Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Tale to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Wife of Bath's Tale has 408 lines, and 8% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 70% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 22% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.13 strong matches and 3.92 weak matches.

Wife of Bath's Tale

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Geoffrey Chaucer

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11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 4

The elf-queen, with hir Ioly companye,
11

Shipman's Tale: 95

A mayde child cam in hir companye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1583

To hir he wroot yet ofte tyme al newe [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 5

Daunced ful ofte in many a grene mede;
12

Knight's Tale: 395

That yeveth hem ful ofte in many a gyse
11

Merchant's Tale: 793

That stood under a laurer alwey grene.
11

Merchant's Tale: 794

Ful ofte tyme he, Pluto, and his quene,
11

Franklin's Tale: 454

For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
11

Shipman's Tale: 94

[continues previous] And him saleweth, as she hath don ofte.
11

Shipman's Tale: 95

[continues previous] A mayde child cam in hir companye,
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... falle. Eke for to pryde him in his strengthe of body, it is an heigh folye; for certes, the flesh coveiteth agayn the spirit, and ay the more strong that the flesh is, the sorier may the soule be: and, over al this, strengthe of body and worldly hardinesse causeth ful ofte many a man to peril and meschaunce. Eek for to pryde him of his gentrye is ful greet folye; for ofte tyme the gentrye of the body binimeth the gentrye of the soule; and eek we ben alle of o fader and of o moder; and alle we been of o nature ...
12

A. B. C.: 34

For heer-biforn ful ofte, in many a wyse,
11

Parlement of Foules: 184

Upon a river, in a grene mede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 697

That plyted she ful ofte in many fold. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1582

[continues previous] For which he weep ful ofte many a tere.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 6

This was the olde opinion, as I rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 698

[continues previous] Now was hir herte warm, now was it cold,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 9

For now the grete charitee and prayeres
11

Summoner's Tale: 231

Up springeth in-to their, right so prayeres [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 232

Of charitable and chaste bisy freres [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 10

Of limitours and othere holy freres,
11

Summoner's Tale: 232

[continues previous] Of charitable and chaste bisy freres
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 13

Blessinge halles, chambres, kichenes, boures,
13

Knight's Tale: 1605

Myn is the ruine of the hye halles, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 304

Of braunches were hir halles and hir boures,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 14

Citees, burghes, castels, hye toures,
13

Knight's Tale: 1605

[continues previous] Myn is the ruine of the hye halles,
13

Knight's Tale: 1606

[continues previous] The falling of the toures and of the walles
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 17

For ther as wont to walken was an elf,
11

Miller's Tale: 255

Ther as the cat was wont in for to crepe;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 655

That any whyle dorste ther endure. [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 656

The moder was an elf, by aventure [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 58

Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 113

Right ther as I was wont to done, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 18

Ther walketh now the limitour him-self
12

Man of Law's Tale: 655

[continues previous] That any whyle dorste ther endure.
12

Man of Law's Tale: 656

[continues previous] The moder was an elf, by aventure
11

Summoner's Tale: 58

[continues previous] Cam til an hous ther he was wont to be
11

Hous of Fame 1: 113

[continues previous] Right ther as I was wont to done,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 23

In every bush, or under every tree;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 720

That I mot be thy tormentour, or deye [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 13

... or 'salvacion,' on whom men shul hope to have foryifnesse of sinnes, which that is proprely salvacion of sinnes. And therfore seyde the aungel to Ioseph: 'thou shall clepen his name Iesus, that shal saven his peple of hir sinnes.' And heer-of seith seint Peter: 'ther is noon other name under hevene that is yeve to any man, by which a man may be saved, but only Iesus.' Nazarenus is as muche for to seye as 'florisshinge,' in which a man shal hope, that he that yeveth him remission of sinnes shal yeve him eek grace wel for to do. For ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 35

... him the name of Crist, to be called a Cristene man, and liveth agayns Cristes livinge and his techinge, alle they taken goddes name in ydel. Loke eek what seint Peter seith, Actuum quarto capitulo, 'Non est aliud nomen sub celo,' &c. 'Ther nis noon other name,' seith seint Peter, 'under hevene, yeven to men, in which they mowe be saved;' that is to seyn, but the name of Iesu Crist. Take kepe eek how that the precious name of Crist, as seith seint Paul ad Philipenses secundo, 'In nomine Iesu, &c.: that in the name of Iesu every knee of ... [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 24

Ther is noon other incubus but he,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 721

[continues previous] On shames deeth; ther is noon other weye!'
12

Parson's Tale: 13

[continues previous] ... Iesus is to seyn 'saveour' or 'salvacion,' on whom men shul hope to have foryifnesse of sinnes, which that is proprely salvacion of sinnes. And therfore seyde the aungel to Ioseph: 'thou shall clepen his name Iesus, that shal saven his peple of hir sinnes.' And heer-of seith seint Peter: 'ther is noon other name under hevene that is yeve to any man, by which a man may be saved, but only Iesus.' Nazarenus is as muche for to seye as 'florisshinge,' in which a man shal hope, that he that yeveth him remission of sinnes shal yeve him eek grace wel for to do. For in the flour ...
10

Parson's Tale: 29

... his freletee. Now been ther three maneres of humilitee; as humilitee in herte, and another humilitee in his mouth; the thridde in hise werkes. The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres: that oon is, whan a man holdeth him-self as noght worth biforn god of hevene. Another is, whan he ne despyseth noon other man. The thridde is, whan he rekketh nat thogh men holde him noght worth. The ferthe is, whan he nis nat sory of his humiliacion. Also, the humilitee of mouth is in foure thinges: in attempree speche, and in humblesse of speche, and whan he biknoweth with his owene mouth ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 35

[continues previous] ... swereth with his mouth, or elles taketh on him the name of Crist, to be called a Cristene man, and liveth agayns Cristes livinge and his techinge, alle they taken goddes name in ydel. Loke eek what seint Peter seith, Actuum quarto capitulo, 'Non est aliud nomen sub celo,' &c. 'Ther nis noon other name,' seith seint Peter, 'under hevene, yeven to men, in which they mowe be saved;' that is to seyn, but the name of Iesu Crist. Take kepe eek how that the precious name of Crist, as seith seint Paul ad Philipenses secundo, 'In nomine Iesu, &c.: that in the name ...
12

Parson's Tale: 86

... of man. And eek the preest that is thy Iuge, may the bettre been avysed of his Iugement in yevinge of thy penaunce, and that is after thy contricioun. For understond wel, that after tyme that a man hath defouled his baptesme by sinne, if he wole come to salvacioun, ther is noon other wey but by penitence and shrifte and satisfaccioun; and namely by the two, if ther be a confessour to which he may shryven him; and the thridde, if he have lyf to parfournen it. [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 107

Than were he quit; ther is noon other bote. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 25

And he ne wol doon hem but dishonour.
10

Parson's Tale: 29

[continues previous] ... his freletee. Now been ther three maneres of humilitee; as humilitee in herte, and another humilitee in his mouth; the thridde in hise werkes. The humilitee in herte is in foure maneres: that oon is, whan a man holdeth him-self as noght worth biforn god of hevene. Another is, whan he ne despyseth noon other man. The thridde is, whan he rekketh nat thogh men holde him noght worth. The ferthe is, whan he nis nat sory of his humiliacion. Also, the humilitee of mouth is in foure thinges: in attempree speche, and in humblesse of speche, and whan he biknoweth with ...
11

Parson's Tale: 86

[continues previous] ... thy Iuge, may the bettre been avysed of his Iugement in yevinge of thy penaunce, and that is after thy contricioun. For understond wel, that after tyme that a man hath defouled his baptesme by sinne, if he wole come to salvacioun, ther is noon other wey but by penitence and shrifte and satisfaccioun; and namely by the two, if ther be a confessour to which he may shryven him; and the thridde, if he have lyf to parfournen it.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 107

[continues previous] Than were he quit; ther is noon other bote.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 26

And so bifel it, that this king Arthour
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 34

And swich pursute un-to the king Arthour,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 35

That dampned was this knight for to be deed
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 27

Hadde in his hous a lusty bacheler,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 79

With him ther was his sone, a yong Squyer, [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 80

A lovyere, and a lusty bacheler, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 24

As any bacheler of al his hous. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 25

A fair persone he was and fortunat, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 805

'Hit happed that I cam on a day [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 806

Into a place, ther I say, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 28

That on a day cam rydinge fro river;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 79

[continues previous] With him ther was his sone, a yong Squyer,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 80

[continues previous] A lovyere, and a lusty bacheler,
11

Squire's Tale: 25

[continues previous] A fair persone he was and fortunat,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 29

And happed that, allone as she was born,
13

Knight's Tale: 775

And on his hors, allone as he was born, [continues next]
13

Book of the Duchesse: 805

[continues previous] 'Hit happed that I cam on a day
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 298

Allone as I was born, y-wis, compleyne;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 30

He saugh a mayde walkinge him biforn,
13

Knight's Tale: 775

[continues previous] And on his hors, allone as he was born,
12

Knight's Tale: 776

[continues previous] He carieth al this harneys him biforn;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 31

Of whiche mayde anon, maugree hir heed,
13

Monk's Tale: 58

Maugree Philistiens of that citee, [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 86

... mercy of god of hise sinnes. The sixte circumstaunce is, why that a man sinneth, as by whiche temptacioun; and if him-self procure thilke temptacioun, or by the excytinge of other folk; or if he sinne with a womman by force, or by hir owene assent; or if the womman, maugree hir heed, hath been afforced, or noon; this shal she telle; for coveitise, or for poverte, and if it was hir procuringe or noon; and swiche manere harneys. The seventhe circumstaunce is, in what manere he hath doon his sinne, or how that she hath suffred that folk han doon to hir. ...
10

Legend of Philomela: 99

Maugree her heed, by strengthe and by his might. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 32

By verray force he rafte hir maydenheed;
13

Monk's Tale: 57

[continues previous] By verray force, at Gazan, on a night,
10

Legend of Philomela: 99

[continues previous] Maugree her heed, by strengthe and by his might.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 34

And swich pursute un-to the king Arthour,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 26

And so bifel it, that this king Arthour [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 35

That dampned was this knight for to be deed
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 26

[continues previous] And so bifel it, that this king Arthour
11

Second Nun's Tale: 310

'That is so ofte dampned to be deed,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 38

But that the quene and othere ladies mo
11

Merchant's Prologue: 3

Quod the Marchaunt, 'and so don othere mo [continues next]
11

Merchant's Prologue: 4

That wedded been, I trowe that it be so. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 39

So longe preyeden the king of grace,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 3

[continues previous] Quod the Marchaunt, 'and so don othere mo
10

Second Nun's Tale: 406

With whippe of leed, til he his lyf gan lete. [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 58

This wikked custom is so longe y-ronne [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 59

Til that of Athenes king Egeus [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 40

Til he his lyf him graunted in the place,
11

Cook's Tale: 46

Than he shende alle the servants in the place. [continues next]
11

Cook's Tale: 47

Therfore his maister yaf him acquitance, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 406

[continues previous] With whippe of leed, til he his lyf gan lete.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 407

[continues previous] Cecile him took and buried him anoon
11

Legend of Ariadne: 59

[continues previous] Til that of Athenes king Egeus
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 41

And yaf him to the quene al at hir wille,
11

Cook's Tale: 47

[continues previous] Therfore his maister yaf him acquitance,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 630

And to him yaf I al the lond and fee
11

Legend of Dido: 294

These hertes wilde, and han hem at hir wille.
11

Legend of Dido: 295

Among al this to-romblen gan the heven,
10

Legend of Ariadne: 31

So that the citee was al at his wille, [continues next]
10

Legend of Ariadne: 32

To saven whom him list, or elles spille; [continues next]
11

Anelida and Arcite: 196

Therfor she had him at hir owne wille. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 42

To chese, whether she wolde him save or spille.
10

Clerk's Tale: 447

Ben youres al, and ye mowe save or spille
10

Legend of Ariadne: 32

[continues previous] To saven whom him list, or elles spille;
13

Legend of Ariadne: 51

Unto Minos, to save him or to spille,
12

Legend of Ariadne: 52

Or lete his beste devoure him at his wille.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 196

[continues previous] Therfor she had him at hir owne wille.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1953

Save or spille, and also sloo;
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 43

The quene thanketh the king with al hir might,
10

Physician's Tale: 52

To seme wys; but after hir degree [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 53

She spak, and alle hir wordes more and lesse [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3504

To forther me with al hir might, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 741

Bar witnes of hir wo and hir constreynte; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 742

And thus she spak, sobbinge, in hir compleynte: [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 44

And after this thus spak she to the knight,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1005

And whan she saugh hir fader in the strete, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 394

And whan the knight saugh verraily al this, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 395

That she so fair was, and so yong ther-to, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 328

And to the firste knight right thus spak he,
11

Merchant's Tale: 757

And whan she saugh hir time, up-on a day, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 758

To visite this Damian goth May, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 673

For whan she saugh that Romayns wan the toun, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 674

She took hir children alle, and skipte adoun [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 816

As well as can a knight, with-outen drede.' [continues next]
10

Physician's Tale: 52

[continues previous] To seme wys; but after hir degree
10

Physician's Tale: 53

[continues previous] She spak, and alle hir wordes more and lesse
10

Pardoner's Tale: 554

And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 632

But right anon the worthy knight bigan, [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 633

Whan that he saugh that al the peple lough, [continues next]
13

Melibee's Tale: 5

... fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of god, shal warisshe and escape. And al were it so ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 13

... prively in his ere conseilled him certeyn thing, and conseilled him the contrarie in general audience. Whan Melibeus hadde herd that the gretteste partie of his conseil weren accorded that he sholde maken werre, anoon he consented to hir conseilling, and fully affermed hir sentence. Thanne dame Prudence, whan that she saugh how that hir housbonde shoop him for to wreken him on his foos, and to biginne werre, she in ful humble wyse, when she saugh hir tyme, seide him thise wordes: 'My lord,' quod she, 'I yow biseche as hertely as I dar and can, ne haste yow nat ... [continues next]
13

Melibee's Tale: 62

Thanne Dame Prudence, whan she saugh the gode wil of her housbonde, delibered and took avys in hir-self, thinkinge how she mighte bringe this nede un-to a good conclusioun and to a good ende. And whan she saugh hir tyme, she sente for thise adversaries to come un-to hir in-to a privee place, and shewed wysly un-to hem the grete goodes that comen of pees, and the grete harmes and perils that been in werre; and seyde to hem in a goodly manere, how that hem oughte have greet repentaunce of the iniurie and wrong that ... [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 75

And whan that dame Prudence saugh hir tyme, she freyned and axed hir lord Melibee, what vengeance he thoughte to taken of hise adversaries? [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 82

In tyme whan hir lust to han a make. [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 166

And after that, thus spak he to the crowe:
10

Hous of Fame 3: 160

To lerne, saugh I trumpe there. [continues next]
13

Legend of Dido: 53

And Eneas and Achates she grette, [continues next]
14

Legend of Dido: 54

And thus she to hem spak, whan she hem mette. [continues next]
11

Legend of Dido: 427

Up-on the fyr of sacrifys she sterte, [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 135

That wel unnethe of mete took she keep; [continues next]
10

Anelida and Arcite: 136

And whan that she was to hir reste broght, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3333

Whan she saugh for no sermoning [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3334

She might me fro my foly bring. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 3505

[continues previous] And helpe in worde and in dede,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 452

She with him spak, whan that she dorste or leste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 741

[continues previous] Bar witnes of hir wo and hir constreynte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 742

[continues previous] And thus she spak, sobbinge, in hir compleynte:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1046

Of Troilus, tho weep she many a tere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1047

Whan that she saugh his wyde woundes blede; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1512

To Diomede, and thus she spak and tolde.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1513

'This ilke boor bitokneth Diomede,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 45

Whan that she saugh hir tyme, up-on a day:
10

Reeve's Tale: 138

Whan that he saugh his tyme, softely;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 952

Unnethe up-on hir feet she mighte stonde.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 953

When Alla saugh his wyf, faire he hir grette,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1005

[continues previous] And whan she saugh hir fader in the strete,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1006

[continues previous] She lighte doun, and falleth him to fete.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 393

[continues previous] Cast up the curtin, loke how that it is.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 394

[continues previous] And whan the knight saugh verraily al this,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 395

[continues previous] That she so fair was, and so yong ther-to,
10

Merchant's Tale: 614

And afterward, whan that he saugh his tyme,
15+

Merchant's Tale: 757

[continues previous] And whan she saugh hir time, up-on a day,
10

Merchant's Tale: 852

She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste.
10

Merchant's Tale: 853

Up-on that other syde Damian
12

Squire's Tale: 624

He saugh up-on a tyme a kyte flee,
11

Franklin's Tale: 672

[continues previous] That at Cartage birafte hir-self hir lyf?
11

Franklin's Tale: 673

[continues previous] For whan she saugh that Romayns wan the toun,
11

Franklin's Tale: 674

[continues previous] She took hir children alle, and skipte adoun
11

Franklin's Tale: 816

[continues previous] As well as can a knight, with-outen drede.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 817

[continues previous] She thonketh him up-on hir knees al bare,
10

Pardoner's Tale: 554

[continues previous] And whan that this was doon, thus spak that oon,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 633

[continues previous] Whan that he saugh that al the peple lough,
15+

Melibee's Tale: 5

[continues previous] ... til she have wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of god, shal warisshe and escape. And al were it so ...
12

Melibee's Tale: 13

[continues previous] ... Melibeus in his conseil many folk, that prively in his ere conseilled him certeyn thing, and conseilled him the contrarie in general audience. Whan Melibeus hadde herd that the gretteste partie of his conseil weren accorded that he sholde maken werre, anoon he consented to hir conseilling, and fully affermed hir sentence. Thanne dame Prudence, whan that she saugh how that hir housbonde shoop him for to wreken him on his foos, and to biginne werre, she in ful humble wyse, when she saugh hir tyme, seide him thise wordes: 'My lord,' quod she, 'I yow biseche as hertely as I dar and can, ne haste yow nat to faste, and for alle guerdons as yeveth me audience. For Piers Alfonce seith: "who-so that dooth to that other good or harm, haste thee nat to quyten ...
15+

Melibee's Tale: 62

[continues previous] Thanne Dame Prudence, whan she saugh the gode wil of her housbonde, delibered and took avys in hir-self, thinkinge how she mighte bringe this nede un-to a good conclusioun and to a good ende. And whan she saugh hir tyme, she sente for thise adversaries to come un-to hir in-to a privee place, and shewed wysly un-to hem the grete goodes that comen of pees, and the grete harmes and perils that been in werre; and seyde to hem in a goodly manere, how that hem oughte have greet repentaunce of ...
14

Melibee's Tale: 75

[continues previous] And whan that dame Prudence saugh hir tyme, she freyned and axed hir lord Melibee, what vengeance he thoughte to taken of hise adversaries?
11

Monk's Tale: 76

And sleping in hir barme up-on a day
11

Monk's Tale: 77

She made to clippe or shere his heer awey,
10

Manciple's Tale: 81

[continues previous] Or leest of reputacion wol she take,
10

Manciple's Tale: 82

[continues previous] In tyme whan hir lust to han a make.
10

Hous of Fame 3: 159

[continues previous] That in hir tyme famous were
10

Hous of Fame 3: 160

[continues previous] To lerne, saugh I trumpe there.
13

Legend of Dido: 53

[continues previous] And Eneas and Achates she grette,
14

Legend of Dido: 54

[continues previous] And thus she to hem spak, whan she hem mette.
11

Legend of Dido: 426

[continues previous] And, whan she mighte her tyme wel espye,
11

Legend of Dido: 427

[continues previous] Up-on the fyr of sacrifys she sterte,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 135

[continues previous] That wel unnethe of mete took she keep;
10

Anelida and Arcite: 136

[continues previous] And whan that she was to hir reste broght,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3332

[continues previous] With that word Resoun wente hir gate,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 3333

[continues previous] Whan she saugh for no sermoning
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3334

[continues previous] She might me fro my foly bring.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 452

[continues previous] She with him spak, whan that she dorste or leste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1046

[continues previous] Of Troilus, tho weep she many a tere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1047

[continues previous] Whan that she saugh his wyde woundes blede;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1209

But whan he saugh she nolde hir terme holde,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 46

'Thou standest yet,' quod she, 'in swich array,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 874

She was in swich array; ne she nil seye [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 370

For wel he knew he stood in swich array, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 47

That of thy lyf yet hastow no suretee.
10

Man of Law's Tale: 875

[continues previous] Of hir estaat, althogh she sholde deye.
10

Shipman's Tale: 371

[continues previous] That nedes moste he winne in that viage
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 48

I grante thee lyf, if thou canst tellen me
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

And if thou canst nat tellen it anon, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 152

Coude ye me wisse, I wolde wel quyte your hyre.' [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4637

Canst thou yit chese, lat me see, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 511

Of thing fro which thou canst thee nat defende. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 49

What thing is it that wommen most desyren?
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

[continues previous] And if thou canst nat tellen it anon,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 65

To lerne, what thing wommen loven most;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 151

[continues previous] What thing it is that wommen most desyre;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4636

[continues previous] Is it swete or bitter thing?
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4638

[continues previous] What best thy socour mighte be?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 511

[continues previous] Of thing fro which thou canst thee nat defende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 512

[continues previous] What wole now every lover seyn of thee,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 51

And if thou canst nat tellen it anon,
12

Miller's Tale: 371

Axe nat why, for though thou aske me, [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 372

I wol nat tellen goddes privetee. [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 373

Suffiseth thee, but if thy wittes madde, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 48

I grante thee lyf, if thou canst tellen me
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 49

What thing is it that wommen most desyren?
11

Friar's Tale: 255

Hent it anon, for he hath yeve it thee, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 438

I wol it tellen heer in your presence. [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 531

Unhappy man! anon I wol me hye [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 532

To tellen thyn unwit and thy folye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 52

Yet wol I yeve thee leve for to gon
12

Miller's Tale: 372

[continues previous] I wol nat tellen goddes privetee.
11

Miller's Tale: 373

[continues previous] Suffiseth thee, but if thy wittes madde,
11

Miller's Tale: 611

This wol I yeve thee, if thou me kisse!'
11

Reeve's Tale: 133

In stede of flour, yet wol I yeve hem bren.
11

Friar's Tale: 255

[continues previous] Hent it anon, for he hath yeve it thee,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 437

[continues previous] And if yow list to yeve me audience,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 438

[continues previous] I wol it tellen heer in your presence.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 531

[continues previous] Unhappy man! anon I wol me hye
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 364

'Herkne, brother Gamelyn what I wol yeve thee;
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 365

For of my body, brother heir geten have I noon,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 3: 4

[continues previous] thy compleint, it behoveth thee to shewen it; and I wol
10

Compleynt of Mars: 153

And after that I wol my leve take;
10

Compleynt of Mars: 154

And God yeve every wight Ioye of his make!
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 53

A twelf-month and a day, to seche and lere
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1255

Never a day to seche sorwe;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 54

An answere suffisant in this matere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 834

Wherfore I wol deffyne in this matere, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 55

And suretee wol I han, er that thou pace,
12

Squire's Tale: 494

Myn harm I wol confessen, er I pace.'
12

Squire's Tale: 495

And ever, whyl that oon hir sorwe tolde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 834

[continues previous] Wherfore I wol deffyne in this matere,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 57

Wo was this knight and sorwefully he syketh;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

This knight avyseth him and sore syketh, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 862

'No, no,' quod he, and sorwefully he syketh. [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 863

'What was the cause? tel me if thou can.' [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 58

But what! he may nat do al as him lyketh.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

[continues previous] But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 862

[continues previous] 'No, no,' quod he, and sorwefully he syketh.
15+

Franklin's Tale: 863

[continues previous] 'What was the cause? tel me if thou can.'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 59

And at the laste, he chees him for to wende,
11

Clerk's Tale: 133

Of hir entente, and hoom agayn they wende. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 313

And shortly to the point right for to gon, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 746

For to biginne a newe werre agayn. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 747

He wende wel, for that fortune him sente [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 60

And come agayn, right at the yeres ende,
11

Clerk's Tale: 132

[continues previous] Him thanken alle, and thus they han an ende
11

Clerk's Tale: 133

[continues previous] Of hir entente, and hoom agayn they wende.
11

Shipman's Tale: 312

[continues previous] For that my lord daun Iohn was come agayn.
11

Shipman's Tale: 313

[continues previous] And shortly to the point right for to gon,
11

Monk's Tale: 746

[continues previous] For to biginne a newe werre agayn.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 61

With swich answere as god wolde him purveye;
11

Knight's Tale: 359

But taketh his leve, and homward he him spedde; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1159

And gan to smyle, and seyde him, 'eem, I preye, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1160

Swich answere as yow list your-self purveye, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 62

And taketh his leve, and wendeth forth his weye.
11

Knight's Tale: 359

[continues previous] But taketh his leve, and homward he him spedde;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 630

He takth the lettre, and forth he gooth his weye. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 604

So atte laste he moste forth his weye, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 605

And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 611

He taketh his leve, and she astonied stood,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 479

And took his leve, and wente forth his weye,
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 480

And at the thridde day broghte his moneye,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 277

And taketh his leve, and hoomward saileth he.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1159

[continues previous] And gan to smyle, and seyde him, 'eem, I preye,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 63

He seketh every hous and every place,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 630

[continues previous] He takth the lettre, and forth he gooth his weye.
10

Squire's Tale: 604

[continues previous] So atte laste he moste forth his weye,
11

Squire's Tale: 605

[continues previous] And forth he fleeth, til he cam ther him leste.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 65

To lerne, what thing wommen loven most;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 49

What thing is it that wommen most desyren?
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 129

This is to seye, what wommen loven moost,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 151

What thing it is that wommen most desyre; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 177

What thing that worldly wommen loven best. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 66

But he ne coude arryven in no cost,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 152

[continues previous] Coude ye me wisse, I wolde wel quyte your hyre.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 178

[continues previous] This knight ne stood nat stille as doth a best,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse,
11

Knight's Tale: 1658

Somme seyden thus, somme seyde it shal be so; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1659

Somme helden with him with the blake berd, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 257

Thou seyst, som folk desyre us for richesse, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse; [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 71

Somme, riche array, somme seyden, lust abedde, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

And somme seyn, how that we loven best [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 177

What thing that worldly wommen loven best.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse;
15+

Knight's Tale: 1658

[continues previous] Somme seyden thus, somme seyde it shal be so; [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 1659

[continues previous] Somme helden with him with the blake berd, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1660

[continues previous] Somme with the balled, somme with the thikke-herd; [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1661

Somme sayde, he loked grim and he wolde fighte; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

[continues previous] Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

[continues previous] Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

[continues previous] Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 71

[continues previous] Somme, riche array, somme seyden, lust abedde, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

[continues previous] And somme seyn, how that we loven best
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 71

Somme, riche array, somme seyden, lust abedde,
15+

Knight's Tale: 1658

[continues previous] Somme seyden thus, somme seyde it shal be so;
14

Knight's Tale: 1659

[continues previous] Somme helden with him with the blake berd,
11

Knight's Tale: 1660

[continues previous] Somme with the balled, somme with the thikke-herd;
11

Knight's Tale: 1661

[continues previous] Somme sayde, he loked grim and he wolde fighte;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 258

[continues previous] Somme for our shap, and somme for our fairnesse;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

[continues previous] Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

[continues previous] Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse;
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 71

[continues previous] Somme, riche array, somme seyden, lust abedde,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 178

of the holy man." And ofte tyme it bitydeth, that the somme of [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 72

And ofte tyme to be widwe and wedde.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 178

[continues previous] of the holy man." And ofte tyme it bitydeth, that the somme of [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 73

Somme seyde, that our hertes been most esed,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 178

[continues previous] of the holy man." And ofte tyme it bitydeth, that the somme of
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 75

He gooth ful ny the sothe, I wol nat lye;
11

Miller's Tale: 327

'Now John,' quod Nicholas, 'I wol nat lye;
11

Miller's Tale: 328

I have y-founde in myn astrologye,
12

Reeve's Tale: 56

But right fair was hir heer, I wol nat lye.
12

Reeve's Tale: 57

The person of the toun, for she was feir,
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 46

For sothe, I wol nat kepe me chast in al; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 515

We wommen han, if that I shal nat lye, [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 207

Fro Paradys first, if I shal nat lye, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 842

My trouthe wol I kepe, I wol nat lye.'
13

Franklin's Tale: 843

With herte soor he gooth un-to his cofre,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 125

I counseille yow the beste, I wol nat lye,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 58

Al swere I nat, of this I wol nat lye,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 76

A man shal winne us best with flaterye;
13

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] Welcome the sixte, whan that ever he shal.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 515

[continues previous] We wommen han, if that I shal nat lye,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 516

[continues previous] In this matere a queynte fantasye;
13

Summoner's Tale: 207

[continues previous] Fro Paradys first, if I shal nat lye,
13

Summoner's Tale: 208

[continues previous] Was man out chaced for his glotonye;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 78

Been we y-lymed, bothe more and lesse.
11

Friar's Tale: 264

And al his handwerk, bothe more and lesse! [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 820

That thou deceyvest bothe more and lesse! [continues next]
15+

Melibee's Prologue: 31

For somme of hem seyn more, and somme lesse, [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 253

And eek his freendes, bothe more and lesse; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7068

Engyns, bothe more and lesse, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

And somme seyn, how that we loven best
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 70

Somme seyde, honour, somme seyde, Iolynesse;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 89

And somme seyn, that greet delyt han we [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 264

[continues previous] And al his handwerk, bothe more and lesse!
11

Friar's Tale: 265

[continues previous] That was wel twight, myn owene lyard boy!
11

Merchant's Tale: 820

[continues previous] That thou deceyvest bothe more and lesse!
15+

Melibee's Prologue: 31

[continues previous] For somme of hem seyn more, and somme lesse,
12

Monk's Tale: 253

[continues previous] And eek his freendes, bothe more and lesse;
10

Monk's Tale: 254

[continues previous] For what man that hath freendes thurgh fortune,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7067

[continues previous] And thanne, that he wolde updresse
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7068

[continues previous] Engyns, bothe more and lesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 80

For to be free, and do right as us lest,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 90

[continues previous] For to ben holden stable and eek secree,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 82

But seye that we be wyse, and no-thing nyce.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 528

Ther is no-thing missayd nor do.' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 83

For trewely, ther is noon of us alle,
12

Knight's Tale: 64

For certes, lord, ther nis noon of us alle,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 76

For, as of trouthe, is ther noon hir liche, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 527

[continues previous] Quod he, 'for ther lyth noon ther-to;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 528

[continues previous] Ther is no-thing missayd nor do.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 488

Ther any wight is of us more fayn [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 84

If any wight wol clawe us on the galle,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 75

[continues previous] That hir to seen had every wight lykinge;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 487

[continues previous] We mighten goon, if I shal soothly seyn,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 488

[continues previous] Ther any wight is of us more fayn
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 85

That we nil kike, for he seith us sooth;
12

Merchant's Prologue: 17

Assaye who-so wol, and he shal finde [continues next]
12

Merchant's Prologue: 18

I seye sooth, by seint Thomas of Inde, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 86

Assay, and he shal finde it that so dooth.
12

Merchant's Prologue: 17

[continues previous] Assaye who-so wol, and he shal finde
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 294

As in effect, he shal finde it al oon.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 88

We wol been holden wyse, and clene of sinne.
12

Parson's Tale: 14

... that sinne; and his reson aperceyveth it wel, that it is sinne agayns the lawe of god, and yet his reson refreyneth nat his foul delyt or talent, though he se wel apertly that it is agayns the reverence of god; al-though his reson ne consente noght to doon that sinne in dede, yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god with perfit consentinge of his reson; for ther-of is ... [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 89

And somme seyn, that greet delyt han we
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 79

And somme seyn, how that we loven best [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 31

... the grete bole and the wilde hert." And the book seith: "a litel thorn may prikke a greet king ful sore; and an hound wol holde the wilde boor." But nathelees, I sey nat thou shall be so coward that thou doute ther wher-as is no drede. The book seith: that "somme folk han greet lust to deceyve, but yet they dreden hem to be deceyved." Yet shaltou drede to been empoisoned, and kepe yow from the companye of scorneres. For the book seith: "with scorneres make no companye, but flee hir wordes as venim." [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... wel sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part to hem that han greet nede; "ne thy goodes shullen nat been so opene, to been every mannes goodes." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses and in usinge hem, ye shul alwey have three thinges in your herte; that is to seyn, our lord god, conscience, and good name. First, ye shul have god in ... [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... on that sinne; and his reson aperceyveth it wel, that it is sinne agayns the lawe of god, and yet his reson refreyneth nat his foul delyt or talent, though he se wel apertly that it is agayns the reverence of god; al-though his reson ne consente noght to doon that sinne in dede, yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god with perfit consentinge of his reson; for ther-of is no doute, that it is deedly sinne in consentinge. For ...
10

Parson's Tale: 27

... of atyr likerousnesse and pryde. I sey nat that honestetee in clothinge of man or womman is uncovenable, but certes the superfluitee or disordinat scantitee of clothinge is reprevable. Also the sinne of aornement or of apparaille is in thinges that apertenen to rydinge, as in to manye delicat horses that been holden for delyt, that been so faire, fatte, and costlewe; and also to many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; in to curious harneys, as in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which god ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 740

We ben shrewes, every wight, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 741

And han delyt in wikkednes, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 90

For to ben holden stable and eek secree,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 80

[continues previous] For to be free, and do right as us lest,
12

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... hert." And the book seith: "a litel thorn may prikke a greet king ful sore; and an hound wol holde the wilde boor." But nathelees, I sey nat thou shall be so coward that thou doute ther wher-as is no drede. The book seith: that "somme folk han greet lust to deceyve, but yet they dreden hem to be deceyved." Yet shaltou drede to been empoisoned, and kepe yow from the companye of scorneres. For the book seith: "with scorneres make no companye, but flee hir wordes as venim."
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... sholde ye kepe yow and governe yow in swich a wyse that men calle yow nat fool-large. Therfore seith Tullius: "the goodes," he seith, "of thyn hous ne sholde nat been hid, ne kept so cloos but that they mighte been opened by pitee and debonairetee;" that is to seyn, to yeven part to hem that han greet nede; "ne thy goodes shullen nat been so opene, to been every mannes goodes." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses and in usinge hem, ye shul alwey have three thinges in your herte; that is to seyn, our lord god, conscience, and good name. First, ye ...
10

Parson's Tale: 27

[continues previous] ... they in hir array of atyr likerousnesse and pryde. I sey nat that honestetee in clothinge of man or womman is uncovenable, but certes the superfluitee or disordinat scantitee of clothinge is reprevable. Also the sinne of aornement or of apparaille is in thinges that apertenen to rydinge, as in to manye delicat horses that been holden for delyt, that been so faire, fatte, and costlewe; and also to many a vicious knave that is sustened by cause of hem; in to curious harneys, as in sadeles, in crouperes, peytrels, and brydles covered with precious clothing and riche, barres and plates of gold and of silver. For which ...
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 4: 48

ben hoot. But for as moche as for to ben holden honourable or
11

Hous of Fame 3: 740

[continues previous] We ben shrewes, every wight,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 741

[continues previous] And han delyt in wikkednes,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 92

And nat biwreye thing that men us telle.
13

Clerk's Prologue: 14

Ne that thy tale make us nat to slepe. [continues next]
13

Clerk's Prologue: 15

Telle us som mery thing of aventures; — [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 138

Biwreye a word of thing that ye me telle, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 93

But that tale is nat worth a rake-stele;
13

Clerk's Prologue: 14

[continues previous] Ne that thy tale make us nat to slepe.
11

Shipman's Tale: 138

[continues previous] Biwreye a word of thing that ye me telle,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 94

Pardee, we wommen conne no-thing hele;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 782

Ther-to we wrecched wommen no-thing conne,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 95

Witnesse on Myda; wol ye here the tale?
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 828

Now wol I seye my tale, if ye wol here.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 829

The Frere lough, whan he hadde herd al this,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 125

The remenant of the tale if ye wol here, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 23

That wonder is; but herkneth to my tale. [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 96

Ovyde, amonges othere thinges smale,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 761

And spak of mirthe amonges othere thinges, [continues next]
12

Man of Law's Tale: 85

Amonges othere thinges, specially
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

[continues previous] Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere.
12

Merchant's Tale: 784

Amonges othere of his honest thinges, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 24

[continues previous] Amonges alle his gestes, grete and smale,
12

Monk's Tale: 369

Amonges othere thinges that he wan,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 59

And many othere thinges smale.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 97

Seyde, Myda hadde, under his longe heres,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 762

[continues previous] Whan that we hadde maad our rekeninges;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 120

Myn housbond hath longe asses eres two! [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 784

[continues previous] Amonges othere of his honest thinges,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1388

Servyse of love, hadde eres al-so longe
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1389

As hadde Myda, ful of coveityse;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 98

Growinge up-on his heed two asses eres,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 120

[continues previous] Myn housbond hath longe asses eres two!
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 99

The which vyce he hidde, as he best mighte,
10

Merchant's Tale: 522

As he best mighte, savinge his honour,
13

Squire's Tale: 595

As I best mighte, I hidde fro him my sorwe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 874

But nathelees, as he best mighte, he seyde [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 632

Thencheson of his wo, as he best mighte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 635

And whan he was from every mannes sighte, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 636

With softe voys he, of his lady dere, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 100

Ful subtilly from every mannes sighte,
11

Franklin's Tale: 423

Thus semed it to every mannes sighte. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 875

[continues previous] From Troilus thise wordes to Criseyde.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 635

[continues previous] And whan he was from every mannes sighte,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 101

That, save his wyf, ther wiste of it na-mo.
11

Reeve's Tale: 361

And doun he fil bakward up-on his wyf,
11

Reeve's Tale: 362

That wiste no-thing of this nyce stryf;
10

Franklin's Tale: 424

[continues previous] Now than conclude I thus, that if I mighte
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 102

He loved hir most, and trusted hir also;
11

Franklin's Tale: 113

Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 114

And preyede hir on knees, for goddes sake, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 103

He preyede hir, that to no creature
11

Clerk's Tale: 712

But o thing he him preyede outerly,
11

Clerk's Tale: 713

That he to no wight, though men wolde enquere,
11

Franklin's Tale: 113

[continues previous] Hir freendes sawe hir sorwe gan to slake,
11

Franklin's Tale: 114

[continues previous] And preyede hir on knees, for goddes sake,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

[continues previous] To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

[continues previous] And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 105

She swoor him 'nay, for al this world to winne,
14

Parlement of Foules: 391

May I not lete, for al this world to winne, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 504

To tellen it, for al this world to winne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1069

Alderfirst his purpos for to winne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1070

Al this Pandare in his herte thoughte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 128

What? bet than swiche fyve? ey, nay, y-wis!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 129

For al this world ne can I reden what
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1335

Whom that I nolde leven for to see [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1336

For al this world, as wyd as it hath space; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 106

She nolde do that vileinye or sinne,
14

Parlement of Foules: 392

[continues previous] That he that most is worthy shal beginne.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1335

[continues previous] Whom that I nolde leven for to see
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 107

To make hir housbond han so foul a name;
10

Hous of Fame 3: 725

And preyed hir to han good fame, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 108

She nolde nat telle it for hir owene shame.'
10

Knight's Tale: 1426

But how she dide hir ryte I dar nat telle, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1427

But it be any thing in general; [continues next]
12

Cook's Prologue: 37

But nathelees I wol nat telle it yit, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 194

That was hir housbonde and hir love also. [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 679

Of Tarquin, for hir thoughte it was a shame [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 726

[continues previous] And that she nolde hem doon no shame,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 735

And Ecquo dyed for Narcisus
10

Book of the Duchesse: 736

Nolde nat love hir; and right thus
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 62

What wonder is though that hir sore smerte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 63

Whan she forgoth hir owene swete herte? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 109

But nathelees, hir thoughte that she dyde,
10

Knight's Tale: 1427

[continues previous] But it be any thing in general;
12

Cook's Prologue: 37

[continues previous] But nathelees I wol nat telle it yit,
12

Cook's Prologue: 38

[continues previous] But er we parte, y-wis, thou shalt be quit.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 194

[continues previous] That was hir housbonde and hir love also.
11

Franklin's Tale: 195

[continues previous] But nathelees she moste a tyme abyde,
11

Franklin's Tale: 679

[continues previous] Of Tarquin, for hir thoughte it was a shame
11

Hous of Fame 1: 380

What that she wroot or that she dyde; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 62

[continues previous] What wonder is though that hir sore smerte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 63

[continues previous] Whan she forgoth hir owene swete herte?
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 110

That she so longe sholde a conseil hyde;
10

Reeve's Tale: 46

Hir thoughte that a lady sholde hir spare, [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 600

She wolde noght hir sone had do so; [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 601

Hir thoughte a despit, that he sholde take [continues next]
11

Man of Law's Tale: 602

So strange a creature un-to his make. [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 380

[continues previous] What that she wroot or that she dyde;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 111

Hir thoughte it swal so sore aboute hir herte,
10

Reeve's Tale: 46

[continues previous] Hir thoughte that a lady sholde hir spare,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 599

[continues previous] Hir thoughte hir cursed herte brast a-two;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 600

[continues previous] She wolde noght hir sone had do so;
11

Man of Law's Tale: 601

[continues previous] Hir thoughte a despit, that he sholde take
11

Man of Law's Tale: 602

[continues previous] So strange a creature un-to his make.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 180

Hir thoughte hir sorwful herte brast a-two.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 114

Doun to a mareys faste by she ran;
12

Reeve's Tale: 185

Hir capul cacche, he ran alwey so faste, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 186

Til in a dich they caughte him atte laste. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 115

Til she came there, hir herte was a-fyre,
12

Reeve's Tale: 185

[continues previous] Hir capul cacche, he ran alwey so faste,
12

Reeve's Tale: 186

[continues previous] Til in a dich they caughte him atte laste.
10

Clerk's Tale: 702

To whom that she was yeven, herte and al, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 703

As to hir verray worldly suffisaunce; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 720

And thus she sette hir woful herte a-fyre [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 721

Thorugh remembraunce of that she gan desyre. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 116

And, as a bitore bombleth in the myre,
10

Clerk's Tale: 702

[continues previous] To whom that she was yeven, herte and al,
10

Clerk's Tale: 703

[continues previous] As to hir verray worldly suffisaunce;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 720

[continues previous] And thus she sette hir woful herte a-fyre
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 117

She leyde hir mouth un-to the water doun:
10

Second Nun's Tale: 148

Valerian gan faste unto hir swere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1055

With that hir heed doun in the bed she leyde,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 118

'Biwreye me nat, thou water, with thy soun,'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 495

That, by my trouthe, I wol thee nat biwreye.' [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 496

'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 147

[continues previous] So that ye swere ye shul me nat biwreye.'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 119

Quod she, 'to thee I telle it, and namo;
11

Pardoner's Tale: 496

[continues previous] 'Now,' quod the firste, 'thou woost wel we be tweye,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 120

Myn housbond hath longe asses eres two!
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 97

Seyde, Myda hadde, under his longe heres,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 98

Growinge up-on his heed two asses eres,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 690

'That I was born! Wel may myn herte longe [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 121

Now is myn herte all hool, now is it oute;
11

Clerk's Tale: 805

That I yow yaf myn herte in hool entente. [continues next]
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 75

Right now, that yet myn herte is sore afright.
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 76

Now god,' quod he, 'my swevene recche aright,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2068

And hool myn herte taken me fro,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2069

That it wol do for me no-thing
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3317

He took myn herte so hool him til,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 3318

That it is no-thing at my wil;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4612

To Bialacoil leve I myn herte [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4613

Al hool, withoute departing, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 690

[continues previous] 'That I was born! Wel may myn herte longe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 691

[continues previous] After my deeth; for now live I to longe!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 988

Myn herte is now in tribulacioun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1165

That in myn herte I now reioyse thus. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1166

It is ayein som good I have a thought. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 122

I mighte no lenger kepe it, out of doute,'
11

Clerk's Tale: 805

[continues previous] That I yow yaf myn herte in hool entente.
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 27

I may no lenger liven heer in this stounde; [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4612

[continues previous] To Bialacoil leve I myn herte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1165

[continues previous] That in myn herte I now reioyse thus.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 123

Heer may ye se, thogh we a tyme abyde,
13

Merchant's Tale: 86

Heer may ye se, and heer-by may ye preve,
13

Merchant's Tale: 743

Heer may ye se how excellent franchyse
11

Shipman's Tale: 160

But out it moot, I may namore abyde. [continues next]
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 27

[continues previous] I may no lenger liven heer in this stounde;
12

Parlement of Foules: 509

Ye may abyde a whyle yet, parde!' [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 124

Yet out it moot, we can no conseil hyde;
14

Shipman's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Ful lief were me this conseil for to hyde,
14

Shipman's Tale: 160

[continues previous] But out it moot, I may namore abyde.
13

Melibee's Tale: 23

... wight parfitly trewe to him that he to sore dredeth." And Tullius seith: "ther nis no might so greet of any emperour, that longe may endure, but-if he have more love of the peple than drede." Thou shalt also eschewe the conseiling of folk that been dronkelewe; for they ne can no conseil hyde. For Salomon seith: "ther is no privetee ther-as regneth dronkenesse." Ye shul also han in suspect the conseilling of swich folk as conseille yow a thing prively, and conseille yow the contrarie openly. For Cassidorie seith: that "it is a maner sleighte to hindre, whan he sheweth to doon a thing openly and werketh prively the ...
12

Parlement of Foules: 509

[continues previous] Ye may abyde a whyle yet, parde!'
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 125

The remenant of the tale if ye wol here,
11

Knight's Tale: 30

The remenant of the tale is long y-nough.
11

Knight's Tale: 31

I wol nat letten eek noon of this route;
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 828

Now wol I seye my tale, if ye wol here.'
14

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 829

The Frere lough, whan he hadde herd al this,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 95

Witnesse on Myda; wol ye here the tale? [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 145

Your excellente doghter that is here.
10

Squire's Tale: 146

The vertu of the ring, if ye wol here,
10

Monk's Tale: 469

Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 126

Redeth Ovyde, and ther ye may it lere.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 95

[continues previous] Witnesse on Myda; wol ye here the tale?
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 96

[continues previous] Ovyde, amonges othere thinges smale,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 250

Loketh the Bible, and ther ye may it lere.
10

Monk's Tale: 469

[continues previous] Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse,
10

Monk's Tale: 470

[continues previous] Redeth the grete poete of Itaille,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 127

This knight, of which my tale is specially,
12

Man of Law's Tale: 1027

Of Custance is my tale specially.
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 128

Whan that he saugh he mighte nat come therby,
10

Merchant's Tale: 362

Him thoughte his chois mighte nat ben amended.
10

Merchant's Tale: 363

For whan that he him-self concluded hadde,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 633

Whan that he saugh that al the peple lough,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 842

In this craft, that men can nat come therby, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1531

For whan he saugh that he his wille
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 1532

Mighte in no maner wey fulfille,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 75

Sire, come am I to yow for causes tweye; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1699

For whan he saugh that she ne mighte dwelle,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 129

This is to seye, what wommen loven moost,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 65

To lerne, what thing wommen loven most;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 177

What thing that worldly wommen loven best.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 178

This knight ne stood nat stille as doth a best,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 842

[continues previous] In this craft, that men can nat come therby,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 74

[continues previous] To me,' quod she, 'ey! what is this to seye?
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 130

With-inne his brest ful sorweful was the goost;
11

Knight's Tale: 442

With-inne his brest, and hente him by the herte
12

Franklin's Tale: 618

And hoom she gooth a sorweful creature. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 731

Criseyde, ful of sorweful pitee, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 131

But hoom he gooth, he mighte nat soiourne.
12

Franklin's Tale: 618

[continues previous] And hoom she gooth a sorweful creature.
10

Shipman's Tale: 369

And hoom he gooth, mery as a papeiay.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 730

[continues previous] They took hir leve, and hoom they wenten alle.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1667

[continues previous] He gooth him hoom, and gan ful sone sende
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 133

And in his wey it happed him to ryde,
13

Friar's Tale: 81

And happed that he saugh bifore him ryde [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 134

In al this care, under a forest-syde,
13

Friar's Tale: 82

[continues previous] A gay yeman, under a forest-syde. [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 83

A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 624

He saugh up-on a tyme a kyte flee, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 135

Wher-as he saugh up-on a daunce go
12

Friar's Tale: 82

[continues previous] A gay yeman, under a forest-syde.
12

Friar's Tale: 83

[continues previous] A bowe he bar, and arwes brighte and kene;
11

Squire's Tale: 624

[continues previous] He saugh up-on a tyme a kyte flee,
10

Prioress' Tale: 53

And eek also, wher-as he saugh thimage
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 136

Of ladies foure and twenty, and yet mo;
13

Friar's Tale: 28

To techen him to foure and twenty mo.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 137

Toward the whiche daunce he drow ful yerne,
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6719

Than may he go a-begging yerne, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 138

In hope that som wisdom sholde he lerne.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6720

[continues previous] Til he som maner craft can lerne,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 140

Vanisshed was this daunce, he niste where.
13

Second Nun's Tale: 216

Tho vanisshed the olde man, he niste where,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1351

That where his spirit was, for Ioye he niste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1202

For when he saugh that she abood so longe, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1203

He niste what he iuggen of it mighte, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 141

No creature saugh he that bar lyf,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1202

[continues previous] For when he saugh that she abood so longe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1203

[continues previous] He niste what he iuggen of it mighte,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 142

Save on the grene he saugh sittinge a wyf;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 190

And with that word up stirte the olde wyf,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 191

Which that the knight saugh sittinge in the grene:
13

Merchant's Tale: 993

'My wyf,' quod he, 'ther may no wight sey nay; [continues next]
12

Parson's Tale: 9

... thus: 'though I wiste that neither god ne man ne sholde nevere knowe it, yet wolde I have desdayn for to do sinne.' And the same Seneca also seith: 'I am born to gretter thinges than to be thral to my body, or than for to maken of my body a thral.' Ne a fouler thral may no man ne womman maken of his body, than for to yeven his body to sinne. Al were it the fouleste cherl, or the fouleste womman that liveth, and leest of value, yet is he thanne more foule and more in servitute. Evere fro the hyer degree ... [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 143

A fouler wight ther may no man devyse.
13

Merchant's Tale: 993

[continues previous] 'My wyf,' quod he, 'ther may no wight sey nay;
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

... been ny sib to hem. And certes, as in that, hir condicioun is bet than youres. Thanne lat us considere also if the conseilling of hem that conseilleden yow to taken sodeyn vengeaunce, whether it accorde to resoun? And certes, ye knowe wel "nay." For as by right and resoun, ther may no man taken vengeance on no wight, but the Iuge that hath the Iurisdiccioun of it, whan it is graunted him to take thilke vengeance, hastily or attemprely, as the lawe requireth. And yet more-over, of thilke word that Tullius clepeth "consentinge," thou shalt considere if thy might and thy power may consenten and suffyse to thy ...
12

Parson's Tale: 9

[continues previous] ... thus: 'though I wiste that neither god ne man ne sholde nevere knowe it, yet wolde I have desdayn for to do sinne.' And the same Seneca also seith: 'I am born to gretter thinges than to be thral to my body, or than for to maken of my body a thral.' Ne a fouler thral may no man ne womman maken of his body, than for to yeven his body to sinne. Al were it the fouleste cherl, or the fouleste womman that liveth, and leest of value, yet is he thanne more foule and more in servitute. Evere fro the hyer degree that man falleth, the more ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 277

That art so fair and goodly to devyse?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 685

To speke as now, for no wight may bireve
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 686

A man to love, til that him list to leve.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1367

Of me, whos wo ther may no wight discryve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1368

I can no more but, cheste of every care,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 144

Agayn the knight this olde wyf gan ryse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 190

And with that word up stirte the olde wyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 191

Which that the knight saugh sittinge in the grene:
12

Merchant's Tale: 22

Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 278

[continues previous] Ther-with his herte gan to sprede and ryse,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 145

And seyde, 'sir knight, heer-forth ne lyth no wey.
12

Merchant's Tale: 22

[continues previous] Thus seyde this olde knight, that was so wys.
11

Merchant's Tale: 23

[continues previous] And certeinly, as sooth as god is king,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 30

That they ne hadden reuthe of that ilke knight,
11

Gamelyn's Tale: 31

And seyde, 'sir, for goddes love ne dismay you nought;
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 99

'Thanne,' quod she, 'ne sholden men nat by no wey seken [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 110

Do wey your barbe, and shew your face bare; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 146

Tel me, what that ye seken, by your fey?
11

Clerk's Prologue: 9

Telle us som mery tale, by your fey;
11

Clerk's Prologue: 10

For what man that is entred in a pley,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 99

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'ne sholden men nat by no wey seken
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 109

[continues previous] But lat be this, and tel me how ye fare;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 110

[continues previous] Do wey your barbe, and shew your face bare;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 148

Thise olde folk can muchel thing,' quod she.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.' [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 53

'This is a consequence,' quod I. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 54

'This thing thanne,' quod she, 'that ne hath nede of no [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 32

whiche sentence none of thise olde folk ne withseyde never; al-be-it
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1212

'Depar-dieux,' quod she, 'god leve al be wel! [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 149

'My leve mooder,' quod this knight certeyn,
14

Miller's Tale: 110

I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

[continues previous] 'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 54

[continues previous] 'This thing thanne,' quod she, 'that ne hath nede of no
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6580

But-if it be in certeyn cas, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1211

[continues previous] Refuseth not at this tyme my preyere.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1212

[continues previous] 'Depar-dieux,' quod she, 'god leve al be wel!
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 150

'I nam but deed, but-if that I can seyn
12

Knight's Tale: 264

I nam but deed; ther nis namore to seye.'
12

Knight's Tale: 416

I nam but deed; ther nis no remedye.'
14

Miller's Tale: 110

[continues previous] I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
12

Reeve's Tale: 369

Myn herte is broken, help, I nam but deed;
12

Book of the Duchesse: 204

For certes, swete, I nam but deed;
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1188

And, but I telle hir, I nam but deed;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1189

And if I telle hir, to seye sooth,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6580

[continues previous] But-if it be in certeyn cas,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6581

[continues previous] That I can reherce, if mister be,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1498

So thenk I nam but deed, with-oute more.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1245

'O Pandarus, now knowe I crop and rote!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1246

I nam but deed, ther nis non other bote!
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 151

What thing it is that wommen most desyre;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 49

What thing is it that wommen most desyren? [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 65

To lerne, what thing wommen loven most; [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 152

Coude ye me wisse, I wolde wel quyte your hyre.'
12

Reeve's Prologue: 10

'So theek,' quod he, 'ful wel coude I yow quyte
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 48

[continues previous] I grante thee lyf, if thou canst tellen me
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 66

[continues previous] But he ne coude arryven in no cost,
11

Franklin's Tale: 600

And in myn hand your trouthe plighten ye [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 153

'Plighte me thy trouthe, heer in myn hand,' quod she,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 195

For which he plighte me his trouthe there, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 599

[continues previous] Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me;
11

Franklin's Tale: 600

[continues previous] And in myn hand your trouthe plighten ye
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 154

'The nexte thing that I requere thee,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 196

[continues previous] The firste thing I wolde of him requere, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 155

Thou shalt it do, if it lye in thy might;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 197

[continues previous] He wolde it do, if it lay in his might.
11

Shipman's Tale: 266

If it lye in my power and my might, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Prologue: 19

I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 227

For I ne might, for bote ne bale, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 92

In chaunged vois, right for his verrey drede, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.'
11

Knight's Tale: 478

And of Arcita forth I wol yow telle.
11

Cook's Prologue: 18

I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can
11

Cook's Prologue: 37

But nathelees I wol nat telle it yit,
11

Cook's Prologue: 38

But er we parte, y-wis, thou shalt be quit.'
11

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I
11

Squire's Tale: 661

First wol I telle yow of Cambynskan,
11

Franklin's Tale: 30

Sir, I wol be your humble trewe wyf, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 269

Than wol I love yow best of any man; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 266

[continues previous] If it lye in my power and my might,
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 185

Anon I wol yow telle.
11

Melibee's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 265

Our ingottes, testes, and many mo.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 266

I wol yow telle, as was me taught also,
11

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose.
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
11

Hous of Fame 3: 337

Of whiche I wol yow telle fonde,
11

Legend of Philomela: 122

And of her suster forth I wol yow telle.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 226

[continues previous] And I wol telle yow wherfore;
12

Book of the Duchesse: 227

[continues previous] For I ne might, for bote ne bale,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6690

'Sir, I wol gladly telle yow:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 91

[continues previous] I yow wol telle, as techen bokes olde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
12

Knight's Tale: 752

Have heer my trouthe, to-morwe I wol nat fayle,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 148

Thise olde folk can muchel thing,' quod she. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 149

'My leve mooder,' quod this knight certeyn, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 317

Yet may the hye god, and so hope I, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 318

Grante me grace to liven vertuously. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 319

Thanne am I gentil, whan that I biginne [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 1100

Thanne sholde I climbe wel y-nogh,' quod she, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 31

[continues previous] Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
12

Franklin's Tale: 270

[continues previous] Have heer my trouthe in al that ever I can.'
11

Pardoner's Tale: 427

Have heer my trouthe, as thou art his aspye,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 45

'Why sholde I nat remembre that?' quod I. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?' [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 53

'This is a consequence,' quod I. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 54

'This thing thanne,' quod she, 'that ne hath nede of no [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 65

'It mot needly been so,' quod I. [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 66

'Thilke thing thanne,' quod she, 'that is oon and simple [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 99

'Thanne,' quod she, 'ne sholden men nat by no wey seken [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 134

'Thanne,' quod she, 'for as mochel as thou hast knowen [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 79

'Thanne,' quod she, 'moten we nedes graunten and confessen [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 32

'Thanne most thou graunten,' quod she, 'by semblable resoun, [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 146

'Thanne,' quod she, 'desiren alle thinges oon?' [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 151

'Alle thinges thanne,' quod she, 'requiren good; and thilke [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 114

'Thanne is yvel nothing,' quod she, 'sin that he ne may nat [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 79

'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that a wight be mighty to moeve and [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 167

'Is ther any wight thanne,' quod she, 'that weneth that men [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 73

'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that any good were added to the [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 77

'And what seystow thanne,' quod she, 'of thilke wrecche that [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 84

'Thanne, certes,' quod she, 'han shrewes, whan they ben [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 91

the deserte of felonye.' 'I ne may nat denye it,' quod I. 'Moche [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 92

more thanne,' quod she, 'ben shrewes unsely, whan they ben [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 165

'Thanne ne doutestow nat,' quod she, 'that thilke folk that ben [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 168

'Yif thou were thanne,' quod she, 'y-set a Iuge or a knower of [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 36

'Thanne ayeinward,' quod she, 'I suppose that ther be prescience, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 684

I dar wel swere she took the beste! [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 148

[continues previous] Thise olde folk can muchel thing,' quod she.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 149

[continues previous] 'My leve mooder,' quod this knight certeyn,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 317

[continues previous] Yet may the hye god, and so hope I,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 318

[continues previous] Grante me grace to liven vertuously.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Thanne am I gentil, whan that I biginne
10

Clerk's Tale: 255

And al that lyketh me, I dar wel seyn
12

Merchant's Tale: 1099

[continues previous] (For wel I woot that ye mistruste me)
12

Merchant's Tale: 1100

[continues previous] Thanne sholde I climbe wel y-nogh,' quod she,
11

Shipman's Tale: 119

That I was born," but to no wight,' quod she,
11

Shipman's Tale: 120

'Dar I nat telle how that it stant with me.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 45

[continues previous] 'Why sholde I nat remembre that?' quod I.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 46

[continues previous] 'Maystow nat telle me thanne,' quod she, 'what thing is a man?'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 54

[continues previous] 'This thing thanne,' quod she, 'that ne hath nede of no
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 66

[continues previous] 'Thilke thing thanne,' quod she, 'that is oon and simple
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 99

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'ne sholden men nat by no wey seken
14

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 134

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'for as mochel as thou hast knowen
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 79

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'moten we nedes graunten and confessen
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 32

[continues previous] 'Thanne most thou graunten,' quod she, 'by semblable resoun,
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 146

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'desiren alle thinges oon?'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 151

[continues previous] 'Alle thinges thanne,' quod she, 'requiren good; and thilke
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 53

[continues previous] 'Thanne ordeineth he alle thinges by thilke good,' quod she;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 114

[continues previous] 'Thanne is yvel nothing,' quod she, 'sin that he ne may nat
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 79

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that a wight be mighty to moeve and
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 167

[continues previous] 'Is ther any wight thanne,' quod she, 'that weneth that men
13

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 73

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'yif that any good were added to the
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 77

[continues previous] 'And what seystow thanne,' quod she, 'of thilke wrecche that
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 84

[continues previous] 'Thanne, certes,' quod she, 'han shrewes, whan they ben
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 91

[continues previous] the deserte of felonye.' 'I ne may nat denye it,' quod I. 'Moche
12

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 92

[continues previous] more thanne,' quod she, 'ben shrewes unsely, whan they ben
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 165

[continues previous] 'Thanne ne doutestow nat,' quod she, 'that thilke folk that ben
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 168

[continues previous] 'Yif thou were thanne,' quod she, 'y-set a Iuge or a knower of
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 1: 9

Thanne quod she, 'I haste me to yilden and assoilen to thee
13

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 4: 36

[continues previous] 'Thanne ayeinward,' quod she, 'I suppose that ther be prescience,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 683

[continues previous] For, also wis god yive me reste,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 684

[continues previous] I dar wel swere she took the beste!
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 159

Thy lyf is sauf, for I wol stonde therby,
11

Parson's Prologue: 60

That I wol stonde to correccioun.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 160

Up-on my lyf, the queen wol seye as I.
10

Parson's Prologue: 60

[continues previous] That I wol stonde to correccioun.'
11

Parson's Prologue: 61

[continues previous] Up-on this word we han assented sone,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 163

That dar seye nay, of that I shal thee teche;
12

Melibee's Prologue: 47

And therfor herkneth what that I shal seye, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 962

Whan that hir liste, that I dar seye,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 963

That she was lyk to torche bright,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1298

That shal ye finden in me al my lyf,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1502

And doth somwhat, as that I shal yow seye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 164

Lat us go forth with-outen lenger speche.'
11

Friar's Tale: 271

Lat us go forth abouten our viage;
12

Melibee's Prologue: 48

[continues previous] And lat me tellen al my tale, I preye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1503

[continues previous] And lat us stele away bitwixe us tweye;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 388

And rys up now with-oute more speche,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 389

And lat us caste how forth may best be drive
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 165

Tho rouned she a pistel in his ere,
13

Friar's Tale: 252

Ful prively, and rouned in his ere: [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 954

Rouned ech in otheres ere
11

Hous of Fame 3: 955

A newe tyding prevely,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 166

And bad him to be glad, and have no fere.
13

Friar's Tale: 252

[continues previous] Ful prively, and rouned in his ere:
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 168

Seyde, 'he had holde his day, as he hadde hight,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1185

He thoughte he misacounted hadde his day,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1186

And seyde, 'I understonde have al a-mis.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 170

Ful many a noble wyf, and many a mayde,
12

Knight's Tale: 313

Al be she mayde, or widwe, or elles wyf. [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 314

And eek it is nat lykly, al thy lyf, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 636

Hath ther nat many a noble wyf, er this, [continues next]
15+

Franklin's Tale: 637

And many a mayde y-slayn hir-self, allas! [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 171

And many a widwe, for that they ben wyse,
12

Knight's Tale: 313

[continues previous] Al be she mayde, or widwe, or elles wyf.
12

Knight's Tale: 314

[continues previous] And eek it is nat lykly, al thy lyf,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 188

[continues previous] Ne widwe, that contraried that he sayde,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 636

[continues previous] Hath ther nat many a noble wyf, er this,
15+

Franklin's Tale: 637

[continues previous] And many a mayde y-slayn hir-self, allas!
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 175

To every wight comanded was silence,
10

Merchant's Tale: 479

And Venus laugheth up-on every wight. [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 480

For Ianuarie was bicome hir knight, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 445

Han thus comanded and maad ordinaunce, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 446

That every cristen wight shal han penaunce [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 176

And that the knight sholde telle in audience,
11

Summoner's Tale: 364

What sholde I telle thanswere of the knight? [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 480

[continues previous] For Ianuarie was bicome hir knight,
10

Merchant's Tale: 481

[continues previous] And wolde bothe assayen his corage
11

Second Nun's Tale: 445

[continues previous] Han thus comanded and maad ordinaunce,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 446

[continues previous] That every cristen wight shal han penaunce
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1263

God woot wher he was lyk a manly knight! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1264

What sholde I drecche, or telle of his aray? [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 177

What thing that worldly wommen loven best.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 65

To lerne, what thing wommen loven most; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 69

Somme seyde, wommen loven best richesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 129

This is to seye, what wommen loven moost, [continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 364

[continues previous] What sholde I telle thanswere of the knight?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1264

[continues previous] What sholde I drecche, or telle of his aray?
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 178

This knight ne stood nat stille as doth a best,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 66

[continues previous] But he ne coude arryven in no cost,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 129

[continues previous] This is to seye, what wommen loven moost,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 179

But to his questioun anon answerde
11

Squire's Tale: 99

He with a manly voys seith his message, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 180

With manly voys, that al the court it herde:
11

Squire's Tale: 99

[continues previous] He with a manly voys seith his message,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 181

'My lige lady, generally,' quod he,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 182

'Wommen desyren to have sovereyntee
12

Shipman's Tale: 173

And wel ye woot that wommen naturelly [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 174

Desyren thinges sixe, as wel as I. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

[continues previous] Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1197

As wel as I have told hir hevinesse. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 183

As wel over hir housbond as hir love,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 466

Lest that hir housbond, shortly for to sayn, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 467

Wolde hir for Iesu Cristes love han slayn, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 737

Of Clitemistra, for hir lecherye, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 738

That falsly made hir housbond for to dye, [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 174

[continues previous] Desyren thinges sixe, as wel as I.
11

Melibee's Tale: 5

... moder to wepen in the deeth of hir child, til she have wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

[continues previous] Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 772

[continues previous] Quod he, 'so as ye wommen demen alle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1196

[continues previous] After myn auctor, tellen hir gladnesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1197

[continues previous] As wel as I have told hir hevinesse.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 184

And for to been in maistrie him above;
10

Man of Law's Tale: 466

[continues previous] Lest that hir housbond, shortly for to sayn,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 467

[continues previous] Wolde hir for Iesu Cristes love han slayn,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 738

[continues previous] That falsly made hir housbond for to dye,
11

Melibee's Tale: 5

[continues previous] ... wepen in the deeth of hir child, til she have wept hir fille, as for a certain tyme; and thanne shal man doon his diligence with amiable wordes hir to reconforte, and preyen hir of hir weping for to stinte.' For which resoun this noble wyf Prudence suffred hir housbond for to wepe and crye as for a certein space; and whan she saugh hir tyme, she seyde him in this wyse. 'Allas, my lord,' quod she,' why make ye your-self for to be lyk a fool? For sothe, it aperteneth nat to a wys man, to maken swiche a sorwe. Your doghter, with the grace of ...
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 185

This is your moste desyr, thogh ye me kille,
12

Clerk's Tale: 591

But as yow list; noght greveth me at al, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 592

Thogh that my doghter and my sone be slayn, [continues next]
10

Compleint to His Lady: 126

As [is] your moste plesure, so doth by me; [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 186

Doth as yow list, I am heer at your wille.'
11

Friar's Tale: 322

Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf; [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 591

[continues previous] But as yow list; noght greveth me at al,
11

Clerk's Tale: 596

Ye been our lord, doth with your owene thing
11

Clerk's Tale: 597

Right as yow list; axeth no reed at me.
12

Franklin's Tale: 607

Doth as yow list, have your biheste in minde,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 152

Construeth that as yow list, I do no cure.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 31

So that the citee was al at his wille, [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 32

To saven whom him list, or elles spille; [continues next]
10

Compleint to His Lady: 126

[continues previous] As [is] your moste plesure, so doth by me;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 939

'Thanne, eem,' quod she, 'doth her-of as yow list;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1176

Do what yow list, I am al in your grace.' [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 187

In al the court ne was ther wyf ne mayde,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 69

And of his port as meke as is a mayde. [continues next]
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 70

He never yet no vileinye ne sayde [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 414

In al this world ne was ther noon him lyk
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon [continues next]
12

Knight's Tale: 313

Al be she mayde, or widwe, or elles wyf. [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 572

Ne was ther never in court, of his degree;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 170

Ful many a noble wyf, and many a mayde, [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Ne was I never er now, widwe ne wyf, [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 322

[continues previous] Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf; [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 323

[continues previous] Ne never I nas but of my body trewe!
11

Squire's Tale: 86

In al the halle ne was ther spoke a word
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 110

o god; but, by the participacioun of divinitee, ther ne let ne [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 111

desturbeth nothing that ther ne ben manye goddes.' [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 31

[continues previous] So that the citee was al at his wille,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1176

[continues previous] Do what yow list, I am al in your grace.'
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 188

Ne widwe, that contraried that he sayde,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 70

[continues previous] He never yet no vileinye ne sayde
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 451

[continues previous] In al the parisshe wyf ne was ther noon
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 452

[continues previous] That to the offring bifore hir sholde goon;
12

Knight's Tale: 313

[continues previous] Al be she mayde, or widwe, or elles wyf.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 171

[continues previous] And many a widwe, for that they ben wyse,
13

Friar's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Ne was I never er now, widwe ne wyf,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 110

[continues previous] o god; but, by the participacioun of divinitee, ther ne let ne
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 111

[continues previous] desturbeth nothing that ther ne ben manye goddes.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 190

And with that word up stirte the olde wyf,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 142

Save on the grene he saugh sittinge a wyf; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 144

Agayn the knight this olde wyf gan ryse, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 191

Which that the knight saugh sittinge in the grene:
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 142

[continues previous] Save on the grene he saugh sittinge a wyf;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 144

[continues previous] Agayn the knight this olde wyf gan ryse,
10

Merchant's Tale: 607

But god wot what that May thoughte in hir herte, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 608

Whan she him saugh up sittinge in his sherte, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 609

In his night-cappe, and with his nekke lene; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 192

'Mercy,' quod she, 'my sovereyn lady quene!
11

Merchant's Tale: 608

[continues previous] Whan she him saugh up sittinge in his sherte,
11

Franklin's Tale: 582

Salewed hath his sovereyn lady dere:
11

Franklin's Tale: 583

'My righte lady,' quod this woful man,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 108

'A! mercy! swete lady dere!'
10

Book of the Duchesse: 109

Quod she to Iuno, hir goddesse;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 195

For which he plighte me his trouthe there,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 153

'Plighte me thy trouthe, heer in myn hand,' quod she, [continues next]
10

Legend of Phyllis: 73

To wedden her, and her his trouthe plighte,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 196

The firste thing I wolde of him requere,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 154

[continues previous] 'The nexte thing that I requere thee, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 197

He wolde it do, if it lay in his might.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 540

Withouten hyre, if it lay in his might.
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 541

His tythes payed he ful faire and wel,
10

Knight's Tale: 292

To helpen me, if it lay in thy might,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 155

[continues previous] Thou shalt it do, if it lye in thy might;
12

Squire's Tale: 467

Of your disese, if it lay in my might,
12

Squire's Tale: 468

I wolde amende it, er that it were night,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 198

Bifore the court than preye I thee, sir knight,'
10

Knight's Tale: 1397

Than preye I thee, to-morwe with a spere
10

Knight's Tale: 1524

Than preye I thee to rewe up-on my pyne.
12

Manciple's Prologue: 103

Tel on thy tale, maunciple, I thee preye.' [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.' [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 47

'But I preye,' quod she, 'see now how thou mayst proeven, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 199

Quod she, 'that thou me take un-to thy wyf;
11

Merchant's Tale: 61

And if thou take a wyf un-to thyn hold, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 7

... his body endured and receyved ful many a grevous tribulacioun; yet seyde he thus: "our lord hath yeven it me, our lord hath biraft it me; right as our lord hath wold, right so it is doon; blessed be the name of our lord."' To thise foreseide thinges answerde Melibeus un-to his wyf Prudence: 'Alle thy wordes,' quod he, 'been sothe, and ther-to profitable; but trewely myn herte is troubled with this sorwe so grevously, that I noot what to done.' 'Lat calle,' quod Prudence, 'thy trewe freendes alle, and thy linage whiche that been wyse; telleth your cas, and herkneth what they seye in conseiling, and yow ...
11

Second Nun's Tale: 295

'Lo, right so as the love of Crist,' quod she,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 296

'Made me thy brotheres wyf, right in that wyse
12

Manciple's Prologue: 104

[continues previous] 'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 47

[continues previous] 'But I preye,' quod she, 'see now how thou mayst proeven,
12

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 37

A-nother manere of equaciouns of houses by the Astrolabie. Tak thyn assendent, and thanne hastow thy 4 angles; for wel thou wost that the opposit of thyn assendent, that is to seyn, thy by-ginning of the 7 hous, sit up-on the west orizonte; and the byginning of the 10 hous sit up-on the lyne meridional; and his opposit up-on the lyne of midnight. Thanne ley thy ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 592

Thy grace most, of alle lustes leve. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 200

For wel thou wost that I have kept thy lyf.
11

Merchant's Tale: 61

[continues previous] And if thou take a wyf un-to thyn hold,
11

Franklin's Prologue: 24

'What, frankeleyn? pardee, sir, wel thou wost
11

Franklin's Prologue: 25

That eche of yow mot tellen atte leste
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 157

how gret sikernesse of peril to me defendede I al the senat!
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 158

Thou wost wel that I seye sooth, ne I ne avauntede me never
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 7: 1

Thanne seyde I thus: 'Thou wost wel thy-self that the coveitise
12

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 37

[continues previous] A-nother manere of equaciouns of houses by the Astrolabie. Tak thyn assendent, and thanne hastow thy 4 angles; for wel thou wost that the opposit of thyn assendent, that is to seyn, thy by-ginning of the 7 hous, sit up-on the west orizonte; and the byginning of the 10 hous sit up-on the lyne meridional; and his opposit up-on the lyne of midnight. Thanne ley thy label over the degree that assendeth, and ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 257

For thee have I my nece, of vyces clene,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 267

For wel thou wost, the name as yet of here
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 591

[continues previous] Now mercy, lord, thou wost wel I desire
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 592

[continues previous] Thy grace most, of alle lustes leve.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 201

If I sey fals, sey nay, up-on thy fey!'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 242

'Amended?' quod this knight, 'allas! nay, nay! [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 299

And eek whan I sey "ye," ne sey nat "nay,"
10

Parson's Prologue: 23

Or art a person? sey sooth, by thy fey!
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 202

This knight answerde, 'allas! and weylawey!
10

Miller's Tale: 109

That but ye wayte wel and been privee, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 242

[continues previous] 'Amended?' quod this knight, 'allas! nay, nay!
12

Shipman's Tale: 118

For I may singe "allas" and "weylawey, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 6

This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges folk in sorwe, but it is rather graunted him to wepe. The Apostle Paul un-to the Romayns wryteth, "man shal reioyse with hem that maken Ioye, and wepen with swich folk as wepen." But thogh ... [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 203

I woot right wel that swich was my biheste.
10

Miller's Tale: 109

[continues previous] That but ye wayte wel and been privee,
12

Miller's Tale: 110

[continues previous] I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
11

Franklin's Tale: 598

But in a gardin yond, at swich a place,
11

Franklin's Tale: 599

Ye woot right wel what ye bihighten me;
11

Shipman's Tale: 118

[continues previous] For I may singe "allas" and "weylawey,
12

Shipman's Tale: 119

[continues previous] That I was born," but to no wight,' quod she,
11

Melibee's Tale: 6

[continues previous] This Melibeus answerde anon and seyde, 'What man,' quod he, 'sholde of his weping stinte, that hath so greet a cause for to wepe? Iesu Crist, our lord, him-self wepte for the deeth of Lazarus his freend.' Prudence answerde, 'Certes, wel I woot, attempree weping is no-thing defended to him that sorweful is, amonges folk in sorwe, but it is rather graunted him to wepe. The Apostle Paul un-to the Romayns wryteth, "man shal reioyse with hem that maken Ioye, and wepen with swich folk as wepen." But thogh attempree weping be y-graunted, ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1663

He wol me telle, I woot it wel right now,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1664

That secret is, and for the tounes prow.'
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 204

For goddes love, as chees a newe requeste;
13

Knight's Tale: 226

For Goddes love, tak al in pacience [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 123

For Goddes love, as tak som laxatyf; [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 205

Tak al my good, and lat my body go.'
13

Knight's Tale: 226

[continues previous] For Goddes love, tak al in pacience
11

Pardoner's Tale: 619

Lat be,' quod he, 'it shal nat be, so theech! [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Tale: 123

[continues previous] For Goddes love, as tak som laxatyf;
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 206

'Nay than,' quod she, 'I shrewe us bothe two!
11

Pardoner's Tale: 618

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay,' quod he, 'than have I Cristes curs!
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 606

'Nay than,' quod he, 'I shrewe us bothe two, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 607

And first I shrewe my-self, bothe blood and bones, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 207

For thogh that I be foul, and old, and pore,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 364

To han me foul and old til that I deye, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

And be to yow a trewe humble wyf, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 606

[continues previous] 'Nay than,' quod he, 'I shrewe us bothe two,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 607

[continues previous] And first I shrewe my-self, bothe blood and bones,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 208

I nolde for al the metal, ne for ore,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 364

[continues previous] To han me foul and old til that I deye,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 210

But-if thy wyf I were, and eek thy love.'
10

Monk's Tale: 237

Thy wyf eek and thy wenches sinfully
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 211

'My love?' quod he; 'nay, my dampnacioun!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 851

'Nay, nay, it may not stonden in this wyse; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 212

Allas! that any of my nacioun
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

[continues previous] 'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 214

But al for noght, the ende is this, that he
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 658

Is worthy to been hanged on the galwes!"
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 659

But al for noght, I sette noght an hawe
10

Franklin's Tale: 436

Or elles he shal shame hir atte leste.' [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 328

And telleth hir that chaffare is so dere, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 329

That nedes moste he make a chevisaunce. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 330

For he was bounde in a reconissaunce [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 370

For wel he knew he stood in swich array, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 371

That nedes moste he winne in that viage [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... that men seye nat that your richesses been y-buried, but that ye have hem in your might and in your weeldinge. For a wys man repreveth the avaricious man, and seith thus, in two vers: "wherto and why burieth a man hise goodes by his grete avarice, and knoweth wel that nedes moste he dye; for deeth is the ende of every man as in this present lyf." And for what cause or enchesoun Ioyneth he him or knitteth he him so faste un-to hise goodes, that alle his wittes mowen nat disseveren him or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or oghte knowe, that whan ... [continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 18

... thurgh that sinne deeth, right so thilke deeth entred in-to alle men that sinneden.' And this man was Adam, by whom sinne entred in-to this world whan he brak the comaundement of god. And therfore, he that first was so mighty that he sholde not have dyed, bicam swich oon that he moste nedes dye, whether he wolde or noon; and all his progenie in this world that in thilke man sinneden. Loke that in thestaat of innocence, when Adam and Eve naked weren in paradys, and no-thing ne hadden shame of hir nakednesse, how that the serpent, that was most wyly of alle othere bestes that ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 215

Constreyned was, he nedes moste hir wedde;
10

Franklin's Tale: 435

[continues previous] Than moste she nedes holden hir biheste, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 436

[continues previous] Or elles he shal shame hir atte leste.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 329

[continues previous] That nedes moste he make a chevisaunce.
11

Shipman's Tale: 330

[continues previous] For he was bounde in a reconissaunce
10

Shipman's Tale: 370

[continues previous] For wel he knew he stood in swich array,
10

Shipman's Tale: 371

[continues previous] That nedes moste he winne in that viage
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... men seye nat that your richesses been y-buried, but that ye have hem in your might and in your weeldinge. For a wys man repreveth the avaricious man, and seith thus, in two vers: "wherto and why burieth a man hise goodes by his grete avarice, and knoweth wel that nedes moste he dye; for deeth is the ende of every man as in this present lyf." And for what cause or enchesoun Ioyneth he him or knitteth he him so faste un-to hise goodes, that alle his wittes mowen nat disseveren him or departen him from hise goodes; and knoweth wel, or ...
11

Parson's Tale: 18

[continues previous] ... that sinne deeth, right so thilke deeth entred in-to alle men that sinneden.' And this man was Adam, by whom sinne entred in-to this world whan he brak the comaundement of god. And therfore, he that first was so mighty that he sholde not have dyed, bicam swich oon that he moste nedes dye, whether he wolde or noon; and all his progenie in this world that in thilke man sinneden. Loke that in thestaat of innocence, when Adam and Eve naked weren in paradys, and no-thing ne hadden shame of hir nakednesse, how that the serpent, that was most wyly of alle othere bestes that ...
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 216

And taketh his olde wyf, and gooth to bedde.
13

Reeve's Tale: 233

To bedde he gooth, and with him goth his wyf.
10

Reeve's Tale: 240

To bedde gooth Aleyn and also Iohn;
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 229

He walweth, and he turneth to and fro.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 230

His olde wyf lay smylinge evermo,
10

Franklin's Tale: 434

[continues previous] Than were my brother warisshed of his wo.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 217

Now wolden som men seye, paraventure,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1418

Which som men wolden doon oppressioun,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 218

That, for my necligence, I do no cure
11

Knight's Tale: 1023

I trowe men wolde deme it necligence, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1024

If I foryete to tellen the dispence [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 208

Y-wrought, as often as by cure. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 152

Construeth that as yow list, I do no cure. [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 219

To tellen yow the Ioye and al tharray
11

Knight's Tale: 1024

[continues previous] If I foryete to tellen the dispence
11

Man of Law's Tale: 1016

Who can the pitous Ioye tellen al
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al, [continues next]
13

Squire's Tale: 63

Of which if I shal tellen al tharray,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 209

[continues previous] Hit nedeth noght yow for to tellen,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 152

[continues previous] Construeth that as yow list, I do no cure.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 421

What? is this al the Ioye and al the feste? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1541

What nedeth yow to tellen al the chere [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 653

The newe Ioye, and al the feste agayn; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 220

That at the feste was that ilke day.
10

Knight's Tale: 25

And of the feste that was at hir weddinge,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

[continues previous] I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 421

[continues previous] What? is this al the Ioye and al the feste?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1542

[continues previous] That Deiphebus un-to his brother made,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 653

[continues previous] The newe Ioye, and al the feste agayn;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 441

Was never er that day wist at any feste.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 221

To whiche thing shortly answere I shal;
10

Monk's Tale: 89

Thende of this caytif was as I shal seye; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 331

Shortly I seye, as for conclusioun, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 332

That I shal han of this avisioun [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 830

Shortly, what shal I more seye? [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 22

Thus am I slayn, sith that Pite is deed; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1641

That in my gilt ther shal no thing be lorn, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 222

I seye, ther nas no Ioye ne feste at al,
12

Knight's Tale: 791

Ther nas no good day, ne no saluing; [continues next]
11

Miller's Prologue: 2

In al the route nas ther yong ne old [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 219

To tellen yow the Ioye and al tharray
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 220

That at the feste was that ilke day.
15+

Clerk's Tale: 376

Ther nas discord, rancour, ne hevinesse [continues next]
15+

Clerk's Tale: 377

In al that lond, that she ne coude apese, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave, [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 311

Ne no wight elles, that he nas ful fayn, [continues next]
10

Monk's Tale: 89

[continues previous] Thende of this caytif was as I shal seye;
10

Monk's Tale: 90

[continues previous] His fo-men made a feste upon a day,
11

Monk's Tale: 340

That ther nas king ne prince in al that londe [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 331

[continues previous] Shortly I seye, as for conclusioun,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 332

[continues previous] That I shal han of this avisioun
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

That ther nas no man in no regioun [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 830

[continues previous] Shortly, what shal I more seye?
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 21

[continues previous] I nas but lorn; ther nas no more to seye. [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 22

[continues previous] Thus am I slayn, sith that Pite is deed; [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 207

Ne no man may ther wexe seek ne old; [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 208

Yet was ther Ioye more a thousand fold [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7107

Ther nas no wight in al Parys, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 421

What? is this al the Ioye and al the feste?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 653

The newe Ioye, and al the feste agayn; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1641

[continues previous] That in my gilt ther shal no thing be lorn,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1642

[continues previous] Ne I nil not rakle as for to greven here;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 446

That at that feste it nas wel herd acorde; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 447

Ne of ladies eek so fayr a companye [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 621

Why Troilus hath al this hevinesse?' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 622

And al this nas but his malencolye, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 223

Ther nas but hevinesse and muche sorwe;
12

Knight's Tale: 791

[continues previous] Ther nas no good day, ne no saluing;
11

Knight's Tale: 792

[continues previous] But streight, with-outen word or rehersing,
11

Miller's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] In al the route nas ther yong ne old
15+

Clerk's Tale: 376

[continues previous] Ther nas discord, rancour, ne hevinesse
10

Shipman's Tale: 310

[continues previous] In al the hous ther nas so litel a knave,
11

Monk's Tale: 340

[continues previous] That ther nas king ne prince in al that londe
10

Nun's Priest's Tale: 490

[continues previous] That ther nas no man in no regioun
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 21

[continues previous] I nas but lorn; ther nas no more to seye.
10

Parlement of Foules: 207

[continues previous] Ne no man may ther wexe seek ne old;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 7107

[continues previous] Ther nas no wight in al Parys,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 654

[continues previous] But Pandarus, if goodly hadde he might,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 446

[continues previous] That at that feste it nas wel herd acorde;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 621

[continues previous] Why Troilus hath al this hevinesse?'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 622

[continues previous] And al this nas but his malencolye,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 224

For prively he wedded hir on a morwe,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 99

I ferde the worse al the morwe [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 100

After, to thenken on her sorwe. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1191

For which she may yet holde al hir biheste.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1192

And on the morwe un-to the yate he wente, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 225

And al day after hidde him as an oule;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 99

[continues previous] I ferde the worse al the morwe
10

Book of the Duchesse: 100

[continues previous] After, to thenken on her sorwe.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1191

[continues previous] For which she may yet holde al hir biheste.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1192

[continues previous] And on the morwe un-to the yate he wente,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 227

Greet was the wo the knight hadde in his thoght,
11

Knight's Tale: 522

What sholde I al-day of his wo endyte? [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 523

Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 1115

But on his wyf his thoght was evermo; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 59

werk, and ledeth that he hadde loked biforn in his thoght simply [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 228

Whan he was with his wyf a-bedde y-broght;
11

Knight's Tale: 523

[continues previous] Whan he endured hadde a yeer or two
12

Merchant's Tale: 355

And whan that he was in his bed y-broght, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 356

He purtreyed, in his herte and in his thoght, [continues next]
13

Merchant's Tale: 1115

[continues previous] But on his wyf his thoght was evermo;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 59

[continues previous] werk, and ledeth that he hadde loked biforn in his thoght simply
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 229

He walweth, and he turneth to and fro.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 216

And taketh his olde wyf, and gooth to bedde. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 355

[continues previous] And whan that he was in his bed y-broght,
12

Merchant's Tale: 356

[continues previous] He purtreyed, in his herte and in his thoght,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 230

His olde wyf lay smylinge evermo,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 216

[continues previous] And taketh his olde wyf, and gooth to bedde.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 231

And seyde, 'o dere housbond, benedicite!
10

Prioress' Tale: 193

And seyde, 'o dere child, I halse thee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1347

And seyde, 'O dere herte, may it be
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 192

And seyde, 'O dere doughter myn, wel-come!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 193

She seyde eek, she was fayn with him to mete,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 233

Is this the lawe of king Arthures hous?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 618

Thourgh love is broken alday every lawe. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 234

Is every knight of his so dangerous?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 617

[continues previous] For-thy tak herte, and thenk, right as a knight,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 618

[continues previous] Thourgh love is broken alday every lawe.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 240

What is my gilt? for goddes love, tel me it,
14

Knight's Tale: 52

And telleth me if it may been amended; [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 467

And it shal been amended, if I may.' [continues next]
12

Summoner's Tale: 489

For goddes love your pacience ye holde;
12

Summoner's Tale: 490

Tel me your grief:' and he anon him tolde,
12

Merchant's Tale: 160

Blessed be god, that it shal been amended! [continues next]
14

Book of the Duchesse: 1142

That she hath left yow? is hit this?
14

Book of the Duchesse: 1143

For goddes love, tel me al.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 864

Knowe ich hir ought? for my love, tel me this;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 96

For goddes love, what seith it? tel it us.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 97

Is it of love? O, som good ye me lere!'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 122

'Now uncle dere,' quod she, 'tel it us
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 123

For goddes love; is than the assege aweye?
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 241

And it shal been amended, if I may.'
14

Knight's Tale: 52

[continues previous] And telleth me if it may been amended; [continues next]
14

Knight's Tale: 53

[continues previous] And why that ye ben clothed thus in blak?' [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And it shal been amended, if I may.' [continues next]
15+

Summoner's Tale: 468

[continues previous] 'I have,' quod he, 'had a despyt this day, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 160

[continues previous] Blessed be god, that it shal been amended! [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 161

[continues previous] For I wol be, certeyn, a wedded man, [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 84

In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 851

'Nay, nay, it may not stonden in this wyse; [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 242

'Amended?' quod this knight, 'allas! nay, nay!
14

Knight's Tale: 52

[continues previous] And telleth me if it may been amended;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 201

If I sey fals, sey nay, up-on thy fey!'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 202

This knight answerde, 'allas! and weylawey!
15+

Summoner's Tale: 467

[continues previous] And it shal been amended, if I may.'
15+

Summoner's Tale: 468

[continues previous] 'I have,' quod he, 'had a despyt this day,
12

Merchant's Tale: 160

[continues previous] Blessed be god, that it shal been amended! [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1010

Ne see ye nat this honurable knight, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 1011

By-cause, allas! that he is blind and old, [continues next]
12

Anelida and Arcite: 84

[continues previous] In hir ne mighte no-thing been amended.
12

Anelida and Arcite: 85

[continues previous] This Theban knight [Arcite] eek, sooth to seyn,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

[continues previous] 'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 851

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay, it may not stonden in this wyse; [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 243

It wol nat been amended never mo!
10

Merchant's Tale: 160

[continues previous] Blessed be god, that it shal been amended!
10

Merchant's Tale: 161

[continues previous] For I wol be, certeyn, a wedded man,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1010

[continues previous] Ne see ye nat this honurable knight,
10

Monk's Tale: 264

But of hir shape she mighte nat been amended.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 851

[continues previous] 'Nay, nay, it may not stonden in this wyse;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 245

And ther-to comen of so lowe a kinde,
10

Friar's Tale: 168

It is no wonder thing thogh it be so; [continues next]
10

Friar's Tale: 169

A lousy Iogelour can deceyve thee, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 280

For never erst ne saugh she swich a sighte. [continues next]
11

Amorous Compleint: 20

Durste ever thinken in so hy a place, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 246

That litel wonder is, thogh I walwe and winde.
10

Miller's Tale: 516

That for your love I swete ther I go.
12

Miller's Tale: 517

No wonder is thogh that I swelte and swete;
10

Miller's Tale: 518

I moorne as doth a lamb after the tete.
10

Friar's Tale: 168

[continues previous] It is no wonder thing thogh it be so;
10

Clerk's Tale: 281

[continues previous] No wonder is thogh that she were astoned
11

Amorous Compleint: 21

[continues previous] What wonder is, thogh ye do me no grace?
11

Book of the Duchesse: 583

The pure deeth is so my fo, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 584

[Thogh] I wolde deye, hit wolde not so; [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 182

What wonder is then, thogh that I besette
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 600

And wel wot I thou mayst do me no reste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1278

Myn herte swete, how I yow mighte plese! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 306

Flee forth out of myn herte, and lat it breste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 307

And folwe alwey Criseyde, thy lady dere; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 423

And god, to whom myn herte I sacrifyse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1009

But in effect, and shortly for to seye, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 247

So wolde god myn herte wolde breste!'
12

Merchant's Tale: 852

She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 31

Have heer my trouthe, til that myn herte breste.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 165

Thise rokkes sleen myn herte for the fere.' [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 166

Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous tere. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 328

Do this miracle, or do myn herte breste[continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 75

Right now, that yet myn herte is sore afright. [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 76

Now god,' quod he, 'my swevene recche aright, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 583

[continues previous] The pure deeth is so my fo,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 584

[continues previous] [Thogh] I wolde deye, hit wolde not so;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 599

[continues previous] Yet wole I telle it, though myn herte breste;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1108

And she to-laugh, it thoughte hir herte breste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1277

[continues previous] And thus seyde he, 'now wolde god I wiste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1278

[continues previous] Myn herte swete, how I yow mighte plese!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 306

[continues previous] Flee forth out of myn herte, and lat it breste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 580

So wel-a-wey, why nil myn herte breste? [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

Myn herte, which that is at point to breste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 423

[continues previous] And god, to whom myn herte I sacrifyse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 424

[continues previous] So sende us hastely the tenthe day!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1008

[continues previous] I may yow seen, or do myn herte breste.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 248

'Is this,' quod she, 'the cause of your unreste?'
12

Merchant's Tale: 852

[continues previous] She wayteth whan hir herte wolde breste.
11

Franklin's Tale: 165

[continues previous] Thise rokkes sleen myn herte for the fere.'
11

Franklin's Tale: 166

[continues previous] Thus wolde she seyn, with many a pitous tere.
12

Franklin's Tale: 328

[continues previous] Do this miracle, or do myn herte breste —
11

Franklin's Tale: 329

[continues previous] That now, next at this opposicioun,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 75

[continues previous] Right now, that yet myn herte is sore afright.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 76

[continues previous] Now god,' quod he, 'my swevene recche aright,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1108

[continues previous] And she to-laugh, it thoughte hir herte breste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1109

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'loke alwey that ye finde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 841

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'thus fallen is this cas.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 842

[continues previous] 'Why, uncle myn,' quod she, 'who tolde him this?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 581

[continues previous] For, as in love, ther is but litel reste.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 879

That cause is of this sorwe and this unreste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

[continues previous] 'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1638

[continues previous] Myn herte, which that is at point to breste.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 249

'Ye, certainly,' quod he, 'no wonder is.'
10

Shipman's Tale: 214

'Qui la?' quod he. 'Peter! it am I,' [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 121

Seyde he nat thus, ne do no fors of dremes? [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 122

Now, sire,' quod she, 'whan we flee fro the bemes, [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 49

'Wistestow never yit that thou were any other thing?' quod [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 52

'Now woot I,' quod she, 'other cause of thy maladye, and [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1298

'Sir,' quod I, 'wher is she now?' [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1299

Now!' quod he, and stinte anoon. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 67

Who is al there? I see nought trewely.' [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1143

'Ye maze, maze, gode sire,' quod she,
11

Merchant's Tale: 1144

'This thank have I for I have maad yow see;
10

Shipman's Tale: 208

'Now, elles god forbede, sire,' quod she,
10

Shipman's Tale: 214

[continues previous] 'Qui la?' quod he. 'Peter! it am I,'
10

Shipman's Tale: 215

[continues previous] Quod she, 'what, sire, how longe wol ye faste?
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 122

[continues previous] Now, sire,' quod she, 'whan we flee fro the bemes,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 49

[continues previous] 'Wistestow never yit that thou were any other thing?' quod
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 52

[continues previous] 'Now woot I,' quod she, 'other cause of thy maladye, and
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1298

[continues previous] 'Sir,' quod I, 'wher is she now?'
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1299

[continues previous] Now!' quod he, and stinte anoon.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 67

[continues previous] Who is al there? I see nought trewely.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 68

[continues previous] 'Sire,' quod Criseyde, 'it is Pandare and I.'
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 251

If that me liste, er it were dayes three,
12

Knight's Tale: 771

And on the morwe, er it were dayes light,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 253

But for ye speken of swich gentillesse
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 261

Crist wol, we clayme of him our gentillesse, [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 261

Ne in linage, ne in other gentillesse. [continues next]
11

Monk's Tale: 262

Of kinges blode of Perse is she descended; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 254

As is descended out of old richesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 262

[continues previous] Nat of our eldres for hir old richesse.
11

Monk's Tale: 262

[continues previous] Of kinges blode of Perse is she descended;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 255

That therfore sholden ye be gentil men,
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 36

as that a maner necessitee be imposed to gentil men, for that [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 37

they ne sholden nat outrayen or forliven fro the virtues of hir [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 6855

I rekke not of pore men, [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 256

Swich arrogance is nat worth an hen.
11

Nun's Priest's Prologue: 24

Swich talking is nat worth a boterflye;
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 6: 37

[continues previous] they ne sholden nat outrayen or forliven fro the virtues of hir
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 257

Loke who that is most vertuous alway,
12

Squire's Tale: 532

This is to seyn, that, after his desert, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 43

Loke who that is most pacient in love,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6856

[continues previous] Hir astate is not worth an hen.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 258

Privee and apert, and most entendeth ay
10

Merchant's Tale: 656

That Damian entendeth nat to me? [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 657

Is he ay syk, or how may this bityde?' [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 530

That evermore myn honour and renoun
12

Squire's Tale: 531

[continues previous] Were saved, bothe privee and apert;
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 259

To do the gentil dedes that he can,
10

Merchant's Tale: 656

[continues previous] That Damian entendeth nat to me?
10

Merchant's Tale: 657

[continues previous] Is he ay syk, or how may this bityde?'
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 260

And tak him for the grettest gentil man.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 275

For of our eldres may we no-thing clayme [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 261

Crist wol, we clayme of him our gentillesse,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 253

But for ye speken of swich gentillesse [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 273

Prowesse of man, for god, of his goodnesse, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Wol that of him we clayme our gentillesse;" [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 275

[continues previous] For of our eldres may we no-thing clayme [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 262

Nat of our eldres for hir old richesse.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 254

[continues previous] As is descended out of old richesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 273

[continues previous] Prowesse of man, for god, of his goodnesse,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 274

[continues previous] Wol that of him we clayme our gentillesse;" [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 275

[continues previous] For of our eldres may we no-thing clayme [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 263

For thogh they yeve us al hir heritage,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 275

[continues previous] For of our eldres may we no-thing clayme
10

Merchant's Tale: 56

For she wol clayme half part al hir lyf; [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 264

For which we clayme to been of heigh parage,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 250

And if that she be riche, of heigh parage,
10

Merchant's Tale: 56

[continues previous] For she wol clayme half part al hir lyf;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 265

Yet may they nat biquethe, for no-thing,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 308

It was no-thing biquethe us with our place. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 266

To noon of us hir vertuous living,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 307

[continues previous] Than comth our verray gentillesse of grace,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 308

[continues previous] It was no-thing biquethe us with our place.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 269

Wel can the wyse poete of Florence,
15+

Monk's Tale: 469

Who-so wol here it in a lenger wyse,
15+

Monk's Tale: 470

Redeth the grete poete of Itaille, [continues next]
15+

Monk's Tale: 471

That highte Dant, for he can al devyse [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 270

That highte Dant, speken in this sentence;
15+

Monk's Tale: 471

[continues previous] That highte Dant, for he can al devyse
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 273

Prowesse of man, for god, of his goodnesse,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 261

Crist wol, we clayme of him our gentillesse, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 262

Nat of our eldres for hir old richesse. [continues next]
10

A. B. C.: 138

With-oute thee; for God, of his goodnesse, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 274

Wol that of him we clayme our gentillesse;"
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 261

[continues previous] Crist wol, we clayme of him our gentillesse, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 262

[continues previous] Nat of our eldres for hir old richesse. [continues next]
10

A. B. C.: 138

[continues previous] With-oute thee; for God, of his goodnesse,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 275

For of our eldres may we no-thing clayme
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 260

[continues previous] And tak him for the grettest gentil man.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 261

[continues previous] Crist wol, we clayme of him our gentillesse,
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 262

[continues previous] Nat of our eldres for hir old richesse.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 263

[continues previous] For thogh they yeve us al hir heritage,
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

... attemprely, as the lawe requireth. And yet more-over, of thilke word that Tullius clepeth "consentinge," thou shalt considere if thy might and thy power may consenten and suffyse to thy wilfulnesse and to thy conseillours. And certes, thou mayst wel seyn that "nay." For sikerly, as for to speke proprely, we may do no-thing but only swich thing as we may doon rightfully. And certes, rightfully ne mowe ye take no vengeance as of your propre auctoritee. Thanne mowe ye seen, that your power ne consenteth nat ne accordeth nat with your wilfulnesse. Lat us now examine the thridde point that Tullius clepeth "consequent." Thou shalt understonde that the vengeance that ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 276

But temporel thing, that man may hurte and mayme.
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

[continues previous] ... as the lawe requireth. And yet more-over, of thilke word that Tullius clepeth "consentinge," thou shalt considere if thy might and thy power may consenten and suffyse to thy wilfulnesse and to thy conseillours. And certes, thou mayst wel seyn that "nay." For sikerly, as for to speke proprely, we may do no-thing but only swich thing as we may doon rightfully. And certes, rightfully ne mowe ye take no vengeance as of your propre auctoritee. Thanne mowe ye seen, that your power ne consenteth nat ne accordeth nat with your wilfulnesse. Lat us now examine the thridde point that Tullius clepeth "consequent." Thou shalt understonde that the vengeance that ...
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 277

Eek every wight wot this as wel as I,
11

Shipman's Tale: 174

Desyren thinges sixe, as wel as I. [continues next]
13

Anelida and Arcite: 220

1. I wot my-self as wel as any wight;
13

Anelida and Arcite: 221

For I loved oon with al my herte and might
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6102

And this thing wot I wel, certeyn, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6103

If I speke ought to peire hir loos, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 238

For wel wot I, as yvel as I ye fare.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 278

If gentillesse were planted naturelly
11

Shipman's Tale: 173

[continues previous] And wel ye woot that wommen naturelly
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6103

[continues previous] If I speke ought to peire hir loos,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 280

Privee ne apert, than wolde they never fyne
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 788

And whan I saugh he wolde never fyne [continues next]
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1796

Of force togidre they must go.
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 1797

But never this archer wolde fyne [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6621

Or doon of him apert Iustice, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6622

Than suffren him in such malice." [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 281

To doon of gentillesse the faire offyce;
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 789

[continues previous] To reden on this cursed book al night,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1798

[continues previous] To shete at me with alle his pyne,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6621

[continues previous] Or doon of him apert Iustice,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 285

And lat men shette the dores and go thenne;
11

Monk's Tale: 435

The gayler shette the dores of the tour.
11

Monk's Tale: 542

The faster shette they the dores alle;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 286

Yet wol the fyr as faire lye and brenne,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2548

For thou shalt brenne as any fyr. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2549

This is the stryf and eke the affray, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 287

As twenty thousand men mighte it biholde;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2548

[continues previous] For thou shalt brenne as any fyr.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 288

His office naturel ay wol it holde,
11

Friar's Tale: 223

For I wol holde companye with thee [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 224

Til it be so, that thou forsake me.' [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 289

Up peril of my lyf, til that it dye.
11

Friar's Tale: 224

[continues previous] Til it be so, that thou forsake me.'
13

Summoner's Tale: 563

And ye shul seen, up peril of my lyf,
12

Summoner's Tale: 564

By preve which that is demonstratif,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 124

Up peril of my soule, and of my lyf,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 113

On peril of my lyf, I shal not lye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1657

Was fals, ne never shal til that I dye. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 290

Heer may ye see wel, how that genterye
11

Friar's Tale: 269

Heer may ye see, myn owene dere brother,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 44

Heer is a miteyn eek, that ye may see. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 633

Ye been right hoot, I see wel how ye swete,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 634

Have heer a cloth, and wype awey the wete.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 842

For thou art wrooth, ye, now at erst I see; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 843

Wostow nat wel that Fortune is commune [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1657

[continues previous] Was fals, ne never shal til that I dye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1658

[continues previous] At shorte wordes, wel ye may me leve;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 291

Is nat annexed to possessioun,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 44

[continues previous] Heer is a miteyn eek, that ye may see.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 4: 49

reverent ne cometh nat to folk of hir propre strengthe of nature, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 102

feblesse and infirmitee of wikkede folk, that ne mowen nat comen [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 103

to that hir naturel entencioun ledeth hem, and yit almost thilke [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 843

[continues previous] Wostow nat wel that Fortune is commune
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 844

[continues previous] To every maner wight in som degree?
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 292

Sith folk ne doon hir operacioun
12

Parson's Tale: 30

... by the rightful Iugement and ordinance of god. Som-tyme comth grucching of avarice; as Iudas grucched agayns the Magdaleyne, whan she enoynte the heved of oure lord Iesu Crist with hir precious oynement. This maner murmure is swich as whan man gruccheth of goodnesse that him-self dooth, or that other folk doon of hir owene catel. Som-tyme comth murmure of pryde; as whan Simon the Pharisee grucched agayn the Magdaleyne, whan she approched to Iesu Crist, and weep at his feet for hir sinnes. And somtyme grucching sourdeth of Envye; whan men discovereth a mannes harm that was privee, or bereth him on hond ... [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 4: 49

[continues previous] reverent ne cometh nat to folk of hir propre strengthe of nature,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 102

[continues previous] feblesse and infirmitee of wikkede folk, that ne mowen nat comen
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 103

[continues previous] to that hir naturel entencioun ledeth hem, and yit almost thilke
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 410

For cold mighte elles doon hir harm. [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 411

These olde folk have alwey colde, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 293

Alwey, as dooth the fyr, lo! in his kinde.
12

Parson's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... paciently, for they comen by the rightful Iugement and ordinance of god. Som-tyme comth grucching of avarice; as Iudas grucched agayns the Magdaleyne, whan she enoynte the heved of oure lord Iesu Crist with hir precious oynement. This maner murmure is swich as whan man gruccheth of goodnesse that him-self dooth, or that other folk doon of hir owene catel. Som-tyme comth murmure of pryde; as whan Simon the Pharisee grucched agayn the Magdaleyne, whan she approched to Iesu Crist, and weep at his feet for hir sinnes. And somtyme grucching sourdeth of Envye; whan men discovereth a mannes harm that ...
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 411

[continues previous] These olde folk have alwey colde,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 294

For, god it woot, men may wel often finde
11

Second Nun's Tale: 507

For comunly men woot it wel overal,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 508

That mighty god is in his hevenes hye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 968

I woot eek wel; but certein, men shal finde
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 299

And nil him-selven do no gentil dedis,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 314

That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 595

A man may do no sinne with his wyf, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 596

Ne hurte him-selven with his owene knyf; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6660

And folwe him in goode dedis. [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 300

Ne folwe his gentil auncestre that deed is,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 313

[continues previous] Ther shul ye seen expres that it no drede is, [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 314

[continues previous] That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis; [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 595

[continues previous] A man may do no sinne with his wyf,
11

Merchant's Tale: 596

[continues previous] Ne hurte him-selven with his owene knyf;
12

Parson's Tale: 24

... of his neighebore, that is to seyn, of his evene-cristene, or hath despyt to doon that him oghte to do. Arrogant, is he that thinketh that he hath thilke bountees in him that he hath noght, or weneth that he sholde have hem by hise desertes; or elles he demeth that he be that he nis nat. Impudent, is he that for his pride hath no shame of hise sinnes. Swellinge of herte, is whan a man reioyseth him of harm that he hath doon. Insolent, is he that despyseth in his Iugement alle othere folk as to regard of his value, and of his conning, and of his speking, and of his ... [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6659

[continues previous] But he bad wirken whan that nede is,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6660

[continues previous] And folwe him in goode dedis.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6661

[continues previous] Seynt Poule, that loved al holy chirche,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 301

He nis nat gentil, be he duk or erl;
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 314

[continues previous] That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis;
12

Parson's Tale: 24

[continues previous] ... hath desdeyn of his neighebore, that is to seyn, of his evene-cristene, or hath despyt to doon that him oghte to do. Arrogant, is he that thinketh that he hath thilke bountees in him that he hath noght, or weneth that he sholde have hem by hise desertes; or elles he demeth that he be that he nis nat. Impudent, is he that for his pride hath no shame of hise sinnes. Swellinge of herte, is whan a man reioyseth him of harm that he hath doon. Insolent, is he that despyseth in his Iugement alle othere folk as to regard of his value, and of his conning, and of his speking, ...
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 302

For vileyns sinful dedes make a cherl.
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

... seyn, good conscience to thyn owene persone inward, and good loos for thy neighebore outward." And he that trusteth him so muchel in his gode conscience, that he displeseth and setteth at noght his gode name or loos, and rekketh noght though he kepe nat his gode name, nis but a cruel cherl. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 303

For gentillesse nis but renomee
11

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... is to seyn, good conscience to thyn owene persone inward, and good loos for thy neighebore outward." And he that trusteth him so muchel in his gode conscience, that he displeseth and setteth at noght his gode name or loos, and rekketh noght though he kepe nat his gode name, nis but a cruel cherl.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 304

Of thyne auncestres, for hir heigh bountee,
12

Clerk's Tale: 362

So spradde of hir heigh bountee the fame,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 305

Which is a strange thing to thy persone.
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

... seith: that "the wyse man that dredeth harmes escheweth harmes; ne he ne falleth in-to perils, that perils escheweth." And al-be-it so that it seme that thou art in siker place, yet shaltow alwey do thy diligence in kepinge of thy persone; this is to seyn, ne be nat necligent to kepe thy persone, nat only fro thy gretteste enemys but fro thy leeste enemy. Senek seith: "a man that is wel avysed, he dredeth his leste enemy." Ovide seith: that "the litel wesele wol slee the grete bole and the wilde hert." And the book seith: "a litel thorn may prikke a greet king ful sore; and ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 306

Thy gentillesse cometh fro god allone;
11

Melibee's Tale: 31

[continues previous] ... "the wyse man that dredeth harmes escheweth harmes; ne he ne falleth in-to perils, that perils escheweth." And al-be-it so that it seme that thou art in siker place, yet shaltow alwey do thy diligence in kepinge of thy persone; this is to seyn, ne be nat necligent to kepe thy persone, nat only fro thy gretteste enemys but fro thy leeste enemy. Senek seith: "a man that is wel avysed, he dredeth his leste enemy." Ovide seith: that "the litel wesele wol slee the grete bole and the wilde hert." And the book seith: "a litel thorn may prikke a greet king ful sore; and ...
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 307

Than comth our verray gentillesse of grace,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 266

To noon of us hir vertuous living, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 308

It was no-thing biquethe us with our place.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 265

[continues previous] Yet may they nat biquethe, for no-thing,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 266

[continues previous] To noon of us hir vertuous living,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 312

Redeth Senek, and redeth eek Boëce,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 310

Reed eek of Ioseph, and ther shul ye see [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1485

Ye shul eek seen so many a lusty knight [continues next]
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 313

Ther shul ye seen expres that it no drede is,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 300

Ne folwe his gentil auncestre that deed is, [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 310

[continues previous] Reed eek of Ioseph, and ther shul ye see
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 2196

That he is gentil, bicause he doth [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1484

[continues previous] That ay drede I, that ye wol bleve there.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1485

[continues previous] Ye shul eek seen so many a lusty knight
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 314

That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis;
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 299

[continues previous] And nil him-selven do no gentil dedis,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 300

[continues previous] Ne folwe his gentil auncestre that deed is,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 301

[continues previous] He nis nat gentil, be he duk or erl;
13

Romaunt of the Rose: 2196

[continues previous] That he is gentil, bicause he doth
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 317

Yet may the hye god, and so hope I,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 319

Thanne am I gentil, whan that I biginne [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 318

Grante me grace to liven vertuously.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

[continues previous] 'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 320

[continues previous] To liven vertuously and weyve sinne. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 319

Thanne am I gentil, whan that I biginne
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 157

[continues previous] 'Have heer my trouthe,' quod the knight, 'I grante.'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'Thanne,' quod she, 'I dar me wel avante,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 317

Yet may the hye god, and so hope I, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 319

[continues previous] Thanne am I gentil, whan that I biginne [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 320

To liven vertuously and weyve sinne.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 318

[continues previous] Grante me grace to liven vertuously.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 321

And ther-as ye of povert me repreve,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 350

Of my povert na-more ye me repreve.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 351

Now, sire, of elde ye repreve me;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 325

May understonde that Iesus, hevene king,
13

Miller's Tale: 278

If that I may, by Iesus, hevene king! [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 279

Get me a staf, that I may underspore, [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 149

Ther is no foul that fleeth under the hevene [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 150

That she ne shal wel understonde his stevene, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 326

Ne wolde nat chese a vicious living.
12

Miller's Tale: 279

[continues previous] Get me a staf, that I may underspore,
11

Squire's Tale: 150

[continues previous] That she ne shal wel understonde his stevene,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 327

Glad povert is an honest thing, certeyn;
10

Franklin's Tale: 45

Pacience is an heigh vertu certeyn; [continues next]
10

Manciple's Tale: 209

He wol yow haten mortally, certeyn. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 328

This wol Senek and othere clerkes seyn.
10

Franklin's Tale: 46

[continues previous] For it venquisseth, as thise clerkes seyn,
10

Manciple's Tale: 210

[continues previous] Daun Salomon, as wyse clerkes seyn,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 329

Who-so that halt him payd of his poverte,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 269

I trow that she shal holde her payd.' [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 270

I hadde unneth that word y-sayd [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 330

I holde him riche, al hadde he nat a sherte.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 269

[continues previous] I trow that she shal holde her payd.'
11

Book of the Duchesse: 270

[continues previous] I hadde unneth that word y-sayd
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 331

He that coveyteth is a povre wight,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 22

And ther-of cometh it, that yif thou see a wight that wolde geten [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 332

For he wolde han that is nat in his might.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 22

[continues previous] And ther-of cometh it, that yif thou see a wight that wolde geten
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 23

[continues previous] that he may nat geten, thou mayst nat douten that power ne
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 333

But he that noght hath, ne coveyteth have,
10

Parson's Tale: 14

... him longe for to thinke on that sinne; and his reson aperceyveth it wel, that it is sinne agayns the lawe of god, and yet his reson refreyneth nat his foul delyt or talent, though he se wel apertly that it is agayns the reverence of god; al-though his reson ne consente noght to doon that sinne in dede, yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god with perfit consentinge of his reson; for ther-of ... [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 239

But noght nil I, so mote I thryve, [continues next]
11

Legend of Phyllis: 89

For unto Phillis yit ne com he noght.
11

Legend of Phyllis: 90

And that hath she so harde and sore aboght,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 334

Is riche, al-though ye holde him but a knave.
10

Parson's Tale: 14

[continues previous] ... sinne, and delyteth him longe for to thinke on that sinne; and his reson aperceyveth it wel, that it is sinne agayns the lawe of god, and yet his reson refreyneth nat his foul delyt or talent, though he se wel apertly that it is agayns the reverence of god; al-though his reson ne consente noght to doon that sinne in dede, yet seyn somme doctours that swich delyt that dwelleth longe, it is ful perilous, al be it nevere so lite. And also a man sholde sorwe, namely, for al that evere he hath desired agayn the lawe of god ...
11

Hous of Fame 3: 237

Enbrowded wonderliche riche,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 238

[continues previous] Al-though they nere nought y-liche.
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 337

"The povre man, whan he goth by the weye,
12

Prioress' Tale: 56

His Ave Marie, as he goth by the weye. [continues next]
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 129

who seith, a pore man, that berth no richesse on him by the weye, [continues next]
15+

Wife of Bath's Tale: 338

Bifore the theves he may singe and pleye."
12

Prioress' Tale: 56

[continues previous] His Ave Marie, as he goth by the weye.
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 129

[continues previous] who seith, a pore man, that berth no richesse on him by the weye,
15+

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 5: 130

[continues previous] may boldely singe biforn theves, for he hath nat wherof to ben
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 340

A ful greet bringer out of bisinesse;
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... nis thing in this world, of which we sholden have so greet Ioye as whan our conscience bereth us good witnesse." And the wyse man seith: "the substance of a man is ful good, whan sinne is nat in mannes conscience." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses, and in usinge of hem, yow moste have greet bisinesse and greet diligence, that your goode name be alwey kept and conserved. For Salomon seith: that "bettre it is and more it availleth a man to have a good name, than for to have grete richesses." And therfore he seith in another place: "do greet diligence," seith Salomon, "in keping of thy ... [continues next]
12

Melibee's Tale: 70

... of Melibee, al this matere as it is aboven expressed and declared; and preyden hem that they wolde yeven hir avys and conseil, what best were to doon in this nede. And whan Melibees freendes hadde taken hir avys and deliberacioun of the forseide matere, and hadden examined it by greet bisinesse and greet diligence, they yave ful conseil for to have pees and reste; and that Melibee sholde receyve with good herte hise adversaries to foryifnesse and mercy. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 341

A greet amender eek of sapience
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

[continues previous] ... of which we sholden have so greet Ioye as whan our conscience bereth us good witnesse." And the wyse man seith: "the substance of a man is ful good, whan sinne is nat in mannes conscience." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses, and in usinge of hem, yow moste have greet bisinesse and greet diligence, that your goode name be alwey kept and conserved. For Salomon seith: that "bettre it is and more it availleth a man to have a good name, than for to have grete richesses." And therfore he seith in another place: "do greet diligence," seith Salomon, "in keping of thy ...
12

Melibee's Tale: 70

[continues previous] ... of Melibee, al this matere as it is aboven expressed and declared; and preyden hem that they wolde yeven hir avys and conseil, what best were to doon in this nede. And whan Melibees freendes hadde taken hir avys and deliberacioun of the forseide matere, and hadden examined it by greet bisinesse and greet diligence, they yave ful conseil for to have pees and reste; and that Melibee sholde receyve with good herte hise adversaries to foryifnesse and mercy.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 343

Povert is this, al-though it seme elenge:
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 4: 88

al-though it seme swete and ioyful to hem that useth it,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 344

Possessioun, that no wight wol chalenge.
10

Compleint to His Lady: 12

Ther is no wight that wol me wo bereve
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 345

Povert ful ofte, whan a man is lowe,
10

Melibee's Tale: 52

... alwey doon your bisinesse to gete yow richesses, so that ye gete hem with good conscience. And thapostle seith: that "ther nis thing in this world, of which we sholden have so greet Ioye as whan our conscience bereth us good witnesse." And the wyse man seith: "the substance of a man is ful good, whan sinne is nat in mannes conscience." Afterward, in getinge of your richesses, and in usinge of hem, yow moste have greet bisinesse and greet diligence, that your goode name be alwey kept and conserved. For Salomon seith: that "bettre it is and more it availleth a man to have a ...
11

Monk's Tale: 148

Er he be war, is ofte y-leyd ful lowe.
11

Monk's Tale: 149

Ful wys is he that can him-selven knowe.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 740

For it is seyd, 'man maketh ofte a yerde [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1166

For which his song ful ofte is 'weylaway!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1167

But whan he saugh that specheles she lay, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 346

Maketh his god and eek him-self to knowe.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 740

[continues previous] For it is seyd, 'man maketh ofte a yerde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1166

[continues previous] For which his song ful ofte is 'weylaway!'
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 349

And therfore, sire, sin that I noght yow greve,
10

Merchant's Tale: 424

And therfore, sire, the beste reed I can,
10

Merchant's Tale: 425

Dispeire yow noght, but have in your memorie,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1004

Shal wel be told, so that ye noght yow greve, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1005

Though I to yow right on your-self compleyne. [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 350

Of my povert na-more ye me repreve.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 321

And ther-as ye of povert me repreve, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 351

Now, sire, of elde ye repreve me; [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1004

[continues previous] Shal wel be told, so that ye noght yow greve,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 351

Now, sire, of elde ye repreve me;
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 321

[continues previous] And ther-as ye of povert me repreve,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 350

[continues previous] Of my povert na-more ye me repreve. [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 352

[continues previous] And certes, sire, thogh noon auctoritee [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 352

And certes, sire, thogh noon auctoritee
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 1

'Experience, though noon auctoritee [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 351

[continues previous] Now, sire, of elde ye repreve me;
11

Merchant's Tale: 414

He wolde noon auctoritee allegge,
11

Merchant's Tale: 415

But seyde, 'sire, so ther be noon obstacle
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 353

Were in no book, ye gentils of honour
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 2

[continues previous] Were in this world, were right y-nough to me
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

... conseil whan the thing is chaunged; or elles whan the thing semeth otherweyes than it was biforn. And more-over I seye, that though ye han sworn and bihight to perfourne your emprise, and nathelees ye weyve to perfourne thilke same emprise by Iuste cause, men sholde nat seyn therefore that ye were a lyer ne forsworn. For the book seith, that "the wyse man maketh no lesing whan he turneth his corage to the bettre." And al-be-it so that your emprise be establissed and ordeyned by greet multitude of folk, yet thar ye nat accomplice thilke same ordinaunce but yow lyke. ... [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 354

Seyn that men sholde an old wight doon favour,
11

Melibee's Tale: 15

[continues previous] ... it is no folie to chaunge conseil whan the thing is chaunged; or elles whan the thing semeth otherweyes than it was biforn. And more-over I seye, that though ye han sworn and bihight to perfourne your emprise, and nathelees ye weyve to perfourne thilke same emprise by Iuste cause, men sholde nat seyn therefore that ye were a lyer ne forsworn. For the book seith, that "the wyse man maketh no lesing whan he turneth his corage to the bettre." And al-be-it so that your emprise be establissed and ordeyned by greet multitude of folk, yet thar ye nat accomplice thilke same ordinaunce but yow ...
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 356

And auctours shal I finden, as I gesse.
10

Franklin's Tale: 684

Mo than a thousand stories, as I gesse, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 685

Coude I now telle as touchinge this matere. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 357

Now ther ye seye, that I am foul and old,
10

Franklin's Tale: 685

[continues previous] Coude I now telle as touchinge this matere.
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 359

For filthe and elde, al-so moot I thee,
12

Friar's Prologue: 7

Ye han heer touched, al-so moot I thee,
12

Merchant's Prologue: 14

Were I unbounden, al-so moot I thee!
12

Merchant's Prologue: 15

I wolde never eft comen in the snare.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 361

But nathelees, sin I knowe your delyt,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1678

And that your reson brydled your delyt, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 362

I shal fulfille your worldly appetyt.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1677

[continues previous] As rudenesse and poeplish appetyt;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1678

[continues previous] And that your reson brydled your delyt,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 363

Chese now,' quod she, 'oon of thise thinges tweye,
10

Friar's Tale: 291

Tanswere to the court of certeyn thinges.'
10

Friar's Tale: 292

'Now, lord,' quod she, 'Crist Iesu, king of kinges,
11

Franklin's Tale: 631

Oon of thise two bihoveth me to chese.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 1

'Felestow,' quod she, 'thise thinges, and entren they aught in
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 93

to geten alle thise thinges to-gider?'
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 94

Philosophie. 'Certes,' quod she, 'I wolde seye, that he wolde
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 128

'Thise thinges thanne,' quod she, 'that is to sey, erthely [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 98

'Up-on thise thinges thanne,' quod she, 'right as thise geometriens,
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 141

'Tak now thus the discrecioun of this questioun,' quod she. [continues next]
13

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 142

'Yif alle thise thinges,' quod she, 'weren membres to felicitee, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 11: 146

'Thanne,' quod she, 'desiren alle thinges oon?'
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 37

Thanne seyde she: 'sin thou felest thus thise thinges,' quod
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 38

she, 'I trowe that I have litel more to done that thou, mighty of
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 364

To han me foul and old til that I deye,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 207

For thogh that I be foul, and old, and pore, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 208

I nolde for al the metal, ne for ore, [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 387

But I to yow be al-so good and trewe [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 126

me wel that over thilke good ther nis no-thing more to ben
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 9: 128

[continues previous] 'Thise thinges thanne,' quod she, 'that is to sey, erthely
12

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 142

[continues previous] 'Yif alle thise thinges,' quod she, 'weren membres to felicitee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1607

Whos I am al, and shal, til that I deye; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 444

Shal han me holly hires til that I deye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 445

For, Pandarus, sin I have trouthe hir hight,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

And be to yow a trewe humble wyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 320

I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alis." [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 207

[continues previous] For thogh that I be foul, and old, and pore,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 387

[continues previous] But I to yow be al-so good and trewe
10

Clerk's Tale: 781

For sith I yaf to yow my maydenhede, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 782

And am your trewe wyf, it is no drede, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 30

Sir, I wol be your humble trewe wyf,
11

Franklin's Tale: 813

But every wyf be-war of hir biheste, [continues next]
10

Balade of Compleynt: 15

Beseching yow in my most humble wyse [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 106

Thus muche as now, O wommanliche wyf, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 107

I may out-bringe, and if this yow displese, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1607

[continues previous] Whos I am al, and shal, til that I deye;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1608

[continues previous] And, that I thus am hires, dar I seye,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 366

And never yow displese in al my lyf,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 320

[continues previous] I knowe yow for a trewe wyf, dame Alis."
11

Friar's Tale: 322

Somoned un-to your court in al my lyf;
11

Friar's Tale: 323

Ne never I nas but of my body trewe!
10

Clerk's Tale: 293

'That, sith it shal be doon in hastif wyse, [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 781

[continues previous] For sith I yaf to yow my maydenhede,
10

Clerk's Tale: 782

[continues previous] And am your trewe wyf, it is no drede,
11

Franklin's Tale: 812

[continues previous] That ever yet I knew in al my lyf.
10

Physician's Tale: 78

Or elles ye han falle in freletee, [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 82

I wol yow seyn the lyf of seint Edward; [continues next]
10

Balade of Compleynt: 14

[continues previous] Whom for to serve is set al my plesaunce.
10

Balade of Compleynt: 15

[continues previous] Beseching yow in my most humble wyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 27

Han felt that Love dorste yow displese; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 107

[continues previous] I may out-bringe, and if this yow displese,
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 367

Or elles ye wol han me yong and fair,
10

Clerk's Tale: 294

[continues previous] Wol ye assente, or elles yow avyse?
10

Physician's Tale: 78

[continues previous] Or elles ye han falle in freletee,
10

Monk's Prologue: 83

[continues previous] Or elles first Tragedies wol I telle
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 26

[continues previous] Of othere folk, and thenketh how that ye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 28

[continues previous] Or ye han wonne him with to greet an ese.
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 370

Or in som other place, may wel be.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 203

As on fyve or sixe ounces, may wel be,
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 204

Of silver or som other quantite,
13

Wife of Bath's Tale: 371

Now chese your-selven, whether that yow lyketh.'
11

Knight's Tale: 998

That whether of yow bothe that hath might, [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 310

Ye mowe, for me, right as yow lyketh do; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 311

Avyseth yow, ye been a man of age, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 277

That hath hir body whan so that him lyketh?' [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 400

And after him, by order shul ye chese,
10

Parlement of Foules: 401

After your kinde, everich as yow lyketh,
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 372

This knight avyseth him and sore syketh,
11

Knight's Tale: 997

[continues previous] Up-on my trouthe, and as I am a knight,
10

Cook's Tale: 39

But atte laste his maister him bithoghte, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 57

Wo was this knight and sorwefully he syketh; [continues next]
14

Friar's Prologue: 4

No vileyns word as yet to him spak he. [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 311

[continues previous] Avyseth yow, ye been a man of age,
11

Merchant's Tale: 350

But nathelees, bitwixe ernest and game, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 351

He atte laste apoynted him on oon, [continues next]
10

Merchant's Tale: 352

And leet alle othere from his herte goon, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 277

[continues previous] That hath hir body whan so that him lyketh?'
13

Franklin's Tale: 278

[continues previous] Aurelius ful ofte sore syketh;
11

Hous of Fame 3: 588

And out his trumpe of golde he brayde [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1220

Hit nas no game, hit sat me sore. [continues next]
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 373

But atte laste he seyde in this manere,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 709

But trewely to tellen, atte laste,
12

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 710

He was in chirche a noble ecclesiaste.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 860

His tale anon, and seyde in this manere.
10

Knight's Tale: 1407

But atte laste the statue of Venus shook,
10

Cook's Tale: 39

[continues previous] But atte laste his maister him bithoghte,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 811

But atte laste, with muchel care and wo,
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 58

[continues previous] But what! he may nat do al as him lyketh.
14

Friar's Prologue: 4

[continues previous] No vileyns word as yet to him spak he.
14

Friar's Prologue: 5

[continues previous] But atte laste he seyde un-to the Wyf,
12

Friar's Tale: 327

Up-on hir knees, he seyde in this manere,
13

Summoner's Tale: 461

Til atte laste he seyde: 'god yow see!'
12

Summoner's Tale: 462

This lord gan loke, and seide, 'benedicite!
10

Clerk's Tale: 240

Ful sobrely, and seyde in this manere,
12

Clerk's Tale: 312

And to the peple he seyde in this manere, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 313

'This is my wyf,' quod he, 'that standeth here. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 491

But atte laste speken she bigan,
10

Clerk's Tale: 971

But atte laste, whan that thise lordes wende
10

Merchant's Tale: 228

But atte laste, shortly for to seyn,
10

Merchant's Tale: 350

[continues previous] But nathelees, bitwixe ernest and game,
11

Merchant's Tale: 351

[continues previous] He atte laste apoynted him on oon,
10

Merchant's Tale: 837

But atte laste, after a monthe or tweye,
13

Squire's Tale: 445

Till atte laste she spak in this manere
10

Squire's Tale: 575

That I supposed of him noght but good.
10

Squire's Tale: 576

But fynally, thus atte laste it stood,
10

Franklin's Tale: 10

But atte laste, she, for his worthinesse,
12

Shipman's Tale: 382

Til, atte laste, that this Marchant seyde,
11

Monk's Tale: 93

But atte laste he made a foul affray;
10

Monk's Tale: 281

But atte laste hir frendes han hir maried
10

Second Nun's Tale: 360

But atte laste, to tellen short and pleyn,
12

Parson's Prologue: 70

And with that word he seyde in this manere[continues next]
11

Parson's Tale: 30

... proprely lyk to the devel, that evere reioyseth him of mannes harm. Of thise two speces comth bakbyting; and this sinne of bakbyting or detraccion hath certeine speces, as thus. Som man preiseth his neighebore by a wikke entente; for he maketh alwey a wikked knotte atte laste ende. Alwey he maketh a 'but' atte laste ende, that is digne of more blame, than worth is al the preisinge. The seconde spece is, that if a man be good and dooth or seith a thing to good entente, the bakbyter wol turne all thilke goodnesse up-so-doun to his shrewed entente. The thridde is, to amenuse the ...
14

Hous of Fame 3: 586

That hit be knowen atte laste.' [continues next]
14

Hous of Fame 3: 587

[continues previous] 'Ful gladly, lady myn,' he seyde; [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 3: 636

But atte laste hit was on-lofte.
10

Legend of Lucretia: 158

But atte laste of Tarquiny she hem tolde,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1221

[continues previous] 'So atte laste, sooth to seyn,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1059

His fulle freend, than seyde in this manere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1579

A leche anoon, and seyde, 'in this manere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1580

Men curen folk; this charme I wol yow lere.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1449

In armes streyne, and seyde in this manere:
14

Wife of Bath's Tale: 374

'My lady and my love, and wyf so dere,
12

Clerk's Tale: 313

[continues previous] 'This is my wyf,' quod he, 'that standeth here.
12

Clerk's Tale: 825

Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 826

I was your wyf, thogh I unworthy were. [continues next]
14

Merchant's Tale: 894

'Rys up, my wyf, my love, my lady free;
10

Parson's Prologue: 70

[continues previous] And with that word he seyde in this manere —
14

Hous of Fame 3: 587

[continues previous] 'Ful gladly, lady myn,' he seyde;
11

Hous of Fame 3: 588

[continues previous] And out his trumpe of golde he brayde
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 375

I put me in your wyse governance;
12

Clerk's Tale: 826

[continues previous] I was your wyf, thogh I unworthy were.
11

Compleynt of Mars: 16

And ye, that han not chosen in humble wyse, [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 17

Without repenting cheseth yow your make. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 376

Cheseth your-self, which may be most plesance,
10

Shipman's Tale: 191

And doon to yow what plesance and servyce [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse. [continues next]
11

Compleynt of Mars: 17

[continues previous] Without repenting cheseth yow your make.
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 377

And most honour to yow and me also.
10

Shipman's Tale: 191

[continues previous] And doon to yow what plesance and servyce
10