Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Prologue to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Prologue to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Prologue has 856 lines, and 5% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 65% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 30% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.08 strong matches and 2.83 weak matches.

Geoffrey Chaucer

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12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 1

'Experience, though noon auctoritee
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 352

And certes, sire, thogh noon auctoritee [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 2

Were in this world, were right y-nough to me
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 353

[continues previous] Were in no book, ye gentils of honour
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6398

O shrift is right y-nough to me.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6399

This oughte thee suffyce wel,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6411

The firste is right y-nough to me;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6412

This latter assoiling quyte I thee.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 3

To speke of wo that is in mariage;
10

Physician's Tale: 31

In which that Nature hadde swich delyt. [continues next]
12

Envoy to Bukton: 6

The sorwe and wo that is in mariage, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 4

For, lordinges, sith I twelf yeer was of age,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 82

Of twenty yeer of age he was, I gesse.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 83

Of his stature he was of evene lengthe,
15+

Clerk's Tale: 680

Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 724

Hir brother, which that seven yeer was of age,
15+

Physician's Tale: 30

[continues previous] This mayde of age twelf yeer was and tweye, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 422

The eldeste scarsly fyf yeer was of age.
11

Monk's Tale: 423

Allas, fortune! it was greet crueltee
11

Monk's Tale: 441

His yonge sone, that three yeer was of age,
11

Envoy to Bukton: 7

[continues previous] I dar not wryte of hit no wikkednesse,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 5

Thonked be god that is eterne on lyve,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 461

She was a worthy womman al hir lyve, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve! [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 44

Blessed be god that I have wedded fyve! [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 680

[continues previous] Whan that his doghter twelf yeer was of age,
13

Merchant's Tale: 408

Come to the blisse ther Crist eterne on lyve is?
12

Merchant's Tale: 409

This is my drede, and ye, my bretheren tweye,
13

Physician's Tale: 31

[continues previous] In which that Nature hadde swich delyt.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 6

Housbondes at chirche-dore I have had fyve;
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 462

[continues previous] Housbondes at chirche-dore she hadde fyve,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 44

[continues previous] Blessed be god that I have wedded fyve!
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 9

But me was told certeyn, nat longe agon is,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 150

Sith Lamek was, that is so longe agoon, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 10

That sith that Crist ne wente never but onis
10

Anelida and Arcite: 150

[continues previous] Sith Lamek was, that is so longe agoon,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 12

That by the same ensample taughte he me
12

Merchant's Tale: 331

And been assented fully, that he sholde [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 13

That I ne sholde wedded be but ones.
12

Merchant's Tale: 331

[continues previous] And been assented fully, that he sholde
12

Merchant's Tale: 332

[continues previous] Be wedded whanne him list and wher he wolde.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 14

Herke eek, lo! which a sharp word for the nones
10

Parlement of Foules: 211

Under a tree, besyde a welle, I say [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1456

Besyde a welle, under a tree, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 15

Besyde a welle Iesus, god and man,
11

Parlement of Foules: 211

[continues previous] Under a tree, besyde a welle, I say
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1456

[continues previous] Besyde a welle, under a tree,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 16

Spak in repreve of the Samaritan:
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 358

Of fiftene plowes of lond this sixtene yer, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 17

"Thou hast y-had fyve housbondes," quod he,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 357

[continues previous] For, brother, thou hast y-had by seynt Richer,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 19

Is noght thyn housbond;" thus seyde he certeyn;
11

Miller's Tale: 483

Or elles he is at his hous, certeyn; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 20

What that he mente ther-by, I can nat seyn;
11

Miller's Tale: 484

[continues previous] Wher that he be, I can nat sothly seyn.' [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 732

Supposing noght but trouthe, soth to seyn, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 733

He was so glad, that I can nat expresse [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 162

But of his face I can nat seyn the hewe. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 97

I can nat seyn if that hit be possible, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 106

Can I nat seyn if that the cause were [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 126

Yet wiste I never wel what that he mente.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 21

But that I axe, why that the fifthe man
11

Miller's Tale: 484

[continues previous] Wher that he be, I can nat sothly seyn.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 733

[continues previous] He was so glad, that I can nat expresse
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 162

[continues previous] But of his face I can nat seyn the hewe.
10

Legend of Dido: 97

[continues previous] I can nat seyn if that hit be possible,
10

Parlement of Foules: 106

[continues previous] Can I nat seyn if that the cause were
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 24

Yet herde I never tellen in myn age
11

Melibee's Tale: 47

'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir wikked wil and hir corage. And ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 25

Upon this nombre diffinicioun;
11

Melibee's Tale: 47

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 26

Men may devyne and glosen up and doun.
11

Melibee's Tale: 47

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod Melibee, 'I graunte yow, dame Prudence, that pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun; but every man may nat have the perfeccioun that ye seken; ne I nam nat of the nombre of right parfite men, for myn herte may never been in pees un-to the tyme it be venged. And al-be-it so that it was greet peril to myne enemys, to do me a vileinye in takinge vengeance up-on me, yet token they noon hede of the peril, but fulfilleden hir wikked wil and hir corage. And therfore, me ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 29

That gentil text can I wel understonde.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 661

But wel I woot he lyed right in dede; [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 110

I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 288

'Grisilde,' he seyde, 'ye shul wel understonde [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.' [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 1

'This understonde I wel,' quod I, 'and I acorde wel that it is [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 2: 472

And seyde, 'I woot wel I am here; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1679

Receyveth wrong, as woot wel here Pandare, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1680

That can hir cas wel bet than I declare.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 164

As I wel mene, eek mene wel to me, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 338

Therfore I dar this fully undertake. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 120

He seyde eek thus, 'I woot, yow thinketh straunge, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 968

I woot eek wel; but certein, men shal finde [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 660

[continues previous] 'Purs is the erchedeknes helle,' seyde he.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 661

[continues previous] But wel I woot he lyed right in dede;
10

Knight's Tale: 465

The answere of this I lete to divynis, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 466

But wel I woot, that in this world gret pyne is. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 109

[continues previous] That but ye wayte wel and been privee,
11

Miller's Tale: 110

[continues previous] I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
11

Clerk's Tale: 288

[continues previous] 'Grisilde,' he seyde, 'ye shul wel understonde
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 401

Ther was defaute in som-what, wel I woot.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 402

Another seyde, the fyr was over hoot: —
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

[continues previous] mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 1

[continues previous] 'This understonde I wel,' quod I, 'and I acorde wel that it is
12

Hous of Fame 2: 472

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I woot wel I am here;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1679

[continues previous] Receyveth wrong, as woot wel here Pandare,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1680

[continues previous] That can hir cas wel bet than I declare.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 164

[continues previous] As I wel mene, eek mene wel to me,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 165

[continues previous] And myn honour, with wit and besinesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

[continues previous] For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 338

[continues previous] Therfore I dar this fully undertake.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

[continues previous] Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

[continues previous] Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 120

[continues previous] He seyde eek thus, 'I woot, yow thinketh straunge,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 968

[continues previous] I woot eek wel; but certein, men shal finde
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 31

Sholde lete fader and moder, and take me;
11

Knight's Tale: 465

[continues previous] The answere of this I lete to divynis,
14

Parson's Tale: 75

... fyr and of brimston; in fyr, for the lecherie; in brimston, for the stink of hir ordure. Certes, the brekinge of this sacrement is an horrible thing; it was maked of god him-self in paradys, and confermed by Iesu Crist, as witnesseth seint Mathew in the gospel: 'A man shal lete fader and moder, and taken him to his wyf, and they shullen be two in o flesh.' This sacrement bitokneth the knittinge togidre of Crist and of holy chirche. And nat only that god forbad avoutrie in dede, but eek he comanded that thou sholdest nat coveite thy neighebores wyf. In this heeste, seith ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 21

thee in cure and kepinge, whan thou were orphelin of fader and
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 22

moder, and were chosen in affinitee of princes of the citee; and
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 35

Lo, here the wyse king, dan Salomon;
10

Squire's Tale: 250

Save that he, Moyses, and king Salomon [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 36

I trowe he hadde wyves mo than oon;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 578

Of maistres hadde he mo than thryes ten,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 56

And Iacob eek, as ferforth as I can;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 57

And ech of hem hadde wyves mo than two;
10

Squire's Tale: 250

[continues previous] Save that he, Moyses, and king Salomon
10

Squire's Tale: 251

[continues previous] Hadde a name of konning in swich art.
10

Squire's Tale: 607

I trowe he hadde thilke text in minde,
10

Parson's Prologue: 16

Now lakketh us no tales mo than oon.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4318

Who hadde wist what wo I hadde,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4319

I trowe he wolde have had pitee.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 37

As, wolde god, it leveful were to me
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 118

it were leveful to me to hyde the sothe, ne assente to lesinges. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 6

in-to destruccioun of goode men, that it were leveful to hem to [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 38

To be refresshed half so ofte as he!
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 118

[continues previous] it were leveful to me to hyde the sothe, ne assente to lesinges.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 6

[continues previous] in-to destruccioun of goode men, that it were leveful to hem to
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 39

Which yifte of god hadde he for alle his wyvis!
11

Parson's Tale: 67

... soule. This desyr, if so be that a man do his diligence to parfournen it, al-be-it that his desyr ne take noon effect, yet is it to him a deedly sinne; and if he be ordred, he is irreguler. Certes, Symonye is cleped of Symon Magus, that wolde han boght, for temporel catel, the yifte that god hadde yeven, by the holy goost, to seint Peter and to the apostles. And therfore understond, that bothe he that selleth and he that byeth thinges espirituels, been cleped Symonials; be it by catel, be it by procuringe, or by fleshly preyere of hise freendes, fleshly freendes, or espirituel freendes. Fleshly, ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 40

No man hath swich, that in this world alyve is.
11

Knight's Tale: 466

But wel I woot, that in this world gret pyne is. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 41

God woot, this noble king, as to my wit,
11

Knight's Tale: 466

[continues previous] But wel I woot, that in this world gret pyne is.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 42

The firste night had many a mery fit
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 371

Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 319

To finde out mery crafty notes; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

By Troilus he lay, with mery chere, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 39

Of ech of hem, so as it semed me,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 371

[continues previous] Wel semed ech of hem a fair burgeys,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 5

Thonked be god that is eterne on lyve, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 219

I governed hem so wel, after my lawe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 220

That ech of hem ful blisful was and fawe
11

Pardoner's Tale: 445

But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 318

[continues previous] To singe, for ech of hem him peyned
10

Parlement of Foules: 607

Lat ech of hem be soleyn al hir lyve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

[continues previous] By Troilus he lay, with mery chere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 231

[continues previous] To tale; and wel was hem they were y-fere.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 44

Blessed be god that I have wedded fyve!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] Thonked be god that is eterne on lyve,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 6

[continues previous] Housbondes at chirche-dore I have had fyve;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 45

Welcome the sixte, whan that ever he shal.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 360

In feith, he shal nat kepe me but me lest; [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 76

A man shal winne us best with flaterye; [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 843

With herte soor he gooth un-to his cofre, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 88

God help me so, for he shal never thee! [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 87

... sith that Crist is sovereyn and the preest mene and mediatour bitwixe Crist and the sinnere, and the sinnere is the laste by wey of resoun, thanne sholde nat the sinnere sitte as heighe as his confessour, but knele biforn him or at his feet, but-if maladie destourbe it. For he shal nat taken kepe who sit there, but in whos place that he sitteth. A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord, and set him doun anon by the lord, men wolde holden him outrageous, and nat worthy so sone for ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 46

For sothe, I wol nat kepe me chast in al;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 360

[continues previous] In feith, he shal nat kepe me but me lest;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

[continues previous] He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye;
11

Friar's Tale: 132

For sothe, I take al that men wol me yive;
10

Merchant's Tale: 1075

For sothe, I wol no lenger yow contrarie.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 842

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 88

[continues previous] God help me so, for he shal never thee!
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 89

[continues previous] (But I wol nat avowe that I seye,
11

Parson's Tale: 87

[continues previous] ... manere, sith that Crist is sovereyn and the preest mene and mediatour bitwixe Crist and the sinnere, and the sinnere is the laste by wey of resoun, thanne sholde nat the sinnere sitte as heighe as his confessour, but knele biforn him or at his feet, but-if maladie destourbe it. For he shal nat taken kepe who sit there, but in whos place that he sitteth. A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord, and set him doun anon by the lord, men wolde holden him outrageous, and nat worthy so sone for to have remissioun ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 49

For thanne thapostle seith, that I am free
11

Melibee's Tale: 38

Now sir, if men wolde axe me, why that god suffred men to do yow this vileinye, certes, I can nat wel answere as for no sothfastnesse. For thapostle seith, that "the sciences and the Iuggementz of our lord god almighty been ful depe; ther may no man comprehende ne serchen hem suffisantly." Nathelees, by certeyne presumpcions and coniectinges, I holde and bileve that god, which that is ful of Iustice and of rightwisnesse, hath suffred this bityde by Iuste cause ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... that "bettre it is to been a good man and have litel good and tresour, than to been holden a shrewe and have grete richesses." And yet seye I ferthermore, that ye sholde alwey doon your bisinesse to gete yow richesses, so that ye gete hem with good conscience. And thapostle seith: that "ther nis thing in this world, of which we sholden have so greet Ioye as whan our conscience bereth us good witnesse." And the wyse man seith: "the substance of a man is ful good, whan sinne is nat in mannes conscience." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses, and in ...
11

Monk's Prologue: 21

"Allas!" she seith, "that ever I was shape [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 50

To wedde, a goddes half, wher it lyketh me.
11

Monk's Prologue: 22

[continues previous] To wedde a milksop or a coward ape,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 915

That he wol nat that it discovered be, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 916

But wher it lyketh to his deitee [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 51

He seith that to be wedded is no sinne;
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 915

[continues previous] That he wol nat that it discovered be,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 916

[continues previous] But wher it lyketh to his deitee
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 56

And Iacob eek, as ferforth as I can;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 36

I trowe he hadde wyves mo than oon; [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 17

First shaltow understonde that Confession is verray shewinge of sinnes to the preest; this is to seyn 'verray,' for he moste confessen him of alle the condiciouns that bilongen to his sinne, as ferforth as he can. Al moot be seyd, and no thing excused ne hid ne forwrapped, and noght avaunte him of his gode werkes. And forther over, it is necessarie to understonde whennes that sinnes springen, and how they encresen, and whiche they been.
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 16

That ech of hem hadde his part as it mighte falle. [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 792

As ferforth as I can myn art.'
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 57

And ech of hem hadde wyves mo than two;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 36

[continues previous] I trowe he hadde wyves mo than oon;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 685

To reden on this book of wikked wyves. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 686

He knew of hem mo legendes and lyves [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 287

They lived in Ioye and in felicitee;
12

Monk's Tale: 288

For ech of hem hadde other leef and dere.
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 16

[continues previous] That ech of hem hadde his part as it mighte falle.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 58

And many another holy man also.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 686

[continues previous] He knew of hem mo legendes and lyves
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 60

That hye god defended mariage
12

Summoner's Tale: 126

Ire is a thing that hye god defended, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 61

By expres word? I pray you, telleth me;
11

Summoner's Tale: 127

[continues previous] And ther-of wol I speke a word or two.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 62

Or wher comanded he virginitee?
12

Knight's Tale: 1539

Ne reccheth never wher I sinke or flete. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 473

But wher in body or in gost [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 63

I woot as wel as ye, it is no drede,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 742

And wel ye woot, no vileinye is it.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 773

And wel I woot, as ye goon by the weye,
12

Knight's Tale: 1539

[continues previous] Ne reccheth never wher I sinke or flete.
12

Knight's Tale: 1540

[continues previous] And wel I woot, er she me mercy hete,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 29

It wol nat come agayn, with-outen drede, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 123

And for noone other cause: sey ye no?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 124

The experience woot wel it is noght so;
12

Franklin's Tale: 884

As wel as any of yow, it is no drede!
11

Parson's Tale: 22

... the same thinges; and yet nathelees they been sinnes. Soothly, as thise clerkes wryten, this is to seyn, that at every tyme that a man eteth or drinketh more than suffyseth to the sustenaunce of his body, in certein he dooth sinne. And eek whan he speketh more than nedeth, it is sinne. Eke whan he herkneth nat benignely the compleint of the povre. Eke whan he is in hele of body and wol nat faste, whan othere folk faste, withouten cause resonable. Eke whan he slepeth more than nedeth, or whan he comth by thilke enchesoun to late to chirche, or ... [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 472

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I woot wel I am here;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 779

Ye woot your-self, as wel as any wight,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1261

I am a womman, as ful wel ye woot,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1262

And as I am avysed sodeynly,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 64

Thapostel, whan he speketh of maydenhede;
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] Na more than wol Malkins maydenhede,
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 31

Whan she hath lost it in hir wantownesse;
11

Parson's Tale: 22

[continues previous] ... and ne shryveth him nat of the same thinges; and yet nathelees they been sinnes. Soothly, as thise clerkes wryten, this is to seyn, that at every tyme that a man eteth or drinketh more than suffyseth to the sustenaunce of his body, in certein he dooth sinne. And eek whan he speketh more than nedeth, it is sinne. Eke whan he herkneth nat benignely the compleint of the povre. Eke whan he is in hele of body and wol nat faste, whan othere folk faste, withouten cause resonable. Eke whan he slepeth more than nedeth, or whan he comth by thilke enchesoun ...
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 66

Men may conseille a womman to been oon,
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

... David the king, that wolde have slayn him, and apaysed the ire of the king by hir wit and by hir good conseilling. Hester by hir good conseil enhaunced greetly the peple of god in the regne of Assuerus the king. And the same bountee in good conseilling of many a good womman may men telle. And moreover, whan our lord hadde creat Adam our forme-fader, he seyde in this wyse: "it is nat good to been a man allone; make we to him an help semblable to himself." Here may ye se that, if that wommen were nat goode, and hir conseils goode ... [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 67

But conseilling is no comandement;
10

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... hir housbonde fro David the king, that wolde have slayn him, and apaysed the ire of the king by hir wit and by hir good conseilling. Hester by hir good conseil enhaunced greetly the peple of god in the regne of Assuerus the king. And the same bountee in good conseilling of many a good womman may men telle. And moreover, whan our lord hadde creat Adam our forme-fader, he seyde in this wyse: "it is nat good to been a man allone; make we to him an help semblable to himself." Here may ye se that, if that wommen were ...
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 68

He putte it in our owene Iugement.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 763

Of water, and in he putte his owene hond.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 764

And in his sleve (as ye biforn-hond
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 73

Poul dorste nat comanden atte leste
11

Legend of Lucretia: 157

Ne upon hem she dorste nat beholde. [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 74

A thing of which his maister yaf noon heste.
10

Cook's Tale: 47

Therfore his maister yaf him acquitance,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 162

Right at his owene table he yaf his heste [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 158

[continues previous] But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 75

The dart is set up for virginitee;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 163

[continues previous] To sleen the Baptist Iohn ful giltelees.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 77

But this word is nat take of every wight,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 75

That hir to seen had every wight lykinge; [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 76

For, as of trouthe, is ther noon hir liche, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 78

But ther as god list give it of his might.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 76

[continues previous] For, as of trouthe, is ther noon hir liche,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 80

But natheless, thogh that he wroot and sayde,
10

Knight's Tale: 1661

Somme sayde, he loked grim and he wolde fighte; [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 27

For Simkin wolde no wyf, as he sayde, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 81

He wolde that every wight were swich as he,
11

Knight's Tale: 1627

Made every wight to been in swich plesaunce, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1628

That al that Monday Iusten they and daunce, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1661

[continues previous] Somme sayde, he loked grim and he wolde fighte;
11

Reeve's Tale: 27

[continues previous] For Simkin wolde no wyf, as he sayde,
11

Reeve's Tale: 28

[continues previous] But she were wel y-norissed and a mayde,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 135

But I seye noght that every wight is holde,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 136

That hath swich harneys as I to yow tolde,
11

Clerk's Tale: 906

After my lust, and therfor wolde I fayn [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 907

That thyn were al swich maner governaunce; [continues next]
12

Manciple's Tale: 42

And so is every wight in swich degree; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 624

Another tyme imaginen he wolde
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 625

That every wight that wente by the weye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 740

To stele awey with swich on as he is? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 82

Al nis but conseil to virginitee;
11

Knight's Tale: 1628

[continues previous] That al that Monday Iusten they and daunce,
11

Clerk's Tale: 907

[continues previous] That thyn were al swich maner governaunce;
12

Manciple's Tale: 43

[continues previous] But al in ydel, for it availleth noght.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 741

[continues previous] But al to late cometh the letuarie,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 83

And for to been a wyf, he yaf me leve
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3073

Which bar the roses, he yaf me leve;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 91

This is al and som, he heeld virginitee
10

Legend of Dido: 75

For this is al and som, it was Venus,
10

Legend of Philomela: 157

For this is al and som, thus was she served,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 94

Wolde leden al hir lyf in chastitee.
12

Franklin's Tale: 824

In sovereyn blisse leden forth hir lyf.
10

Parson's Tale: 77

... ordure of this sinne. And this is in two maneres, that is to seyn, chastitee in mariage, and chastitee of widwehode. Now shaltow understonde, that matrimoine is leefful assemblinge of man and of womman, that receyven by vertu of the sacrement the bond, thurgh which they may nat be departed in al hir lyf, that is to seyn, whyl that they liven bothe. This, as seith the book, is a ful greet sacrement. God maked it, as I have seyd, in paradys, and wolde him-self be born in mariage. And for to halwen mariage, he was at a weddinge, where-as he turned water in-to ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 95

I graunte it wel, I have noon envye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 29

... gretter nombre of foles than of wyse men, and therfore the conseils that been at congregaciouns and multitudes of folk, ther-as men take more reward to the nombre than to the sapience of persones, ye see wel that in swiche conseillinges foles han the maistrie.' Melibeus answerde agayn, and seyde: 'I graunte wel that I have erred; but ther-as thou hast told me heer-biforn, that he nis nat to blame that chaungeth hise conseillours in certein caas, and for certeine Iuste causes, I am al redy to chaunge my conseillours, right as thow wolt devyse. The proverbe seith: that "for to do sinne is mannish, but ...
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6058

'Parfay,' seide Love, 'I graunte it yow;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6059

I wol wel holde him for my man;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 98

Of myn estaat I nil nat make no boost.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3461

Suffire, I rede, and no boost make,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 99

For wel ye knowe, a lord in his houshold,
10

Melibee's Tale: 57

Whanne Melibee hadde herd dame Prudence maken semblant of wratthe, he seyde in this wyse, 'dame, I prey yow that ye be nat displesed of thinges that I seye; for ye knowe wel that I am angry and wrooth, and that is no wonder; and they that been wrothe witen nat wel what they doon, ne what they seyn. Therfore the prophete seith: that "troubled eyen han no cleer sighte." But seyeth and conseileth me as yow lyketh; for I am redy to ...
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 100

He hath nat every vessel al of gold;
10

Shipman's Tale: 368

The somme of gold, and gat of hem his bond; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 101

Somme been of tree, and doon hir lord servyse.
10

Shipman's Tale: 367

[continues previous] To certeyn Lumbardes, redy in hir hond,
10

Shipman's Tale: 368

[continues previous] The somme of gold, and gat of hem his bond;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 102

God clepeth folk to him in sondry wyse,
12

Melibee's Prologue: 23

Al be it told som-tyme in sondry wyse
12

Melibee's Prologue: 24

Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 51

He coude werke, and that in sondry wyse. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 52

He hath take on him many a greet empryse, [continues next]
13

Parson's Tale: 27

... the dong and in the myre, on horse and eek on fote, as wel of man as of womman, that al thilke trailing is verraily as in effect wasted, consumed, thredbare, and roten with donge, rather than it is yeven to the povre; to greet damage of the forseyde povre folk. And that in sondry wyse: this is to seyn, that the more that clooth is wasted, the more it costeth to the peple for the scantnesse; and forther-over, if so be that they wolde yeven swich pounsoned and dagged clothing to the povre folk, it is nat convenient to were for hir estaat, ne suffisant to bete hir ... [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2249

Withouten pryde in sondry wyse, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2250

And him disgysen in queyntyse. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 440

And brende him so in sondry wyse ay newe, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 964

As plaunte a tre or herbe, in sondry wyse, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 103

And everich hath of god a propre yifte,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 51

[continues previous] He coude werke, and that in sondry wyse.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 52

[continues previous] He hath take on him many a greet empryse,
13

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... dong and in the myre, on horse and eek on fote, as wel of man as of womman, that al thilke trailing is verraily as in effect wasted, consumed, thredbare, and roten with donge, rather than it is yeven to the povre; to greet damage of the forseyde povre folk. And that in sondry wyse: this is to seyn, that the more that clooth is wasted, the more it costeth to the peple for the scantnesse; and forther-over, if so be that they wolde yeven swich pounsoned and dagged clothing to the povre folk, it is nat convenient to were for ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 2250

[continues previous] And him disgysen in queyntyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 440

[continues previous] And brende him so in sondry wyse ay newe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 965

[continues previous] And on the morwe pulle it up as blyve,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 105

Virginitee is greet perfeccioun,
11

Parson's Tale: 90

... veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. If thou ofte falle, ofte thou aryse by confessioun. And thogh thou shryve thee ofter than ones of sinne, of which thou hast be shriven, it is the more merite. And, as seith seint Augustin, thou shalt have the more lightly relesing and grace ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 106

And continence eek with devocioun.
11

Man of Law's Tale: 159

That every wight, with gret devocioun, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 90

[continues previous] ... thee for veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. If thou ofte falle, ofte thou aryse by confessioun. And thogh thou shryve thee ofter than ones of sinne, of which thou hast be shriven, it is the more merite. And, as seith seint Augustin, thou shalt have the more lightly relesing and grace of god, ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 107

But Crist, that of perfeccioun is welle,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 160

[continues previous] Shulde preyen Crist that he this mariage
11

Parson's Tale: 90

[continues previous] ... nat shryve thee for veyne glorie, ne for ypocrisye, ne for no cause, but only for the doute of Iesu Crist and the hele of thy soule. Thou shalt nat eek renne to the preest sodeynly, to tellen him lightly thy sinne, as who-so telleth a Iape or a tale, but avysely and with greet devocioun. And generally, shryve thee ofte. If thou ofte falle, ofte thou aryse by confessioun. And thogh thou shryve thee ofter than ones of sinne, of which thou hast be shriven, it is the more merite. And, as seith seint Augustin, thou shalt have the more ...
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 112

And lordinges, by your leve, that am nat I.
11

Reeve's Prologue: 61

Peraventure in scorn, for I am oon. [continues next]
11

Reeve's Prologue: 62

And, by your leve, I shal him quyte anoon; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 319

Tak your disport, I wol nat leve no talis; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 320

I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alis." [continues next]
15+

Merchant's Tale: 212

But sires, by your leve, that am nat I. [continues next]
15+

Melibee's Tale: 15

... been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and hele thinges that men oghte secreely to hyde. And soothly, as to your fifthe resoun, wher-as ye seyn, that "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" god woot, thilke ... [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 113

I wol bistowe the flour of al myn age
11

Reeve's Prologue: 61

[continues previous] Peraventure in scorn, for I am oon.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 174

Of which I am expert in al myn age, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 319

[continues previous] Tak your disport, I wol nat leve no talis;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 320

[continues previous] I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alis."
15+

Merchant's Tale: 212

[continues previous] But sires, by your leve, that am nat I.
12

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and hele thinges that men oghte secreely to hyde. And soothly, as to your fifthe resoun, wher-as ye seyn, that "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" god woot, thilke ...
11

Hous of Fame 1: 347

And alle myn actes red and songe [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 348

Over al this lond, on every tonge. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 896

'Certes,' quod I, 'in al myn age, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 114

In the actes and in fruit of mariage.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 174

[continues previous] Of which I am expert in al myn age,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 347

[continues previous] And alle myn actes red and songe
11

Hous of Fame 3: 896

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod I, 'in al myn age,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 119

Glose who-so wole, and seye bothe up and doun,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 305

And for he squiereth me bothe up and doun,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 121

Of urine, and our bothe thinges smale
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1191

And fillen forth in speche of thinges smale,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1192

And seten in the window bothe tweye.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 122

Were eek to knowe a femele from a male,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 105

semblable progressiouns of sedes and of sexes, that is to seyn, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 106

male and femele. And this ilke ordre constreineth the fortunes and [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 123

And for noone other cause: sey ye no?
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 742

And wel ye woot, no vileinye is it. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 63

I woot as wel as ye, it is no drede, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 106

[continues previous] male and femele. And this ilke ordre constreineth the fortunes and
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 124

The experience woot wel it is noght so;
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 742

[continues previous] And wel ye woot, no vileinye is it.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 63

[continues previous] I woot as wel as ye, it is no drede,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 4

That wedded been, I trowe that it be so. [continues next]
11

Merchant's Prologue: 5

For, wel I woot, it fareth so with me. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1312

[continues previous] Sin wel ye woot that it is now a truwe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 125

So that the clerkes be nat with me wrothe,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] That wedded been, I trowe that it be so.
11

Merchant's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] For, wel I woot, it fareth so with me.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 127

This is to seye, for office, and for ese
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5698

Ther may no marchaunt live at ese, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7498

We wolden, if it were your ese, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 128

Of engendrure, ther we nat god displese.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5697

[continues previous] 'For soth it is, whom it displese,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5698

[continues previous] Ther may no marchaunt live at ese,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7497

[continues previous] And, so it shulde you nat displese,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7498

[continues previous] We wolden, if it were your ese,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 130

That man shal yelde to his wyf hir dette?
13

Merchant's Tale: 804

And whan he wolde paye his wyf hir dette [continues next]
15+

Parson's Tale: 22

... othere folk faste, withouten cause resonable. Eke whan he slepeth more than nedeth, or whan he comth by thilke enchesoun to late to chirche, or to othere werkes of charite. Eke whan he useth his wyf, withouten sovereyn desyr of engendrure, to the honour of god, or for the entente to yelde to his wyf the dette of his body. Eke whan he wol nat visite the sike and the prisoner, if he may. Eke if he love wyf or child, or other worldly thing, more than resoun requyreth. Eke if he flatere or blandishe more than him oghte for any necessitee. Eke if he amenuse or withdrawe the ...
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 131

Now wher-with sholde he make his payement,
13

Merchant's Tale: 804

[continues previous] And whan he wolde paye his wyf hir dette
11

Merchant's Tale: 805

[continues previous] In somer seson, thider wolde he go,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 134

To purge uryne, and eek for engendrure.
12

Compleynt of Mars: 189

For this day in hir servise shal I dye; [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 469

And but I speke, I mot for sorwe deye. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 135

But I seye noght that every wight is holde,
11

Knight's Tale: 1372

I am so confus, that I can noght seye.
11

Knight's Tale: 1373

But mercy, lady bright, that knowest weel
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 81

He wolde that every wight were swich as he, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 419

Tak hede of every word that I yow seye, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 420

Ther is no wight that hereth it but we tweye. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

Thanne thus, in getinge richesses, ye mosten flee ydelnesse. And afterward, ye shul use the richesses, whiche ye have geten by your wit and by your travaille, in swich a manere, that men holde nat yow to scars, ne to sparinge, ne to fool-large, that is to seyn, over-large a spender. For right as men blamen an avaricious man by-cause of his scarsetee and chincherye, in the same wyse is he to blame that spendeth over largely. And therfore seith Caton: "use," he seith, ... [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 641

The storie of Alisaundre is so comune, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 642

That every wight that hath discrecioun [continues next]
12

Compleynt of Mars: 188

[continues previous] I flater noght, that may wite every wight;
10

Parlement of Foules: 468

[continues previous] For tarying here, noght half that I wolde seye;
10

Parlement of Foules: 469

[continues previous] And but I speke, I mot for sorwe deye.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 136

That hath swich harneys as I to yow tolde,
11

Knight's Tale: 1239

The bataille to darreyne, as I yow tolde; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 81

[continues previous] He wolde that every wight were swich as he,
10

Clerk's Tale: 419

[continues previous] Tak hede of every word that I yow seye,
10

Clerk's Tale: 420

[continues previous] Ther is no wight that hereth it but we tweye.
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] Thanne thus, in getinge richesses, ye mosten flee ydelnesse. And afterward, ye shul use the richesses, whiche ye have geten by your wit and by your travaille, in swich a manere, that men holde nat yow to scars, ne to sparinge, ne to fool-large, that is to seyn, over-large a spender. For right as men blamen an avaricious man by-cause of his scarsetee and chincherye, in the same wyse is he to blame that spendeth over largely. And therfore seith Caton: "use," he seith, "thy richesses that ...
11

Monk's Tale: 642

[continues previous] That every wight that hath discrecioun
11

Second Nun's Tale: 180

Telle him the wordes whiche I to yow tolde;
11

Second Nun's Tale: 181

And whan that he hath purged yow fro sinne,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6883

And for to make yow hem perceyven, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6884

That usen folk thus to disceyven, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 137

To goon and usen hem in engendrure;
11

Knight's Tale: 1239

[continues previous] The bataille to darreyne, as I yow tolde;
11

Knight's Tale: 1240

[continues previous] And til Athenes, hir covenant for to holde,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6883

[continues previous] And for to make yow hem perceyven,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6884

[continues previous] That usen folk thus to disceyven,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 140

And many a seint, sith that the world bigan,
13

Franklin's Tale: 202

That is, or was, sith that the world bigan.
13

Shipman's Tale: 162

That ever was, sith that the world bigan. [continues next]
13

Shipman's Tale: 163

But sith I am a wyf, it sit nat me [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 121

Was never wight, sith that the world bigan,
13

Monk's Tale: 122

That slow so many monstres as dide he.
13

Manciple's Tale: 16

That is or was, sith that the world bigan.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 141

Yet lived they ever in parfit chastitee.
13

Shipman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] That ever was, sith that the world bigan.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 143

Lat hem be breed of pured whete-seed,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 23

And lat us speke of wyves, that is best; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 144

And lat us wyves hoten barly-breed;
11

Legend of Lucretia: 23

[continues previous] And lat us speke of wyves, that is best; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 145

And yet with barly-breed, Mark telle can,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 23

[continues previous] And lat us speke of wyves, that is best;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 146

Our lord Iesu refresshed many a man.
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 9

As whan a man hath been in povre estaat, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 147

In swich estaat as god hath cleped us
12

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 9

[continues previous] As whan a man hath been in povre estaat,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 151

If I be daungerous, god yeve me sorwe!
12

Cook's Prologue: 11

I pray to god, so yeve me sorwe and care,
12

Cook's Prologue: 12

If ever, sith I highte Hogge of Ware,
12

Monk's Prologue: 62

God yeve me sorwe! but, and I were a pope,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4271

I have pite to seen the sorwe, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1609

And yeve me sorwe, but he shal it rewe, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 152

Myn housbond shal it have bothe eve and morwe,
13

Knight's Tale: 1963

To tellen how she weep, bothe eve and morwe?
10

Compleint to His Lady: 9

And from the morwe forth til hit be eve; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2847

To speke of him, at eve or morwe, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2848

It cureth me of al my sorwe. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 487

It shewed in his hewe, bothe eve and morwe;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 65

Whan morwe com, gan make hir weymentinge, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1609

[continues previous] And yeve me sorwe, but he shal it rewe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 595

And she to souper com, whan it was eve, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 614

And hider hoom I com whan it was eve; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 615

And here I dwelle out-cast from alle Ioye, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 725

So tendrely she weep, bothe eve and morwe.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 153

Whan that him list com forth and paye his dette.
11

Merchant's Tale: 804

And whan he wolde paye his wyf hir dette
12

Parson's Tale: 11

... sinful man the goodnesse of glorie, that only is bihight to gode men that labouren and werken. Wel may he be sory thanne, that oweth al his lif to god as longe as he hath lived, and eek as longe as he shal live, that no goodnesse ne hath to paye with his dette to god, to whom he oweth al his lyf. For trust wel, 'he shal yeven acountes,' as seith seint Bernard, 'of alle the godes that han be yeven him in this present lyf, and how he hath hem despended; in so muche that ther shal nat perisse an heer of ...
10

Compleint to His Lady: 9

[continues previous] And from the morwe forth til hit be eve;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2847

[continues previous] To speke of him, at eve or morwe,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4272

[continues previous] That waketh bothe eve and morwe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 65

[continues previous] Whan morwe com, gan make hir weymentinge,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 595

[continues previous] And she to souper com, whan it was eve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 614

[continues previous] And hider hoom I com whan it was eve;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 157

Up-on his flessh, whyl that I am his wyf.
10

Franklin's Tale: 813

But every wyf be-war of hir biheste, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 158

I have the power duringe al my lyf
10

Franklin's Tale: 812

[continues previous] That ever yet I knew in al my lyf.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 163

Up sterte the Pardoner, and that anon,
10

Melibee's Tale: 30

To this sentence answerde anon dame Prudence, and seyde: 'Examineth,' quod she, 'your conseil, and lat us see the whiche of hem han spoken most resonably, and taught yow best conseil. And for-as-muche as that the examinacioun is necessarie, lat us biginne at the surgiens and at the phisiciens, that first speken in this matere. I sey yow, ... [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 164

'Now dame,' quod he, 'by god and by seint Iohn,
11

Reeve's Tale: 106

'Symond,' quod Iohn, 'by god, nede has na peer; [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 207

'Now, Symond,' seyde Iohn, 'by seint Cutberd,
11

Man of Law's Prologue: 18

Now, for the love of god and of seint Iohn,
15+

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn! [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 483

But he was quit, by god and by seint Ioce!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 830

'Now, dame,' quod he, 'so have I Ioye or blis,
10

Friar's Prologue: 6

'Dame,' quod he, 'god yeve yow right good lyf!
11

Friar's Tale: 145

Wel be we met, by god and by seint Iame!
12

Summoner's Tale: 92

'Ey, maister! wel-come be ye, by seint Iohn!' [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 130

'Now dame,' quod he, 'Ie vous dy sanz doute,
15+

Summoner's Tale: 544

A goune-cloth, by god and by Seint Iohn!' [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 545

'My lord,' quod he, 'whan that the weder is fair, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1146

'Now, dame,' quod he, 'lat al passe out of minde.
11

Physician's Epilogue: 34

'It shall be doon,' quod he, 'by seint Ronyon!
11

Physician's Epilogue: 35

But first,' quod he, 'heer at this ale-stake
10

Pardoner's Tale: 424

'Thou partest nat so lightly, by seint Iohn!
12

Shipman's Tale: 148

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'by god and seint Martyn,
12

Shipman's Tale: 149

He is na more cosin un-to me
11

Shipman's Tale: 355

I thanke yow, by god and by seint Iame!
10

Melibee's Tale: 30

[continues previous] To this sentence answerde anon dame Prudence, and seyde: 'Examineth,' quod she, 'your conseil, and lat us see the whiche of hem han spoken most resonably, and taught yow best conseil. And for-as-muche as that the examinacioun is necessarie, lat us biginne at the surgiens and at the phisiciens, that first speken in this matere. I sey yow, that the surgiens ...
10

Parson's Tale: 35

... wrong that man dooth to his neighebore, in body or in catel. Of this cursed sinne of Ire cometh eek manslaughtre. And understonde wel, that homicyde, that is manslaughtre, is in dyverse wyse. Som manere of homicyde is spirituel, and som is bodily. Spirituel manslaughtre is in six thinges. First, by hate; as seint Iohn seith, 'he that hateth his brother is homicyde.' Homicyde is eek by bakbytinge; of whiche bakbyteres seith Salomon, that 'they han two swerdes with whiche they sleen hir neighebores.' For soothly, as wikke is to binime his good name as his lyf. Homicyde is eek, in yevinge of wikked conseil by fraude; ...
10

Parson's Tale: 75

Now lat us speke thanne of thilke stinkinge sinne of Lecherie that men clepe Avoutrie of wedded folk, that is to seyn, if that oon of hem be wedded, or elles bothe. Seint Iohn seith, that avoutiers shullen been in helle in a stank brenninge of fyr and of brimston; in fyr, for the lecherie; in brimston, for the stink of hir ordure. Certes, the brekinge of this sacrement is an horrible thing; it was maked of god him-self in paradys, and confermed by ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!'
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 165

Ye been a noble prechour in this cas!
11

Reeve's Tale: 105

[continues previous] And Iohn also, how now, what do ye heer?'
14

Man of Law's Tale: 922

[continues previous] A moder he hath, but fader hath he non
12

Summoner's Tale: 92

[continues previous] 'Ey, maister! wel-come be ye, by seint Iohn!'
12

Summoner's Tale: 93

[continues previous] Seyde this wyf, 'how fare ye hertely?'
14

Summoner's Tale: 544

[continues previous] A goune-cloth, by god and by Seint Iohn!'
10

Parson's Tale: 75

[continues previous] Now lat us speke thanne of thilke stinkinge sinne of Lecherie that men clepe Avoutrie of wedded folk, that is to seyn, if that oon of hem be wedded, or elles bothe. Seint Iohn seith, that avoutiers shullen been in helle in a stank brenninge of fyr and of brimston; in fyr, for the lecherie; in brimston, for the stink of hir ordure. Certes, the brekinge of this sacrement is an horrible thing; it was maked of god him-self in paradys, and confermed by Iesu Crist, as witnesseth seint Mathew ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 167

What sholde I bye it on my flesh so dere?
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5929

For he ne can so dere it bye
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 168

Yet hadde I lever wedde no wyf to-yere!'
11

Man of Law's Tale: 928

Of worldly wommen, mayden, nor of wyf;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 929

I dar wel seyn hir hadde lever a knyf
11

Clerk's Tale: 28

Wedde no wyf, for noght that may bifalle.
10

Clerk's Tale: 126

Lest that this markis no wyf wolde wedde.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 823

Yet hadde I lever spenden al the good
12

Manciple's Prologue: 78

Yet hadde I lever payen for the mare
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1508

That for hir love is that I fare a-mis;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1509

Yet hadde I lever unwist for sorwe dye."
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 170

Nay, thou shalt drinken of another tonne
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 177

Of thilke tonne that I shal abroche. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 178

Be war of it, er thou to ny approche; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 842

Telle of a Somnour swich a tale or two, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 195

For this thing is al of another tonne, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 196

Of olde story, er swich thing was be-gonne. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 171

Er that I go, shal savoure wors than ale.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 177

[continues previous] Of thilke tonne that I shal abroche.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 841

[continues previous] 'Now, by my feith, I shal, er that I go,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 196

[continues previous] Of olde story, er swich thing was be-gonne.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 172

And whan that I have told thee forth my tale
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 586

A! ha! by god, I have my tale ageyn.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 587

Whan that my fourthe housbond was on bere,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 173

Of tribulacioun in mariage,
11

Merchant's Tale: 399

And so greet ese and lust in mariage, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 174

Of which I am expert in al myn age,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 113

I wol bistowe the flour of al myn age
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 114

In the actes and in fruit of mariage.
11

Merchant's Tale: 400

[continues previous] That ever I am agast, now in myn age,
10

Merchant's Tale: 401

That I shal lede now so mery a lyf,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 513

Have al this tresor to my-self allone, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 896

'Certes,' quod I, 'in al myn age,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 897

Ne saugh I swich a hous as this.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 175

This to seyn, my-self have been the whippe; —
10

Pardoner's Tale: 513

[continues previous] Have al this tresor to my-self allone,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 176

Than maystow chese whether thou wolt sippe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 955

And chese, if thou wolt singe or daunce or lepe;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 177

Of thilke tonne that I shal abroche.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 170

Nay, thou shalt drinken of another tonne [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 171

Er that I go, shal savoure wors than ale. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1622

That I shal seyn, be war of this myscheef, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 178

Be war of it, er thou to ny approche;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 170

[continues previous] Nay, thou shalt drinken of another tonne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1622

[continues previous] That I shal seyn, be war of this myscheef,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 179

For I shal telle ensamples mo than ten.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 578

Of maistres hadde he mo than thryes ten, [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 107

Than telle I hem ensamples many oon
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 180

Who-so that nil be war by othere men,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 579

[continues previous] That were of lawe expert and curious;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 184

'Dame, I wolde praye yow, if your wil it were,'
12

Knight's Tale: 246

And seyde: 'Venus, if it be thy wil [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 247

Yow in this gardin thus to transfigure [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 48

'A!' quod dame Prudence, 'ye seyn your wil and as yow lyketh; but in no caas of the world a man sholde nat doon outrage ne excesse for to vengen him. For Cassidore seith: that "as yvel doth he that vengeth him by outrage, as he that doth the outrage." And therfore ye shul venge yow after the ordre of right, ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1357

To knowen fully, if your wil it were,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 185

Seyde this Pardoner, 'as ye bigan,
12

Knight's Tale: 246

[continues previous] And seyde: 'Venus, if it be thy wil
12

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan. [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 98

Bigan his tale, as ye shal after here. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 194

As ever mote I drinken wyn or ale, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 466

Therof no fors; I wol precede as now, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 186

Telle forth your tale, spareth for no man,
12

Knight's Tale: 496

[continues previous] For I wol telle forth as I bigan.
10

Man of Law's Prologue: 98

[continues previous] Bigan his tale, as ye shal after here.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

[continues previous] Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale.
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And telle forth my tale of the chanoun,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 188

'Gladly,' quod she, 'sith it may yow lyke.
11

Friar's Prologue: 14

But if it lyke to this companye, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 789

For sith it lyketh yow, my lord,' quod she,
10

Merchant's Prologue: 30

Ful hertely I pray yow telle us part.' [continues next]
10

Merchant's Prologue: 31

'Gladly,' quod he, 'but of myn owene sore, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1152

'Ye, sire,' quod she, 'ye may wene as yow lest; [continues next]
10

Amorous Compleint: 8

Can I noght doon ne seye that may yow lyke,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 800

'What do ye there, beau sire?' quod she,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 801

Come [neer], and if it lyke yow
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 431

May lyke yow, so beth to me benigne; [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 598

To telle it thee; for, sith it may thee lyke, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 599

Yet wole I telle it, though myn herte breste; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 101

But now or never, if that it lyke yow, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 102

I may hir have right sone, doutelees. [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 189

But yet I praye to al this companye,
11

Friar's Prologue: 15

[continues previous] I wol yow of a somnour telle a game. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] 'Gladly,' quod he, 'but of myn owene sore,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1153

[continues previous] But, sire, a man that waketh out of his sleep,
13

Hous of Fame 3: 460

That gonne hir of hir grace praye;
13

Hous of Fame 3: 461

And yit, lo, al this companye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 430

[continues previous] Wherfore, lord, if my servyse or I
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 431

[continues previous] May lyke yow, so beth to me benigne;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 599

[continues previous] Yet wole I telle it, though myn herte breste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 102

[continues previous] I may hir have right sone, doutelees.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 190

If that I speke after my fantasye,
10

Friar's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] But if it lyke to this companye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 191

As taketh not a-grief of that I seye;
11

Miller's Prologue: 64

For goddes love, demeth nat that I seye [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 65

Of evel entente, but that I moot reherce [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 844

The peple of god? I seye, for this entente, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 845

That, right as god spirit of vigour sente [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 192

For myn entente nis but for to pleye.
11

Miller's Prologue: 65

[continues previous] Of evel entente, but that I moot reherce
11

Man of Law's Tale: 844

[continues previous] The peple of god? I seye, for this entente,
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 40

'Nay,' quod this monk, 'I have no lust to pleye; [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 3: 1042

Aboute, and dide al myn entente
14

Hous of Fame 3: 1043

Me for to pleye and for to lere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 121

'Yet coude I telle a thing to doon you pleye.' [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 193

Now sires, now wol I telle forth my tale.
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 833

Lat se now who shal telle the firste tale. [continues next]
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 834

As ever mote I drinke wyn or ale, [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 496

For I wol telle forth as I bigan. [continues next]
10

Cook's Prologue: 18

I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 186

Telle forth your tale, spareth for no man, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 828

Now wol I seye my tale, if ye wol here.'
10

Friar's Tale: 37

Thus seyde our host, 'and lat him telle his tale.
10

Friar's Tale: 38

Now telleth forth, thogh that the Somnour gale,
10

Summoner's Prologue: 7

As suffereth me I may my tale telle! [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I
12

Merchant's Tale: 776

And in my tale forth I wol procede.
10

Merchant's Tale: 1020

'Ye shal,' quod Proserpyne, 'wol ye so;
10

Merchant's Tale: 1021

Now, by my modres sires soule I swere,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1064

As ever hool I mote brouke my tresses, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 6

Agayn your lust; a tale wol I telle.
15+

Pardoner's Tale: 332

But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 41

[continues previous] Now let another telle, as I have told.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 151

Al that I can anon now wol I telle.
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 466

Therof no fors; I wol precede as now, [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 467

And telle forth my tale of the chanoun, [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
10

Book of the Duchesse: 225

Of this tale next before:
10

Book of the Duchesse: 226

And I wol telle yow wherfore;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 121

[continues previous] 'Yet coude I telle a thing to doon you pleye.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

[continues previous] 'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 194

As ever mote I drinken wyn or ale,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 637

And for to drinken strong wyn, reed as blood.
12

Knight's Tale: 496

[continues previous] For I wol telle forth as I bigan.
11

Miller's Prologue: 31

And therfore, if that I misspeke or seye, [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 32

Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye; [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 227

And drinken ever strong ale atte beste.
10

Cook's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 185

[continues previous] Seyde this Pardoner, 'as ye bigan,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 601

And I was fourty, if I shal seye sooth; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 602

But yet I hadde alwey a coltes tooth. [continues next]
10

Summoner's Prologue: 7

[continues previous] As suffereth me I may my tale telle!
10

Merchant's Tale: 1064

[continues previous] As ever hool I mote brouke my tresses, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1065

[continues previous] I shal nat spare, for no curteisye, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 332

[continues previous] But, sirs, now wol I telle forth my tale.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 604

Com doun, and I shal telle yow what I mente. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.' [continues next]
15+

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 466

[continues previous] Therof no fors; I wol precede as now,
11

Manciple's Prologue: 60

For, were it wyn, or old or moysty ale,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 125

'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'as ever mote I thryve!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1206

And seyde, 'O swete, as ever mote I goon,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 195

I shal seye sooth, tho housbondes that I hadde,
15+

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 834

[continues previous] As ever mote I drinke wyn or ale,
11

Miller's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] And therfore, if that I misspeke or seye,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 601

[continues previous] And I was fourty, if I shal seye sooth;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 602

[continues previous] But yet I hadde alwey a coltes tooth.
12

Merchant's Prologue: 17

Assaye who-so wol, and he shal finde
12

Merchant's Prologue: 18

I seye sooth, by seint Thomas of Inde,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1064

[continues previous] As ever hool I mote brouke my tresses,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1065

[continues previous] I shal nat spare, for no curteisye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 604

[continues previous] Com doun, and I shal telle yow what I mente.
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 605

[continues previous] I shal seye sooth to yow, god help me so.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 196

As three of hem were gode and two were badde.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 196

As three of hem were gode and two were badde. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 197

The three men were gode, and riche, and olde; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 349

And somme were riche, and hadden badde name. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 197

The three men were gode, and riche, and olde;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 196

[continues previous] As three of hem were gode and two were badde.
11

Merchant's Tale: 349

[continues previous] And somme were riche, and hadden badde name.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 199

In which that they were bounden un-to me.
11

Merchant's Tale: 1032

What rekketh me of your auctoritees? [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 1099

(For wel I woot that ye mistruste me) [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 599

Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me; [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 457

Hoom to myn hous, or elles un-to youres — [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 458

For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures — [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee!
15+

Miller's Tale: 585

By sëynt Note, ye woot wel what I mene.'
15+

Miller's Tale: 586

This Absolon ne roghte nat a bene
11

Summoner's Tale: 491

As ye han herd biforn, ye woot wel what.
10

Summoner's Tale: 492

The lady of the hous ay stille sat,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1032

[continues previous] What rekketh me of your auctoritees?
11

Merchant's Tale: 1033

[continues previous] I woot wel that this Iew, this Salomon,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1099

[continues previous] (For wel I woot that ye mistruste me)
12

Franklin's Tale: 594

Er ye me sleen by-cause that I yow love.
12

Franklin's Tale: 595

For, madame, wel ye woot what ye han hight;
13

Franklin's Tale: 599

[continues previous] Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me;
12

Pardoner's Tale: 458

[continues previous] For wel ye woot that al this gold is oures —
15+

Against Women Unconstaunt: 20

Al light for somer, ye woot wel what I mene,
15+

Against Women Unconstaunt: 21

In stede of blew, thus may ye were al grene.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 689

But wel I woot, the mene of it no vyce is,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 133

As help me god, I noot nat what ye mene.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 226

'Shal I not witen what ye mene of this?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 257

For thee have I my nece, of vyces clene,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 201

As help me god, I laughe whan I thinke
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 596

As help me god, whan that I saugh him go
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 605

As help me god, I was a lusty oon,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 805

As help me god, I shal thee never smyte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 133

[continues previous] As help me god, I noot nat what ye mene.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 202

How pitously a-night I made hem swinke;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 215

I sette hem so a-werke, by my fey, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 203

And by my fey, I tolde of it no stoor.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 215

[continues previous] I sette hem so a-werke, by my fey,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 205

Me neded nat do lenger diligence
11

Clerk's Tale: 174

With everich obeisaunce and diligence [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 530

And preyeth him to doon his diligence [continues next]
13

Manciple's Tale: 37

And night and day dide ever his diligence [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 206

To winne hir love, or doon hem reverence.
11

Clerk's Tale: 175

[continues previous] That child may doon to fadres reverence.
11

Franklin's Tale: 529

[continues previous] Doth to his maister chere and reverence,
11

Franklin's Tale: 530

[continues previous] And preyeth him to doon his diligence
11

Franklin's Tale: 531

[continues previous] To bringen him out of his peynes smerte,
13

Manciple's Tale: 38

[continues previous] Hir for to plese, and doon hir reverence,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 82

To bokes olde and doon hem reverence,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 98

To olde stories, and doon hem reverence,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 207

They loved me so wel, by god above,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1004

I mene wel, by god that sit above:'[continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 208

That I ne tolde no deyntee of hir love!
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 38

And sin it is thus, that goode men ne failen never-mo of hir mede, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 39

certes, no wys man ne may doute of undepartable peyne of the [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1004

[continues previous] I mene wel, by god that sit above:' —
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 209

A wys womman wol sette hir ever in oon
11

Merchant's Tale: 729

To any womman, for to gete hir love, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 39

[continues previous] certes, no wys man ne may doute of undepartable peyne of the
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 210

To gete hir love, ther as she hath noon.
11

Merchant's Tale: 729

[continues previous] To any womman, for to gete hir love,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 888

To gete hir love no ner nas he
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 211

But sith I hadde hem hoolly in myn hond,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 624

I wolde I hadde thy coillons in myn hond [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 625

In stede of relikes or of seintuarie; [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 249

For though I hadde hem in myn hondes two,
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 43

A compleynt hadde I, writen, in myn hond, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 212

And sith they hadde me yeven all hir lond,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 346

They han hir yeven, and clothes eek she hadde,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 624

[continues previous] I wolde I hadde thy coillons in myn hond
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 43

[continues previous] A compleynt hadde I, writen, in myn hond,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 215

I sette hem so a-werke, by my fey,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 202

How pitously a-night I made hem swinke;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 203

And by my fey, I tolde of it no stoor.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 217

The bacoun was nat fet for hem, I trowe,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 155

It was almost a spanne brood, I trowe;
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 156

For, hardily, she was nat undergrowe.
10

Squire's Tale: 213

I trowe som men of armes been ther-inne, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 303

By note, that ever man, I trowe, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 304

Had herd; for som of hem song lowe, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 218

That som men han in Essex at Dunmowe.
10

Squire's Tale: 213

[continues previous] I trowe som men of armes been ther-inne,
10

Squire's Tale: 214

[continues previous] That shapen hem this citee for to winne.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 304

[continues previous] Had herd; for som of hem song lowe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 219

I governed hem so wel, after my lawe,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve! [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 444

No lenger thanne after Deeth they soughte, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 445

But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 220

That ech of hem ful blisful was and fawe
10

Man of Law's Tale: 866

They brennen, sleen, and bringe hem to meschance [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 867

Ful many a day; but shortly, this is thende, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

[continues previous] With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Pardoner's Tale: 445

[continues previous] But ech of hem so glad was of that sighte,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 138

[continues previous] So ech of hem [doth wel] to creature.
15+

Parlement of Foules: 688

Sith ech of hem recovered hath his make;
15+

Parlement of Foules: 689

Ful blisful may they singen whan they wake;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1343

For which ful ofte ech of hem seyde, 'O swete,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 221

To bringe me gaye thinges fro the fayre.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 866

[continues previous] They brennen, sleen, and bringe hem to meschance
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 47

[continues previous] And ech of hem seyde to other ful lowde,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 222

They were ful glad whan I spak to hem fayre;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 391

They were ful glad to excusen hem ful blyve
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 336

I hem defye, I love hem never a del. [continues next]
10

Legend of Dido: 54

And thus she to hem spak, whan she hem mette.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 223

For god it woot, I chidde hem spitously.
10

Merchant's Tale: 300

For god it woot, I have wept many a tere
10

Shipman's Tale: 406

For, god it woot, I wende, withouten doute,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 335

[continues previous] For they ben venimous, I woot it wel;
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 336

[continues previous] I hem defye, I love hem never a del.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 225

Ye wyse wyves, that can understonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 378

This knowe they that been to wyves bonde.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 379

Lordinges, right thus, as ye have understonde, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

... thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne kept suffisantly withouten the ... [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 283

Al were it so that she hem longe taried; [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 284

And ye shul understonde how that he [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 3

And now, sith I have declared yow what thing is Penitence, now shul ye understonde that ther been three accions of Penitence. The firste accion of Penitence is, that a man be baptized after that he hath sinned. Seint Augustin seith: 'but he be penitent for his olde sinful lyf, he may nat biginne the newe clene lif.' For certes, if he be baptized withouten penitence ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 12

... that men yaven him, of the foule mowes, and of the repreves that men to him seyden; of the nayles with whiche he was nailed to the croys, and of al the remenant of his passion that he suffred for my sinnes, and no-thing for his gilt.' And ye shul understonde, that in mannes sinne is every manere of ordre or ordinance turned up-so-doun. For it is sooth, that god, and reson, and sensualitee, and the body of man been so ordeyned, that everich of thise foure thinges sholde have lordshipe over that other; as thus: god sholde have lordshipe over reson, ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 24

And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, and to his goostly ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 42

... 'thou dronkelewe harlot,' and so forth; thanne aperteneth that to the reioysinge of the devel, that evere hath Ioye that men doon sinne. And certes, chydinge may nat come but out of a vileyns herte. For after the habundance of the herte speketh the mouth ful ofte. And ye shul understonde that loke, by any wey, whan any man shal chastyse another, that he be war from chydinge or reprevinge. For trewely, but he be war, he may ful lightly quiken the fyr of angre and of wratthe, which that he sholde quenche, and per-aventure sleeth him which that he mighte chastyse ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 67

... and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 68

Now shul ye understonde, that the relevinge of Avarice is misericorde, and pitee largely taken. And men mighten axe, why that misericorde and pitee is relevinge of Avarice? Certes, the avaricious man sheweth no pitee ne misericorde to the nedeful man; for he delyteth him in the kepinge of his tresor, and nat in the ... [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 93

Now as to speken of bodily peyne, it stant in preyeres, in wakinges, in fastinges, in vertuouse techinges of orisouns. And ye shul understonde, that orisouns or preyeres is for to seyn a pilous wil of herte, that redresseth it in god and expresseth it by word outward, to remoeven harmes and to han thinges espirituel and durable, and somtyme temporel thinges; of whiche orisouns, certes, in the orisoun of the Pater-noster, hath Iesu Crist ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 226

Thus shul ye speke and bere hem wrong on honde;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 379

[continues previous] Lordinges, right thus, as ye have understonde,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... over alle thynges, ye sholde doon your diligence to kepen your persone and to warnestore your hous. And seyden also, that in this caas ye oghten for to werken ful avysely and with greet deliberacioun. And sir, as to the firste point, that toucheth to the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne ...
12

Monk's Tale: 283

[continues previous] Al were it so that she hem longe taried;
12

Monk's Tale: 284

[continues previous] And ye shul understonde how that he
10

Parson's Tale: 3

[continues previous] And now, sith I have declared yow what thing is Penitence, now shul ye understonde that ther been three accions of Penitence. The firste accion of Penitence is, that a man be baptized after that he hath sinned. Seint Augustin seith: 'but he be penitent for his olde sinful lyf, he may nat biginne the newe clene lif.' For certes, if he be baptized ...
10

Parson's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... of the buffettes that men yaven him, of the foule mowes, and of the repreves that men to him seyden; of the nayles with whiche he was nailed to the croys, and of al the remenant of his passion that he suffred for my sinnes, and no-thing for his gilt.' And ye shul understonde, that in mannes sinne is every manere of ordre or ordinance turned up-so-doun. For it is sooth, that god, and reson, and sensualitee, and the body of man been so ordeyned, that everich of thise foure thinges sholde have lordshipe over that other; as thus: god sholde have lordshipe ...
11

Parson's Tale: 24

[continues previous] And thogh so be that no man can outrely telle the nombre of the twigges and of the harmes that cometh of Pryde, yet wol I shewe a partie of hem, as ye shul understonde. Ther is Inobedience, Avauntinge, Ipocrisie, Despyt, Arrogance, Impudence, Swellinge of herte, Insolence, Elacion, Impacience, Strif, Contumacie, Presumpcion, Irreverence, Pertinacie, Veyne Glorie; and many another twig that I can nat declare. Inobedient, is he that disobeyeth for despyt to the comandements of god and to hise sovereyns, and to his ...
10

Parson's Tale: 42

[continues previous] ... as, 'thou holour,' 'thou dronkelewe harlot,' and so forth; thanne aperteneth that to the reioysinge of the devel, that evere hath Ioye that men doon sinne. And certes, chydinge may nat come but out of a vileyns herte. For after the habundance of the herte speketh the mouth ful ofte. And ye shul understonde that loke, by any wey, whan any man shal chastyse another, that he be war from chydinge or reprevinge. For trewely, but he be war, he may ful lightly quiken the fyr of angre and of wratthe, which that he sholde quenche, and per-aventure sleeth him which that he ...
10

Parson's Tale: 67

[continues previous] ... which comth deceite, false othes, chydinges, and alle ravines, blaspheminge and reneyinge of god, and hate of hise neighebores, wast of godes, misspendinge of tyme, and somtyme manslaughtre. Certes, hasardours ne mowe nat been with-outen greet sinne whyles they haunte that craft. Of avarice comen eek lesinges, thefte, fals witnesse, and false othes. And ye shul understonde that thise been grete sinnes, and expres agayn the comaundements of god, as I have seyd. Fals witnesse is in word and eek in dede. In word, as for to bireve thy neighebores goode name by thy fals witnessing, or bireven him his catel or his heritage by thy fals witnessing; whan thou, for ire or ...
10

Parson's Tale: 68

[continues previous] Now shul ye understonde, that the relevinge of Avarice is misericorde, and pitee largely taken. And men mighten axe, why that misericorde and pitee is relevinge of Avarice? Certes, the avaricious man sheweth no pitee ne misericorde to the nedeful man; for he delyteth him in the kepinge of his tresor, and nat ...
10

Parson's Tale: 93

[continues previous] Now as to speken of bodily peyne, it stant in preyeres, in wakinges, in fastinges, in vertuouse techinges of orisouns. And ye shul understonde, that orisouns or preyeres is for to seyn a pilous wil of herte, that redresseth it in god and expresseth it by word outward, to remoeven harmes and to han thinges espirituel and durable, and somtyme temporel thinges; of whiche orisouns, certes, in the orisoun of the Pater-noster, hath ...
12

Parlement of Foules: 658

And seyde hem thus, as ye shul after here.
12

Parlement of Foules: 659

To you speke I, ye tercelets,' quod Nature,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

[continues previous] Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

[continues previous] Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1183

As men don hem that shul be leyd on bere.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1184

And after this, with sterne and cruel herte,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 227

For half so boldely can ther no man
10

Man of Law's Tale: 931

Ther is no man coude bringe hir to that prikke.' [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 880

Ther can no man in humblesse him acquyte [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 803

In Engelond ther can no man it make.'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 804

'No fors,' quod he, 'now, sir, for goddes sake,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 146

For trewely, ther can no wight yow serve,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 147

That half so looth your wraththe wolde deserve.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 228

Swere and lyen as a womman can.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 930

[continues previous] Thurgh-out her breste, than been a womman wikke;
10

Clerk's Tale: 880

[continues previous] Ther can no man in humblesse him acquyte
10

Clerk's Tale: 881

[continues previous] As womman can, ne can ben half so trewe
13

Merchant's Tale: 80

That womman is for mannes help y-wroght. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... nat be conseilled so ofte. For soothly, thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 229

I sey nat this by wyves that ben wyse,
13

Merchant's Tale: 79

[continues previous] And herke why, I sey nat this for noght,
13

Merchant's Tale: 80

[continues previous] That womman is for mannes help y-wroght.
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... thilke man that asketh conseil of a purpos, yet hath he free chois, wheither he wole werke by that conseil or noon. And as to your fourthe resoun, ther ye seyn that "the Ianglerie of wommen hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it ...
10

Monk's Prologue: 24

Thou darst nat stonden by thy wyves right!" [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 25

This is my lyf, but-if that I wol fighte; [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Venus: 49

But certes, Love, I sey nat in such wyse
11

Compleynt of Venus: 50

That for tescape out of your lace I mente;
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

... the remenaunt of the noumbre that leveth the latitude of the regioun. As thus: I suppose that the sonne is thilke day at noon 38 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte. Abate thanne thise degrees and minutes out of 90; so leveth there 51 degrees and 50 minutes, the latitude. I sey nat this but for ensample; for wel I wot the latitude of Oxenforde is certein minutes lasse, as I mighte prove. Now yif so be that thee semeth to long a taryinge, to abyde til that the sonne be in the hevedes of Aries or of Libra, thanne waite whan the sonne ...
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 230

But-if it be whan they hem misavyse.
10

Monk's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] This is my lyf, but-if that I wol fighte;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 231

A wys wyf, if that she can hir good,
11

Parlement of Foules: 626

Than wol I doon hir this favour, that she [continues next]
11

Parlement of Foules: 627

Shal have right him on whom hir herte is set, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1111

Hath som-what in hir hertes prevetee, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1112

Wher-with she can, if I shal right arede, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 232

Shal beren him on hond the cow is wood,
11

Parlement of Foules: 627

[continues previous] Shal have right him on whom hir herte is set,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1112

[continues previous] Wher-with she can, if I shal right arede,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 233

And take witnesse of hir owene mayde
12

Parson's Tale: 86

... but soothly, swich departed shrift deserveth no mercy of god of hise sinnes. The sixte circumstaunce is, why that a man sinneth, as by whiche temptacioun; and if him-self procure thilke temptacioun, or by the excytinge of other folk; or if he sinne with a womman by force, or by hir owene assent; or if the womman, maugree hir heed, hath been afforced, or noon; this shal she telle; for coveitise, or for poverte, and if it was hir procuringe or noon; and swiche manere harneys. The seventhe circumstaunce is, in what manere he hath doon his sinne, or how that she hath suffred that folk han doon to ... [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 234

Of hir assent; but herkneth how I sayde.
12

Parson's Tale: 86

[continues previous] ... but soothly, swich departed shrift deserveth no mercy of god of hise sinnes. The sixte circumstaunce is, why that a man sinneth, as by whiche temptacioun; and if him-self procure thilke temptacioun, or by the excytinge of other folk; or if he sinne with a womman by force, or by hir owene assent; or if the womman, maugree hir heed, hath been afforced, or noon; this shal she telle; for coveitise, or for poverte, and if it was hir procuringe or noon; and swiche manere harneys. The seventhe circumstaunce is, in what manere he hath doon his sinne, or how that she hath suffred that folk han doon to ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 236

Why is my neighebores wyf so gay?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 239

What dostow at my neighebores hous? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 240

Is she so fair? artow so amorous? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 237

She is honoured over-al ther she goth;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 240

[continues previous] Is she so fair? artow so amorous?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 239

What dostow at my neighebores hous?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 236

Why is my neighebores wyf so gay? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 240

Is she so fair? artow so amorous?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 236

[continues previous] Why is my neighebores wyf so gay?
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 237

[continues previous] She is honoured over-al ther she goth;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 245

If that I walke or pleye un-to his hous!
12

Pardoner's Tale: 457

Hoom to myn hous, or elles un-to youres — [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1514

Un-to Deiphebus hous, as thee to pleye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 246

Thou comest hoom as dronken as a mous,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 457

[continues previous] Hoom to myn hous, or elles un-to youres —
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1513

[continues previous] Thow shall gon over night, and that as blyve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1514

[continues previous] Un-to Deiphebus hous, as thee to pleye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 248

Thou seist to me, it is a greet meschief
10

Knight's Tale: 361

How greet a sorwe suffreth now Arcite! [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 80

... wyves that been apparailled in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 249

To wedde a povre womman, for costage;
10

Knight's Tale: 360

[continues previous] Let him be war, his nekke lyth to wedde!
10

Knight's Tale: 361

[continues previous] How greet a sorwe suffreth now Arcite!
11

Clerk's Tale: 668

For he a povre womman wedded hadde,
13

Manciple's Tale: 115

And for that other is a povre womman, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 80

[continues previous] ... in silk and in precious purpre ne mowe nat clothen hem in Iesu Crist. What seith seint Iohn eek in this matere? Seint Gregorie eek seith, that no wight seketh precious array but only for veyne glorie, to been honoured the more biforn the peple. It is a greet folye, a womman to have a fair array outward and in hir-self be foul inward. A wyf sholde eek be mesurable in lokinge and in beringe and in laughinge, and discreet in alle hir wordes and hir dedes. And aboven alle worldly thing she sholde loven hir housbonde with al hir herte, and to him be ...
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 250

And if that she be riche, of heigh parage,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 264

For which we clayme to been of heigh parage,
13

Manciple's Tale: 115

[continues previous] And for that other is a povre womman,
13

Manciple's Tale: 116

[continues previous] She shal be cleped his wenche, or his lemman.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 253

And if that she be fair, thou verray knave,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 376

Thou seyst, that right as wormes shende a tree, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 254

Thou seyst that every holour wol hir have;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 375

[continues previous] To consume every thing that brent wol be.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 376

[continues previous] Thou seyst, that right as wormes shende a tree,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 255

She may no whyle in chastitee abyde,
11

Parlement of Foules: 509

Ye may abyde a whyle yet, parde!' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 256

That is assailled up-on ech a syde.
11

Parlement of Foules: 508

[continues previous] For to delivere us is gret charitè.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse,
12

Miller's Tale: 195

For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 196

And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 259

And som, for she can outher singe or daunce, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse;
12

Miller's Tale: 195

[continues previous] For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse,
12

Miller's Tale: 196

[continues previous] And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

[continues previous] Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

[continues previous] Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 259

[continues previous] And som, for she can outher singe or daunce, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

[continues previous] Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

[continues previous] Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 71

Somme, riche array, somme seyden, lust abedde,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 259

And som, for she can outher singe or daunce,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

[continues previous] Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

[continues previous] Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 250

But-if she outher saugh or herde [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 251

Som greet mischaunce, or greet disese. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 955

And chese, if thou wolt singe or daunce or lepe;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 409

If oon can singe, another can wel daunce;
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 260

And som, for gentillesse and daliaunce;
10

Miller's Tale: 195

For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse, [continues next]
15+

Miller's Tale: 196

And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 83

And som for veyne glorie, and som for hate. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 251

[continues previous] Som greet mischaunce, or greet disese.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 261

Som, for hir handes and hir armes smale;
11

Knight's Tale: 1218

With smale houndes al aboute hir feet; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1219

And undernethe hir feet she hadde a mone, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 195

[continues previous] For som folk wol ben wonnen for richesse,
15+

Miller's Tale: 196

[continues previous] And som for strokes, and som for gentillesse.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 83

[continues previous] And som for veyne glorie, and som for hate.
11

Parson's Tale: 10

... han misese of poverte; and this poverte shal been in foure thinges: in defaute of tresor, of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and the venim of ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5809

Yit wommen wol hir bodies selle; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1247

Hir armes smale, hir streyghte bak and softe,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1248

Hir sydes longe, fleshly, smothe, and whyte
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 262

Thus goth al to the devel by thy tale.
11

Knight's Tale: 1218

[continues previous] With smale houndes al aboute hir feet;
11

Parson's Tale: 10

[continues previous] ... poverte; and this poverte shal been in foure thinges: in defaute of tresor, of which that David seith; 'the riche folk, that embraceden and oneden al hir herte to tresor of this world, shul slepe in the slepinge of deeth; and no-thing ne shul they finden in hir handes of al hir tresor.' And more-over, the miseise of helle shal been in defaute of mete and drinke. For god seith thus by Moyses; 'they shul been wasted with hunger, and the briddes of helle shul devouren hem with bitter deeth, and the galle of the dragon shal been hir drinke, and ...
12

Hous of Fame 3: 749

But what art thou that seyst this tale, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 750

That werest on thy hose a pale, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5810

[continues previous] Suche soules goth to the devel of helle.'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 263

Thou seyst, men may nat kepe a castel-wal;
12

Hous of Fame 3: 749

[continues previous] But what art thou that seyst this tale,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 266

Coveiteth every man that she may se;
10

Merchant's Tale: 866

As be deceyved whan a man may se. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 867

Lo, Argus, which that hadde an hondred yën, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 267

For as a spaynel she wol on him lepe,
10

Cook's Tale: 14

Out of the shoppe thider wolde he lepe. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 866

[continues previous] As be deceyved whan a man may se.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 137

On him she thoghte alwey til that she sleep; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 268

Til that she finde som man hir to chepe;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 756

A fairer burgeys is ther noon in Chepe: [continues next]
10

Cook's Tale: 15

[continues previous] Til that he hadde al the sighte y-seyn,
10

Hous of Fame 1: 279

For this shal every woman finde
10

Hous of Fame 1: 280

That som man, of his pure kinde,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 137

[continues previous] On him she thoghte alwey til that she sleep;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 269

Ne noon so grey goos goth ther in the lake,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 756

[continues previous] A fairer burgeys is ther noon in Chepe:
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 271

And seyst, it is an hard thing for to welde
12

Melibee's Tale: 65

'Certes,' quod Prudence, 'it is an hard thing and right perilous, that a man putte him al outrely in the arbitracioun and Iuggement, and in the might and power of hise enemys. For Salomon seith: "leveth me, and yeveth credence to that I shal seyn; I seye," quod he, "ye peple, folk, and governours of holy chirche, to thy ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 272

A thing that no man wol, his thankes, helde.
11

Knight's Tale: 768

Wol noght, his thankes, have no felaweshipe;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 274

And that no wys man nedeth for to wedde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 323

I sey not this for no mistrust of yow, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 324

Ne for no wys man, but for foles nyce, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 275

Ne no man that entendeth un-to hevene.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 323

[continues previous] I sey not this for no mistrust of yow,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 324

[continues previous] Ne for no wys man, but for foles nyce,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 278

Thow seyst that dropping houses, and eek smoke,
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

... hath hid thinges that they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 279

And chyding wyves, maken men to flee
13

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... they woot noght," as who seith, that "a womman can nat hyde that she woot;" sir, thise wordes been understonde of wommen that been Iangleresses and wikked; of whiche wommen, men seyn that "three thinges dryven a man out of his hous; that is to seyn, smoke, dropping of reyn, and wikked wyves;" and of swiche wommen seith Salomon, that "it were bettre dwelle in desert, than with a womman that is riotous." And sir, by your leve, that am nat I; for ye han ful ofte assayed my grete silence and my gret pacience; and eek how wel that I can hyde and ...
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 280

Out of hir owene hous; a! benedicite!
12

Miller's Tale: 582

Why ryse ye so rathe, ey, benedicite! [continues next]
13

Shipman's Prologue: 8

The Persone him answerde, 'benedicite! [continues next]
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 73

'O seinte Marie, benedicite! [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 281

What eyleth swich an old man for to chyde?
12

Miller's Tale: 583

[continues previous] What eyleth yow? som gay gerl, god it woot,
13

Shipman's Prologue: 9

[continues previous] What eyleth the man, so sinfully to swere?'
12

Sir Thopas' Tale: 74

[continues previous] What eyleth this love at me
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 75

To binde me so sore?
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 283

Til we be fast, and than we wol hem shewe;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 292

And than, seistow, we wol oure vices shewe.
11

Hous of Fame 2: 509

To loke on hem.' 'That may wel be,' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6924

Of hem that wol ayens us be,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6925

We hate hem deedly everichoon,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6926

And we wol werrey hem, as oon.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 284

Wel may that be a proverbe of a shrewe!
11

Hous of Fame 2: 509

[continues previous] To loke on hem.' 'That may wel be,'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 285

Thou seist, that oxen, asses, hors, and houndes,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 349

Men, hors, houndes, and other thing;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 292

And than, seistow, we wol oure vices shewe.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 283

Til we be fast, and than we wol hem shewe;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 297

And but thou make a feste on thilke day
10

Knight's Tale: 365

He seyde, 'Allas that day that I was born! [continues next]
10

Reeve's Tale: 189

'Allas,' quod Iohn, 'the day that I was born! [continues next]
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 79

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born! [continues next]
10

Legend of Thisbe: 128

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born! [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 484

Of al my lyf, sin that day I was born, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 304

Seyd, "welawey! the day that I was born!" [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

That I was born, and make me fresh and gay,
10

Knight's Tale: 365

[continues previous] He seyde, 'Allas that day that I was born!
10

Reeve's Tale: 189

[continues previous] 'Allas,' quod Iohn, 'the day that I was born!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 508

But in our bed he was so fresh and gay, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose, [continues next]
14

Squire's Tale: 622

Though he were gentil born, and fresh and gay, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 623

And goodly for to seen, and humble and free, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 171

Ther I was wont to be right fresh and gay
10

Legend of Cleopatra: 79

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
10

Legend of Thisbe: 128

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
10

Parlement of Foules: 484

[continues previous] Of al my lyf, sin that day I was born,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 304

[continues previous] Seyd, "welawey! the day that I was born!"
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 305

[continues previous] And many a maydes sorwes for to newe;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 299

And but thou do to my norice honour,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 508

[continues previous] But in our bed he was so fresh and gay,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

[continues previous] And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose,
14

Squire's Tale: 622

[continues previous] Though he were gentil born, and fresh and gay,
14

Squire's Tale: 623

[continues previous] And goodly for to seen, and humble and free,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 304

For his crisp heer, shyninge as gold so fyn,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 824

Crisp was his heer, and eek ful bright.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 825

His shuldres of a large brede,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 305

And for he squiereth me bothe up and doun,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 119

Glose who-so wole, and seye bothe up and doun,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 307

I wol hym noght, thogh thou were deed to-morwe.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3138

He com criand as he were wood, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3140

Thou bringest hider so boldly [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 393

But tel me this, why thou art now so mad [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 308

But tel me this, why hydestow, with sorwe,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3139

[continues previous] And seide, 'Bialacoil, tel me why
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 393

[continues previous] But tel me this, why thou art now so mad
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 309

The keyes of thy cheste awey fro me?
15+

Merchant's Tale: 283

To whom I yeve my good awey fro me, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 310

It is my good as wel as thyn, pardee.
15+

Merchant's Tale: 283

[continues previous] To whom I yeve my good awey fro me,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 284

[continues previous] Wel muchel more I oghte avysed be
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1368

My fader, as ye knowen wel, pardee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1369

Is old, and elde is ful of coveityse.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 312

Now by that lord, that called is seint Iame,
15+

Reeve's Tale: 344

For by that lord that called is seint Iame,
11

Summoner's Tale: 235

And by that lord that clepid is seint Yve,
11

Shipman's Tale: 227

And by that lord that cleped is Seint Yve,
11

Melibee's Tale: 46

... man atempreth hem and stilleth." He seith also: "it is more worth to be pacient than for to be right strong; and he that may have the lordshipe of his owene herte is more to preyse, than he that by his force or strengthe taketh grete citees." And therfore seith seint Iame in his epistle: that "pacience is a greet vertu of perfeccioun."'
10

Melibee's Tale: 55

'Certes,' quod she, 'I conseille yow that ye accorde with youre adversaries, and that ye haue pees with hem. For seint Iame seith in hise epistles: that "by concord and pees the smale richesses wexen grete, and by debaat and discord the grete richesses fallen doun." And ye knowen wel that oon of the gretteste and most sovereyn thing, that is in this world, is unitee and pees. And therfore seyde oure lord Iesu Crist to hise apostles ...
10

Parson's Tale: 19

... which his flesh was blak as an Ethiopen for hete and ny destroyed for cold, yet seyde he: that 'the brenninge of lecherie boiled in al his body.' Wherfore I woot wel sikerly, that they been deceyved that seyn, that they ne be nat tempted in hir body. Witnesse on Seint Iame the Apostel, that seith: that 'every wight is tempted in his owen concupiscence': that is to seyn, that everich of us hath matere and occasion to be tempted of the norissinge of sinne that is in his body. And therfore seith Seint Iohn the Evaungelist: 'if that we seyn that we beth with-oute sinne, we ...
10

Gamelyn's Tale: 764

For by seint Iame in Gales that many man hath sought,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 797

'By seint Iame!' seyde his yonge men 'and thou rede therto, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 313

Thou shalt nat bothe, thogh that thou were wood,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 797

[continues previous] 'By seint Iame!' seyde his yonge men 'and thou rede therto,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 316

What nedeth thee of me to enquere or spyën?
11

Miller's Prologue: 58

Of the remenant nedeth nat enquere.'
11

Miller's Prologue: 59

What sholde I more seyn, but this Millere
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

... I have seyd biforn, ye han greetly erred to han cleped swich maner folk to your conseil; which conseillours been y-nogh repreved by the resouns afore-seyd. But nathelees, lat us now descende to the special. Ye shuln first procede after the doctrine of Tullius. Certes, the trouthe of this matere or of this conseil nedeth nat diligently enquere; for it is wel wist whiche they been that han doon to yow this trespas and vileinye, and how manye trespassours, and in what manere they han to yow doon al this wrong and al this vileinye. And after this, thanne shul ye examine the seconde condicioun, which that the ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 317

I trowe, thou woldest loke me in thy chiste!
12

Parson's Tale: 75

... man shal lete fader and moder, and taken him to his wyf, and they shullen be two in o flesh.' This sacrement bitokneth the knittinge togidre of Crist and of holy chirche. And nat only that god forbad avoutrie in dede, but eek he comanded that thou sholdest nat coveite thy neighebores wyf. In this heeste, seith seint Augustin, is forboden alle manere coveitise to doon lecherie. Lo what seith seint Mathew in the gospel: that 'who-so seeth a womman to coveitise of his lust, he hath doon lecherie with hir in his herte.' Here may ye seen that nat only the dede of ... [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 318

Thou sholdest seye, "wyf, go wher thee liste,
12

Parson's Tale: 75

[continues previous] ... in the gospel: 'A man shal lete fader and moder, and taken him to his wyf, and they shullen be two in o flesh.' This sacrement bitokneth the knittinge togidre of Crist and of holy chirche. And nat only that god forbad avoutrie in dede, but eek he comanded that thou sholdest nat coveite thy neighebores wyf. In this heeste, seith seint Augustin, is forboden alle manere coveitise to doon lecherie. Lo what seith seint Mathew in the gospel: that 'who-so seeth a womman to coveitise of his lust, he hath doon lecherie with hir in his herte.' Here may ye seen that nat only the dede ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 319

Tak your disport, I wol nat leve no talis;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 112

And lordinges, by your leve, that am nat I. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 113

I wol bistowe the flour of al myn age [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse [continues next]
10

Prioress' Prologue: 13

'My lady Prioresse, by your leve, [continues next]
10

Prioress' Prologue: 14

So that I wiste I sholde yow nat greve, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 320

I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alis."
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 112

[continues previous] And lordinges, by your leve, that am nat I.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 113

[continues previous] I wol bistowe the flour of al myn age
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 548

That Iankin clerk, and my gossib dame Alis,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

And be to yow a trewe humble wyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 366

And never yow displese in al my lyf,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Un-to your wil; now herkneth what I seye.
11

Franklin's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] I wol yow nat contrarien in no wyse
10

Prioress' Prologue: 14

[continues previous] So that I wiste I sholde yow nat greve,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 322

Wher that we goon, we wol ben at our large.
13

Miller's Tale: 407

Tomorwe at night, whan men ben alle aslepe, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 408

In-to our kneding-tubbes wol we crepe, [continues next]
13

Manciple's Prologue: 96

Wher that we goon, good drink we with us carie;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 323

Of alle men y-blessed moot he be,
13

Miller's Tale: 407

[continues previous] Tomorwe at night, whan men ben alle aslepe,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 324

The wyse astrologien Dan Ptholome,
10

Melibee's Tale: 12

... to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 325

That seith this proverbe in his Almageste,
12

Cook's Tale: 40

Up-on a day, whan he his paper soghte, [continues next]
12

Cook's Tale: 41

Of a proverbe that seith this same word, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... folk to whiche his speche anoyeth, as dooth to singe biforn him that wepeth. And whan this wyse man saugh that him wanted audience, al shamefast he sette him doun agayn. For Salomon seith: "ther-as thou ne mayst have noon audience, enforce thee nat to speke." 'I see wel,' quod this wyse man, 'that the commune proverbe is sooth; that "good conseil wanteth whan it is most nede."'
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 326

"Of alle men his wisdom is the hyeste,
12

Cook's Tale: 41

[continues previous] Of a proverbe that seith this same word,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 328

By this proverbe thou shalt understonde,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 336

Have thou y-nough, thee thar nat pleyne thee. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 337

Thou seyst also, that if we make us gay [continues next]
10

Parson's Tale: 95

After this, thou shalt understonde, that bodily peyne stant in wakinge; for Iesu Crist seith, 'waketh, and preyeth that ye ne entre in wikked temptacioun.' Ye shul understanden also, that fastinge stant in three thinges; in forberinge of bodily mete and drinke, and in forberinge of worldly Iolitee, and in forberinge of deedly sinne; this ... [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 46

... by night or by day, thou than shalt esely knowe, &c. Furthermore, if it so be that thou happe to worke for this matere aboute the tyme of the coniunccioun, bringe furthe the degree of the mone with the labelle to that coste as it is before seyd. But than thou shalt understonde that thou may not bringe furthe the label fro the degree of the mone as thou dide before; for-why the sonne is than in the same degree with the mone. And so thou may at that tyme by the point of the labelle unremeved knowe the houre of the flode or of ... [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 329

Have thou y-nogh, what thar thee recche or care
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 336

[continues previous] Have thou y-nough, thee thar nat pleyne thee.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 337

[continues previous] Thou seyst also, that if we make us gay
10

Parson's Tale: 95

[continues previous] After this, thou shalt understonde, that bodily peyne stant in wakinge; for Iesu Crist seith, 'waketh, and preyeth that ye ne entre in wikked temptacioun.' Ye shul understanden also, that fastinge stant in three thinges; in forberinge of bodily mete and drinke, and in forberinge of worldly Iolitee, and in forberinge of deedly ...
14

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 62

what, wenestow, thar [thee] recche, yif thou forlete hir in deyinge,
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 46

[continues previous] ... by night or by day, thou than shalt esely knowe, &c. Furthermore, if it so be that thou happe to worke for this matere aboute the tyme of the coniunccioun, bringe furthe the degree of the mone with the labelle to that coste as it is before seyd. But than thou shalt understonde that thou may not bringe furthe the label fro the degree of the mone as thou dide before; for-why the sonne is than in the same degree with the mone. And so thou may at that tyme by the point of the labelle unremeved knowe the houre of the flode or of ...
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 334

A man to lighte his candle at his lanterne;
10

Parson's Tale: 92

... thou shalt nat forbere to doon almesse though men seen it; so that it be nat doon for thank of the world, but only for thank of Iesu Crist. For as witnesseth Seint Mathew, capitulo quinto, 'A citee may nat been hid that is set on a montayne; ne men lighte nat a lanterne and put it under a busshel; but men sette it on a candle-stikke, to yeve light to the men in the hous. Right so shal youre light lighten bifore men, that they may seen youre gode werkes, and glorifie youre fader that is in hevene.'
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 335

He shal have never the lasse light, pardee;
10

Shipman's Tale: 219

Ye have y-nough, pardee, of goddes sonde; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 336

Have thou y-nough, thee thar nat pleyne thee.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 328

By this proverbe thou shalt understonde, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 329

Have thou y-nogh, what thar thee recche or care [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 219

[continues previous] Ye have y-nough, pardee, of goddes sonde;
10

Manciple's Tale: 248

Thee thar nat drede for to be biwreyd;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 71

'Certes,' quod she, 'ne ther-of thar thee nat doute. Now
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 337

Thou seyst also, that if we make us gay
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 328

[continues previous] By this proverbe thou shalt understonde,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 329

[continues previous] Have thou y-nogh, what thar thee recche or care
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 171

Ther I was wont to be right fresh and gay [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 338

With clothing and with precious array,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 171

[continues previous] Ther I was wont to be right fresh and gay
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 172

[continues previous] Of clothing and of other good array,
11

Parson's Tale: 27

... thinges that apertenen to rydinge, as in to manye delicat horses that been holden for delyt, that been so faire, fatte, and costlewe; and also to many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; in to curious harneys, as in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god seith by Zakarie the prophete, 'I wol confounde the ryderes of swiche horses.' This folk taken litel reward of the rydinge of goddes sone of hevene, and of his harneys whan he rood up-on the asse, and ne hadde noon other ...
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 343

Ye wommen shul apparaille yow," quod he,
11

Knight's Tale: 888

It nedeth noght to pyne yow with the corde. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 889

Ye shul be deed, by mighty Mars the rede!' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 344

"And noght in tressed heer and gay perree,
11

Knight's Tale: 888

[continues previous] It nedeth noght to pyne yow with the corde.
11

Monk's Tale: 315

She was al clad in perree and in gold,
11

Monk's Tale: 316

And eek she lafte noght, for noon hunting,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 345

As perles, ne with gold, ne clothes riche;"
11

Man of Law's Tale: 39

Clothes of gold, and satins riche of hewe;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 346

After thy text, ne after thy rubriche
10

Melibee's Tale: 20

... thanne rede I yow, that ye kepe it secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne thy folie; for they wol yeve yow audience and loking and supportacioun in thy presence, and scorne thee in thyn absence." Another clerk seith, that "scarsly shaltou finden any persone that may kepe conseil secreely." The book seith: "whyl that thou kepest thy conseil in thyn herte, thou kepest it in ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 347

I wol nat wirche as muchel as a gnat.
11

Knight's Tale: 1901

And certeinly, ther nature wol nat wirche,
10

Melibee's Tale: 20

[continues previous] ... best, thanne rede I yow, that ye kepe it secree. Biwrey nat your conseil to no persone, but-if so be that ye wenen sikerly that, thurgh your biwreying, your condicioun shal be to yow the more profitable. For Iesus Syrak seith: "neither to thy foo ne to thy freend discovere nat thy secree ne thy folie; for they wol yeve yow audience and loking and supportacioun in thy presence, and scorne thee in thyn absence." Another clerk seith, that "scarsly shaltou finden any persone that may kepe conseil secreely." The book seith: "whyl that thou kepest thy conseil in thyn herte, thou kepest it in thy prisoun: and whan ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 348

Thou seydest this, that I was lyk a cat;
12

Hous of Fame 3: 693

For ye be lyk the sweynte cat, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 694

That wolde have fish; but wostow what? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 349

For who-so wolde senge a cattes skin,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 351

And if the cattes skin be slyk and gay, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 693

[continues previous] For ye be lyk the sweynte cat,
12

Hous of Fame 3: 694

[continues previous] That wolde have fish; but wostow what?
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 350

Thanne wolde the cat wel dwellen in his in;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 350

[continues previous] Thanne wolde the cat wel dwellen in his in; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 351

[continues previous] And if the cattes skin be slyk and gay, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 351

And if the cattes skin be slyk and gay,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 349

[continues previous] For who-so wolde senge a cattes skin,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 350

[continues previous] Thanne wolde the cat wel dwellen in his in;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 352

She wol nat dwelle in house half a day,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 509

Gan he and I wel half a day to dwelle,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 357

Sire olde fool, what eyleth thee to spyën?
11

Manciple's Prologue: 16

What eyleth thee to slepe by the morwe?
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 311

But yit I sey, what eyleth thee to wryte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 331

Calkas I mene, allas! what eyleth thee [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 332

To been a Greek, sin thou art born Troian? [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 358

Thogh thou preye Argus, with his hundred yën,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 332

[continues previous] To been a Greek, sin thou art born Troian?
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 359

To be my warde-cors, as he can best,
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... your grace, certes ye despysen alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 360

In feith, he shal nat kepe me but me lest;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 45

Welcome the sixte, whan that ever he shal.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 46

For sothe, I wol nat kepe me chast in al;
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... alle wommen in this wyse; and "he that alle despyseth alle displeseth," as seith the book. And Senek seith that "who-so wole have sapience, shal no man dispreise; but he shal gladly techen the science that he can, with-outen presumpcioun or pryde. And swiche thinges as he nought ne can, he shal nat been ashamed to lerne hem and enquere of lasse folk than him-self." And sir, that ther hath been many a good womman, may lightly be preved. For certes, sir, our lord Iesu Crist wolde never have descended to be born of a womman, if alle wommen hadden ben wikke. And ...
12

Parson's Tale: 87

... sith that Crist is sovereyn and the preest mene and mediatour bitwixe Crist and the sinnere, and the sinnere is the laste by wey of resoun, thanne sholde nat the sinnere sitte as heighe as his confessour, but knele biforn him or at his feet, but-if maladie destourbe it. For he shal nat taken kepe who sit there, but in whos place that he sitteth. A man that hath trespased to a lord, and comth for to axe mercy and maken his accord, and set him doun anon by the lord, men wolde holden him outrageous, and nat worthy so sone for to have remissioun ne mercy. The thridde signe ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 361

Yet coude I make his berd, so moot I thee.
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 163

thing hath ben descovered to thee, in that thou seydest that [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 362

Thou seydest eek, that ther ben thinges three,
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

... in conseillinges. For the book seith, that "in olde men is the sapience and in longe tyme the prudence." And Tullius seith: that "grete thinges ne been nat ay accompliced by strengthe, ne by delivernesse of body, but by good conseil, by auctoritee of persones, and by science; the whiche three thinges ne been nat feble by age, but certes they enforcen and encreesen day by day." And thanne shul ye kepe this for a general reule. First shul ye clepen to your conseil a fewe of your freendes that been especiale; for Salomon seith: "manye freendes have thou; but among a ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 29

... your conseil your trewe freendes olde and wyse, ye han y-cleped straunge folk, and yong folk, false flatereres, and enemys reconsiled, and folk that doon yow reverence withouten love. And eek also ye have erred, for ye han broght with yow to your conseil ire, covetise, and hastifnesse; the whiche three thinges been contrariouse to every conseil honeste and profitable; the whiche three thinges ye han nat anientissed or destroyed hem, neither in your-self ne in your conseillours, as yow oghte. Ye han erred also, for ye han shewed to your conseillours your talent, and your affeccioun to make werre anon and for to do vengeance; they han espyed by your wordes to what ... [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 72

thinges, yif ther be no beautee to ben desyred, why sholdest thou [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 8: 9

covere al the erthe: — al this acordaunce of thinges is bounden with [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 32

and to power, so that we demen that thise three thinges ben [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 135

which is thilke verray blisfulnesse, and eek whiche thilke thinges [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 136

ben that lyen falsly blisfulnesse, that is to seyn, that by deceite [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 163

[continues previous] thing hath ben descovered to thee, in that thou seydest that
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 16

now on this syde and now on that syde. Two thinges ther ben [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 35

many maner gyses to thinges that ben to done; the whiche [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 225

ofte tyme thinges, the whiche thinges, whan they han don hem, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 15

thinges, of whiche thou seydest a litel her-biforn, that they ne were [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 87

thinges ben doon by necessitee whiche that ben y-seyn and [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 363

The whiche thinges troublen al this erthe,
11

Melibee's Tale: 21

[continues previous] ... been approved in conseillinges. For the book seith, that "in olde men is the sapience and in longe tyme the prudence." And Tullius seith: that "grete thinges ne been nat ay accompliced by strengthe, ne by delivernesse of body, but by good conseil, by auctoritee of persones, and by science; the whiche three thinges ne been nat feble by age, but certes they enforcen and encreesen day by day." And thanne shul ye kepe this for a general reule. First shul ye clepen to your conseil a fewe of your freendes that been especiale; for Salomon seith: "manye freendes have thou; but among a ...
11

Melibee's Tale: 29

[continues previous] ... cleped to your conseil your trewe freendes olde and wyse, ye han y-cleped straunge folk, and yong folk, false flatereres, and enemys reconsiled, and folk that doon yow reverence withouten love. And eek also ye have erred, for ye han broght with yow to your conseil ire, covetise, and hastifnesse; the whiche three thinges been contrariouse to every conseil honeste and profitable; the whiche three thinges ye han nat anientissed or destroyed hem, neither in your-self ne in your conseillours, as yow oghte. Ye han erred also, for ye han shewed to your conseillours your talent, and your affeccioun to make werre anon and for to do vengeance; they han espyed by your wordes to what ...
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 71

[continues previous] acountedest for thyne goodes nas nat thy good. In the whiche
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 72

[continues previous] thinges, yif ther be no beautee to ben desyred, why sholdest thou
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 8: 9

[continues previous] covere al the erthe:al this acordaunce of thinges is bounden with
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 32

[continues previous] and to power, so that we demen that thise three thinges ben
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 135

[continues previous] which is thilke verray blisfulnesse, and eek whiche thilke thinges
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 16

[continues previous] now on this syde and now on that syde. Two thinges ther ben
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 17

[continues previous] in whiche the effect of alle the dedes of mankinde standeth, that
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 35

[continues previous] many maner gyses to thinges that ben to done; the whiche
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 225

[continues previous] ofte tyme thinges, the whiche thinges, whan they han don hem,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 7: 15

[continues previous] thinges, of whiche thou seydest a litel her-biforn, that they ne were
12

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 87

[continues previous] thinges ben doon by necessitee whiche that ben y-seyn and
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 364

And that no wight ne may endure the ferthe;
12

Melibee's Tale: 31

... the keping of your persone; ye shul understonde that he that hath werre shal evermore mekely and devoutly preyen biforn alle thinges, that Iesus Crist of his grete mercy wol han him in his proteccioun, and been his sovereyn helping at his nede. For certes, in this world ther is no wight that may be conseilled ne kept suffisantly withouten the keping of our lord Iesu Crist. To this sentence accordeth the prophete David, that seith: "if god ne kepe the citee, in ydel waketh he that it kepeth." Now sir, thanne shul ye committe the keping of your persone to your trewe freendes that been approved ...
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 23

ther nis no wight that may merveylen y-nough, ne compleine,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 24

that swiche thinges ben doon in the regne of god, that alle thinges
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6207

Ne no wight may, by my clothing,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 373

Thou lyknest it also to wilde fyr;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 23

more cruely than the fyr of the mountaigne Ethna, that ay brenneth. [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 2467

The more thyn herte brenneth in fyr, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 374

The more it brenneth, the more it hath desyr
14

Melibee's Tale: 52

... goodes, that alle his wittes mowen nat disseveren him or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, he shal no-thing bere with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde ... [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 22

[continues previous] maneres! But the anguissous love of havinge brenneth in folk
12

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Metre 5: 23

[continues previous] more cruely than the fyr of the mountaigne Ethna, that ay brenneth.
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 2467

[continues previous] The more thyn herte brenneth in fyr,
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 2468

[continues previous] The more thyn herte is in desyr.
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 375

To consume every thing that brent wol be.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 254

Thou seyst that every holour wol hir have; [continues next]
14

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan he is deed, he shal no-thing bere with him out of this world. And ther-fore seith seint Augustin: that "the avaricious man is likned un-to helle; that the more it swelweth, the more desyr it hath to swelwe and devoure." And as wel as ye wolde eschewe to be called an avaricious man or chinche, as wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat ...
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 1

'This understonde I wel,' quod I, 'and I acorde wel that it is [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 376

Thou seyst, that right as wormes shende a tree,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 253

[continues previous] And if that she be fair, thou verray knave,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 254

[continues previous] Thou seyst that every holour wol hir have;
10

Shipman's Tale: 167

A wyf ne shal nat seyn of hir housbonde [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 6

... Ioyous and glad in herte, it him conserveth florisshing in his age; but soothly sorweful herte maketh his bones drye." He seith eek thus: "that sorwe in herte sleeth ful many a man." Salomon seith: "that, right as motthes in the shepes flees anoyeth to the clothes, and the smale wormes to the tree, right so anoyeth sorwe to the herte." Wherfore us oghte, as wel in the deeth of our children as in the losse of our goodes temporels, have pacience. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 1

[continues previous] 'This understonde I wel,' quod I, 'and I acorde wel that it is
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 2: 2

[continues previous] right as thou seyst. But I axe yif ther be any libertee of free wil
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 377

Right so a wyf destroyeth hir housbonde;
10

Franklin's Tale: 87

And speken I wole of Dorigene his wyf, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 88

That loveth hir housbonde as hir hertes lyf. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 167

[continues previous] A wyf ne shal nat seyn of hir housbonde
12

Shipman's Tale: 212

Up to hir housbonde is this wyf y-gon, [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 6

[continues previous] ... herte, it him conserveth florisshing in his age; but soothly sorweful herte maketh his bones drye." He seith eek thus: "that sorwe in herte sleeth ful many a man." Salomon seith: "that, right as motthes in the shepes flees anoyeth to the clothes, and the smale wormes to the tree, right so anoyeth sorwe to the herte." Wherfore us oghte, as wel in the deeth of our children as in the losse of our goodes temporels, have pacience.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 378

This knowe they that been to wyves bonde.'
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 764

Ye been to me right welcome hertely: [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 225

Ye wyse wyves, that can understonde. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 88

[continues previous] That loveth hir housbonde as hir hertes lyf.
12

Shipman's Tale: 212

[continues previous] Up to hir housbonde is this wyf y-gon,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 379

Lordinges, right thus, as ye have understonde,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 763

[continues previous] And seyde thus: 'Now, lordinges, trewely,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 764

[continues previous] Ye been to me right welcome hertely:
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 225

[continues previous] Ye wyse wyves, that can understonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 226

[continues previous] Thus shul ye speke and bere hem wrong on honde;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 380

Bar I stifly myne olde housbondes on honde,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 575

I bar him on honde, he hadde enchanted me;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 381

That thus they seyden in hir dronkenesse;
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 486

Thus they seyden alle that weren in the halle.
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 385

Ful giltelees, by goddes swete pyne!
14

Melibee's Prologue: 18

'Gladly,' quod I, 'by goddes swete pyne, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 386

For as an hors I coude byte and whyne.
13

Melibee's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] 'Gladly,' quod I, 'by goddes swete pyne,
13

Melibee's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose,
13

Anelida and Arcite: 157

Right as an hors, that can both byte and pleyne; [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 158

For he bar hir on honde of trecherye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 387

I coude pleyne, thogh I were in the gilt,
12

Anelida and Arcite: 157

[continues previous] Right as an hors, that can both byte and pleyne;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 391

They were ful glad to excusen hem ful blyve
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 222

They were ful glad whan I spak to hem fayre;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 392

Of thing of which they never agilte hir lyve.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5833

He agilte hir never in other caas,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7383

He nolde lette, for man on lyve, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7384

That he ne wolde hir ofte shryve. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 393

Of wenches wolde I beren him on honde,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7383

[continues previous] He nolde lette, for man on lyve,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7384

[continues previous] That he ne wolde hir ofte shryve.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1404

Makinge his sort, and beren him on honde,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 394

Whan that for syk unnethes mighte he stonde.
13

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 32

And, whan for age he mighte unnethes gon,
13

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 33

He yaf to Pelleus the governing
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 249

His speche him rafte, unnethes mighte he seye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 395

Yet tikled it his herte, for that he
11

Monk's Tale: 457

His children wende that it for hunger was [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 458

That he his armes gnow, and nat for wo, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 396

Wende that I hadde of him so greet chiertee.
12

Knight's Tale: 410

Thus may we seyen alle, and namely I,
12

Knight's Tale: 411

That wende and hadde a greet opinioun,
11

Knight's Tale: 412

That, if I mighte escapen from prisoun,
11

Franklin's Tale: 153

Than semed it ye hadde a greet chiertee
11

Monk's Tale: 457

[continues previous] His children wende that it for hunger was
11

Monk's Tale: 458

[continues previous] That he his armes gnow, and nat for wo,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 397

I swoor that al my walkinge out by nighte
10

Legend of Dido: 366

And shapeth him to stele a-wey by nighte. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 398

Was for tespye wenches that he dighte;
10

Legend of Dido: 365

[continues previous] And prively he doth his shippes dighte,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 401

Deceite, weping, spinning god hath yive
10

Knight's Tale: 1559

Of rasour nor of shere, I wol thee yive, [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 421

'Now wel,' quod he, 'and som-what shal I yive [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4987

Unto Delyt, and him to yive [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 402

To wommen kindely, whyl they may live.
10

Knight's Tale: 1560

[continues previous] And ben thy trewe servant whyl I live. [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 422

[continues previous] Un-to your holy covent whyl I live, [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4987

[continues previous] Unto Delyt, and him to yive
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 4988

[continues previous] Hir servise, whyl that she may live.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 403

And thus of o thing I avaunte me,
10

Knight's Tale: 1560

[continues previous] And ben thy trewe servant whyl I live.
10

Summoner's Tale: 423

[continues previous] And in thyn hand thou shalt it have anoon;
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 405

By sleighte, or force, or by som maner thing,
11

Reeve's Tale: 91

Of corn by sleighte, ne by force hem reve;
15+

Parson's Tale: 67

... questemongeres and notaries! Certes, for fals witnessing was Susanna in ful gret sorwe and peyne, and many another mo. The sinne of thefte is eek expres agayns goddes heste, and that in two maneres, corporel and espirituel. Corporel, as for to take thy neighebores catel agayn his wil, be it by force or by sleighte, be it by met or by mesure. By steling eek of false enditements upon him, and in borwinge of thy neighebores catel, in entente nevere to payen it agayn, and semblable thinges. Espirituel thefte is Sacrilege, that is to seyn, hurtinge of holy thinges, or of thinges sacred to Crist, in two maneres; by reson of ...
10

Hous of Fame 2: 162

Wol with som maner thing thee quyte,
10

Legend of Thisbe: 29

By sleighte, and speken som of hir desyr; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 406

As by continuel murmur or grucching;
10

Legend of Thisbe: 30

[continues previous] As, wry the gleed, and hotter is the fyr;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 408

Ther wolde I chyde and do hem no plesaunce;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 419

That made me that ever I wolde hem chyde. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 27

Whan folk in chirche had yeve him what hem leste, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 28

He wente his wey, no lenger wolde he reste, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 409

I wolde no lenger in the bed abyde,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 419

[continues previous] That made me that ever I wolde hem chyde.
11

Summoner's Tale: 28

[continues previous] He wente his wey, no lenger wolde he reste,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 411

Til he had maad his raunson un-to me;
11

Monk's Tale: 295

Than wolde she suffre him doon his fantasye [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 412

Than wolde I suffre him do his nycetee.
12

Monk's Tale: 295

[continues previous] Than wolde she suffre him doon his fantasye
13

Monk's Tale: 300

Than wolde she ones suffre him do the same.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 413

And ther-fore every man this tale I telle,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 732

For this ye knowen al-so wel as I, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 733

Who-so shal telle a tale after a man, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 7

As suffereth me I may my tale telle! [continues next]
11

Summoner's Prologue: 8

This Frere bosteth that he knoweth helle, [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 67

But this was eek the tale, nathelees, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 414

Winne who-so may, for al is for to selle.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 733

[continues previous] Who-so shal telle a tale after a man,
11

Summoner's Prologue: 7

[continues previous] As suffereth me I may my tale telle!
11

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 68

[continues previous] That who-so wolde winne thilke flees,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 415

With empty hand men may none haukes lure;
15+

Reeve's Tale: 214

With empty hand men may na haukes tulle;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 416

For winning wolde I al his lust endure,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 192

Was al his lust, for no cost wolde he spare.
10

Manciple's Tale: 77

Lo, here hath lust his dominacioun, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 417

And make me a feyned appetyt;
10

Manciple's Tale: 78

[continues previous] And appetyt flemeth discrecioun.
10

Manciple's Tale: 79

A she-wolf hath also a vileins kinde;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 419

That made me that ever I wolde hem chyde.
11

Knight's Tale: 1182

I may not rekne hem alle, thogh I wolde. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 408

Ther wolde I chyde and do hem no plesaunce;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 409

I wolde no lenger in the bed abyde,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 420

For thogh the pope had seten hem biside,
11

Knight's Tale: 1182

[continues previous] I may not rekne hem alle, thogh I wolde. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1183

[continues previous] The statue of Mars up-on a carte stood, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 421

I wolde nat spare hem at hir owene bord.
11

Knight's Tale: 1182

[continues previous] I may not rekne hem alle, thogh I wolde.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 635

For-why this is your owene hous, pardee. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 422

For by my trouthe, I quitte hem word for word.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 384

For, by my trouthe, I wol be to yow bothe,
10

Shipman's Tale: 418

For, by my trouthe, I have on myn array,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1197

Can he ther-on? for, by my trouthe, I noot.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 636

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, I sey it nought a-game,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 423

As help me verray god omnipotent,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 248

Thurgh verray god, that is omnipotent,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 425

I ne owe hem nat a word that it nis quit.
10

Melibee's Tale: 14

... moste som tyme be secree, til it were tyme that it moste be knowe; and this ne may noght be. [For it is writen, that "the Ianglerie of wommen can hyden thinges that they witen noght." Furthermore, the philosophre seith, "in wikked conseil wommen venquisshe men;" and for thise resouns I ne owe nat usen thy conseil.']
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 8

'Certes,' quod she, 'ne is nis nat leveful to hem, as I shal wel
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 139

is lyke a merveil or a miracle to hem that ne knowen it nat), why that
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 427

That they moste yeve it up, as for the beste;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 382

As doth a curre or elles another beste. [continues next]
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 396

As doth a curre or elles another beste. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 428

Or elles hadde we never been in reste.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 382

[continues previous] As doth a curre or elles another beste.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 383

[continues previous] In noble corage oghte been areste,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 396

[continues previous] As doth a curre or elles another beste.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 397

[continues previous] In noble corage oghte been areste,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 429

For thogh he loked as a wood leoun,
11

Knight's Tale: 798

In his fighting were a wood leoun,
11

Knight's Tale: 799

And as a cruel tygre was Arcite:
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 794

And he up-stirte as dooth a wood leoun, [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 444

'The frere up stirte as doth a wood leoun:
12

Summoner's Tale: 445

'A! false cherl,' quod he, 'for goddes bones,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 430

Yet sholde he faille of his conclusioun.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 794

[continues previous] And he up-stirte as dooth a wood leoun,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 795

[continues previous] And with his fist he smoot me on the heed,
11

Friar's Tale: 65

Thanne wolde he seye, 'frend, I shal for thy sake [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 431

Thanne wolde I seye, 'gode lief, tak keep
11

Friar's Tale: 65

[continues previous] Thanne wolde he seye, 'frend, I shal for thy sake
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 433

Com neer, my spouse, lat me ba thy cheke!
10

Miller's Tale: 523

'As help me god, it wol nat be "com ba me,"
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 434

Ye sholde been al pacient and meke,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 527

He wayted after no pompe and reverence, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 529

But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 276

Your wyf, that is so meke and pacient. [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 277

And therfor, Thomas, trowe me if thee leste, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 435

And han a swete spyced conscience,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 527

[continues previous] He wayted after no pompe and reverence,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 528

[continues previous] Ne maked him a spyced conscience,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 529

[continues previous] But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve,
11

Summoner's Tale: 276

[continues previous] Your wyf, that is so meke and pacient.
11

Summoner's Tale: 277

[continues previous] And therfor, Thomas, trowe me if thee leste,
11

Summoner's Tale: 291

Now sith ye han so holy and meke a wyf, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 436

Sith ye so preche of Iobes pacience.
11

Summoner's Tale: 291

[continues previous] Now sith ye han so holy and meke a wyf,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 437

Suffreth alwey, sin ye so wel can preche;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1472

To been a wyf, and as he can wel preche,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1473

He shal som Grek so preyse and wel alose,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 438

And but ye do, certain we shal yow teche
11

Melibee's Tale: 24

Now sir, sith I have shewed yow of which folk ye shul take your conseil, and of which folk ye shul folwe the conseil, now wol I teche yow how ye shal examine your conseil, after the doctrine of Tullius. In the examininge thanne of your conseillour, ye shul considere manye thinges. Alderfirst thou shalt considere, that in thilke thing that thou purposest, and upon what thing thou wolt have conseil, that verray trouthe be seyd and conserved; this is to seyn, ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1475

Or do yow doon by force as he shal teche.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 442

Than womman is, ye moste been suffrable.
11

Miller's Tale: 582

Why ryse ye so rathe, ey, benedicite! [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 443

What eyleth yow to grucche thus and grone?
11

Miller's Tale: 583

[continues previous] What eyleth yow? som gay gerl, god it woot,
10

Merchant's Tale: 1124

And she answerde, 'sir, what eyleth yow?
10

Shipman's Tale: 99

'What eyleth yow so rathe for to ryse?'
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 69

She was agast, and seyde, 'O herte dere,
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 70

What eyleth yow, to grone in this manere?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 211

'What eyleth yow to be thus wery sone,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 212

And namelich of wommen? wol ye so?
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 446

Peter! I shrewe yow but ye love it weel!
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4324

I see he wolde it selle ageyn, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 447

For if I wolde selle my bele chose,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

Whan that he wolde han my bele chose,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4323

[continues previous] But now, thurgh doubling of my peyn,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4324

[continues previous] I see he wolde it selle ageyn,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 449

But I wol kepe it for your owene tooth.
11

Merchant's Tale: 55

Thy good to kepe, than thyn owene wyf.
11

Merchant's Tale: 56

For she wol clayme half part al hir lyf;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 450

Ye be to blame, by god, I sey yow sooth.'
11

Melibee's Tale: 60

... him, and seyde, 'I conseille yow,' quod she, 'aboven alle thinges, that ye make pees bitwene god and yow; and beth reconsiled un-to him and to his grace. For as I have seyd yow heer-biforn, god hath suffred yow to have this tribulacioun and disese for your sinnes. And if ye do as I sey yow, god wol sende your adversaries un-to yow, and maken hem fallen at your feet, redy to do your wil and your comandements. For Salomon seith: "whan the condicioun of man is plesaunt and likinge to god, he chaungeth the hertes of the mannes adversaries, and constreyneth hem to biseken him of ...
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 774

'Stoupeth adoun, by god, ye be to blame,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1090

I was right yong, [the] sooth to sey, [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1091

And ful gret need I hadde to lerne; [continues next]
12

Merciles Beautè: 18

I sey yow sooth, me nedeth not to feyne;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 451

Swiche maner wordes hadde we on honde.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1091

[continues previous] And ful gret need I hadde to lerne;
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 452

Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde.
11

Knight's Tale: 1958

Now wol I speken forth of Emelye.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 453

My fourthe housbonde was a revelour, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

But yet to be right mery wol I fonde. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 481

I seye, I hadde in herte greet despyt [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 39

Now wol I speken of lesinges, which generally is fals significacioun of word, in entente to deceyven his evene-cristene. Som lesinge is of which ther comth noon avantage to no wight: and som lesinge turneth to the ese or profit of o man, and to disese and damage of another man. Another lesinge is for ...
12

Parson's Tale: 53

After the sinnes of Envie and of Ire, now wol I speken of the sinne of Accidie. For Envye blindeth the herte of a man, and Ire troubleth a man; and Accidie maketh him hevy, thoghtful, and wrawe. Envye and Ire maken bitternesse in herte; which bitternesse is moder of Accidie, and binimeth him the love of alle goodnesse. Thanne is Accidie the anguissh of a ...
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 453

My fourthe housbonde was a revelour,
11

Cook's Tale: 7

That he was cleped Perkin Revelour. [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 27

For sikerly a prentis revelour, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 452

[continues previous] Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

[continues previous] Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 454

This is to seyn, he hadde a paramour;
11

Cook's Tale: 8

[continues previous] He was as ful of love and paramour
11

Cook's Tale: 27

[continues previous] For sikerly a prentis revelour,
11

Cook's Tale: 28

[continues previous] That haunteth dys, riot, or paramour,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 455

And I was yong and ful of ragerye,
12

Clerk's Tale: 17

A fair persone, and strong, and yong of age, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 18

And ful of honour and of curteisye; [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 603

He was al coltish, ful of ragerye, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 604

And ful of Iargon as a flekked pye. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 456

Stiborn and strong, and Ioly as a pye.
12

Clerk's Tale: 17

[continues previous] A fair persone, and strong, and yong of age,
12

Clerk's Tale: 18

[continues previous] And ful of honour and of curteisye;
13

Merchant's Tale: 604

[continues previous] And ful of Iargon as a flekked pye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 694

But Pandarus, that wel coude eche a del [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 695

The olde daunce, and every poynt ther-inne, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 457

Wel coude I daunce to an harpe smale,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 37

Whan that I here the smale foules singe, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2322

To harpe and giterne, daunce and play; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 694

[continues previous] But Pandarus, that wel coude eche a del
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 695

[continues previous] The olde daunce, and every poynt ther-inne,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 458

And singe, y-wis, as any nightingale,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2322

[continues previous] To harpe and giterne, daunce and play;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1233

And as the newe abaysshed nightingale, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1234

That stinteth first whan she biginneth singe, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 459

Whan I had dronke a draughte of swete wyn.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 397

And, certeinly, he was a good felawe.
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 398

Ful many a draughte of wyn had he y-drawe
13

Pardoner's Tale: 127

Your lyking is that I shal telle a tale.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 128

Now, have I dronke a draughte of corny ale,
13

Pardoner's Tale: 129

By god, I hope I shal yow telle a thing
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 37

[continues previous] Whan that I here the smale foules singe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1234

[continues previous] That stinteth first whan she biginneth singe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1235

[continues previous] Whan that she hereth any herde tale,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 460

Metellius, the foule cherl, the swyn,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 124

The foule cherl that, for his covetyse, [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 136

The foule cherl that, for his covetyse, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 461

That with a staf birafte his wyf hir lyf,
10

Knight's Tale: 1399

Thanne rekke I noght, whan I have lost my lyf,
10

Knight's Tale: 1400

Though that Arcita winne hir to his wyf.
14

Franklin's Tale: 671

What shal I seyn of Hasdrubales wyf,
14

Franklin's Tale: 672

That at Cartage birafte hir-self hir lyf? [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 709

What shal I seye of Nicerates wyf, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 710

That for swich cas birafte hir-self hir lyf? [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 21

Napoplexye shente nat hir heed; [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 23

Hir bord was served most with whyt and blak, [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 543

Ful louder than dide Hasdrubales wyf,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 544

Whan that hir housbond hadde lost his lyf,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 424

He wolde have take hir to his wyf; [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 124

[continues previous] The foule cherl that, for his covetyse,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 136

[continues previous] The foule cherl that, for his covetyse,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4255

Ne that he saugh never, in his lyf,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4256

Unto hir husbonde a trewe wyf;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 462

For she drank wyn, thogh I hadde been his wyf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 317

To han his wyf allone, trusteth me. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 937

I may nat, certes, thogh I sholde dye, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 938

Forbere to been out of your companye [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 72

Hoom with his wyf he gooth to his contree, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Tale: 673

[continues previous] For whan she saugh that Romayns wan the toun,
12

Franklin's Tale: 710

[continues previous] That for swich cas birafte hir-self hir lyf?
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

'Lo, lo!' quod dame Prudence, 'how lightly is every man enclyned to his owene desyr and to his owene plesaunce! Certes,' quod she, 'the wordes of the phisiciens ne sholde nat han been understonden in this wyse. For certes, wikkednesse is nat contrarie to wikkednesse, ne vengeaunce to vengeaunce, ne wrong to wrong; but they been semblable. And therfore, o vengeaunce is nat warisshed by another vengeaunce, ne o wrong by another wrong; but everich of hem encreesceth and aggreggeth other. But certes, ... [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 22

[continues previous] No wyn ne drank she, neither whyt ne reed;
11

Parson's Tale: 76

... thefte douted gretly Joseph, whan that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is the filthe thurgh which they breken the comandement of god, and defoulen the auctour of matrimoine, that is Crist. For ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 425

[continues previous] For she desired nothing elles,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 463

He sholde nat han daunted me fro drinke;
11

Merchant's Tale: 317

[continues previous] To han his wyf allone, trusteth me.
11

Merchant's Tale: 318

[continues previous] Ye shul nat plese hir fully yeres three,
12

Merchant's Tale: 937

[continues previous] I may nat, certes, thogh I sholde dye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 72

[continues previous] Hoom with his wyf he gooth to his contree,
10

Franklin's Tale: 73

[continues previous] Nat fer fro Penmark, ther his dwelling was,
10

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] 'Lo, lo!' quod dame Prudence, 'how lightly is every man enclyned to his owene desyr and to his owene plesaunce! Certes,' quod she, 'the wordes of the phisiciens ne sholde nat han been understonden in this wyse. For certes, wikkednesse is nat contrarie to wikkednesse, ne vengeaunce to vengeaunce, ne wrong to wrong; but they been semblable. And therfore, o vengeaunce is nat warisshed by another vengeaunce, ne o wrong by another wrong; but everich of hem encreesceth and aggreggeth other. But ...
11

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... that his lordes wyf preyed him of vileinye, whan he seyde, 'lo, my lady, how my lord hath take to me under my warde al that he hath in this world; ne no-thing of hise thinges is out of my power, but only ye that been his wyf. And how sholde I thanne do this wikkednesse, and sinne so horribly agayns god, and agayns my lord? God it forbede.' Allas! al to litel is swich trouthe now y-founde! The thridde harm is the filthe thurgh which they breken the comandement of god, and defoulen the auctour of matrimoine, that is Crist. ...
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 465

For al so siker as cold engendreth hayl,
10

Parson's Tale: 76

... or elles with hem with whiche hir fadres or hir kinrede han deled in the sinne of lecherie; this sinne maketh hem lyk to houndes, that taken no kepe to kinrede. And certes, parentele is in two maneres, outher goostly or fleshly; goostly, as for to delen with hise godsibbes. For right so as he that engendreth a child is his fleshly fader, right so is his godfader his fader espirituel. For which a womman may in no lasse sinne assemblen with hir godsib than with hir owene fleshly brother. The fifthe spece is thilke abhominable sinne, of which that no man unnethe oghte speke ne wryte, ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 991

For al so siker as thow lyst here by me,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 466

A likerous mouth moste han a likerous tayl.
10

Parson's Tale: 76

[continues previous] ... fadres or hir kinrede han deled in the sinne of lecherie; this sinne maketh hem lyk to houndes, that taken no kepe to kinrede. And certes, parentele is in two maneres, outher goostly or fleshly; goostly, as for to delen with hise godsibbes. For right so as he that engendreth a child is his fleshly fader, right so is his godfader his fader espirituel. For which a womman may in no lasse sinne assemblen with hir godsib than with hir owene fleshly brother. The fifthe spece is thilke abhominable sinne, of which that no man unnethe oghte speke ne wryte, nathelees ...
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 468

This knowen lechours by experience.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 327

But whan ye comen by my sepulture, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 469

But, lord Crist! whan that it remembreth me
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 4

wonder swiftly and sone. But this is a thing that greetly smerteth
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 5

me whan it remembreth me. For in alle adversitee of fortune,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 327

[continues previous] But whan ye comen by my sepulture,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 328

[continues previous] Remembreth that your felawe resteth there;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 471

It tikleth me aboute myn herte rote.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1026

Me thinketh in myn herte rote, [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1027

As helpe me god, whan I remembre [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2039

The Ioye wente to myn herte rote.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 472

Unto this day it dooth myn herte bote
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1026

[continues previous] Me thinketh in myn herte rote,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 476

Lat go, fare-wel, the devel go therwith!
12

Summoner's Tale: 533

Now ete your mete, and lat the cherl go pleye,
12

Summoner's Tale: 534

Lat him go honge himself a devel weye!'
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 477

The flour is goon, ther is na-more to telle,
10

Summoner's Tale: 365

His sone was slayn, ther is na-more to seye.
10

Summoner's Tale: 380

Lest thee repente;" ther is na-more to seye.
10

Clerk's Tale: 315

Who-so me loveth; ther is na-more to seye.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
10

Squire's Tale: 314

And seyde, 'sir, ther is na-more to seyne,
10

Squire's Tale: 334

Ryde whan yow list, ther is na-more to done.'
13

Franklin's Tale: 856

Myn heritage; ther is na-more to telle.'
10

Franklin's Tale: 878

This al and som, ther is na-more to seyn.'
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 420

But I ne can not bulte it to the bren, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 379

'What!' quod my lord, 'ther is na-more to done,
11

Manciple's Tale: 162

This is theffect, ther is na-more to sayn;
10

Hous of Fame 2: 335

And this place of which I telle, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 336

Ther as Fame list to dwelle, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 2: 337

Is set amiddes of these three, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 478

The bren, as I best can, now moste I selle;
10

Squire's Tale: 594

And took it wel, sin that it moste be.
10

Squire's Tale: 595

As I best mighte, I hidde fro him my sorwe,
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 51

But I be mery, y-wis, I wol be blamed:' — [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 420

[continues previous] But I ne can not bulte it to the bren,
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 421

[continues previous] As can the holy doctour Augustyn,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 335

[continues previous] And this place of which I telle,
10

Hous of Fame 2: 336

[continues previous] Ther as Fame list to dwelle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 458

'Good goodly, to whom serve I and laboure,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 459

As I best can, now wolde god, Criseyde,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 479

But yet to be right mery wol I fonde.
10

Miller's Tale: 492

To Alison now wol I tellen al [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 452

Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 165

Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 166

And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde, [continues next]
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 179

To telle it wol I fonde. [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 51

[continues previous] But I be mery, y-wis, I wol be blamed:' — [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 52

[continues previous] And right anon his tale he hath attamed, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 398

'Pees!' quod my lord, 'the next tyme I wol fonde [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 399

To bringe our craft al in another plyte; [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 64

The which, as I can now remembre, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 65

I wol yow tellen every del. [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 155

And thoghte, 'I wol him tellen of my drede [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1584

To make ensample wol I fonde; [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1585

Right as a mirour openly [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 479

Ayeins my wil; but elles wol I fonde, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 480

Now wol I tellen of my fourthe housbonde.
11

Miller's Tale: 493

[continues previous] My love-longing, for yet I shal nat misse [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 452

[continues previous] Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 563

Now wol I tellen forth what happed me. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Al sodeynly, for I wol nat abyde;
12

Merchant's Tale: 166

[continues previous] And I wol fonde tespyen, on my syde,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 178

[continues previous] If ye wol any more of it,
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 179

[continues previous] To telle it wol I fonde.
14

Sir Thopas' Tale: 180

[continues previous] Now hold your mouth, par charitee,
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 51

[continues previous] But I be mery, y-wis, I wol be blamed:' —
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 398

[continues previous] 'Pees!' quod my lord, 'the next tyme I wol fonde
11

Hous of Fame 1: 64

[continues previous] The which, as I can now remembre,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 65

[continues previous] I wol yow tellen every del.
11

Legend of Thisbe: 155

[continues previous] And thoghte, 'I wol him tellen of my drede
11

Legend of Thisbe: 156

[continues previous] Bothe of the leonesse and al my dede.'
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1584

[continues previous] To make ensample wol I fonde;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 479

[continues previous] Ayeins my wil; but elles wol I fonde,
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 481

I seye, I hadde in herte greet despyt
10

Miller's Tale: 492

[continues previous] To Alison now wol I tellen al
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 452

[continues previous] Now wol I speken of my fourthe housbonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 563

[continues previous] Now wol I tellen forth what happed me.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 564

[continues previous] I seye, that in the feeldes walked we,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 483

But he was quit, by god and by seint Ioce!
11

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 164

'Now dame,' quod he, 'by god and by seint Iohn,
11

Friar's Tale: 145

Wel be we met, by god and by seint Iame!
10

Friar's Tale: 146

But, leve brother, tel me than thy name,'
11

Summoner's Tale: 544

A goune-cloth, by god and by Seint Iohn!'
11

Shipman's Tale: 355

I thanke yow, by god and by seint Iame! [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 356

But nathelees I took un-to our dame, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 484

I made him of the same wode a croce;
11

Shipman's Tale: 355

[continues previous] I thanke yow, by god and by seint Iame!
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 491

For god it woot, he sat ful ofte and song
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 52

Ful ofte tyme he hadde the bord bigonne [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 711

And whan that he this pitous lettre sey, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 712

Ful ofte he seyde 'allas!' and 'weylawey!' [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 99

For god it woot, that children ofte been
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4238

He went ful ofte, for to see. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1233

And took it him: he thonked hir and seyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1234

'God woot, of thing ful ofte looth bigonne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1261

God woot if he sat on his hors a-right,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 240

God woot, and thou, that it sat me so sore,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1782

And whan that he com rydinge in-to toun, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1783

Ful ofte his lady, from hir window doun, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1166

For which his song ful ofte is 'weylaway!' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1167

But whan he saugh that specheles she lay, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 492

Whan that his shoo ful bitterly him wrong.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 51

[continues previous] At Alisaundre he was, whan it was wonne;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 711

[continues previous] And whan that he this pitous lettre sey,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4238

[continues previous] He went ful ofte, for to see.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 4239

[continues previous] Whan his lot was to wake a-night,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1782

[continues previous] And whan that he com rydinge in-to toun,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1166

[continues previous] For which his song ful ofte is 'weylaway!'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1167

[continues previous] But whan he saugh that specheles she lay,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 493

Ther was no wight, save god and he, that wiste,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 282

Ther wiste no wight that he was in dette,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 376

Ther every wight save he, maister and knave,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 377

Was with the leoun frete er he asterte?
10

Merchant's Tale: 762

So secrely, that no wight of it wiste,
10

Merchant's Tale: 763

And bad him been al hool, and forth she wente
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... alle wommen ben wikke. For though that he ne fond no good womman, certes, ful many another man hath founden many a womman ful good and trewe. Or elles per-aventure the entente of Salomon was this; that, as in sovereyn bountee, he fond no womman; this is to seyn, that ther is no wight that hath sovereyn bountee save god allone; as he him-self recordeth in his Evaungelie. For ther nis no creature so good that him ne wanteth somwhat of the perfeccioun of god, that is his maker. Your thridde resoun is this: ye seyn that "if ye governe yow by my conseil, it sholde seme that ye hadde ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 728

Ther was no wight to whom she dorste hir pleyne.
15+

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 501

Lat him fare-wel, god yeve his soule reste,
15+

Clerk's Prologue: 30

I prey to god so yeve his soule reste! [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 502

He is now in the grave and in his cheste.
11

Clerk's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] He is now deed and nayled in his cheste, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] Fraunceys Petrark, the laureat poete,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 503

Now of my fifthe housbond wol I telle.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 525

My fifthe housbonde, god his soule blesse! [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 526

Which that I took for love and no richesse, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] He is now deed and nayled in his cheste,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 504

God lete his soule never come in helle!
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 525

[continues previous] My fifthe housbonde, god his soule blesse!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 506

That fele I on my ribbes al by rewe,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 507

And ever shal, un-to myn ending-day.
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

[continues previous] And ever shal, til that myn herte dye;
12

Compleynt of Venus: 55

And therfore certes, to myn ending-day
12

Compleynt of Venus: 56

To love him best ne shal I never repente.
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 508

But in our bed he was so fresh and gay,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 567

A baggepype wel coude he blowe and sowne, [continues next]
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 568

And ther-with-al he broghte us out of towne. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 67

There nis no man so wys, that coude thenche [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 68

So gay a popelote, or swich a wenche. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

That I was born, and make me fresh and gay, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 299

And but thou do to my norice honour, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 622

Though he were gentil born, and fresh and gay, [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 623

And goodly for to seen, and humble and free, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 922

Of love, that made hir herte fresh and gay.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 923

That herkned she so longe in good entente,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 509

And ther-with-al so wel coude he me glose,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 567

[continues previous] A baggepype wel coude he blowe and sowne,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 568

[continues previous] And ther-with-al he broghte us out of towne.
10

Miller's Tale: 67

[continues previous] There nis no man so wys, that coude thenche
10

Miller's Tale: 68

[continues previous] So gay a popelote, or swich a wenche.
12

Miller's Tale: 139

A mery child he was, so god me save, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 140

Wel coude he laten blood and clippe and shave, [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 6

Dauncen he coude so wel and Iolily, [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 7

That he was cleped Perkin Revelour. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

[continues previous] That I was born, and make me fresh and gay,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 299

[continues previous] And but thou do to my norice honour,
10

Squire's Tale: 622

[continues previous] Though he were gentil born, and fresh and gay,
10

Squire's Tale: 623

[continues previous] And goodly for to seen, and humble and free,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 462

This Chauntecleer, whan he gan him espye, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 463

He wolde han fled, but that the fox anon [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 961

'Therto she coude so wel pleye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 434

He was, so wel dissimulen he coude.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 435

And al the whyl which that I yow devyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1796

And over al this, so wel coude he devyse
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 510

Whan that he wolde han my bele chose,
11

Miller's Tale: 139

[continues previous] A mery child he was, so god me save,
11

Miller's Tale: 140

[continues previous] Wel coude he laten blood and clippe and shave,
11

Cook's Tale: 6

[continues previous] Dauncen he coude so wel and Iolily,
11

Cook's Tale: 7

[continues previous] That he was cleped Perkin Revelour.
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 447

For if I wolde selle my bele chose,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 462

[continues previous] This Chauntecleer, whan he gan him espye,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 463

[continues previous] He wolde han fled, but that the fox anon
12

Book of the Duchesse: 962

[continues previous] Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 511

That thogh he hadde me bet on every boon,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 596

Ther was noon auditour coude on him winne. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 512

He coude winne agayn my love anoon.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 596

[continues previous] Ther was noon auditour coude on him winne.
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 597

[continues previous] Wel wiste he, by the droghte, and by the reyn,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 514

Was of his love daungerous to me.
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 724

Tho redde he me, if that I shal nat lyen, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 515

We wommen han, if that I shal nat lye,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 765

For by my trouthe, if that I shal nat lye, [continues next]
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 766

I ne saugh this yeer so mery a companye [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 596

But who was woful, if I shal nat lye, [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 909

To feste, and shortly, if I shal nat lye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 724

[continues previous] Tho redde he me, if that I shal nat lyen,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 76

A man shal winne us best with flaterye; [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 207

Fro Paradys first, if I shal nat lye,
11

Summoner's Tale: 502

'Madame,' quod he, 'by god I shal nat lye;
11

Summoner's Tale: 503

But I on other weyes may be wreke,
14

Merchant's Tale: 497

If that I lye or noon in this matere. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 498

Maius, that sit with so benigne a chere, [continues next]
14

Second Nun's Tale: 289

Quod tho Tiburce, 'if that I shal nat lye.'
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 149

With many floures, and I shal nat lye;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 181

For nothing elles, and I shal nat lye,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 217

With florouns smale, and I shal nat lye;
14

Legend of Thisbe: 38

Ye lovers two, if that I shal nat lye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 495

'Ne that I shal han cause in this matere,' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 758

Shal I nat loven, in cas if that me leste? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 880

But of malyce, if that I shal nought lye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 652

For I shal shape it so, that sikerly [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1402

If that I lye, in certayn I shal fonde [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 516

In this matere a queynte fantasye;
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 766

[continues previous] I ne saugh this yeer so mery a companye
11

Knight's Tale: 401

Infinite harmes been in this matere; [continues next]
13

Man of Law's Tale: 597

[continues previous] Of this wedding but Donegild, and na mo,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 910

[continues previous] Custances sone wente in his companye.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 76

[continues previous] A man shal winne us best with flaterye;
14

Merchant's Tale: 497

[continues previous] If that I lye or noon in this matere.
13

Legend of Thisbe: 39

[continues previous] Ye founden first this litel narwe clifte;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 495

[continues previous] 'Ne that I shal han cause in this matere,'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 758

[continues previous] Shal I nat loven, in cas if that me leste?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 651

[continues previous] Be glad, and lat me werke in this matere.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1402

[continues previous] If that I lye, in certayn I shal fonde
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 517

Wayte what thing we may nat lightly have,
11

Knight's Tale: 402

[continues previous] We witen nat what thing we preyen here.
10

Reeve's Prologue: 27

For whan we may nat doon, than wol we speke; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 518

Ther-after wol we crye al-day and crave.
10

Reeve's Prologue: 27

[continues previous] For whan we may nat doon, than wol we speke;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 524

This knoweth every womman that is wys.
12

Manciple's Prologue: 22

As ther is falle on me swich hevinesse, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 525

My fifthe housbonde, god his soule blesse!
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1048

Now lat us preyen god his soule blesse!
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 503

Now of my fifthe housbond wol I telle. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 504

God lete his soule never come in helle! [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 826

I prey to god that sit in magestee, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 827

So blesse his soule, for his mercy dere! [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 4

That, also wisly god my soule blesse, [continues next]
13

Nun's Priest's Tale: 475

My lord your fader (god his soule blesse!)
12

Manciple's Prologue: 21

[continues previous] Seyde to our host, 'so god my soule blesse,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 522

And also god your soule blesse! [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6767

And al-so god my soule blesse,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 526

Which that I took for love and no richesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 503

[continues previous] Now of my fifthe housbond wol I telle.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 673

And eek ther was som-tyme a clerk at Rome, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 826

[continues previous] I prey to god that sit in magestee,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 827

[continues previous] So blesse his soule, for his mercy dere!
11

Melibee's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] That, also wisly god my soule blesse,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 523

[continues previous] For we han wel deserved hit,
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 527

He som-tyme was a clerk of Oxenford,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 287

A Clerk ther was of Oxenford also,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 673

[continues previous] And eek ther was som-tyme a clerk at Rome, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Prologue: 1

'Sir clerk of Oxenford,' our hoste sayde,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 528

And had left scole, and wente at hoom to bord
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 544

(So often tymes I to my gossib wente, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 545

For ever yet I lovede to be gay, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 673

[continues previous] And eek ther was som-tyme a clerk at Rome,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 529

With my gossib, dwellinge in oure toun,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 544

[continues previous] (So often tymes I to my gossib wente,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 530

God have hir soule! hir name was Alisoun.
11

Miller's Tale: 337

And shal she drenche? allas! myn Alisoun!' [continues next]
10