note wel the quarter of the world in which the sonne is for the tyme by the azimutz. Turne thanne thyn Astrolabie, and set the degree of the sonne in the almikanteras of his altitude, on thilke side that the sonne stant, as is the manere in taking of houres; and ley thy label on the degree of the sonne, and rikene how many degrees of the bordure ben by-twixe the lyne meridional and the point of thy label; and note wel that noumbre. Turne thanne a-gayn thyn Astrolabie, and set the point ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 764

But right as whan the sonne shyneth brighte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 765

In March, that chaungeth ofte tyme his face, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1729

As stille as stoon; a word ne coude he seye. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 171

Stant in the court, as stille as any stoon.
10

Knight's Tale: 1579

[continues previous] As fayn as fowel is of the brighte sonne.
13

Miller's Tale: 286

This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 65

In crepeth age alwey, as stille as stoon,
11

Merchant's Tale: 574

The bryde was broght a-bedde as stille as stoon;
11

Merchant's Tale: 575

And whan the bed was with the preest y-blessed,
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 168

[continues previous] His brydel as the sonne shoon,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 263

Gamelyn in the place stood as stille as stoon, [continues next]
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 423

Adam took Gamelyn as stille as ony stoon,
12

Hous of Fame 1: 507

[continues previous] So shoon the egles fethres brighte,
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 236

As stille as any stoon; til at the laste, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 237

The god of love on me his eye caste,
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 310

As stille as any stoon; til at the laste, [continues next]
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 29

[continues previous] ... sowth. Take the altitude of thy sonne whan thee list, and note wel the quarter of the world in which the sonne is for the tyme by the azimutz. Turne thanne thyn Astrolabie, and set the degree of the sonne in the almikanteras of his altitude, on thilke side that the sonne stant, as is the manere in taking of houres; and ley thy label on the degree of the sonne, and rikene how many degrees of the bordure ben by-twixe the lyne meridional and the point of thy label; and note wel that noumbre. Turne thanne a-gayn thyn Astrolabie, and set the point of thy gret rewle, ...
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 600

And sette here doun as stille as any stoon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 764

[continues previous] But right as whan the sonne shyneth brighte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 765

[continues previous] In March, that chaungeth ofte tyme his face,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1494

To Troilus, as stille as any stoon, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 354

In-to the derke chaumbre, as stille as stoon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 355

Toward the bed gan softely to goon,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1728

[continues previous] And stant, astoned of these causes tweye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1729

[continues previous] As stille as stoon; a word ne coude he seye.
15+

Squire's Tale: 172

This knight is to his chambre lad anon,
13

Miller's Tale: 286

[continues previous] This Nicholas sat ay as stille as stoon,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 264

[continues previous] For to abyde wrasteling but ther com noon;
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 235

[continues previous] Abood, to knowen what this peple mente,
15+

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 309

[continues previous] Abood, to knowen what this peple mente,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 311

[continues previous] This god of love on me his eyen caste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1493

[continues previous] To telle in short, and forth gan for to wende
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1494

[continues previous] To Troilus, as stille as any stoon,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1495

[continues previous] And al this thing he tolde him, word and ende;
12

Squire's Tale: 175

This is to seyn, the swerd and the mirour,
12

Squire's Tale: 225

And somme of hem wondred on the mirour, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 226

That born was up in-to the maister-tour, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 176

And born anon in-to the heighe tour
12

Squire's Tale: 225

[continues previous] And somme of hem wondred on the mirour,
12

Squire's Tale: 226

[continues previous] That born was up in-to the maister-tour,
11

Squire's Tale: 178

And un-to Canacee this ring was bore
11

Clerk's Tale: 345

And worshipful, that folk ther she was bore [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 449

Quod Canacee un-to this hauk above.
11

Squire's Tale: 179

Solempnely, ther she sit at the table.
11

Clerk's Tale: 345

[continues previous] And worshipful, that folk ther she was bore
12

Squire's Tale: 181

The hors of bras, that may nat be remewed,
10

Squire's Tale: 303

To seen this hors of bras, with al the route
12

Squire's Tale: 305

Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras
12

Squire's Tale: 306

That, sin the grete sege of Troye was,
12

Squire's Tale: 183

Ther may no man out of the place it dryve
10

Monk's Tale: 6

Ther may no man the cours of hir withholde;
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 200

Is ther no man that may you helpe out of this care?'
11

Squire's Tale: 185

And cause why, for they can nat the craft.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 329

They wolde hem selle and spenden on this craft; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 330

They can nat stinte til no-thing be laft. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 186

And therefore in the place they han it laft
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 329

[continues previous] They wolde hem selle and spenden on this craft;
10

Squire's Tale: 187

Til that the knight hath taught hem the manere
10

Squire's Tale: 445

Till atte laste she spak in this manere [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 188

To voyden him, as ye shal after here.
12

Man of Law's Prologue: 98

Bigan his tale, as ye shal after here.
12

Clerk's Tale: 275

Hir tretis, which as ye shal after here, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 446

[continues previous] Un-to the hauk, as ye shul after here.
12

Anelida and Arcite: 357

That shapen was as ye shal after here. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 189

Greet was the prees, that swarmeth to and fro,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 814

To gauren on this ship and on Custance. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 276

[continues previous] The peple cam un-to the hous with-oute,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 357

[continues previous] That shapen was as ye shal after here.
11

Squire's Tale: 190

To gauren on this hors that stondeth so;
11

Miller's Tale: 641

In ronnen, for to gauren on this man, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 642

That yet aswowne he lay, bothe pale and wan; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 814

[continues previous] To gauren on this ship and on Custance.
11

Parson's Tale: 35

... to seyn, but the name of Iesu Crist. Take kepe eek how that the precious name of Crist, as seith seint Paul ad Philipenses secundo, 'In nomine Iesu, &c.: that in the name of Iesu every knee of hevenely creatures, or erthely, or of helle sholden bowe'; for it is so heigh and so worshipful, that the cursede feend in helle sholde tremblen to heren it y-nempned. Thanne semeth it, that men that sweren so horribly by his blessed name, that they despyse him more boldely than dide the cursede Iewes, or elles the devel, that trembleth whan he hereth his name. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 191

For it so heigh was, and so brood and long,
11

Miller's Tale: 641

[continues previous] In ronnen, for to gauren on this man,
11

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... saved;' that is to seyn, but the name of Iesu Crist. Take kepe eek how that the precious name of Crist, as seith seint Paul ad Philipenses secundo, 'In nomine Iesu, &c.: that in the name of Iesu every knee of hevenely creatures, or erthely, or of helle sholden bowe'; for it is so heigh and so worshipful, that the cursede feend in helle sholde tremblen to heren it y-nempned. Thanne semeth it, that men that sweren so horribly by his blessed name, that they despyse him more boldely than dide the cursede Iewes, or elles the devel, that trembleth whan he hereth his name.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 137

Ful long and brood, and everydel
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 138

Enclos it was, and walled wel,
15+

Squire's Tale: 197

Nature ne art ne coude him nat amende
15+

Squire's Tale: 97

Ne coude him nat amende with a word.
13

Legend of Phyllis: 25

That carpenter ne coude hit nat amende. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 198

In no degree, as al the peple wende.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 451

That han me holpen, and put in swich degree. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 452

But trewely I wende, as in this cas, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 461

That han me holpe and put in this degree. [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 462

But trewely I wende, as in this cas, [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 26

[continues previous] The see, by nighte, as any torche brende
12

Squire's Tale: 199

But evermore hir moste wonder was,
12

Monk's Tale: 498

Ne cam, but seyde, 'a fair womman was she.' [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 499

Gret wonder is, how that he coude or mighte [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 452

[continues previous] But trewely I wende, as in this cas,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 462

[continues previous] But trewely I wende, as in this cas,
12

Squire's Tale: 200

How that it coude goon, and was of bras;
11

Monk's Tale: 498

[continues previous] Ne cam, but seyde, 'a fair womman was she.'
12

Monk's Tale: 499

[continues previous] Gret wonder is, how that he coude or mighte
14

Squire's Tale: 201

It was of Fairye, as the peple semed.
14

Reeve's Prologue: 4

But, for the more part, they loughe and pleyde, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 202

Diverse folk diversely they demed;
15+

Reeve's Prologue: 3

[continues previous] Diverse folk diversely they seyde;
11

Squire's Tale: 204

They murmureden as dooth a swarm of been,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 193

For never yet so thikke a swarm of been
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 194

Ne fleigh, as Grekes fro him gonne fleen;
12

Squire's Tale: 205

And maden skiles after hir fantasyes,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 574

That thou reherce of al hir lyf the grete, [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 575

After thise olde auctours listen to trete. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 206

Rehersinge of thise olde poetryes,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 574

[continues previous] That thou reherce of al hir lyf the grete,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 575

[continues previous] After thise olde auctours listen to trete.
13

Squire's Tale: 211

As men may in thise olde gestes rede,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 1028

In olde Romayn gestes may men finde
10

Melibee's Tale: 47

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir wikked wil and hir corage. And therfore, me thinketh men oghten ... [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 154

By god, men may in olde bokes rede
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1753

As men may in these olde bokes rede,
11

Squire's Tale: 212

'Myn herte,' quod oon, 'is evermore in drede;
10

Melibee's Tale: 47

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir wikked wil and hir corage. And therfore, ...
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1232

"For youres is al that ever ther is
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1233

For evermore, myn herte swete!
11

Squire's Tale: 213

I trowe som men of armes been ther-inne,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 217

The bacoun was nat fet for hem, I trowe, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 218

That som men han in Essex at Dunmowe. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 249

If that the wind ne hadde been contrarie, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 214

That shapen hem this citee for to winne.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 44

Han shapen hem to Rome for to wende; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 218

[continues previous] That som men han in Essex at Dunmowe.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 250

[continues previous] That made hem in a citee for to tarie,
12

Squire's Tale: 215

It were right good that al swich thing were knowe.'
12

Man of Law's Tale: 45

[continues previous] Were it for chapmanhode or for disport,
10

Squire's Tale: 564

That, if so were that any thing him smerte,
10

Squire's Tale: 565

Al were it never so lyte, and I it wiste,
10

Melibee's Tale: 5

... saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of god, shal warisshe and escape. And al were it so that she right now were deed, ye ne oghte nat as for hir deeth your-self to destroye. Senek seith: "the wise man shal nat take to greet disconfort for the deeth of his children, but certes he sholde suffren it in pacience, as wel as he abydeth the deeth of his owene propre persone."'
11

Hous of Fame 3: 746

That our fame swich be knowe
11

Hous of Fame 3: 747

In alle thing right as hit is.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 521

That thow beset were on swich oon that sholde
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 522

Knowe al thy wo, al lakkede hir pitee:
11

Squire's Tale: 217

And seyde, 'he lyeth, it is rather lyk
11

Parson's Tale: 69

... his catel. Soothly, what thing that he yeveth for veyne glorie, as to minstrals and to folk, for to beren his renoun in the world, he hath sinne ther-of and noon almesse. Certes, he leseth foule his good, that ne seketh with the yifte of his good no-thing but sinne. He is lyk to an hors that seketh rather to drinken drovy or trouble water than for to drinken water of the clere welle. And for-as-muchel as they yeven ther as they sholde nat yeven, to hem aperteneth thilke malisoun that Crist shal yeven at the day of dome to hem that shullen been dampned. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 218

An apparence y-maad by som magyk,
11

Parson's Tale: 69

[continues previous] ... thing that he yeveth for veyne glorie, as to minstrals and to folk, for to beren his renoun in the world, he hath sinne ther-of and noon almesse. Certes, he leseth foule his good, that ne seketh with the yifte of his good no-thing but sinne. He is lyk to an hors that seketh rather to drinken drovy or trouble water than for to drinken water of the clere welle. And for-as-muchel as they yeven ther as they sholde nat yeven, to hem aperteneth thilke malisoun that Crist shal yeven at the day of dome to hem that shullen been dampned.
11

Squire's Tale: 219

As Iogelours pleyen at thise festes grete.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 413

Swiche as thise subtile tregetoures pleye.
11

Franklin's Tale: 414

For ofte at festes have I wel herd seye,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 169

Ther saugh I pleyen Iogelours,
11

Squire's Tale: 220

Of sondry doutes thus they Iangle and trete,
11

Squire's Tale: 261

Thus Iangle they and demen and devyse,
11

Squire's Tale: 221

As lewed peple demeth comunly
11

Pardoner's Tale: 109

For lewed peple loven tales olde; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 125

comprehended the forme, it knoweth and demeth alle the thinges [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 222

Of thinges that ben maad more subtilly
11

Pardoner's Tale: 110

[continues previous] Swich thinges can they wel reporte and holde.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 125

[continues previous] comprehended the forme, it knoweth and demeth alle the thinges
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 126

[continues previous] that ben under that forme. But she knoweth hem in thilke manere
12

Squire's Tale: 225

And somme of hem wondred on the mirour,
12

Squire's Tale: 175

This is to seyn, the swerd and the mirour, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 176

And born anon in-to the heighe tour [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 226

That born was up in-to the maister-tour,
12

Squire's Tale: 175

[continues previous] This is to seyn, the swerd and the mirour,
12

Squire's Tale: 176

[continues previous] And born anon in-to the heighe tour
12

Squire's Tale: 227

How men mighte in it swiche thinges see.
12

Melibee's Tale: 54

After that Dame Prudence hadde spoken in this manere, Melibee answerde and seyde, 'I see wel, dame Prudence, that by your faire wordes and by your resons that ye han shewed me, that the werre lyketh yow no-thing; but I have nat yet herd your conseil, how I shal do in this nede.' [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 228

Another answerde, and seyde it mighte wel be
12

Melibee's Tale: 54

[continues previous] After that Dame Prudence hadde spoken in this manere, Melibee answerde and seyde, 'I see wel, dame Prudence, that by your faire wordes and by your resons that ye han shewed me, that the werre lyketh yow no-thing; but I have nat yet herd your conseil, how I shal do in this nede.'
13

Squire's Tale: 233

And Aristotle, that writen in hir lyves
13

Manciple's Tale: 50

Thus writen olde clerkes in hir lyves.
11

Squire's Tale: 234

Of queynte mirours and of prospectyves,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 646

And greet renoun and knowen name, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 235

As knowen they that han hir bokes herd.
12

Hous of Fame 3: 646

[continues previous] And greet renoun and knowen name, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 647

[continues previous] As they that han don noble gestes, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 26

Of othere folk, and thenketh how that ye [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 27

Han felt that Love dorste yow displese; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 375

And othere seyn, as they in bokes finde, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 376

That, after tymes of the yeer by kinde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1776

Ye may hir gilt in othere bokes see; [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 236

And othere folk han wondred on the swerd
11

Hous of Fame 3: 646

[continues previous] And greet renoun and knowen name,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 25

[continues previous] That ye han felt, and on the adversitee [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 26

[continues previous] Of othere folk, and thenketh how that ye [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 27

[continues previous] Han felt that Love dorste yow displese; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 876

[continues previous] 'Lo, nece, I trowe ye han herd al how
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 877

[continues previous] The king, with othere lordes, for the beste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 375

[continues previous] And othere seyn, as they in bokes finde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1776

[continues previous] Ye may hir gilt in othere bokes see;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1777

[continues previous] And gladlier I wol wryten, if yow leste,
10

Squire's Tale: 237

That wolde percen thurgh-out every-thing;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 26

[continues previous] Of othere folk, and thenketh how that ye
12

Squire's Tale: 238

And fille in speche of Thelophus the king,
12

Franklin's Tale: 235

And hadde y-knowen him of tyme yore, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 236

They fille in speche; and forth more and more [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 239

And of Achilles with his queynte spere,
10

Franklin's Tale: 236

[continues previous] They fille in speche; and forth more and more
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 374

And, if I lye, Achilles with his spere
12

Squire's Tale: 240

For he coude with it bothe hele and dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 991

Her-afterward; for ye beth bothe wyse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 992

And conne it counseyl kepe in swich a wyse, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 241

Right in swich wyse as men may with the swerd
10

Monk's Tale: 429

And putten him to prisoun in swich wyse
10

Monk's Tale: 430

As ye han herd, and mete and drink he hadde
10

Manciple's Prologue: 93

And thanked him in swich wyse as he coude.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 991

[continues previous] Her-afterward; for ye beth bothe wyse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 992

[continues previous] And conne it counseyl kepe in swich a wyse,
11

Squire's Tale: 242

Of which right now ye han your-selven herd.
11

Merchant's Tale: 262

Ye han your-selven shewed heer to-day
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 546

Of metals, which ye han herd me reherce,
10

Squire's Tale: 248

And seyden alle, that swich a wonder thing
10

Summoner's Tale: 521

'Who ever herde of swich a thing er now? [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 249

Of craft of ringes herde they never non,
10

Summoner's Tale: 521

[continues previous] 'Who ever herde of swich a thing er now?
10

Legend of Phyllis: 6

In love a falser herde I never non,
10

Squire's Tale: 250

Save that he, Moyses, and king Salomon
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 35

Lo, here the wyse king, dan Salomon; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 36

I trowe he hadde wyves mo than oon; [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 251

Hadde a name of konning in swich art.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 36

[continues previous] I trowe he hadde wyves mo than oon;
11

Squire's Tale: 253

But nathelees, somme seyden that it was
11

Monk's Tale: 137

But nathelees somme clerkes hir excusen
11

Squire's Tale: 255

And yet nis glas nat lyk asshen of fern;
10

Parson's Tale: 40

... wors than detraccioun.' For som-tyme detraccion maketh an hautein man be the more humble, for he dredeth detraccion; but certes flaterye, that maketh a man to enhauncen his herte and his contenaunce. Flatereres been the develes enchauntours; for they make a man to wene of him-self be lyk that he nis nat lyk. They been lyk to Iudas that bitraysed [god; and thise flatereres bitraysen] a man to sellen him to his enemy, that is, to the devel. Flatereres been the develes chapelleyns, that singen evere Placebo. I rekene flaterye in the vyces of Ire; for ofte tyme, if o man be wrooth with another, thanne ...
11

Hous of Fame 3: 34

For hit was lyk a thing of glas, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 256

But for they han y-knowen it so fern,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 34

[continues previous] For hit was lyk a thing of glas,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 35

[continues previous] But that hit shoon ful more clere;
11

Squire's Tale: 261

Thus Iangle they and demen and devyse,
11

Squire's Tale: 220

Of sondry doutes thus they Iangle and trete,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 516

And I after gan rome to and fro [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 800

To plesen hem that Iangle of love, and demen, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 801

And coye hem, that they sey non harm of me? [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 262

Til that the king gan fro the bord aryse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 516

[continues previous] And I after gan rome to and fro
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 517

[continues previous] Til that I herde, as that I welk allone,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 800

[continues previous] To plesen hem that Iangle of love, and demen,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 801

[continues previous] And coye hem, that they sey non harm of me?
12

Squire's Tale: 266

Whan that this Tartre king, this Cambynskan,
12

Squire's Tale: 28

This noble king, this Tartre Cambinskan
12

Squire's Tale: 267

Roos fro his bord, ther that he sat ful hye.
12

Knight's Tale: 1814

The heraudes, that ful loude yolle and crye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 254

An hole he fond, ful lowe up-on a bord,
11

Miller's Tale: 255

Ther as the cat was wont in for to crepe;
11

Squire's Tale: 273

For in the Fish hir lady sat ful hye, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 411

Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 53

To maken garlands and corounes hye; [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 54

Ful is the place of soun of minstralcye, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 268

Toforn him gooth the loude minstralcye,
12

Knight's Tale: 1813

[continues previous] The trompes, with the loude minstralcye,
12

Knight's Tale: 1814

[continues previous] The heraudes, that ful loude yolle and crye,
14

Miller's Tale: 169

And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous, [continues next]
14

Miller's Tale: 170

Til he cam to the carpenteres hous [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 273

[continues previous] For in the Fish hir lady sat ful hye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 302

Now gooth this marchant faste and bisily [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 119

of goinge, that gooth on his feet til he mighte come to thilke [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 54

[continues previous] Ful is the place of soun of minstralcye,
14

Squire's Tale: 269

Til he cam to his chambre of parements,
13

Miller's Tale: 169

[continues previous] And forth he gooth, Iolif and amorous,
14

Miller's Tale: 170

[continues previous] Til he cam to the carpenteres hous
11

Miller's Tale: 636

Ne breed ne ale, til he cam to the celle
10

Summoner's Tale: 57

So longe he wente hous by hous, til he [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 58

Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 605

And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste. [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 606

Whan it cam him to purpos for to reste, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 441

Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 301

[continues previous] Til he cam in-to Brugges merily.
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 96

Til that ther cam a greet geaunt, [continues next]
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 97

His name was sir Olifaunt, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 119

[continues previous] of goinge, that gooth on his feet til he mighte come to thilke
13

Squire's Tale: 270

Ther as they sownen diverse instruments,
11

Summoner's Tale: 58

[continues previous] Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be
13

Squire's Tale: 605

[continues previous] And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste.
11

Pardoner's Tale: 441

[continues previous] Til he cam to that tree, and ther they founde
10

Sir Thopas' Tale: 96

[continues previous] Til that ther cam a greet geaunt,
11

Squire's Tale: 271

That it is lyk an heven for to here.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 826

That it an heven was hir voys to here.
11

Squire's Tale: 273

For in the Fish hir lady sat ful hye,
11

Squire's Tale: 267

Roos fro his bord, ther that he sat ful hye.
10

Squire's Tale: 268

Toforn him gooth the loude minstralcye,
11

Squire's Tale: 411

Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 706

With his triumphe, laureat ful hye, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 274

And loketh on hem with a freendly yë.
10

Squire's Tale: 411

[continues previous] Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye,
10

Monk's Tale: 706

[continues previous] With his triumphe, laureat ful hye,
10

Monk's Tale: 707

[continues previous] But on a tyme Brutus Cassius,
13

Squire's Tale: 276

This strange knight is fet to him ful sone,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 294

And on the bed ful sone he gan him sette. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 277

And on the daunce he gooth with Canacee.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 293

[continues previous] And Troilus tho sobreliche he grette,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 294

[continues previous] And on the bed ful sone he gan him sette.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

[continues previous] He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende
11

Squire's Tale: 282

That sholde yow devysen swich array.
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part to hem that han greet nede; ... [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 283

Who coude telle yow the forme of daunces,
11

Shipman's Tale: 7

That men hem doon at festes and at daunces; [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part to hem that han ...
11

Squire's Tale: 284

So uncouthe and so fresshe contenaunces,
11

Shipman's Tale: 7

[continues previous] That men hem doon at festes and at daunces;
11

Shipman's Tale: 8

[continues previous] Swiche salutaciouns and contenaunces
11

Squire's Tale: 287

No man but Launcelot, and he is deed.
11

Knight's Tale: 461

And whan a beest is deed, he hath no peyne;
11

Knight's Tale: 462

But man after his deeth moot wepe and pleyne,
11

Squire's Tale: 288

Therefor I passe of al this lustiheed;
10

Clerk's Tale: 477

This child I am comanded for to take' — [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1576

I passe al that which chargeth nought to seye, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 289

I seye na-more, but in this Iolynesse
11

Knight's Tale: 803

And in this wyse I lete hem fighting dwelle; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 476

[continues previous] And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 477

[continues previous] This child I am comanded for to take' — [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 721

But here I lete hem werken in hir wyse [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 343

Out of hir sighte; ye gete na-more of me. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 344

But thus I lete in lust and Iolitee [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1576

[continues previous] I passe al that which chargeth nought to seye,
12

Squire's Tale: 290

I lete hem, til men to the soper dresse.
11

Knight's Tale: 803

[continues previous] And in this wyse I lete hem fighting dwelle;
11

Clerk's Tale: 476

[continues previous] And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
11

Clerk's Tale: 477

[continues previous] This child I am comanded for to take' —
12

Merchant's Tale: 721

[continues previous] But here I lete hem werken in hir wyse
12

Merchant's Tale: 722

[continues previous] Til evensong rong, and that they moste aryse.
11

Squire's Tale: 344

[continues previous] But thus I lete in lust and Iolitee
12

Squire's Tale: 291

The styward bit the spyces for to hye,
10

Squire's Tale: 293

The usshers and the squyers ben y-goon; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 294

The spyces and the wyn is come anoon. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 852

The spyces and the wyn men forth hem fette; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 292

And eek the wyn, in al this melodye.
10

Squire's Tale: 293

[continues previous] The usshers and the squyers ben y-goon; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 294

[continues previous] The spyces and the wyn is come anoon.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 852

[continues previous] The spyces and the wyn men forth hem fette; [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 293

The usshers and the squyers ben y-goon;
10

Squire's Tale: 291

The styward bit the spyces for to hye, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 292

[continues previous] And eek the wyn, in al this melodye. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 852

[continues previous] The spyces and the wyn men forth hem fette; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 294

The spyces and the wyn is come anoon.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 608

The fruit of every tale is for to seye; [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 291

[continues previous] The styward bit the spyces for to hye,
12

Squire's Tale: 292

[continues previous] And eek the wyn, in al this melodye.
11

Legend of Dido: 187

And spyces parted, and the wyn agoon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 852

[continues previous] The spyces and the wyn men forth hem fette;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 853

[continues previous] And forth they speke of this and that y-fere,
12

Squire's Tale: 295

They ete and drinke; and whan this hadde an ende,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 609

[continues previous] They ete, and drinke, and daunce, and singe, and pleye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 566

And eek the stink, un-to the spokes ende; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 252

As for my wyf, un-to hir lyves ende. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 73

And thus I lete hem ete and drinke and pleye,
12

Shipman's Tale: 74

This marchant and this monk, a day or tweye.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 20

Only to slepe, and for to ete and drinke,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 21

And to devouren al that othere swinke.
11

Parson's Tale: 10

The thridde cause that oghte moeve a man to Contricion, is drede of the day of dome, and of the horrible peynes of helle. For as seint Ierome seith: 'at every tyme that me remembreth of the day of dome, I quake; for whan I ete or drinke, or what-so that I do, evere semeth me that the trompe sowneth in myn ere: riseth up, ye that been dede, and cometh to the Iugement.' O gode god, muchel oghte a man to drede swich a Iugement, 'ther-as we shullen been alle,' as seint Poul seith, 'biforn the sete ...
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 680

And bad hem ete and drinke and that of the beste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1580

Ne though I livede un-to the worldes ende, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 296

Un-to the temple, as reson was, they wende.
10

Summoner's Tale: 565

[continues previous] That equally the soun of it wol wende,
10

Summoner's Tale: 566

[continues previous] And eek the stink, un-to the spokes ende;
11

Clerk's Tale: 251

[continues previous] Thy doghter wol I take, er that I wende,
11

Clerk's Tale: 252

[continues previous] As for my wyf, un-to hir lyves ende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1579

[continues previous] If in this forme I sholde with yow wende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1580

[continues previous] Ne though I livede un-to the worldes ende,
11

Squire's Tale: 297

The service doon, they soupen al by day.
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

... the special. Ye shuln first procede after the doctrine of Tullius. Certes, the trouthe of this matere or of this conseil nedeth nat diligently enquere; for it is wel wist whiche they been that han doon to yow this trespas and vileinye, and how manye trespassours, and in what manere they han to yow doon al this wrong and al this vileinye. And after this, thanne shul ye examine the seconde condicioun, which that the same Tullius addeth in this matere. For Tullius put a thing, which that he clepeth "consentinge," this is to seyn; who been they and how manye, and whiche been they, that ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1541

What nedeth yow to tellen al the chere [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 298

What nedeth yow rehercen hir array?
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

[continues previous] ... descende to the special. Ye shuln first procede after the doctrine of Tullius. Certes, the trouthe of this matere or of this conseil nedeth nat diligently enquere; for it is wel wist whiche they been that han doon to yow this trespas and vileinye, and how manye trespassours, and in what manere they han to yow doon al this wrong and al this vileinye. And after this, thanne shul ye examine the seconde condicioun, which that the same Tullius addeth in this matere. For Tullius put a thing, which that he clepeth "consentinge," this is to seyn; who been they and how manye, and whiche been ...
13

Parson's Tale: 80

... a womman that is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1541

[continues previous] What nedeth yow to tellen al the chere
13

Squire's Tale: 299

Ech man wot wel, that at a kinges feeste
10

Knight's Tale: 403

We faren as he that dronke is as a mous; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 404

A dronke man wot wel he hath an hous, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... is a wyf, as longe as she is a wyf, she hath noon auctoritee to swere ne bere witnesse with-oute leve of hir housbonde, that is hir lord; algate, he sholde be so by resoun. She sholde eek serven him in alle honestee, and been attempree of hir array. I wot wel that they sholde setten hir entente to plesen hir housbondes, but nat by hir queyntise of array. Seint Ierome seith, that wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, ...
12

Squire's Tale: 300

Hath plentee, to the moste and to the leeste,
10

Knight's Tale: 404

[continues previous] A dronke man wot wel he hath an hous,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 320

Here may men feste and royaltee biholde, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 321

And deyntees mo than I can yow devyse, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 301

And deyntees mo than been in my knowing.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 320

[continues previous] Here may men feste and royaltee biholde,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 321

[continues previous] And deyntees mo than I can yow devyse,
11

Franklin's Tale: 491

At-after soper fille they in tretee, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 302

At-after soper gooth this noble king
12

Franklin's Tale: 490

[continues previous] This amorous folk som-tyme mote han reste.' [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 491

[continues previous] At-after soper fille they in tretee, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 303

To seen this hors of bras, with al the route
10

Squire's Tale: 181

The hors of bras, that may nat be remewed,
12

Squire's Tale: 305

Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 306

That, sin the grete sege of Troye was, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 490

[continues previous] This amorous folk som-tyme mote han reste.'
11

Anelida and Arcite: 34

Many a fresh knight, and many a blisful route,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 35

On hors, on fote, in al the felde aboute.
11

Squire's Tale: 304

Of lordes and of ladyes him aboute.
11

Squire's Tale: 305

[continues previous] Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 305

Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras
12

Squire's Tale: 181

The hors of bras, that may nat be remewed, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 303

To seen this hors of bras, with al the route [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 304

[continues previous] Of lordes and of ladyes him aboute. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 307

Ther-as men wondreden on an hors also,
15+

Squire's Tale: 308

Ne was ther swich a wondring as was tho.
11

Hous of Fame 1: 141

I fond that on a wal ther was
11

Hous of Fame 1: 142

Thus writen, on a table of bras:
12

Squire's Tale: 306

That, sin the grete sege of Troye was,
12

Squire's Tale: 181

[continues previous] The hors of bras, that may nat be remewed,
11

Squire's Tale: 303

[continues previous] To seen this hors of bras, with al the route
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 44

Goth now thanne, ye stronge men, ther-as the heye wey of the [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 45

grete ensaumple ledeth yow. O nyce men, why nake ye youre [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 307

Ther-as men wondreden on an hors also,
15+

Squire's Tale: 305

Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Metre 7: 44

[continues previous] Goth now thanne, ye stronge men, ther-as the heye wey of the
15+

Squire's Tale: 308

Ne was ther swich a wondring as was tho.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 695

Ne was ther swich another pardoner.
15+

Squire's Tale: 305

[continues previous] Swich wondring was ther on this hors of bras
11

Squire's Tale: 312

This hors anoon bigan to trippe and daunce,
11

Miller's Tale: 142

In twenty manere coude he trippe and daunce
10

Pardoner's Tale: 632

But right anon the worthy knight bigan, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5679

They laugh and daunce, trippe and singe,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5680

And ley not up for her living,
12

Squire's Tale: 313

Whan that this knight leyde hand up-on his reyne,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 632

[continues previous] But right anon the worthy knight bigan,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 633

[continues previous] Whan that he saugh that al the peple lough,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 224

And hastely up-on his bed him leyde. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 314

And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 477

The flour is goon, ther is na-more to telle,
10

Summoner's Tale: 365

His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 380

Lest thee repente;" ther is na-more to seye.
10

Clerk's Tale: 315

Who-so me loveth; ther is na-more to seye.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
12

Squire's Tale: 319

Or to what contree that yow list to ryde. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 320

And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 334

Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.' [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 856

Myn heritage; ther is na-more to telle.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 878

This al and som, ther is na-more to seyn.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 379

'What!' quod my lord, 'ther is na-more to done,
10

Manciple's Tale: 162

This is theffect, ther is na-more to sayn;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 223

[continues previous] By-cause he wolde slepen, as he seyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 224

[continues previous] And hastely up-on his bed him leyde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 225

[continues previous] And as in winter leves been biraft,
15+

Squire's Tale: 315

But, whan yow list to ryden any-where,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 781

And for to werken as I shal yow seye, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 782

To-morwe, whan ye ryden by the weye, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Or to what contree that yow list to ryde. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 320

[continues previous] And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 334

[continues previous] Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.'
15+

Squire's Tale: 335

[continues previous] Enformed whan the king was of that knight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 997

And whan yow list, ye may come here ayeyn; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 316

Ye moten trille a pin, stant in his ere,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 782

[continues previous] To-morwe, whan ye ryden by the weye,
11

Squire's Tale: 320

[continues previous] And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde,
10

Squire's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Bidde him descende, and trille another pin,
10

Squire's Tale: 328

Trille this pin, and he wol vanishe anoon
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 997

[continues previous] And whan yow list, ye may come here ayeyn;
11

Squire's Tale: 317

Which I shall telle yow bitwix vs two.
11

Franklin's Tale: 804

Than I departe the love bitwix yow two.
11

Franklin's Tale: 805

I yow relesse, madame, in-to your hond
15+

Squire's Tale: 319

Or to what contree that yow list to ryde.
12

Squire's Tale: 314

And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 315

But, whan yow list to ryden any-where, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 333

Bitwixe yow and me, and that ful sone. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 334

Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 605

Tassoille yow, in contree as ye ryde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 322

Doth what yow list, to make him live or deye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1147

Wolde I a lettre un-to yow bringe or take
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1148

To harm of yow; what list yow thus it make?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 997

And whan yow list, ye may come here ayeyn; [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 320

And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde,
12

Squire's Tale: 314

[continues previous] And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne,
12

Squire's Tale: 315

[continues previous] But, whan yow list to ryden any-where, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 316

[continues previous] Ye moten trille a pin, stant in his ere, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 327

Or, if yow liste bidde him thennes goon, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 333

[continues previous] Bitwixe yow and me, and that ful sone.
15+

Squire's Tale: 334

[continues previous] Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.'
11

Squire's Tale: 335

[continues previous] Enformed whan the king was of that knight,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 605

[continues previous] Tassoille yow, in contree as ye ryde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 18

On mortal thing, and as yow list, ay ye [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 997

[continues previous] And whan yow list, ye may come here ayeyn;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 998

[continues previous] And, er ye gon, thus muche I seye yow here:
15+

Squire's Tale: 321

Bidde him descende, and trille another pin,
10

Squire's Tale: 316

[continues previous] Ye moten trille a pin, stant in his ere,
15+

Squire's Tale: 327

[continues previous] Or, if yow liste bidde him thennes goon,
15+

Squire's Tale: 328

[continues previous] Trille this pin, and he wol vanishe anoon
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 19

[continues previous] Yeve him in love ese or adversitee;
11

Squire's Tale: 323

And he wol doun descende and doon your wille;
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 24

On his deth-bedde to abyde goddes wille. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 324

And in that place he wol abyde stille,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 23

[continues previous] Til they comen to him ther he lay stille
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 24

[continues previous] On his deth-bedde to abyde goddes wille.
12

Complaint to My Mortal Foe: 6

In trouthe I wol your servant stille abyde,
11

Squire's Tale: 325

Though al the world the contrarie hadde y-swore;
11

Knight's Tale: 808

So strong it is, that, though the world had sworn
11

Knight's Tale: 809

The contrarie of a thing, by ye or nay,
12

Squire's Tale: 326

He shal nat thennes ben y-drawe ne y-bore.
10

Shipman's Prologue: 26

But it shal nat ben of philosophye,
10

Shipman's Prologue: 27

Ne physices, ne termes queinte of lawe;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 8

the thinges that thou hast graunted, it ne shal nat ben right fer
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 9

that thou ne shalt remembren thilke thing that thou seydest that
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 52

y-sustened by stidefast resoun, ne shal nat ben lad ne proeved by
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1145

Ne cause eek non, to bidde him thennes ryse. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 327

Or, if yow liste bidde him thennes goon,
14

Squire's Tale: 320

And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 321

Bidde him descende, and trille another pin, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1145

[continues previous] Ne cause eek non, to bidde him thennes ryse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1292

To do me live, if that yow liste, or sterve,
15+

Squire's Tale: 328

Trille this pin, and he wol vanishe anoon
10

Squire's Tale: 316

Ye moten trille a pin, stant in his ere,
15+

Squire's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Bidde him descende, and trille another pin,
11

Legend of Dido: 78

And vanished anoon out of his sighte. [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 329

Out of the sighte of every maner wight,
11

Knight's Tale: 1017

But doun on knees wente every maner wight, [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 78

[continues previous] And vanished anoon out of his sighte.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 844

To every maner wight in som degree?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 789

Unwist of every maner wight, certeyn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 790

Save of my-self, as wisly have I Ioye,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1115

Who that ther come; and every maner wight, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1555

For which me thinketh every maner wight
13

Squire's Tale: 330

And come agayn, be it by day or night,
11

Knight's Tale: 1018

[continues previous] And thanked him with al her herte and might,
12

Shipman's Tale: 265

If any thing ther be by day or night,
12

Shipman's Tale: 266

If it lye in my power and my might,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1115

[continues previous] Who that ther come; and every maner wight,
14

Squire's Tale: 331

When that yow list to clepen him ageyn
14

Knight's Tale: 349

Freely to goon, wher that him liste over-al, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 539

That I had graunted him fully my love, [continues next]
10

Prioress' Tale: 110

That swich a boy shal walken as him lest [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1637

For with ful yvel wil list him to leve [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1638

That loveth wel, in swich cas, though him greve. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 332

In swich a gyse as I shal to yow seyn
15+

Knight's Tale: 350

[continues previous] In swich a gyse, as I you tellen shal.
10

Clerk's Tale: 1118

Seyn yow a song to glade yow, I wene, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 540

[continues previous] In swich a gyse as I have seyd above,
11

Squire's Tale: 598

Beth swich as I to yow have been, and shal."
10

Prioress' Tale: 110

[continues previous] That swich a boy shal walken as him lest
10

Prioress' Tale: 111

[continues previous] In your despyt, and singe of swich sentence,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1291

In swich a gyse, that he hir kiste
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 394

That never in me thou deme swich folye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 395

As I shal seyn; me thoughte, by thy speche,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1638

[continues previous] That loveth wel, in swich cas, though him greve.
15+

Squire's Tale: 333

Bitwixe yow and me, and that ful sone.
11

Summoner's Tale: 365

His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 1118

[continues previous] Seyn yow a song to glade yow, I wene,
14

Squire's Tale: 319

Or to what contree that yow list to ryde. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 320

And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1127

And how they wroughte, I shal yow telle sone. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1128

Soth is, that whan they gonne first to mete, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 334

Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 477

The flour is goon, ther is na-more to telle,
11

Summoner's Tale: 365

[continues previous] His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 380

Lest thee repente;" ther is na-more to seye.
10

Clerk's Tale: 315

Who-so me loveth; ther is na-more to seye.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
15+

Squire's Tale: 314

And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 315

But, whan yow list to ryden any-where, [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Or to what contree that yow list to ryde. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 320

[continues previous] And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 856

Myn heritage; ther is na-more to telle.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 878

This al and som, ther is na-more to seyn.'
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 379

'What!' quod my lord, 'ther is na-more to done,
10

Manciple's Tale: 162

This is theffect, ther is na-more to sayn;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1127

[continues previous] And how they wroughte, I shal yow telle sone.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1128

[continues previous] Soth is, that whan they gonne first to mete,
15+

Squire's Tale: 335

Enformed whan the king was of that knight,
15+

Squire's Tale: 315

[continues previous] But, whan yow list to ryden any-where,
11

Squire's Tale: 320

[continues previous] And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde,
13

Squire's Tale: 338

Thus glad and blythe, this noble doughty king
13

Squire's Tale: 11

Thurgh which ther deyde many a doughty man.
13

Squire's Tale: 12

This noble king was cleped Cambinskan,
13

Squire's Tale: 343

Out of hir sighte; ye gete na-more of me.
12

Merchant's Tale: 701

And wente hir wey; ye gete namore of me. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 289

I seye na-more, but in this Iolynesse [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 828

Of thise two folk ye gete of me na-more.
13

Manciple's Prologue: 102

Of that matere ye gete na-more of me.
12

Squire's Tale: 344

But thus I lete in lust and Iolitee
12

Merchant's Tale: 702

[continues previous] But un-to Ianuarie y-comen is she,
11

Squire's Tale: 289

[continues previous] I seye na-more, but in this Iolynesse
11

Squire's Tale: 290

[continues previous] I lete hem, til men to the soper dresse.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 616

That liven in lust and Iolitee. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 617

And now is Mirthe therin, to here
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1286

Noon harm ne slight in hir entente,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1287

But only lust and Iolitee.
11

Squire's Tale: 345

This Cambynskan his lordes festeyinge,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 615

[continues previous] And eek with him cometh his meynee,
13

Squire's Tale: 346

Til wel ny the day bigan to springe.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 824

A-morwe, whan that day bigan to springe,
13

Knight's Tale: 1351

The Sonday night, er day bigan to springe, [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 1352

When Palamon the larke herde singe, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 488

Aboute his dore sin day bigan to springe.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 719

Sin first that day hir love bigan to springe.
13

Squire's Tale: 347

The norice of digestioun, the slepe,
13

Knight's Tale: 1351

[continues previous] The Sonday night, er day bigan to springe,
13

Knight's Tale: 1352

[continues previous] When Palamon the larke herde singe,
11

Squire's Tale: 349

That muchel drink and labour wolde han reste;
11

Merchant's Tale: 618

For every labour som-tyme moot han reste,
11

Squire's Tale: 350

And with a galping mouth hem alle he keste,
11

Melibee's Tale: 73

Thanne the wyseste of hem three answerde for hem alle, and seyde: 'sire,' quod he, 'we knowen wel, that we been unworthy to comen un-to the court of so greet a lord and so worthy as ye been. For we han so greetly mistaken us, and han offended and agilt in swich a wyse agayn your heigh lordshipe, that trewely we han deserved the deeth. ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1129

And al foryaf, and ofte tyme him keste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1130

He thonked hir, and to hir spak, and seyde [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 351

And seyde, 'it was tyme to lye adoun,
11

Melibee's Tale: 73

[continues previous] Thanne the wyseste of hem three answerde for hem alle, and seyde: 'sire,' quod he, 'we knowen wel, that we been unworthy to comen un-to the court of so greet a lord and so worthy as ye been. For we han so greetly mistaken us, and han offended and agilt in swich a wyse agayn your heigh lordshipe, that trewely we han ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1129

[continues previous] And al foryaf, and ofte tyme him keste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1130

[continues previous] He thonked hir, and to hir spak, and seyde
15+

Squire's Tale: 355

And every wight gan drawe him to his reste,
10

Miller's Tale: 663

And every wight gan laughen of this stryf.
10

Clerk's Tale: 685

How that the pope, as for his peples reste, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 686

Bad him to wedde another, if him leste. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 137

That was the cause he gan so ny him drawe
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 138

To his yeman, to herknen al his sawe.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 679

He bad hem sitte ther adoun for to take reste; [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 42

Gan in his slepe that night to him appere. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7296

And every wight gan laughe also,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7297

And seide: — 'Lo here a man aright
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 188

Hadde he to noon, to reven him his reste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 189

But gan to preyse and lakken whom him leste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1186

Gan drawe him to the window next the strete,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1577

So feithfully, that pitee was to here,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1578

And every wight gan waxen for accesse
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 674

The voydè dronke, and travers drawe anon,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 675

Gan every wight, that hadde nought to done
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1119

And at the laste, he gan his breeth to drawe,
10

Squire's Tale: 356

As slepe hem bad; they toke it for the beste.
10

Clerk's Tale: 686

[continues previous] Bad him to wedde another, if him leste.
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 679

[continues previous] He bad hem sitte ther adoun for to take reste;
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 680

[continues previous] And bad hem ete and drinke and that of the beste.
10

Parlement of Foules: 42

[continues previous] Gan in his slepe that night to him appere.
12

Squire's Tale: 358

Ful were hir hedes of fumositee,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 239

Of which ther ryseth swich fumositee, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 359

That causeth dreem, of which ther nis no charge.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 239

[continues previous] Of which ther ryseth swich fumositee,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 240

[continues previous] That whan a man hath dronken draughtes three,
11

Squire's Tale: 360

They slepen til that it was pryme large,
11

Shipman's Tale: 88

And thus he sit til it was passed pryme.
11

Shipman's Tale: 89

Daun Iohn was risen in the morwe also,
11

Squire's Tale: 362

She was ful mesurable, as wommen be.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1688

Quod Pandarus, 'and it your wille be, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 363

For of hir fader hadde she take leve
11

Franklin's Tale: 762

They take hir leve, and on hir wey they gon; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7378

That seide he was hir fader dere, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7379

To whom she hadde ofter went [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1689

[continues previous] That she may take hir leve, er that she go?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1750

God leve us for to take it for the beste! [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 364

To gon to reste, sone after it was eve;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 949

And hastifly he sente after Custaunce. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 560

And whan they sye hir tyme, goon to reste. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 561

Sone after that, this hastif Ianuarie [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 762

[continues previous] They take hir leve, and on hir wey they gon;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7379

[continues previous] To whom she hadde ofter went
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1749

[continues previous] In eche estat is litel hertes reste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1750

[continues previous] God leve us for to take it for the beste!
12

Squire's Tale: 365

Hir liste nat appalled for to be,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 950

[continues previous] But trusteth weel, hir liste nat to daunce
12

Merchant's Tale: 560

[continues previous] And whan they sye hir tyme, goon to reste.
13

Squire's Tale: 368

For swich a Ioye she in hir herte took
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1553

Desyring eft to have hir herte dere
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1554

In swich a plyt, she dorste make him chere.
11

Squire's Tale: 369

Both of hir queynte ring and hir mirour,
10

Squire's Tale: 143

This mirour and this ring, that ye may see, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 433

That on hir finger bar the queynte ring, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 303

But wel was seen in hir colour [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 305

Hir semed have the Iaunyce. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 370

That twenty tyme she changed hir colour;
10

Squire's Tale: 143

[continues previous] This mirour and this ring, that ye may see,
11

Squire's Tale: 433

[continues previous] That on hir finger bar the queynte ring,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 31

So many men as in hir tyme hir knewe, [continues next]
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 32

And yet she dyed not so sodeynly; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 213

So yvel hewed was hir colour, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 214

Hir semed have lived in langour. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 215

She was lyk thing for hungre deed, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 371

And in hir slepe, right for impressioun
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 31

[continues previous] So many men as in hir tyme hir knewe,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 32

[continues previous] And yet she dyed not so sodeynly;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 213

[continues previous] So yvel hewed was hir colour,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 214

[continues previous] Hir semed have lived in langour.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 303

[continues previous] But wel was seen in hir colour
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 304

[continues previous] That she hadde lived in langour;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1191

For she right there hadde in present [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 372

Of hir mirour, she hadde a visioun.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 567

She hadde [in honde] a gay mirour,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1190

[continues previous] And opened had she hir colere;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1191

[continues previous] For she right there hadde in present
10

Squire's Tale: 373

Wherfore, er that the sonne gan up glyde,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 865

Alle that on hir gan beholde. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1156

This Troilus, that on hir gan biholde, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 374

She cleped on hir maistresse hir bisyde,
10

Clerk's Tale: 721

Hir yonge brother ryding hir bisyde. [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 377

As is hir maistresse, answerde hir anoon, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 865

[continues previous] Alle that on hir gan beholde.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 866

[continues previous] Hir eyen semed anoon she wolde
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1289

Have litel thought but on hir play. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1290

Hir lemman was bisyde alway, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1156

[continues previous] This Troilus, that on hir gan biholde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1157

[continues previous] Clepinge hir name, (and she lay as for deed,
13

Squire's Tale: 375

And seyde, that hir liste for to ryse.
10

Clerk's Tale: 720

[continues previous] In riche array, this mayden for to gyde;
10

Clerk's Tale: 721

[continues previous] Hir yonge brother ryding hir bisyde.
13

Squire's Tale: 377

[continues previous] As is hir maistresse, answerde hir anoon,
13

Squire's Tale: 378

[continues previous] And seyde, 'madame, whider wil ye goon
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... flesh that was to hem offred, but they toke by force the flesh that is rawe. Certes, so thise shrewes ne holden hem nat apayed of rosted flesh and sode flesh, with which the peple fedden hem in greet reverence, but they wole have raw flesh of folkes wyves and hir doghtres. And certes, thise wommen that consenten to hir harlotrie doon greet wrong to Crist and to holy chirche and alle halwes, and to alle soules; for they bireven alle thise him that sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to hir lecherie, the ... [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1289

[continues previous] Have litel thought but on hir play.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1290

[continues previous] Hir lemman was bisyde alway,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 701

Thise wommen, that thus wenden hir to plese, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 376

Thise olde wommen that been gladly wyse,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 514

Stinketh, as witnessen thise olde wyse; [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 515

And that ful sone I wol it verifye [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... hem offred, but they toke by force the flesh that is rawe. Certes, so thise shrewes ne holden hem nat apayed of rosted flesh and sode flesh, with which the peple fedden hem in greet reverence, but they wole have raw flesh of folkes wyves and hir doghtres. And certes, thise wommen that consenten to hir harlotrie doon greet wrong to Crist and to holy chirche and alle halwes, and to alle soules; for they bireven alle thise him that sholde worshipe Crist and holy chirche, and preye for cristene soules. And therfore han swiche preestes, and hir lemmanes eek that consenten to ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 701

[continues previous] Thise wommen, that thus wenden hir to plese,
14

Squire's Tale: 377

As is hir maistresse, answerde hir anoon,
13

Squire's Tale: 374

She cleped on hir maistresse hir bisyde, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 375

And seyde, that hir liste for to ryse. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 302

Tiburce answerde and seyde, 'brother dere, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 514

[continues previous] Stinketh, as witnessen thise olde wyse;
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 432

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 442

The god of love answerde hir thus anoon, [continues next]
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 116

Of his goodnesse he gladed hir anoon, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 250

And with that word hir uncle anoon hir kiste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 879

Antigone answerde anoon, and seyde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1600

But Pandarus brak al this speche anoon, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 378

And seyde, 'madame, whider wil ye goon
13

Squire's Tale: 375

[continues previous] And seyde, that hir liste for to ryse.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

[continues previous] And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 73

[continues previous] I pray yow, that ye take it nat a-grief: [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 302

[continues previous] Tiburce answerde and seyde, 'brother dere,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 303

[continues previous] First tel me whider I shal, and to what man?'
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 433

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
14

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 443

[continues previous] 'Madame,' quod he, 'hit is so long agoon
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 117

[continues previous] And seyde, 'lat your fadres treson goon
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 251

[continues previous] And seyde, 'gladly, leve nece dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 879

[continues previous] Antigone answerde anoon, and seyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1601

[continues previous] And seyde to Deiphebus, 'wole ye goon,
12

Squire's Tale: 379

Thus erly? for the folk ben alle on reste.'
12

Man of Law's Tale: 643

But heer al night I wol thou take thy reste, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 72

[continues previous] And he answerde and seyde thus, 'madame,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 306

Of alle thise names now wol I me reste. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 307

For, as I trowe, I have yow told y-nowe [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 159

'Denyestow,' quod she, 'that alle shrewes ne ben worthy to [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 380

'I wol,' quod she, 'aryse, for me leste
12

Man of Law's Tale: 644

[continues previous] Tomorwe wol I seye thee what me leste.'
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 383

'Kis me,' quod she, 'we be no lenger wrothe; [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 384

For, by my trouthe, I wol be to yow bothe, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 306

[continues previous] Of alle thise names now wol I me reste.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 307

[continues previous] For, as I trowe, I have yow told y-nowe
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 158

[continues previous] 'I wolde heren thilke same resouns,' quod I.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 159

[continues previous] 'Denyestow,' quod she, 'that alle shrewes ne ben worthy to
13

Squire's Tale: 381

No lenger for to slepe, and walke aboute.'
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 383

[continues previous] 'Kis me,' quod she, 'we be no lenger wrothe;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 384

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, I wol be to yow bothe,
12

Merchant's Tale: 305

And yet, god woot, my neighebores aboute, [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 273

Her yonge knightes hoven al aboute, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 910

That flyen over his heed aboute, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 818

And othere of hir wommen, a gret route, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 819

Hir folwede in the gardin al aboute. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 382

Hir maistresse clepeth wommen a gret route,
12

Merchant's Tale: 306

[continues previous] And namely of wommen many a route, [continues next]
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 600

And seih the scherreve come with a gret route.
11

Legend of Dido: 274

[continues previous] And of her wommen eek an huge route. [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 360

Ther overtook I a gret route
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 909

[continues previous] But nightingales, a ful gret route,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 818

[continues previous] And othere of hir wommen, a gret route, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 819

[continues previous] Hir folwede in the gardin al aboute. [continues next]
15+

Squire's Tale: 383

And up they rysen, wel a ten or twelve;
12

Merchant's Tale: 306

[continues previous] And namely of wommen many a route,
11

Legend of Dido: 274

[continues previous] And of her wommen eek an huge route.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 420

Fro other wel ten foot or twelve.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 818

[continues previous] And othere of hir wommen, a gret route,
12

Squire's Tale: 384

Up ryseth fresshe Canacee hir-selve,
12

Merchant's Tale: 615

Up ryseth Ianuarie; but fresshe May
14

Squire's Tale: 385

As rody and bright as dooth the yonge sonne,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 7

The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 8

Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 456

Bright was the sonne as in that someres day, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 386

That in the Ram is four degrees up-ronne;
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 7

[continues previous] The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 8

[continues previous] Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 456

[continues previous] Bright was the sonne as in that someres day,
12

Squire's Tale: 387

Noon hyer was he, whan she redy was;
11

Hous of Fame 1: 364

And whan she wiste sothly he [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 365

Was forth unto his shippes goon, [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 135

Compleyning, that hit pite was to here. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 57

Criseyde, whan she redy was to ryde, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 58

Ful sorwfully she sighte, and seyde 'allas!' [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 388

And forth she walketh esily a pas,
12

Knight's Tale: 1359

And in hir houre he walketh forth a pas [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 364

[continues previous] And whan she wiste sothly he
11

Hous of Fame 1: 365

[continues previous] Was forth unto his shippes goon,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 58

[continues previous] Ful sorwfully she sighte, and seyde 'allas!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 60

And forth she rit ful sorwfully a pas.
12

Squire's Tale: 389

Arrayed after the lusty seson sote
12

Knight's Tale: 1360

[continues previous] Un-to the listes, ther hir temple was,
10

Knight's Tale: 1626

And eek the lusty seson of that May
10

Reeve's Tale: 84

Testif they were, and lusty for to pleye, [continues next]
12

Compleynt of Mars: 133

[continues previous] Thanne for al his brenning in the fyre.
12

Compleynt of Mars: 134

[continues previous] After he walketh softely a pas,
11

Squire's Tale: 390

Lightly, for to pleye and walke on fote;
10

Reeve's Tale: 84

[continues previous] Testif they were, and lusty for to pleye,
10

Reeve's Tale: 85

[continues previous] And, only for hir mirthe and revelrye,
11

Merchant's Tale: 799

Swich deintee hath in it to walke and pleye,
10

Franklin's Prologue: 18

But for to pleye at dees, and to despende, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 391

Nat but with fyve or six of hir meynee;
10

Franklin's Prologue: 17

[continues previous] For he to vertu listeth nat entende;
10

Franklin's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] But for to pleye at dees, and to despende,
10

Monk's Tale: 352

Or with hir meynee putten hem to flighte. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 392

And in a trench, forth in the park, goth she.
10

Monk's Tale: 353

[continues previous] In kinges habit wente hir sones two,
11

Squire's Tale: 394

Made the sonne to seme rody and brood;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 155

It was almost a spanne brood, I trowe; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 395

But nathelees, it was so fair a sighte
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 154

[continues previous] But sikerly she hadde a fair forheed;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 155

[continues previous] It was almost a spanne brood, I trowe;
11

Reeve's Tale: 30

And she was proud, and pert as is a pye. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 31

A ful fair sighte was it on hem two; [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 497

No tere out of his yën for that sighte
10

Monk's Tale: 498

Ne cam, but seyde, 'a fair womman was she.'
11

Squire's Tale: 396

That it made alle hir hertes for to lighte,
11

Reeve's Tale: 31

[continues previous] A ful fair sighte was it on hem two;
11

Squire's Tale: 397

What for the seson and the morweninge,
11

Squire's Tale: 53

For which the foules, agayn the sonne shene, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 54

What for the seson and the yonge grene, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 118

The smale foules, of the seson fayn, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 119

That from the panter and the net ben scaped, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 130

The smale foules, of the seson fayn, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 131

That from the panter and the net ben scaped, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 398

And for the foules that she herde singe;
11

Squire's Tale: 53

[continues previous] For which the foules, agayn the sonne shene,
11

Squire's Tale: 54

[continues previous] What for the seson and the yonge grene,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 37

Whan that I here the smale foules singe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 38

And that the floures ginne for to springe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 118

[continues previous] The smale foules, of the seson fayn,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 119

[continues previous] That from the panter and the net ben scaped,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 37

Is comen, and that I here the foules singe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 38

And that the floures ginnen for to springe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 130

[continues previous] The smale foules, of the seson fayn,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 131

[continues previous] That from the panter and the net ben scaped,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 508

Daunces of love, and mery notes.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 509

Whan I thus herde foules singe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1234

That stinteth first whan she biginneth singe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1235

Whan that she hereth any herde tale, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 399

For right anon she wiste what they mente
10

Man of Law's Tale: 228

And right anon she for hir conseil sente;
12

Merchant's Tale: 861

And privee signes, wiste he what she mente;
12

Merchant's Tale: 862

And she knew eek the fyn of his entente.
10

Squire's Tale: 522

That (save the feend) non wiste what he mente.
12

Franklin's Tale: 253

Never erst,' quod she, 'ne wiste I what ye mente.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 38

[continues previous] And that the floures ginne for to springe,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 140

For-why I mette I wiste what they mente.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 38

[continues previous] And that the floures ginnen for to springe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1561

But god and Pandare wiste al what this mente.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1234

[continues previous] That stinteth first whan she biginneth singe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1235

[continues previous] Whan that she hereth any herde tale,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 868

It semed not she wiste what he mente.
13

Squire's Tale: 400

Right by hir song, and knew al hir entente.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 667

And knew hir counseil, and was al hir reed.
13

Merchant's Tale: 876

And Damian, that knew al hir entente, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 968

For verraily he knew al hir entente, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 969

And every signe that she coude make [continues next]
13

Second Nun's Tale: 363

Which hem apposed, and knew al hir entente, [continues next]
13

Second Nun's Tale: 364

And to the image of Iupiter hem sente, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1239

Opned hir herte, and tolde him hir entente.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1240

And right as he that seeth his deeth y-shapen,
13

Squire's Tale: 401

The knotte, why that every tale is told,
13

Merchant's Tale: 876

[continues previous] And Damian, that knew al hir entente,
13

Merchant's Tale: 877

[continues previous] The cliket countrefeted prively;
12

Merchant's Tale: 969

[continues previous] And every signe that she coude make
13

Second Nun's Tale: 364

[continues previous] And to the image of Iupiter hem sente,
11

Squire's Tale: 404

The savour passeth ever lenger the more,
10

Clerk's Tale: 631

This markis wondreth ever lenger the more
10

Franklin's Tale: 734

And she gan wepen ever lenger the more.
10

Franklin's Tale: 735

'Allas!' quod she, 'that ever was I born!
10

Melibee's Tale: 4

Prudence his wyf, as ferforth as she dorste, bisoghte him of his weping for to stinte; but nat for-thy he gan to crye and wepen ever lenger the more.
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 150

And with hem deled ever lenger the more, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 405

For fulsomnesse of his prolixitee.
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 151

[continues previous] For they ben worthy folk, with-outen lees.
12

Squire's Tale: 408

And maken of hir walking sone an ende.
10

Knight's Tale: 2108

And maken of my longe tale an ende.
10

Legend of Philomela: 114

Now is hit tyme I make an ende sone.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 462

To maken of hir speche aright an ende.
11

Squire's Tale: 409

Amidde a tree fordrye, as whyt as chalk,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1014

Hir chere was simple as byrde in bour; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1015

As whyt as lilie or rose in rys, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 410

As Canacee was pleying in hir walk,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1014

[continues previous] Hir chere was simple as byrde in bour;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1015

[continues previous] As whyt as lilie or rose in rys,
14

Squire's Tale: 411

Ther sat a faucon over hir heed ful hye,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 273

In mottelee, and hye on horse he sat,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 274

Up-on his heed a Flaundrish bever hat;
14

Man of Law's Tale: 351

She blesseth hir, and with ful pitous voys [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 267

Roos fro his bord, ther that he sat ful hye.
11

Squire's Tale: 273

For in the Fish hir lady sat ful hye,
10

Squire's Tale: 274

And loketh on hem with a freendly yë.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 689

Un-to Criseyde, that heng hir heed ful lowe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 690

Ther-as she sat allone, and gan to caste [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 412

That with a pitous voys so gan to crye
14

Man of Law's Tale: 351

[continues previous] She blesseth hir, and with ful pitous voys
11

Pardoner's Tale: 203

I seye it now weping with pitous voys, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 204

That they been enemys of Cristes croys, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 511

A whyl, and than he gan to crye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 111

With pitous voys, and tendrely wepinge,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 422

With pitous voys, 'O lord, now youres is
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 689

[continues previous] Un-to Criseyde, that heng hir heed ful lowe,
10

Squire's Tale: 413

That all the wode resouned of hir cry.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 204

[continues previous] That they been enemys of Cristes croys,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 512

[continues previous] That never herde I thing so hye,
11

Squire's Tale: 414

Y-beten hath she hir-self so pitously
11

Physician's Epilogue: 12

Allas! so pitously as she was slayn! [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 415

With bothe hir winges, til the rede blood
11

Knight's Tale: 1777

Out renneth blood on bothe hir sydes rede.
11

Physician's Epilogue: 13

[continues previous] Of bothe yiftes that I speke of now
11

Squire's Tale: 416

Ran endelong the tree ther-as she stood.
11

Clerk's Tale: 621

And ever in oon so pacient was she, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 622

That she no chere made of hevinesse, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 417

And ever in oon she cryde alwey and shrighte,
11

Clerk's Tale: 621

[continues previous] And ever in oon so pacient was she,
11

Clerk's Tale: 622

[continues previous] That she no chere made of hevinesse,
10

Clerk's Tale: 839

And in hir smok, with heed and foot al bare, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 422

For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 637

Ther as she with hir beek had hurt hir-selve. [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 418

And with hir beek hir-selven so she prighte,
12

Knight's Tale: 65

That she nath been a duchesse or a quene; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1772

Ne in Belmarye ther nis so fel leoun, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 838

[continues previous] Biforn the folk hir-selven strepeth she,
11

Clerk's Tale: 839

[continues previous] And in hir smok, with heed and foot al bare,
14

Squire's Tale: 422

[continues previous] For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude.
13

Squire's Tale: 636

[continues previous] And softely in plastres gan hir wrappe, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 637

[continues previous] Ther as she with hir beek had hurt hir-selve. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, ... [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your trewe freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne tak no companye by the weye of a straunge man, but-if so be that thou have ... [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 423

That she ne thenketh in hir corage. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1619

So cercleth it the welle aboute. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

In al this world ther nis so cruel herte [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 723

That hir hadde herd compleynen in hir sorwe, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 419

That ther nis tygre, ne noon so cruel beste,
12

Knight's Tale: 64

[continues previous] For certes, lord, ther nis noon of us alle,
12

Knight's Tale: 65

[continues previous] That she nath been a duchesse or a quene;
13

Knight's Tale: 1118

In which ther dwelleth neither man ne beste, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1772

[continues previous] Ne in Belmarye ther nis so fel leoun,
11

Knight's Tale: 1773

[continues previous] That hunted is, or for his hunger wood,
11

Summoner's Tale: 293

Ther nis, y-wis, no serpent so cruel,
14

Squire's Tale: 637

[continues previous] Ther as she with hir beek had hurt hir-selve.
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, it is nat so. ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... that it kepeth." Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your trewe freendes that been approved and y-knowe; and of hem shul ye axen help your persone for to kepe. For Catoun seith: "if thou hast nede of help, axe it of thy freendes; for ther nis noon so good a phisicien as thy trewe freend." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow fro alle straunge folk, and fro lyeres, and have alwey in suspect hir companye. For Piers Alfonce seith: "ne tak no companye by the weye of a straunge man, but-if so be that thou have ...
10

Parson's Tale: 67

... procuringe, or by fleshly preyere of hise freendes, fleshly freendes, or espirituel freendes. Fleshly, in two maneres; as by kinrede or othere freendes. Soothly, if they praye for him that is nat worthy and able, it is Symonye if he take the benefice; and if he be worthy and able, ther nis noon. That other manere is, whan a man or womman preyen for folk to avauncen hem, only for wikked fleshly affeccioun that they have un-to the persone; and that is foul Symonye. But certes, in service, for which men yeven thinges espirituels un-to hir servants, it moot been understonde that the service ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 1: 52

[continues previous] she hath forsaken thee, ne ther nis no man siker that she ne
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 5: 35

sooth, ne that ther nis nothing sensible; or elles, for that resoun
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 5

That ther nis noon that dwelleth in this contree, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 6

That either hath in helle or heven y-be, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 5

That ther nis noon dwelling in this contree,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 6

That either hath in heven or helle y-be,
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 91

That ther nis tonge noon that may hit telle.
10

Legend of Dido: 57

With any wilde boor or other beste [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 43

This Minos hath a monstre, a wikked beste, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 44

That was so cruel that, without areste, [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 230

That reste nis ther noon in his yeving.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 422

[continues previous] But ther nis no misaventure
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 423

[continues previous] That she ne thenketh in hir corage.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1618

[continues previous] That help ne lyth ther noon, ne reed, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5026

That ther nis compte ne mesure.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5027

'But how that ever the game go,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 722

[continues previous] In al this world ther nis so cruel herte [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 723

[continues previous] That hir hadde herd compleynen in hir sorwe, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 420

That dwelleth either in wode or in foreste
13

Knight's Tale: 1117

[continues previous] First on the wal was peynted a foreste,
13

Knight's Tale: 1118

[continues previous] In which ther dwelleth neither man ne beste,
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde yeve me the maistrie and the lordshipe over your persone." Sir, save your grace, it is ...
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 5

[continues previous] That ther nis noon that dwelleth in this contree, [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 58

[continues previous] That they han hunted to, in this foreste,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 44

[continues previous] That was so cruel that, without areste,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1618

[continues previous] That help ne lyth ther noon, ne reed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 723

[continues previous] That hir hadde herd compleynen in hir sorwe,
11

Squire's Tale: 421

That nolde han wept, if that he wepe coude,
10

Miller's Tale: 231

For, for no cry, hir mayde coude him calle; [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 232

He nolde answere, for no-thing that mighte falle. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 5

[continues previous] That ther nis noon that dwelleth in this contree,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 6

[continues previous] That either hath in helle or heven y-be,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1286

And she for sorwe ginneth wepe and crye, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 422

For sorwe of hir, she shrighte alwey so loude.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 232

[continues previous] He nolde answere, for no-thing that mighte falle.
14

Squire's Tale: 417

And ever in oon she cryde alwey and shrighte,
14

Squire's Tale: 418

And with hir beek hir-selven so she prighte,
11

Franklin's Tale: 107

Thurgh which hir grete sorwe gan aswage;
11

Franklin's Tale: 108

She may nat alwey duren in swich rage.
11

Monk's Tale: 339

Agayn hir foos she faught so cruelly, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1286

[continues previous] And she for sorwe ginneth wepe and crye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1383

For was ther never herte yet so blythe [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 423

For ther nas never yet no man on lyve
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 251

[continues previous] Ther nas no man no-wher so vertuous.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 323

No-wher so bisy a man as he ther nas,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 324

And yet he semed bisier than he was.
10

Knight's Tale: 590

Ther nas no man that Theseus hath derre.
11

Knight's Tale: 1039

For in the lond ther nas no crafty man,
11

Monk's Tale: 340

[continues previous] That ther nas king ne prince in al that londe
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 496

That ther was never man yet yvel apayd
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 497

For gold ne silver that he to me lente,
12

Amorous Compleint: 13

Ther never man on lyve mighte asterte;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 738

For-why to telle nas not his entente
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 739

To never no man, for whom that he so ferde.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1383

[continues previous] For was ther never herte yet so blythe
12

Squire's Tale: 425

That herde of swich another of fairnesse,
12

Knight's Tale: 44

That herde swich another weymentinge;
12

Knight's Tale: 45

And of this cry they nolde never stenten,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 79

Of midel stature, and of swich fairnesse,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 80

That nature had a Ioye hir to behelde;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 939

'But swich a fairnesse of a nekke [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 426

As wel of plumage as of gentillesse
10

Monk's Tale: 674

The deeth of gentillesse and of fraunchyse, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 938

[continues previous] That knoweth al the world ful wel.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 939

[continues previous] 'But swich a fairnesse of a nekke
11

Squire's Tale: 427

Of shap, and al that mighte y-rekened be.
10

Monk's Tale: 674

[continues previous] The deeth of gentillesse and of fraunchyse,
10

Monk's Tale: 675

[continues previous] That al the world welded in his demeyne,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 281

Was lenger than she semed be; [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 348

And if ye nere a god, that knowen al, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 349

Than mighte hit be, as I yow tellen shal; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 428

A faucon peregryn than semed she
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 348

[continues previous] And if ye nere a god, that knowen al,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 349

[continues previous] Than mighte hit be, as I yow tellen shal;
11

Squire's Tale: 429

Of fremde land; and evermore, as she stood,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 280

[continues previous] That the lengthe of a cubyte
11

Squire's Tale: 430

She swowneth now and now for lakke of blood,
11

Squire's Tale: 443

When that it swowned next, for lakke of blood. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 431

Til wel neigh is she fallen fro the tree.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1167

And with that word she leep doun fro the tree. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 441

And heeld hir lappe abrood, for wel she wiste
11

Squire's Tale: 442

[continues previous] The faucon moste fallen fro the twiste,
10

Squire's Tale: 464

For goddes love, com fro the tree adoun; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 432

This faire kinges doghter, Canacee,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1168

[continues previous] This Ianuarie, who is glad but he?
10

Squire's Tale: 465

[continues previous] And, as I am a kinges doghter trewe,
11

Squire's Tale: 433

That on hir finger bar the queynte ring,
11

Squire's Tale: 369

Both of hir queynte ring and hir mirour,
11

Squire's Tale: 370

That twenty tyme she changed hir colour;
12

Squire's Tale: 434

Thurgh which she understood wel every thing
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1261

My wo; and she wel understood [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1262

That I ne wilned thing but good, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 435

That any foul may in his ledene seyn,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1262

[continues previous] That I ne wilned thing but good,
13

Squire's Tale: 436

And coude answere him in his ledene ageyn,
12

Squire's Tale: 151

And knowe his mening openly and pleyn,
13

Squire's Tale: 152

And answere him in his langage ageyn.
12

Squire's Tale: 153

And every gras that groweth up-on rote
11

Squire's Tale: 438

And wel neigh for the rewthe almost she deyde.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1489

Was deed anoon. But, er she deyde, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1490

Ful pitously to god she preyde, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 151

As he that with tho wordes wel neigh deyde.
14

Squire's Tale: 439

And to the tree she gooth ful hastily,
14

Squire's Tale: 471

To hele with your hurtes hastily.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1489

[continues previous] Was deed anoon. But, er she deyde,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1490

[continues previous] Ful pitously to god she preyde,
14

Squire's Tale: 440

And on this faucon loketh pitously,
14

Squire's Tale: 472

[continues previous] Tho shrighte this faucon more pitously [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 473

Than ever she dide, and fil to grounde anoon, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 441

And heeld hir lappe abrood, for wel she wiste
10

Miller's Tale: 38

Ialous he was, and heeld hir narwe in cage,
10

Miller's Tale: 39

For she was wilde and yong, and he was old
11

Squire's Tale: 431

Til wel neigh is she fallen fro the tree. [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 473

[continues previous] Than ever she dide, and fil to grounde anoon,
11

Squire's Tale: 442

The faucon moste fallen fro the twiste,
11

Squire's Tale: 431

[continues previous] Til wel neigh is she fallen fro the tree. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 443

When that it swowned next, for lakke of blood.
11

Squire's Tale: 430

[continues previous] She swowneth now and now for lakke of blood,
12

Squire's Tale: 444

A longe while to wayten hir she stood
12

Miller's Tale: 104

That she hir love him graunted atte laste, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 491

But atte laste speken she bigan, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 492

And mekely she to the sergeant preyde, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 576

But fynally, thus atte laste it stood, [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 146

She cryde, and atte laste thus she wroghte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 742

And thus she spak, sobbinge, in hir compleynte: [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 743

'Alas!' quod she, 'out of this regioun [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 445

Till atte laste she spak in this manere
12

Miller's Tale: 104

[continues previous] That she hir love him graunted atte laste,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
14

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he. [continues next]
14

Friar's Prologue: 5

But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 17

Of other folk he saugh y-nowe in wo. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 18

Un-to this angel spak the frere tho: [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 491

[continues previous] But atte laste speken she bigan,
11

Clerk's Tale: 492

[continues previous] And mekely she to the sergeant preyde,
10

Squire's Tale: 187

Til that the knight hath taught hem the manere [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 576

[continues previous] But fynally, thus atte laste it stood,
10

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
11

Shipman's Tale: 381

And wantounly agayn with him she pleyde;
11

Shipman's Tale: 382

Til, atte laste, that this Marchant seyde,
11

Prioress' Tale: 146

[continues previous] She cryde, and atte laste thus she wroghte,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... if he bereth a spere, hold thee on the right syde, and if he bere a swerd, hold thee on the lift syde." And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow wysely from alle swich manere peple as I have seyd bifore, and hem and hir conseil eschewe. And after this, thanne shul ye kepe yow in swich manere, that for any presumpcioun of your strengthe, that ye ne dispyse nat ne acounte nat the might of your adversarie so litel, that ye lete the keping of your persone for your presumpcioun; for every wys man dredeth his enemy. And Salomon seith: "weleful is he that of alle hath ... [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 161

And, in her frendly speche, in this manere [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 162

She to him spak, and seide as ye may here. [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 159

This rewful cas, and al this thing horrible.