Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 3 to Geoffrey Chaucer

Comparison of Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 3 to Geoffrey Chaucer

Summary

Geoffrey Chaucer Troilus and Criseyde 3 has 1820 lines, and 8% of them have strong matches at magnitude 15+ in Geoffrey Chaucer. 68% of the lines have weak matches at magnitude 10 to 14. 24% of the lines have no match. On average, each line has 0.14 strong matches and 4.01 weak matches.

Geoffrey Chaucer

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11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 2

Adorneth al the thridde hevene faire!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 878

Now fare a-right, for Ioves name in hevene, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 3

O sonnes leef, O Ioves doughter dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 877

[continues previous] Lord, he was glad, and seyde, 'freend so dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 878

[continues previous] Now fare a-right, for Ioves name in hevene,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 128

Quod Troilus, 'O goodly fresshe free! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 192

And seyde, 'O dere doughter myn, wel-come!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 4

Plesaunce of love, O goodly debonaire,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

[continues previous] 'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 128

[continues previous] Quod Troilus, 'O goodly fresshe free!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 6

O verray cause of hele and of gladnesse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 974

And to Pandare he held up bothe his hondes, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 7

Y-heried be thy might and thy goodnesse!
12

Parlement of Foules: 32

Chapitres seven hit hadde, of hevene and helle, [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 33

And erthe, and soules that therinne dwelle, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 973

[continues previous] Thy might, thy grace, y-heried be it here!'
14

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 974

[continues previous] And to Pandare he held up bothe his hondes,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 8

In hevene and helle, in erthe and salte see
13

Knight's Tale: 1440

To whom bothe hevene and erthe and see is sene, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 395

This is to seye, in erthe and eek in hevene.
11

Parson's Tale: 100

... wool alle hise thoghtes and alle hise werkes; to him may no thing been hid ne covered. Men sholden eek remembren hem of the shame that is to come at the day of dome, to hem that been nat penitent and shriven in this present lyf. For alle the creatures in erthe and in helle shullen seen apertly al that they hyden in this world.
11

Hous of Fame 2: 207

Betwixen hevene, erthe, and see;
11

Hous of Fame 2: 208

That, what-so-ever in al these three
13

Parlement of Foules: 32

[continues previous] Chapitres seven hit hadde, of hevene and helle,
13

Parlement of Foules: 33

[continues previous] And erthe, and soules that therinne dwelle,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 9

Is felt thy might, if that I wel descerne;
13

Knight's Tale: 1440

[continues previous] To whom bothe hevene and erthe and see is sene,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 12

God loveth, and to love wol nought werne;
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 79

An elf-queen wol I love, y-wis, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 13

And in this world no lyves creature,
12

Merchant's Tale: 620

This is to seyn, no lyves creature, [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 80

[continues previous] For in this world no womman is
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 386

For in this world ther is no creature, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 14

With-outen love, is worth, or may endure.
12

Merchant's Tale: 619

[continues previous] Or elles longe may he nat endure;
12

Merchant's Tale: 620

[continues previous] This is to seyn, no lyves creature,
11

Parson's Tale: 15

... contricion delivereth a man fro sinne; of which that David seith: 'I seye,' quod David, that is to seyn, 'I purposed fermely to shryve me; and thow, Lord, relesedest my sinne.' And right so as contricion availleth noght, with-outen sad purpos of shrifte, if man have oportunitee, right so litel worth is shrifte or satisfaccion with-outen contricion. And more-over, contricion destroyeth the prison of helle, and maketh wayk and feble alle the strengthes of the develes, and restoreth the yiftes of the holy goost and of alle gode vertues; and it clenseth the soule of sinne, and delivereth the soule fro the peyne of helle, and ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 386

[continues previous] For in this world ther is no creature,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 15

Ye Ioves first to thilke effectes glade,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 5

that ben y-doon, thilke thing, for which any-thing is don, it semeth [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 9

I have shewed that blisfulnesse is thilke same good for which [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 10

that alle thinges ben doon. Thanne is thilke same good purposed [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 16

Thorugh which that thinges liven alle and be,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 4

[continues previous] medes, ne shrewes lakken never-mo torments. For of alle thinges
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 5

[continues previous] that ben y-doon, thilke thing, for which any-thing is don, it semeth
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 9

[continues previous] I have shewed that blisfulnesse is thilke same good for which
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 10

[continues previous] that alle thinges ben doon. Thanne is thilke same good purposed
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 18

On mortal thing, and as yow list, ay ye
10

Clerk's Tale: 590

I wol no thing, ne nil no thing, certayn,
10

Clerk's Tale: 591

But as yow list; noght greveth me at al,
11

Clerk's Tale: 596

Ye been our lord, doth with your owene thing
11

Clerk's Tale: 597

Right as yow list; axeth no reed at me.
10

Squire's Tale: 320

And whan ye come ther as yow list abyde, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 437

And if yow list to yeve me audience, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 23

And, as yow list, ye maken hertes digne;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 19

Yeve him in love ese or adversitee;
10

Squire's Tale: 321

[continues previous] Bidde him descende, and trille another pin,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 437

[continues previous] And if yow list to yeve me audience,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 21

For love in erthe, and whom yow liste, he hente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 686

That, whom yow liste of hem, ye may here calle.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 22

Ye fierse Mars apeysen of his ire,
11

Knight's Tale: 1511

Of fierse Mars, to doon his sacrifyse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 686

[continues previous] That, whom yow liste of hem, ye may here calle.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 23

And, as yow list, ye maken hertes digne;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 18

On mortal thing, and as yow list, ay ye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1045

But, for my devoir and your hertes reste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1046

Wher-so yow list, by ordal or by ooth,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 27

And hye or lowe, after a wight entendeth;
11

Franklin's Tale: 307

As thyn herberwe chaungeth lowe or hye,
11

Manciple's Tale: 257

Wher-so thou come, amonges hye or lowe,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2201

Of hye or lowe, as ye may see,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2202

Or of what kinrede that he be.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1199

Wol lete, and folowe hir spirit lowe or hye;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 31

Ye knowe al thilke covered qualitee
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 108

nat the qualitee of thinges that ben certeinly present to him-ward; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 32

Of thinges which that folk on wondren so,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 8: 23

som-tyme to wondren on foule thinges; the which hevene, certes,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 6: 108

[continues previous] nat the qualitee of thinges that ben certeinly present to him-ward;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 50

Lay al this mene whyle Troilus,
14

Clerk's Tale: 967

In al this mene whyle she ne stente [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 968

This mayde and eek hir brother to commende [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 709

And this chanoun, right in the mene whyle, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 710

Al redy was, the preest eft to bigyle, [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 5: 8

and moeveth and exciteth in this mene whyle the formes that
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 493

Of Troilus that I rehersen sholde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 494

In al this whyle, un-to his lady dere; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 704

As she that, al this mene whyle, brende
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 400

This toun is ful of lordes al aboute, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 401

And trewes lasten al this mene whyle. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 51

Recordinge his lessoun in this manere,
14

Clerk's Tale: 967

[continues previous] In al this mene whyle she ne stente
11

Clerk's Tale: 968

[continues previous] This mayde and eek hir brother to commende
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 709

[continues previous] And this chanoun, right in the mene whyle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 494

[continues previous] In al this whyle, un-to his lady dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 401

[continues previous] And trewes lasten al this mene whyle.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 402

[continues previous] Go we pleye us in som lusty route
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 53

Thus wole I pleyne un-to my lady dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 494

In al this whyle, un-to his lady dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 495

I trowe it were a long thing for to here;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 54

That word is good, and this shal be my chere;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 774

If sorwe of that nil not my bane be, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 775

Than shal no mete or drinke come in me [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 55

This nil I not foryeten in no wyse.'
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 161

I coude never leve it in no wyse. [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6156

But I nil love it, in no wyse.
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6157

I mene of fals religious,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1069

And in ful humble wyse, as in his speche, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 774

[continues previous] If sorwe of that nil not my bane be,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 56

God leve him werken as he gan devyse.
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 218

As ye han herd the dede man devyse; [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 219

And with an hardy herte he gan to crye [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 161

[continues previous] I coude never leve it in no wyse.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 162

[continues previous] Now wolde god my wit mighte suffyse
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 277

That art so fair and goodly to devyse?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 278

Ther-with his herte gan to sprede and ryse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1069

[continues previous] And in ful humble wyse, as in his speche,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1070

[continues previous] He gan him recomaunde un-to hir grace;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 361

And on his pitous face he gan biholden; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 362

But lord, so often gan his herte colden, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 57

And lord, so that his herte gan to quappe,
11

Merchant's Tale: 508

But in his herte he gan hir to manace, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 509

That he that night in armes wolde hir streyne [continues next]
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 219

[continues previous] And with an hardy herte he gan to crye
12

Legend of Thisbe: 160

And lyke the wawes quappe gan her herte, [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 161

And pale as box she wex, and in a throwe [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 277

[continues previous] That art so fair and goodly to devyse?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 278

[continues previous] Ther-with his herte gan to sprede and ryse,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 361

[continues previous] And on his pitous face he gan biholden;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 362

[continues previous] But lord, so often gan his herte colden,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 363

[continues previous] Seing his freend in wo, whos hevinesse
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1427

But fynally, he gan his herte wreste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1428

To trusten hir, and took it for the beste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 58

Heringe hir come, and shorte for to syke!
11

Merchant's Tale: 508

[continues previous] But in his herte he gan hir to manace,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 160

[continues previous] And lyke the wawes quappe gan her herte,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 161

[continues previous] And pale as box she wex, and in a throwe
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1428

[continues previous] To trusten hir, and took it for the beste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 59

And Pandarus, that ladde hir by the lappe,
10

Squire's Tale: 475

Til Canacee hath in hir lappe hir take [continues next]
10

Squire's Tale: 476

Un-to the tyme she gan of swough awake. [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 635

But Canacee hom bereth hir in hir lappe, [continues next]
12

Squire's Tale: 636

And softely in plastres gan hir wrappe, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 59

wolde don afterward. Tho com she ner, and sette hir doun up-on [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 60

the uttereste corner of my bed; and she, biholdinge my chere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 754

And ner he com, and seyde hir in hir ere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1561

That som of us, I trowe, hir hedes ake.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 92

This Diomede, that ladde hir by the brydel,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 93

Whan that he saw the folk of Troye aweye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 60

Com ner, and gan in at the curtin pyke,
10

Squire's Tale: 476

[continues previous] Un-to the tyme she gan of swough awake.
11

Squire's Tale: 635

[continues previous] But Canacee hom bereth hir in hir lappe,
12

Squire's Tale: 636

[continues previous] And softely in plastres gan hir wrappe,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 1: 59

[continues previous] wolde don afterward. Tho com she ner, and sette hir doun up-on
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 754

[continues previous] And ner he com, and seyde hir in hir ere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1562

[continues previous] And ner he com, and seyde, 'how stont it now
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 63

Lo, here is she that is your deeth to wyte.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1279

A womman, that were of his deeth to wyte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 66

'Wher me be wo, O mighty god, thou wost!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 721

Tel me sumwhat, sin al my wo thou wost.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 268

As thou wel wost, above the goddes alle? [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 67

Who is al there? I see nought trewely.'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 249

'Ye, certainly,' quod he, 'no wonder is.' [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 721

[continues previous] Tel me sumwhat, sin al my wo thou wost.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 722

[continues previous] Yet Troilus, for al this, no word seyde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

[continues previous] Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 267

[continues previous] Have I thee nought honoured al my lyve,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 939

'Go,' quod Criseyde, 'and uncle, trewely, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 68

'Sire,' quod Criseyde, 'it is Pandare and I.'
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 250

[continues previous] 'Now, sire,' quod she, 'I coude amende al this,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 314

Non other auctour alegge I. [continues next]
11

Legend of Ariadne: 306

Wher be ye, that I may nat with yow mete, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4104

For him ful oft I singe 'allas!' [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4105

For I ne may nought, thurgh his ire, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1465

Lo, nece myn, see ye nought how I swete? [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1466

I noot whether ye the more thank me conne. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 939

[continues previous] 'Go,' quod Criseyde, 'and uncle, trewely,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 940

[continues previous] I shal don al my might, me to restreyne
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 69

'Ye, swete herte? allas, I may nought ryse
11

Knight's Tale: 189

To doon honour to May, and for to ryse. [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 314

[continues previous] Non other auctour alegge I.
12

Hous of Fame 1: 315

[continues previous] 'Allas!' quod she, 'my swete herte,
12

Legend of Ariadne: 305

[continues previous] And cryed, 'Theseus! myn herte swete!
12

Legend of Ariadne: 306

[continues previous] Wher be ye, that I may nat with yow mete,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4104

[continues previous] For him ful oft I singe 'allas!'
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4105

[continues previous] For I ne may nought, thurgh his ire,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1465

[continues previous] Lo, nece myn, see ye nought how I swete?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1466

[continues previous] I noot whether ye the more thank me conne.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 70

To knele, and do yow honour in som wyse.'
11

Knight's Tale: 189

[continues previous] To doon honour to May, and for to ryse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 71

And dressede him upward, and she right tho
11

Second Nun's Tale: 341

Three persones may ther right wel be.' [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 235

How she gan him comforte tho, [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 236

And bad him to Cartage go, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 72

Gan bothe here hondes softe upon him leye,
11

Second Nun's Tale: 342

[continues previous] Tho gan she him ful bisily to preche
10

Hous of Fame 1: 235

[continues previous] How she gan him comforte tho,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 73

'O, for the love of god, do ye not so
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 74

To me,' quod she, 'ey! what is this to seye?
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 129

This is to seye, what wommen loven moost, [continues next]
13

Summoner's Tale: 493

Til she had herd al what the frere sayde:
13

Summoner's Tale: 494

'Ey, goddes moder,' quod she, 'blisful mayde!
11

Summoner's Tale: 495

Is ther oght elles? telle me faithfully.'
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye. [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 477

This child I am comanded for to take' — [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 300

'Allas!' quod she, 'what me is wo!
10

Hous of Fame 1: 301

Allas! is every man thus trewe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 807

[continues previous] I knowe him not, god helpe me so,' quod she;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 808

[continues previous] 'Allas! what wikked spirit tolde him thus?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 75

Sire, come am I to yow for causes tweye;
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 128

[continues previous] Whan that he saugh he mighte nat come therby,
10

Clerk's Tale: 476

[continues previous] And so wol I; ther is na-more to seye.
10

Clerk's Tale: 477

[continues previous] This child I am comanded for to take' —
11

Monk's Prologue: 95

Now herkneth, if yow lyketh for to here; [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 96

But first I yow biseke in this matere, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 76

First, yow to thonke, and of your lordshipe eke
14

Summoner's Tale: 475

Blasphemed hath our holy covent eke.' [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 95

[continues previous] Now herkneth, if yow lyketh for to here; [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 96

[continues previous] But first I yow biseke in this matere, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 77

Continuaunce I wolde yow biseke.'
14

Summoner's Tale: 476

[continues previous] 'Now, maister,' quod this lord, 'I yow biseke.' [continues next]
11

Monk's Prologue: 96

[continues previous] But first I yow biseke in this matere, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 78

This Troilus, that herde his lady preye
14

Summoner's Tale: 476

[continues previous] 'Now, maister,' quod this lord, 'I yow biseke.'
11

Monk's Prologue: 96

[continues previous] But first I yow biseke in this matere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 79

Of lordship him, wex neither quik ne deed,
12

Merchant's Tale: 855

That ever was; for neither night ne day [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 856

Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May, [continues next]
10

Legend of Lucretia: 137

And in a swough she lay and wex so deed, [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 156

A word for shame ne may she forth out-bringe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 157

Ne upon hem she dorste nat beholde. [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 121

Whether my lord be quik or deed.' [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1991

For sich a word ne mighte nought [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 80

Ne mighte a word for shame to it seye,
12

Merchant's Tale: 855

[continues previous] That ever was; for neither night ne day
12

Merchant's Tale: 856

[continues previous] Ne mighte he speke a word to fresshe May,
10

Legend of Lucretia: 138

[continues previous] Men mighte smyten of her arm or heed; [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 156

[continues previous] A word for shame ne may she forth out-bringe,
11

Legend of Lucretia: 157

[continues previous] Ne upon hem she dorste nat beholde.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 122

[continues previous] With that word she heng doun the heed,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 1991

[continues previous] For sich a word ne mighte nought
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 1992

[continues previous] Isse out of a vilayns thought.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 249

And wostow why? for shame it is to seye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 250

For thee have I bigonne a gamen pleye
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 81

Al-though men sholde smyten of his heed.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 138

[continues previous] Men mighte smyten of her arm or heed; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 957

Ne, though men sholden smyten of hir heed, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 82

But lord, so he wex sodeinliche reed,
11

Clerk's Tale: 260

This sodeyn cas this man astoned so, [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 261

That reed he wex, abayst, and al quaking [continues next]
10

Clerk's Tale: 262

He stood unnethes seyde he wordes mo, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 111

And of his owene thought he wex al reed. [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 137

[continues previous] And in a swough she lay and wex so deed,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 956

[continues previous] But lord, so she wex sodeynliche reed!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 83

And sire, his lesson, that he wende conne,
11

Clerk's Tale: 261

[continues previous] That reed he wex, abayst, and al quaking
11

Shipman's Tale: 111

[continues previous] And of his owene thought he wex al reed.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 84

To preyen hir, is thurgh his wit y-ronne.
11

Clerk's Tale: 158

No likerous lust was thurgh hir herte y-ronne; [continues next]
13

Clerk's Tale: 372

Nat only this Grisildis thurgh hir wit [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 85

Cryseyde al this aspyede wel y-nough,
11

Clerk's Tale: 159

[continues previous] Wel ofter of the welle than of the tonne
13

Clerk's Tale: 372

[continues previous] Nat only this Grisildis thurgh hir wit
13

Clerk's Tale: 373

[continues previous] Coude al the feet of wyfly hoomlinesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1590

Herde al this thing Criseyde wel y-nough,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 924

No wonder is, sin she dide al for gode. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 925

Cryseyde answerde, 'as wisly god at reste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 86

For she was wys, and lovede him never-the-lasse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 924

[continues previous] No wonder is, sin she dide al for gode.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 90

His resons, as I may my rymes holde,
10

Knight's Tale: 1194

As shortly as I can I wol me haste, [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 32

Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye; [continues next]
10

Miller's Prologue: 33

For I wol telle a legende and a lyf [continues next]
10

Cook's Prologue: 18

I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 229

My trouthe wol I holde to my brother, [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 230

As I am sworn, and ech of us til other [continues next]
10

Clerk's Prologue: 26

I wol yow telle a tale which that I [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 658

But hennes-forth I wol my proces holde [continues next]
10

Melibee's Prologue: 18

'Gladly,' quod I, 'by goddes swete pyne, [continues next]
10

Melibee's Prologue: 19

I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose, [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 226

And I wol telle yow wherfore; [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 227

For I ne might, for bote ne bale, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1571

That ye wol holde a greet mervayle [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6058

'Parfay,' seide Love, 'I graunte it yow; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6059

I wol wel holde him for my man; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1262

And as I am avysed sodeynly, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 91

I yow wol telle, as techen bokes olde.
11

Knight's Tale: 478

And of Arcita forth I wol yow telle.
10

Knight's Tale: 1194

[continues previous] As shortly as I can I wol me haste,
10

Knight's Tale: 1195

[continues previous] To telle yow al the descripcioun.
10

Miller's Prologue: 32

[continues previous] Wyte it the ale of Southwerk, I yow preye;
10

Miller's Prologue: 33

[continues previous] For I wol telle a legende and a lyf
12

Cook's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] I wol yow telle as wel as ever I can
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 156

And I wol telle it yow er it be night.' [continues next]
11

Friar's Tale: 229

[continues previous] My trouthe wol I holde to my brother,
11

Friar's Tale: 230

[continues previous] As I am sworn, and ech of us til other
12

Clerk's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] As fer as reson axeth, hardily.
12

Clerk's Prologue: 26

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a tale which that I
11

Squire's Tale: 657

[continues previous] The kinges sone, of whiche I yow tolde.
11

Squire's Tale: 658

[continues previous] But hennes-forth I wol my proces holde
11

Squire's Tale: 661

First wol I telle yow of Cambynskan, [continues next]
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 185

Anon I wol yow telle.
10

Melibee's Prologue: 18

[continues previous] 'Gladly,' quod I, 'by goddes swete pyne, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 266

I wol yow telle, as was me taught also,
10

Parson's Prologue: 45

[continues previous] And therfor, if yow list, I wol nat glose. [continues next]
11

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 337

Of whiche I wol yow telle fonde,
11

Legend of Philomela: 122

And of her suster forth I wol yow telle.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 226

[continues previous] And I wol telle yow wherfore;
11

Book of the Duchesse: 227

[continues previous] For I ne might, for bote ne bale,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1570

[continues previous] But o thing soothly dar I telle,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1571

[continues previous] That ye wol holde a greet mervayle
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6058

[continues previous] 'Parfay,' seide Love, 'I graunte it yow;
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 6059

[continues previous] I wol wel holde him for my man;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 6690

'Sir, I wol gladly telle yow:
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1199

As writen clerkes in hir bokes olde, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1200

Right as an aspes leef she gan to quake, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1262

[continues previous] And as I am avysed sodeynly,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1263

[continues previous] So wol I telle yow, whyl it is hoot.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1483

Thorugh his moder, wol I yow not telle,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 92

In chaunged vois, right for his verrey drede,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 155

[continues previous] Thou shalt it do, if it lye in thy might;
10

Squire's Tale: 662

[continues previous] That in his tyme many a citee wan;
10

Melibee's Prologue: 19

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a litel thing in prose,
10

Parson's Prologue: 46

[continues previous] I wol yow telle a mery tale in prose
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1199

[continues previous] As writen clerkes in hir bokes olde,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1200

[continues previous] Right as an aspes leef she gan to quake,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 93

Which vois eek quook, and ther-to his manere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1267

His persone, his aray, his look, his chere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1268

His goodly manere and his gentillesse, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 94

Goodly abayst, and now his hewes rede,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1267

[continues previous] His persone, his aray, his look, his chere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1268

[continues previous] His goodly manere and his gentillesse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 95

Now pale, un-to Criseyde, his lady dere,
10

Parlement of Foules: 466

Forth with his make, or with his lady dere; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 494

In al this whyle, un-to his lady dere;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1448

Gan therwith-al Criseyde his lady dere [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 307

And folwe alwey Criseyde, thy lady dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 308

Thy righte place is now no lenger here!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1314

How he may best discryven hir his wo. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1315

And to Criseyde, his owene lady dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 96

With look doun cast and humble yolden chere,
12

Knight's Tale: 1361

And doun he kneleth, and with humble chere
12

Knight's Tale: 1362

And herte soor, he seyde as ye shul here.
10

Parlement of Foules: 466

[continues previous] Forth with his make, or with his lady dere;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1449

[continues previous] In armes streyne, and seyde in this manere: —
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1315

[continues previous] And to Criseyde, his owene lady dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 97

Lo, the alderfirste word that him asterte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1343

That sleeth my wit, if ought amis me asterte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 98

Was, twyes, 'mercy, mercy, swete herte!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1173

Have mercy, swete herte myn, Cryseyde! [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1344

[continues previous] For-yeve it me, myn owene swete herte.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 99

And stinte a whyl, and whan he mighte out-bringe,
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 782

On hem left he no-thing whan he mighte hem nom.
12

Gamelyn's Tale: 783

Whyl Gamelyn and his men made merthes ryve,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1174

[continues previous] And if that, in tho wordes that I seyde,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1133

Wher that he was, ne mighte o word out-bringe, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 100

The nexte word was, 'god wot, for I have,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1133

[continues previous] Wher that he was, ne mighte o word out-bringe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1134

[continues previous] As I seyde erst, for wo and for sobbinge.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 104

And though I dar ne can un-to yow pleyne,
11

Clerk's Tale: 41

That we with pitous herte un-to yow pleyne,
13

Melibee's Tale: 13

... hir sentence. Thanne dame Prudence, whan that she saugh how that hir housbonde shoop him for to wreken him on his foos, and to biginne werre, she in ful humble wyse, when she saugh hir tyme, seide him thise wordes: 'My lord,' quod she, 'I yow biseche as hertely as I dar and can, ne haste yow nat to faste, and for alle guerdons as yeveth me audience. For Piers Alfonce seith: "who-so that dooth to that other good or harm, haste thee nat to quyten it; for in this wyse thy freend wol abyde, and thyn enemy shal the lenger live in drede." The proverbe seith: ... [continues next]
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 108

I suffre, and yet I dar not to you pleyne; [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1579

If in this forme I sholde with yow wende.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1580

Ne though I livede un-to the worldes ende,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1353

Al that yow list, I dar not pleyne more, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 105

Y-wis, I suffre nought the lasse peyne.
12

Melibee's Tale: 13

[continues previous] ... hir sentence. Thanne dame Prudence, whan that she saugh how that hir housbonde shoop him for to wreken him on his foos, and to biginne werre, she in ful humble wyse, when she saugh hir tyme, seide him thise wordes: 'My lord,' quod she, 'I yow biseche as hertely as I dar and can, ne haste yow nat to faste, and for alle guerdons as yeveth me audience. For Piers Alfonce seith: "who-so that dooth to that other good or harm, haste thee nat to quyten it; for in this wyse thy freend wol abyde, and thyn enemy shal the lenger ...
12

Compleynt unto Pitè: 108

[continues previous] I suffre, and yet I dar not to you pleyne;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1353

[continues previous] Al that yow list, I dar not pleyne more,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 106

Thus muche as now, O wommanliche wyf,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

And be to yow a trewe humble wyf, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1296

For certes, fresshe wommanliche wyf, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 107

I may out-bringe, and if this yow displese,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 365

[continues previous] And be to yow a trewe humble wyf,
10

Wife of Bath's Tale: 366

[continues previous] And never yow displese in al my lyf,
11

Clerk's Tale: 450

Lyken to yow that may displese me; [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 451

Ne I desyre no-thing for to have, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 585

And lothest were of al this world displese, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 586

Nere it that I for yow have swich disese, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 28

'My lord,' quod she, 'I biseke yow in al humblesse, that ye wol nat wilfully replye agayn my resouns, ne distempre your herte thogh I speke thing that yow displese. For god wot that, as in myn entente, I speke it for your beste, for your honour and for your profite eke. And soothly, I hope that your benignitee wol taken it in pacience. Trusteth me wel,' quod she, 'that your conseil as in this caas ne sholde nat, as ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 146

'Now, uncle myn, I nil yow nought displese, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1297

[continues previous] This dar I seye, that trouthe and diligence,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 108

That shal I wreke upon myn owne lyf
11

Clerk's Tale: 450

[continues previous] Lyken to yow that may displese me;
11

Franklin's Tale: 586

[continues previous] Nere it that I for yow have swich disese,
11

Melibee's Tale: 28

[continues previous] 'My lord,' quod she, 'I biseke yow in al humblesse, that ye wol nat wilfully replye agayn my resouns, ne distempre your herte thogh I speke thing that yow displese. For god wot that, as in myn entente, I speke it for your beste, for your honour and for your profite eke. And soothly, I hope that your benignitee wol taken it in pacience. Trusteth me wel,' quod she, 'that your conseil as in this caas ne sholde nat, as to speke properly, be called a conseilling, ...
10

Parlement of Foules: 644

And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.' [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 645

'I graunte it you,' quod she; and right anoon [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3410

To doon right at your owne wille; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7158

Right sone he shal his lyf forgo. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 146

[continues previous] 'Now, uncle myn, I nil yow nought displese,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 109

Right sone, I trowe, and doon your herte an ese,
10

Parlement of Foules: 644

[continues previous] And myn entente I wol yow sey right sone.'
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3409

[continues previous] With al my might, bothe loude and stille,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 3410

[continues previous] To doon right at your owne wille;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 7158

[continues previous] Right sone he shal his lyf forgo.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1225

She wolde fayn, to doon his herte an ese. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1226

She shette it, and to Pandarus gan goon, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 633

'To doon myn herte as now so greet an ese
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 117

And preyede hir, she wolde hir sorwe apese, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 110

If with my deeth your herte I may apese.
12

Merchant's Tale: 224

I prey yow to my wil ye wole assente.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1225

[continues previous] She wolde fayn, to doon his herte an ese.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 116

[continues previous] To doon it, for to doon hir herte an ese.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 939

But herte myn, sin that I am your man, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 111

But sin that ye han herd me som-what seye,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 515

As heer-biforn that ye han herd devyse.
13

Summoner's Prologue: 5

I yow biseke that, of your curteisye,
13

Summoner's Prologue: 6

Sin ye han herd this false Frere lye,
13

Merchant's Tale: 223

[continues previous] And sin that ye han herd al myn entente,
11

Franklin's Tale: 770

And whan that ye han herd the tale, demeth.
11

Franklin's Tale: 819

And tolde him al as ye han herd me sayd;
11

Franklin's Tale: 820

And be ye siker, he was so weel apayd,
14

Pardoner's Tale: 508

To sleen the thridde, as ye han herd me seye.
14

Pardoner's Tale: 509

This yongest, which that wente un-to the toun,
12

Melibee's Prologue: 37

As thus, thogh that I telle som-what more
12

Melibee's Prologue: 38

Of proverbes, than ye han herd bifore,
12

Melibee's Prologue: 41

And thogh I nat the same wordes seye
12

Melibee's Prologue: 42

As ye han herd, yet to yow alle I preye,
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 546

Of metals, which ye han herd me reherce,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 547

Consumed and wasted han my reednesse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1547

That ye han herd Pandare er this devyse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1548

But certeyn is, er Troilus him leyde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 939

[continues previous] But herte myn, sin that I am your man,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 112

Now recche I never how sone that I deye.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1085

Whan al is wist, than am I not to blame!' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 798

So ye wel fare, I recche not to deye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 799

How mighte it ever y-red ben or y-songe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1081

Rewe on my sorwe, or do me deye sone, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1718

Myn owene deeth in armes wol I seche;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1719

I recche not how sone be the day!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 113

Ther-with his manly sorwe to biholde,
10

Franklin's Tale: 186

Wolde han maad any herte for to lighte [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1085

[continues previous] Whan al is wist, than am I not to blame!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1086

[continues previous] Ther-with the sorwe so his herte shette,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1081

[continues previous] Rewe on my sorwe, or do me deye sone,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 114

It mighte han maad an herte of stoon to rewe;
10

Franklin's Tale: 186

[continues previous] Wolde han maad any herte for to lighte
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 116

And poked ever his nece newe and newe,
11

Reeve's Tale: 249

He poked Iohn, and seyde, 'slepestow? [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 250

Herdestow ever slyk a sang er now? [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 56

And I love hit, and ever y-lyke newe, [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

And ever shal, til that myn herte dye; [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1288

Our Ioye was ever y-liche newe; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 117

And seyde, 'wo bigon ben hertes trewe!
11

Miller's Tale: 472

That is for love alwey so wo bigon, [continues next]
11

Reeve's Tale: 249

[continues previous] He poked Iohn, and seyde, 'slepestow?
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 57

[continues previous] And ever shal, til that myn herte dye;
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1287

[continues previous] 'Therwith she was alway so trewe,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 1289

[continues previous] Our hertes wern so even a payre,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1771

On hertes sore, and kepe hem that ben trewe.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 118

For love of god, make of this thing an ende,
11

Miller's Tale: 472

[continues previous] That is for love alwey so wo bigon,
10

Legend of Thisbe: 129

This o night wol us lovers bothe slee! [continues next]
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 136

And nedes cost this thing mot have an ende; [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 998

Er of this boke an ende I make.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1115

Thou to hir go, and make of this an ende;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 119

Or slee us bothe at ones, er that ye wende.'
13

Friar's Tale: 158

'A,' quod this Somnour, 'benedicite, what sey ye? [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 159

I wende ye were a yeman trewely. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 895

Now telleth me, er that ye ferther wende. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 417

That shul ye knowe, er that I fro yow wende, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 418

By that I of my tale have maad an ende. [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 129

[continues previous] This o night wol us lovers bothe slee!
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 137

[continues previous] Or he or I mot nedes lese our lyf.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 226

'Shal I not witen what ye mene of this?' [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 120

'I? what?' quod she, 'by god and by my trouthe,
11

Man of Law's Tale: 921

'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn! [continues next]
13

Friar's Tale: 158

[continues previous] 'A,' quod this Somnour, 'benedicite, what sey ye?
13

Friar's Tale: 159

[continues previous] I wende ye were a yeman trewely.
12

Franklin's Tale: 896

[continues previous] I can na-more, my tale is at an ende.
12

Shipman's Tale: 134

'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye; [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 135

By god and by this porthors, I yow swere, [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 417

[continues previous] That shul ye knowe, er that I fro yow wende,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 418

[continues previous] By that I of my tale have maad an ende.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 12: 12

'By whiche governement,' quod she, 'that this world is
12

Hous of Fame 3: 673

'I graunte,' quod she, 'by my trouthe! [continues next]
12

Amorous Compleint: 83

By god and by my trouthe, is myn entente;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!' [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 771

'What? not as bisily,' quod Pandarus, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1054

Help now,' quod he. 'Yis, by my trouthe, I shal.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1055

'God yelde thee, freend, and this in special,' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 127

[continues previous] 'Ye, holy god!' quod she, 'what thing is that?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 225

[continues previous] 'A! wel bithought! for love of god,' quod she,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 226

[continues previous] 'Shal I not witen what ye mene of this?'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 958

And love thee best, by god and by my trouthe,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1197

Can he ther-on? for, by my trouthe, I noot.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1281

Were it wel doon?' Quod she, 'nay, by my trouthe!'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1282

'God helpe me so,' quod he, 'ye sey me sooth.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 636

For, by my trouthe, I sey it nought a-game, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1512

For I am thyn, by god and by my trouthe! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 121

I noot nought what ye wilne that I seye.'
11

Man of Law's Tale: 921

[continues previous] 'I noot,' quod he, 'by god, and by seint Iohn!
10

Merchant's Tale: 278

Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 449

'Brethren,' quod he, 'tak kepe what I seye; [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 134

[continues previous] 'The same agayn to yow,' quod she, 'I seye;
12

Melibee's Tale: 65

'Certes,' quod Prudence, 'it is an hard thing and right perilous, that a man putte him al outrely in the arbitracioun and Iuggement, and in the might and power of hise enemys. For Salomon seith: "leveth me, and yeveth credence to that I shal seyn; I seye," quod he, "ye peple, folk, and governours of holy chirche, to thy sone, to thy wyf, to thy freend, ne to thy brother ne yeve thou never might ne maistrie of thy body, whyl thou livest." Now sithen he defendeth, that man shal nat yeven to his brother ne to his freend the ... [continues next]
12

Manciple's Prologue: 104

'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.' [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 95

divynour, that seyde: "Al that I seye," quod he, "either it shal be, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 673

[continues previous] 'I graunte,' quod she, 'by my trouthe!
12

Parlement of Foules: 541

Nay, sirs!' quod he, 'if that I dorste it seye, [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 542

Ye doon me wrong, my tale is not y-do! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 771

[continues previous] 'What? not as bisily,' quod Pandarus, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1054

[continues previous] Help now,' quod he. 'Yis, by my trouthe, I shal.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1197

[continues previous] Can he ther-on? for, by my trouthe, I noot.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1206

'And eek I noot what I sholde to him seye.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1465

Lo, nece myn, see ye nought how I swete? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1466

I noot whether ye the more thank me conne. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 636

[continues previous] For, by my trouthe, I sey it nought a-game,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1512

[continues previous] For I am thyn, by god and by my trouthe!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 122

'I? what?' quod he, 'that ye han on him routhe,
10

Merchant's Tale: 278

[continues previous] Sin ye han seyd, and herkneth what I seye.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 449

[continues previous] 'Brethren,' quod he, 'tak kepe what I seye;
10

Shipman's Tale: 197

I have,' quod he, 'on yow so greet a routhe,
10

Shipman's Tale: 198

That I yow swere and plighte yow my trouthe,
12

Melibee's Tale: 65

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod Prudence, 'it is an hard thing and right perilous, that a man putte him al outrely in the arbitracioun and Iuggement, and in the might and power of hise enemys. For Salomon seith: "leveth me, and yeveth credence to that I shal seyn; I seye," quod he, "ye peple, folk, and governours of holy chirche, to thy sone, to thy wyf, to thy freend, ne to thy brother ne yeve thou never might ne maistrie of thy body, whyl thou livest." Now sithen he defendeth, that man shal nat yeven to his brother ne to his freend the ...
12

Manciple's Prologue: 104

[continues previous] 'Wel, sir,' quod he, 'now herkneth what I seye.'
10

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 95

[continues previous] divynour, that seyde: "Al that I seye," quod he, "either it shal be,
12

Parlement of Foules: 541

[continues previous] Nay, sirs!' quod he, 'if that I dorste it seye,
12

Parlement of Foules: 542

[continues previous] Ye doon me wrong, my tale is not y-do!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 769

And hir bisoughte on thee to han som routhe?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 770

[continues previous] 'Why, nay,' quod he, 'by god and by my trouthe!'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 489

Ne shal I never on him han other routhe.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 490

'I graunte wel,' quod Pandare, 'by my trouthe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1206

[continues previous] 'And eek I noot what I sholde to him seye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1465

[continues previous] Lo, nece myn, see ye nought how I swete?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1466

[continues previous] I noot whether ye the more thank me conne.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 123

For goddes love, and doth him nought to deye.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1209

Of his good wil, and doth him not to deye. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1210

Now for the love of me, my nece dere, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 124

'Now thanne thus,' quod she, 'I wolde him preye
12

Clerk's Tale: 588

Beth pacient, and ther-of I yow preye.'
12

Clerk's Tale: 589

'I have,' quod she, 'seyd thus, and ever shal,
10

Second Nun's Tale: 151

And thanne at erst to him thus seyde she, [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 152

'I have an angel which that loveth me, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 47

'But I preye,' quod she, 'see now how thou mayst proeven,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 1: 27

Thanne seyde she thus: 'Certes,' quod she, 'that were a greet
12

Legend of Phyllis: 139

To have a sely mayde thus betrayed! [continues next]
12

Legend of Phyllis: 140

To god,' quod she, 'preye I, and ofte have prayed, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 309

'Now, my good eem, for goddes love, I preye,' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 310

Quod she, 'com of, and tel me what it is; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 503

'Can he wel speke of love?' quod she, 'I preye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1210

[continues previous] Now for the love of me, my nece dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 125

To telle me the fyn of his entente;
11

Knight's Tale: 1411

Yet wiste he wel that graunted was his bone; [continues next]
13

Knight's Tale: 2131

Greet was theffect, and heigh was his entente; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 862

And she knew eek the fyn of his entente. [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 521

And in this wyse he served his entente, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 231

But no-thing wiste she of his entente. [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 151

[continues previous] And thanne at erst to him thus seyde she,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 139

This song to herkne I dide al myn entente, [continues next]
12

Legend of Phyllis: 140

[continues previous] To god,' quod she, 'preye I, and ofte have prayed,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 811

Twenty winter that his lady wiste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 812

That never yet his lady mouth he kiste. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 310

[continues previous] Quod she, 'com of, and tel me what it is;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 504

[continues previous] Tel me, for I the bet me shal purveye.'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 553

Ye han wel herd the fyn of his entente. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 867

Answerde him tho; but, as of his entente, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 126

Yet wiste I never wel what that he mente.'
12

Knight's Tale: 1411

[continues previous] Yet wiste he wel that graunted was his bone;
13

Knight's Tale: 2132

[continues previous] Wel wiste he why, and what ther-of he mente; [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 20

What that he mente ther-by, I can nat seyn; [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 861

[continues previous] And privee signes, wiste he what she mente; [continues next]
11

Squire's Tale: 522

[continues previous] That (save the feend) non wiste what he mente. [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 231

[continues previous] But no-thing wiste she of his entente.
12

Franklin's Tale: 253

Never erst,' quod she, 'ne wiste I what ye mente. [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 254

But now, Aurelie, I knowe your entente, [continues next]
11

Physician's Tale: 137

That wel he wiste he mighte hir never winne
13

Melibee's Tale: 11

... to repreve in yevynge of Iugement, ne in vengeance-taking, whan it is suffisant and resonable. And that shewed our lord Iesu Crist by ensample; for whan that the womman that was taken in avoutrie was broght in his presence, to knowen what sholde be doon with hir persone, al-be-it so that he wiste wel him-self what that he wolde answere, yet ne wolde he nat answere sodeynly, but he wolde have deliberacioun, and in the ground he wroot twyes. And by thise causes we axen deliberacioun, and we shal thanne, by the grace of god, conseille thee thing that shal be profitable.'
11

Hous of Fame 1: 128

For certeynly, I niste never
11

Hous of Fame 1: 129

Wher that I was, but wel wiste I,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 811

[continues previous] Twenty winter that his lady wiste,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 812

[continues previous] That never yet his lady mouth he kiste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 553

[continues previous] Ye han wel herd the fyn of his entente.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 840

That never yet agilte him, that I wiste?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 868

[continues previous] It semed not she wiste what he mente.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?'
13

Knight's Tale: 2132

[continues previous] Wel wiste he why, and what ther-of he mente;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 20

[continues previous] What that he mente ther-by, I can nat seyn;
12

Merchant's Tale: 861

[continues previous] And privee signes, wiste he what she mente;
11

Squire's Tale: 522

[continues previous] That (save the feend) non wiste what he mente.
12

Franklin's Tale: 253

[continues previous] Never erst,' quod she, 'ne wiste I what ye mente.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 140

[continues previous] For-why I mette I wiste what they mente.
11

Legend of Dido: 371

'My dere herte, which that I love most?' [continues next]
10

Book of the Duchesse: 108

'A! mercy! swete lady dere!' [continues next]
10

Compleynt of Mars: 215

O herte swete, O lady sovereyne! [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7504

Graunt mercy, swete sire dere!' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 3

O sonnes leef, O Ioves doughter dere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 4

Plesaunce of love, O goodly debonaire, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 147

Lo, this mene I, myn owene swete herte.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1210

'Ne hadde I er now, my swete herte dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1525

He seyde, 'farewel, my dere herte swete,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 759

O dere herte eek, that I love so,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1209

And thou, Criseyde, o swete herte dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1274

This al and som, my dere herte swete.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1275

Now that I shal wel bringen it aboute
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 228

O herte myn, Criseyde, O swete fo! [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 229

O lady myn, that I love and no mo! [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1189

Er that the mone, O dere herte swete! [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 128

Quod Troilus, 'O goodly fresshe free!
11

Legend of Dido: 372

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod he, 'this night my fadres gost
10

Book of the Duchesse: 109

[continues previous] Quod she to Iuno, hir goddesse;
10

Compleynt of Mars: 215

[continues previous] O herte swete, O lady sovereyne!
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 7505

[continues previous] Quod alderfirst Dame Abstinence,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 3

[continues previous] O sonnes leef, O Ioves doughter dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 4

[continues previous] Plesaunce of love, O goodly debonaire,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 148

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'lo, here an hard request,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1209

[continues previous] And thou, Criseyde, o swete herte dere,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 228

[continues previous] O herte myn, Criseyde, O swete fo!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 229

[continues previous] O lady myn, that I love and no mo!
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1189

[continues previous] Er that the mone, O dere herte swete!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1475

He lovede so this fresshe mayden free [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 129

That, with the stremes of your eyen clere,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 68

Til on a day, whan Phebus gan to clere,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 69

Aurora with the stremes of hir hete
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1338

Yow first biseche I, that your eyen clere [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1476

[continues previous] That with his manhod, er he wolde stente,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 130

Ye wolde som-tyme freendly on me see,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1354

[continues previous] It were ye that wroughte me swich wo,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1339

[continues previous] To look on this defouled ye not holde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 131

And thanne agreën that I may ben he,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Prose 10: 31

bettre than god, it may nat ben douted thanne that he, that
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 11: 17

he imagineth to ben in thinges with-oute. And thanne alle the [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 132

With-oute braunche of vyce in any wyse,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 3 Metre 11: 17

[continues previous] he imagineth to ben in thinges with-oute. And thanne alle the
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 133

In trouthe alwey to doon yow my servyse
12

Clerk's Tale: 49

And ye, my lord, to doon right as yow leste. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 134

As to my lady right and chief resort,
12

Clerk's Tale: 49

[continues previous] And ye, my lord, to doon right as yow leste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 135

With al my wit and al my diligence,
10

Monk's Prologue: 78

And seyde, 'I wol doon al my diligence, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 243

That I, with al my might and al my lore, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 136

And I to han, right as yow list, comfort,
12

Clerk's Prologue: 23

Ye han of us as now the governaunce, [continues next]
12

Clerk's Tale: 597

Right as yow list; axeth no reed at me. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
12

Shipman's Tale: 193

And but I do, god take on me vengeance
10

Monk's Prologue: 78

[continues previous] And seyde, 'I wol doon al my diligence,
10

Monk's Prologue: 79

[continues previous] As fer as souneth in-to honestee,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 93

Swich vois, right as yow list, to laughe or pleyne.
11

Legend of Ariadne: 156

And for my sustenance yit wol I swinke,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 157

Right as yow list, that Minos ne no wight —
10

Parlement of Foules: 641

Lyk as is everiche other creature, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 256

Sin, as him-selven list, he may yow binde. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 243

[continues previous] That I, with al my might and al my lore,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 137

Under your yerde, egal to myn offence,
12

Clerk's Prologue: 22

[continues previous] 'Hoste,' quod he, 'I am under your yerde;
12

Clerk's Tale: 596

[continues previous] Ye been our lord, doth with your owene thing
10

Parlement of Foules: 640

[continues previous] Soth is that I am ever under your yerde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 257

[continues previous] The yerde is bet that bowen wole and winde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 141

And I to ben your verray humble trewe,
11

Miller's Tale: 422

Help us to scape, or we ben lost echon;
11

Miller's Tale: 423

I am thy trewe verray wedded wyf;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 827

She seyde, 'O love, to whom I have and shal [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 828

Ben humble subgit, trewe in myn entente, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 142

Secret, and in my paynes pacient,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 827

[continues previous] She seyde, 'O love, to whom I have and shal
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 828

[continues previous] Ben humble subgit, trewe in myn entente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 145

And, with good herte, al holly your talent
10

Clerk's Tale: 1095

Receyven al in gree that god us sent; [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 768

With good wil, body, herte, and al.
11

Book of the Duchesse: 769

Al this I putte in his servage,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 146

Receyven wel, how sore that me smerte,
13

Knight's Tale: 536

'Now trewely, how sore that me smerte,'
10

Clerk's Tale: 1094

[continues previous] Un-to a mortal man, wel more us oghte
10

Clerk's Tale: 1095

[continues previous] Receyven al in gree that god us sent;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2769

Good-Hope, how sore that they smerte,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4611

As lovers doon that felen smerte:[continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5445

How sore that it do hem smerte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 906

For trusteth wel, how sore that him smerte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1000

Have and ay shal, how sore that me smerte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1182

'And now,' quod she, 'that I have do yow smerte, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1183

Foryeve it me, myn owene swete herte.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1186

Him-self to sleen, how sore that him smerte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1187

So that his sowle hir sowle folwen mighte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1448

Yet, er that ye me cause so to smerte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1618

For if ye wiste how sore it doth me smerte,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 62

What wonder is though that hir sore smerte, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 132

Comaundeth me, how sore that me smerte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 133

To doon al that may lyke un-to your herte;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1343

That sleeth my wit, if ought amis me asterte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1344

For-yeve it me, myn owene swete herte. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 147

Lo, this mene I, myn owene swete herte.'
11

Clerk's Tale: 86

Made the markis herte han pitee. [continues next]
11

Clerk's Tale: 87

'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Prologue: 31

'Gladly,' quod he, 'but of myn owene sore,
11

Merchant's Prologue: 32

For sory herte, I telle may na-more.'
11

Shipman's Tale: 196

'Now, trewely, myn owene lady dere, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 197

I have,' quod he, 'on yow so greet a routhe, [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 363

Grete wel our dame, myn owene nece swete,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 132

[For] at his day I chees yow to be myn,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 133

With-oute repenting, myn herte swete!'
11

Anelida and Arcite: 280

And al for-yive,whyl that I livemay.
11

Anelida and Arcite: 281

1. Lo! herte myn, al this is for to seyne,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4612

[continues previous] To Bialacoil leve I myn herte
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 772

'As though myn owene lyf lay on this nede?' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 445

Til I myn owene herte blood may see;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 127

'What that I mene, O swete herte dere?' [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1183

[continues previous] Foryeve it me, myn owene swete herte.'
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1184

[continues previous] This Troilus, with blisse of that supprysed,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1277

And thus seyde he, 'now wolde god I wiste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1278

Myn herte swete, how I yow mighte plese!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1311

That day by day, myn owene herte dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1449

[continues previous] Dwel rather here, myn owene swete herte! [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1450

For trewely, myn owene lady dere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1552

To Troilus, myn owene herte free,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1639

And over al this, I pray yow,' quod she tho, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1640

'Myn owene hertes soothfast suffisaunce, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 63

[continues previous] Whan she forgoth hir owene swete herte?
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 64

This Troilus, in wyse of curteisye,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 565

'Lo, yond saugh I myn owene lady daunce; [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1344

[continues previous] For-yeve it me, myn owene swete herte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1401

Y-wis, myn owene dere herte trewe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1402

I woot that, whan ye next up-on me see,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1421

And fare now wel, myn owene swete herte!
14

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1422

This lettre forth was sent un-to Criseyde,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 148

Quod Pandarus, 'lo, here an hard request,
11

Clerk's Tale: 87

[continues previous] 'Ye wol,' quod he, 'myn owene peple dere,
11

Shipman's Tale: 197

[continues previous] I have,' quod he, 'on yow so greet a routhe,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 771

[continues previous] 'What? not as bisily,' quod Pandarus,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 128

[continues previous] Quod Troilus, 'O goodly fresshe free!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 638

[continues previous] 'Why, so mene I,' quod Pandarus, 'al this day.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1254

[continues previous] 'Lo, herte myn, wel wot ye this,' quod she,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1449

[continues previous] Dwel rather here, myn owene swete herte!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1639

[continues previous] And over al this, I pray yow,' quod she tho,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 565

[continues previous] 'Lo, yond saugh I myn owene lady daunce;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 152

That heren wel, this man wol no-thing yerne
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 679

That wel neigh no man heren other coude.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 154

And been so looth to suffren him yow serve.'
11

Melibee's Tale: 30

... they han answered wysly and discreetly, right so rede I that they been heighly and sovereynly guerdoned for hir noble speche; and eek for they sholde do the more ententif bisinesse in the curacioun of your doghter dere. For al-be-it so that they been your freendes, therfore shal ye nat suffren that they serve yow for noght; but ye oghte the rather guerdone hem and shewe hem your largesse. And as touchinge the proposicioun which that the phisiciens entreteden in this caas, this is to seyn, that, in maladyes, that oon contrarie is warisshed by another contrarie, I wolde fayn knowe how ye understonde thilke ... [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 252

Tak it for good that I shal seye yow here.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1568

O! who-so seeth yow knoweth yow ful lyte!' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 146

For trewely, ther can no wight yow serve, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 147

That half so looth your wraththe wolde deserve. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

With that she gan hir eyen on him caste
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 471

Up-on an amblere esily she sat, [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 472

Y-wimpled wel, and on hir heed an hat [continues next]
15+

Knight's Tale: 1223

Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun, [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 129

Another tyme ther wolde she sitte and thinke,
11

Franklin's Tale: 130

And caste hir eyen dounward fro the brinke.
12

Physician's Tale: 123

And so bifel, this Iuge his eyen caste [continues next]
12

Physician's Tale: 124

Up-on this mayde, avysinge him ful faste, [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 30

[continues previous] ... han answered wysly and discreetly, right so rede I that they been heighly and sovereynly guerdoned for hir noble speche; and eek for they sholde do the more ententif bisinesse in the curacioun of your doghter dere. For al-be-it so that they been your freendes, therfore shal ye nat suffren that they serve yow for noght; but ye oghte the rather guerdone hem and shewe hem your largesse. And as touchinge the proposicioun which that the phisiciens entreteden in this caas, this is to seyn, that, in maladyes, that oon contrarie is warisshed by another contrarie, I wolde fayn knowe how ...
11

Hous of Fame 3: 318

As I myn eyen gan up caste,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 319

That this ilke noble quene
10

Anelida and Arcite: 208

She caste hir for to make a compleyning, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 212

With that hir eyen up she casteth,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 865

Alle that on hir gan beholde.
12

Book of the Duchesse: 866

Hir eyen semed anoon she wolde
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 18

And pitously on hir myn yën caste, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

[continues previous] With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1259

And up his look debonairly he caste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

And gan his look on Pandarus up caste [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1353

Gan for to kisse, and seyde, 'O eyen clere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1569

[continues previous] With that she gan hir face for to wrye [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1223

But at the laste, as that hir eyen glente
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1224

A-syde, anoon she gan his swerd aspye,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 147

[continues previous] That half so looth your wraththe wolde deserve.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 156

Ful esily, and ful debonairly,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 471

[continues previous] Up-on an amblere esily she sat,
15+

Knight's Tale: 1223

[continues previous] Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun,
12

Physician's Tale: 124

[continues previous] Up-on this mayde, avysinge him ful faste,
10

Anelida and Arcite: 207

[continues previous] Upon a day, ful sorowfully weping,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 17

[continues previous] But up I roos, with colour ful diverse,
11

Compleynt unto Pitè: 18

[continues previous] And pitously on hir myn yën caste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

[continues previous] And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1259

[continues previous] And up his look debonairly he caste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

[continues previous] And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

[continues previous] And gan his look on Pandarus up caste
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 359

[continues previous] Ful sobrely, and frendly for to see,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1352

[continues previous] This Troilus ful ofte hir eyen two
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1568

[continues previous] O! who-so seeth yow knoweth yow ful lyte!'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1005

[continues previous] And ther-with-al she caste hir eyen doun,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1006

[continues previous] And gan to syke, and seyde, 'O Troye toun,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 157

Avysing hir, and hyed not to faste
11

Book of the Duchesse: 363

And hyed hem to the forest faste, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 364

And I with hem; — so at the laste [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 158

With never a word, but seyde him softely,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 364

[continues previous] And I with hem; — so at the laste
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 479

Ayeins my wil; but elles wol I fonde, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 480

Myn honour sauf, plese him fro day to day; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 159

'Myn honour sauf, I wol wel trewely,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 479

[continues previous] Ayeins my wil; but elles wol I fonde,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 480

[continues previous] Myn honour sauf, plese him fro day to day;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 160

And in swich forme as he can now devyse,
10

Franklin's Tale: 433

And in swich forme endure a day or two;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 162

Biseching him, for goddes love, that he
10

Hous of Fame 3: 520

And lat our werkes han that name [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 163

Wolde, in honour of trouthe and gentilesse,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 521

[continues previous] Now, in honour of gentilesse,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 522

And also god your soule blesse!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 164

As I wel mene, eek mene wel to me,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 29

That gentil text can I wel understonde. [continues next]
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 165

And myn honour, with wit and besinesse,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 762

And kepe alwey myn honour and my name, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1077

And best can ay his lady honour kepe:' — [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1078

And with that word she brast anon to wepe. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 166

Ay kepe; and if I may don him gladnesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 762

[continues previous] And kepe alwey myn honour and my name,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1077

[continues previous] And best can ay his lady honour kepe:'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1078

[continues previous] And with that word she brast anon to wepe.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 167

From hennes-forth, y-wis, I nil not feyne:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1019

Lest she be wrooth, this drede I most, y-wis,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1020

Or nil not here or trowen how it is.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 168

Now beeth al hool, no lenger ye ne pleyne.
12

Clerk's Tale: 586

This warne I yow, that ye nat sodeynly [continues next]
11

Legend of Thisbe: 116

Whan this was doon, no lenger she ne stente, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 496

Quod he, 'to pleyne, or after yow to preche?' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 169

But nathelees, this warne I yow,' quod she,
14

Man of Law's Prologue: 16

'Lordinges,' quod he, 'I warne yow, al this route,
12

Clerk's Tale: 586

[continues previous] This warne I yow, that ye nat sodeynly
10

Merchant's Tale: 586

Er tyme come that I wil doun descende.
10

Merchant's Tale: 587

But nathelees, considereth this,' quod he,
11

Squire's Tale: 657

The kinges sone, of whiche I yow tolde. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 801

'By our lady,' quod this chanoun, 'it is dere,
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 802

I warne yow wel; for, save I and a frere,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 116

[continues previous] Whan this was doon, no lenger she ne stente,
11

Legend of Thisbe: 117

[continues previous] But to the wode her wey than hath she nome.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 110

'I am the kinges sone, Tarquinius,' [continues next]
11

Legend of Lucretia: 111

Quod he, 'but and thou crye, or noise make, [continues next]
14

Legend of Ariadne: 195

'A kinges sone, and eek a knight,' quod she, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 495

[continues previous] 'Ne that I shal han cause in this matere,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 496

[continues previous] Quod he, 'to pleyne, or after yow to preche?'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1639

And over al this, I pray yow,' quod she tho,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 170

'A kinges sone al-though ye be, y-wis,
11

Squire's Tale: 657

[continues previous] The kinges sone, of whiche I yow tolde.
11

Legend of Lucretia: 110

[continues previous] 'I am the kinges sone, Tarquinius,'
14

Legend of Ariadne: 195

[continues previous] 'A kinges sone, and eek a knight,' quod she,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 172

Of me in love, than right in that cas is;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 665

I nolde noght forbere him in no cas. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 173

Ne I nil forbere, if that ye doon a-mis,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 665

[continues previous] I nolde noght forbere him in no cas.
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 666

[continues previous] Now wol I seye yow sooth, by seint Thomas,
10

Melibee's Tale: 46

... thee and helpe." Yet sette I caas, ye have bothe might and licence for to venge yow. I seye, that ther be ful manye thinges that shul restreyne yow of vengeance-takinge, and make yow for to enclyne to suffre, and for to han pacience in the thinges that han been doon to yow. First and foreward, if ye wole considere the defautes that been in your owene persone, for whiche defautes god hath suffred yow have this tribulacioun, as I have seyd yow heer-biforn. For the poete seith, that "we oghte paciently taken the tribulacions that comen to us, whan we thinken and consideren that we han deserved ... [continues next]
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

... necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For Senek seith: ... [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 739

Who mighte have seyd, that I had doon a-mis [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 174

To wrathen yow; and whyl that ye me serve,
10

Melibee's Tale: 46

[continues previous] ... and helpe." Yet sette I caas, ye have bothe might and licence for to venge yow. I seye, that ther be ful manye thinges that shul restreyne yow of vengeance-takinge, and make yow for to enclyne to suffre, and for to han pacience in the thinges that han been doon to yow. First and foreward, if ye wole considere the defautes that been in your owene persone, for whiche defautes god hath suffred yow have this tribulacioun, as I have seyd yow heer-biforn. For the poete seith, that "we oghte paciently taken the tribulacions that comen to us, whan we thinken and consideren that ...
10

Melibee's Tale: 77

[continues previous] ... this necessitee and in this nede, ye caste yow to overcome your herte. For Senek seith: that "he that overcometh his herte, overcometh twyes." And Tullius seith: "ther is nothing so comendable in a greet lord as whan he is debonaire and meke, and appeseth him lightly." And I prey yow that ye wole forbere now to do vengeance, in swich a manere, that your goode name may be kept and conserved; and that men mowe have cause and matere to preyse yow of pitee and of mercy; and that ye have no cause to repente yow of thing that ye doon. For Senek seith: "he overcometh ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 740

[continues previous] To stele awey with swich on as he is?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 176

And shortly, derë herte and al my knight,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

My dere herte, and al myn owene knight, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 996

Of whiche, my dere herte and al my knight, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 177

Beth glad, and draweth yow to lustinesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 871

[continues previous] My dere herte, and al myn owene knight,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 996

[continues previous] Of whiche, my dere herte and al my knight,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 178

And I shal trewely, with al my might,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 998

Don al thy lust, and shal with al my might.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 999

Do now as I shal seye, and fare a-right;
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 939

'Go,' quod Criseyde, 'and uncle, trewely,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 940

I shal don al my might, me to restreyne
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 182

And him in armes took, and gan him kisse.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 398

A thousand tyme a-rewe he gan hir kisse.
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 399

And she obeyed him in every thing
12

Clerk's Tale: 1001

And hir in armes took and gan hir kesse.
12

Clerk's Tale: 1002

And she for wonder took of it no keep;
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 146

And in her armes gan him to embrace,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 147

And him she roggeth and awaketh softe;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

And gan his look on Pandarus up caste [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1080

And fil on knees, and sorwfully he sighte; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1187

He hir in armes faste to him hente. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1188

And Pandarus, with a ful good entente, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1519

And him in armes took, and ofte keste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 911

Thise wordes seyd, she on hir armes two [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 912

Fil gruf, and gan to wepe pitously. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1229

For which Criseyde up-on him gan biholde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1230

And gan him in hir armes faste folde,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1231

And seyde, 'O mercy, god, lo, which a dede!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 183

Fil Pandarus on knees, and up his yën
12

Squire's Tale: 544

Fil on his knees with so devout humblesse,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 110

On knees she fil biforn Ector a-doun;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

[continues previous] And gan his look on Pandarus up caste
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1080

[continues previous] And fil on knees, and sorwfully he sighte;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1188

[continues previous] And Pandarus, with a ful good entente,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1592

To Pandarus on kneës fil adoun, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1593

And er that he wolde of the place aryse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 911

[continues previous] Thise wordes seyd, she on hir armes two
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 912

[continues previous] Fil gruf, and gan to wepe pitously.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 913

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'allas! why do ye so,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 184

To hevene threw, and held his hondes hye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 974

And to Pandare he held up bothe his hondes, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 975

And seyde, 'lord, al thyn be that I have; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1202

And held his hondes up, and sat on knowe,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1592

[continues previous] To Pandarus on kneës fil adoun,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 185

'Immortal god!' quod he, 'that mayst nought dyen,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 974

[continues previous] And to Pandare he held up bothe his hondes,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 190

But ho! no more as now of this matere,
11

Legend of Ariadne: 340

I wol no more speke of this matere;
11

Legend of Ariadne: 341

But thus this false lover can begyle
10

Parlement of Foules: 26

But now to purpos as of this matere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 198

And lat see which of yow shal bere the belle
10

Squire's Tale: 124

This same stede shal bere yow ever-more
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 200

'For ther have ye a layser for to telle.'
10

Pardoner's Tale: 333

Thise ryotoures three, of whiche I telle, [continues next]
13

Second Nun's Tale: 337

'That shal I telle,' quod she, 'er I go. [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 415

That, if I wolde hir names telle, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 416

Al to longe moste I dwelle. [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 576

For who-so shal so many a storie telle, [continues next]
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 577

Sey shortly, or he shal to longe dwelle.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 196

And forth I wol of Troilus yow telle. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 201

Quod Troilus, 'how longe shal I dwelle
11

Summoner's Tale: 56

So thryve I, quod this Somnour, so I shal.[continues next]
11

Summoner's Tale: 57

So longe he wente hous by hous, til he [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 930

This shal be doon to-morwe er sonne reste. [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 333

[continues previous] Thise ryotoures three, of whiche I telle, [continues next]
10

Pardoner's Tale: 334

[continues previous] Longe erst er pryme rong of any belle, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 336

[continues previous] And now of three how maystow bere witnesse?' [continues next]
13

Second Nun's Tale: 337

[continues previous] 'That shal I telle,' quod she, 'er I go. [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 416

[continues previous] Al to longe moste I dwelle.
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 577

[continues previous] Sey shortly, or he shal to longe dwelle.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 983

How shal this longe tyme a-wey be driven, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 195

[continues previous] But here I leve hir with hir fader dwelle,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 196

[continues previous] And forth I wol of Troilus yow telle.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 202

Er this be doon?' Quod he, 'whan thou mayst ryse,
11

Summoner's Tale: 56

[continues previous] So thryve I, quod this Somnour, so I shal. —
12

Merchant's Tale: 930

[continues previous] This shal be doon to-morwe er sonne reste.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 334

[continues previous] Longe erst er pryme rong of any belle,
13

Second Nun's Tale: 337

[continues previous] 'That shal I telle,' quod she, 'er I go.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2461

That faire fresh whan thou mayst see, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 983

[continues previous] How shal this longe tyme a-wey be driven,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1459

[continues previous] 'Sire, al this shal be doon,' quod Pandarus;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 734

In purpos never thennes for to ryse; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 34

To take our wey, ther as I yow devyse.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 35

But natheles, whyl I have tyme and space,
13

Man of Law's Tale: 56

Fro day to day, as I shal yow devyse.
13

Man of Law's Tale: 57

This was the commune vois of every man —
12

Merchant's Tale: 756

For it shal be right as he wol devyse.
12

Franklin's Tale: 740

Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse:
13

Shipman's Tale: 192

That I may doon, right as yow list devyse. [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 193

And but I do, god take on me vengeance [continues next]
12

Shipman's Tale: 268

It shal be doon, right as ye wol devyse.
11

Shipman's Tale: 269

O thing, er that ye goon, if it may be,
13

Melibee's Prologue: 24

Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
13

Melibee's Prologue: 25

As thus; ye woot that every evangelist, [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 712

With boydekins, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
13

Monk's Tale: 713

This Iulius to the Capitolie wente [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 175

Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle. [continues next]
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 670

Of an ingot, as I shal yow devyse.
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 671

I seye, he took out of his owene sleve,
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 202

This balade, which that I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 349

Than mighte hit be, as I yow tellen shal;
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 350

This man to you may falsly been accused,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2462

[continues previous] Thyn herte shal so ravisshed be,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 238

To Troilus, as I shal yow devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 336

For it shal been right as thou wolt devyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 511

That it befel right as I shal yow telle, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 238

In his woodnesse, as I shal yow devyse.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 239

Right as the wilde bole biginneth springe
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 735

[continues previous] And thus she wroughte, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1379

And how I mene, I shal it yow devyse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1380

The moeble which that I have in this toun [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 204

With that Eleyne and also Deiphebus
13

Shipman's Tale: 192

[continues previous] That I may doon, right as yow list devyse.
12

Shipman's Tale: 193

[continues previous] And but I do, god take on me vengeance
12

Melibee's Prologue: 25

[continues previous] As thus; ye woot that every evangelist,
13

Monk's Tale: 712

[continues previous] With boydekins, as I shal yow devyse.
12

Second Nun's Tale: 175

[continues previous] Sey hem right thus, as that I shal yow telle.
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 202

[continues previous] This balade, which that I shal yow devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1641

Out wente anoon to Eleyne and Deiphebus,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1642

And seyde hem, 'so there be no taryinge,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 511

[continues previous] That it befel right as I shal yow telle,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 512

[continues previous] That Pandarus, that ever dide his might
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 736

[continues previous] Hir ounded heer, that sonnish was of hewe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1380

[continues previous] The moeble which that I have in this toun
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 207

His brother and his suster for to blende.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 989

Quod Pandarus, 'for every thing hath tyme; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1134

She gan, and ofte his sorwes to comforte. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1135

Quod Pandarus, 'for ought I can espyen, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 848

'And thou, my suster, ful of discomfort,' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 849

Quod Pandarus, 'what thenkestow to do? [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 208

Quod Pandarus, 'it tyme is that we wende;
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 220

Quod Pandarus, 'now is it tyme I wende;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 252

Tak it for good that I shal seye yow here.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 989

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'for every thing hath tyme;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 770

Unwist, right as I com, so wol I wende. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1135

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'for ought I can espyen,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 849

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'what thenkestow to do?
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 209

Tak, nece myn, your leve at alle three,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 252

[continues previous] Tak it for good that I shal seye yow here.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 771

[continues previous] Now nece myn, ye shul wel understonde,'
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 210

And lat hem speke, and cometh forth with me.'
10

Knight's Tale: 1417

Hir maydens, that she thider with hir ladde, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1418

Ful redily with hem the fyr they hadde, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 251

[continues previous] And seyde, 'gladly, leve nece dere,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 616

She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 211

She took hir leve at hem ful thriftily,
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 105

Under his belt he bar ful thriftily; [continues next]
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 715

To winne silver, as he ful wel coude; [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1417

[continues previous] Hir maydens, that she thider with hir ladde,
10

Knight's Tale: 1418

[continues previous] Ful redily with hem the fyr they hadde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 616

[continues previous] She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 212

As she wel coude, and they hir reverence
14

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 106

[continues previous] (Wel coude he dresse his takel yemanly:
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 129

Ne wette hir fingres in hir sauce depe.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 130

Wel coude she carie a morsel, and wel kepe,
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 715

[continues previous] To winne silver, as he ful wel coude;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 615

[continues previous] But at the laste, as every thing hath ende,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 616

[continues previous] She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 213

Un-to the fulle diden hardely,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 270

She nolde, I dar seyn hardely, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 214

And speken wonder wel, in hir absence,
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 129

In worship and in preysing of hir make, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 272

And sore abyeth she everydel
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 750

It sat hir wonder wel to singe. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 751

Hir vois ful cleer was and ful swete. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 215

Of hir, in preysing of hir excellence,
11

Merchant's Tale: 358

Hir myddel smal, hir armes longe and sclendre, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 359

Hir wyse governaunce, hir gentillesse, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 360

Hir wommanly beringe and hir sadnesse. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 750

[continues previous] It sat hir wonder wel to singe.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 751

[continues previous] Hir vois ful cleer was and ful swete.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 216

Hir governaunce, hir wit; and hir manere
11

Merchant's Tale: 358

[continues previous] Hir myddel smal, hir armes longe and sclendre,
11

Merchant's Tale: 359

[continues previous] Hir wyse governaunce, hir gentillesse,
11

Merchant's Tale: 360

[continues previous] Hir wommanly beringe and hir sadnesse.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 129

[continues previous] In worship and in preysing of hir make,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1217

I durste nat ones loke hir on, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1218

For wit, manere, and al was gon. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1412

Ne sholde in veyn escape in no manere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1413

It was biset in Ioye and bisinesse [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 217

Commendeden, it Ioye was to here.
11

Sir Thopas' Tale: 57

That Ioye it was to here;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 57

But such a Ioye was it to here hem singe,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1218

[continues previous] For wit, manere, and al was gon.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1413

[continues previous] It was biset in Ioye and bisinesse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 218

Now lat hir wende un-to hir owne place,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 245

For langour, er ye torne un-to this place.' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 219

And torne we to Troilus a-yein,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1583

Now torne we ayein to Troilus, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 245

[continues previous] For langour, er ye torne un-to this place.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 246

[continues previous] And whan he fil in any slomeringes,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 220

That gan ful lightly of the lettre passe,
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 118

That werken many a man in sleep ful wo;
11

Nun's Priest's Tale: 119

But I wol passe as lightly as I can.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1702

Deiphebus gan this lettre to unfolde [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1584

[continues previous] That resteles ful longe a-bedde lay,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 221

That Deiphebus hadde in the gardin seyn.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2969

As ye to-forn have herd me seyn; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1702

[continues previous] Deiphebus gan this lettre to unfolde
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 222

And of Eleyne and him he wolde fayn
11

Merchant's Tale: 831

So brente his herte, that he wolde fayn [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 832

That som man bothe him and hir had slayn. [continues next]
12

Pardoner's Tale: 529

And fayn he wolde wreke him, if he mighte, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2970

[continues previous] And fast I bisied, and wolde fayn
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 223

Delivered been, and seyde, that him leste
11

Merchant's Tale: 832

[continues previous] That som man bothe him and hir had slayn.
12

Pardoner's Tale: 528

[continues previous] That, as he seyde, his capouns hadde y-slawe,
12

Pardoner's Tale: 529

[continues previous] And fayn he wolde wreke him, if he mighte,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 913

She seyde, that to slepe wel hir leste. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1106

Hadde he that night; no-thing to slepe him leste. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 224

To slepe, and after tales have reste.
10

Book of the Duchesse: 245

To make me slepe and have som reste
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 913

[continues previous] She seyde, that to slepe wel hir leste.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1106

[continues previous] Hadde he that night; no-thing to slepe him leste.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 225

Eleyne him kiste, and took hir leve blyve,
14

Book of the Duchesse: 152

Go now faste, and hy thee blyve!' [continues next]
14

Book of the Duchesse: 153

This messager took leve and wente [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 126

And took hir leve, and hoom, and held hir stille. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 127

And in hir hous she abood with swich meynee [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 208

And with that word tho Pandarus, as blyve, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 209

He took his leve, and seyde, 'I wol go henne:' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 250

And with that word hir uncle anoon hir kiste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 251

And seyde, 'gladly, leve nece dere,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 597

And lord, how he was glad and wel bigoon! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1536

Therwith he took his leve al softely, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1537

And Troilus to paleys wente blyve. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 616

She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 730

They took hir leve, and hoom they wenten alle. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 226

Deiphebus eek, and hoom wente every wight;
10

Knight's Tale: 1017

But doun on knees wente every maner wight, [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 1018

And thanked him with al her herte and might, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 1881

And hoom wente every man the righte way. [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 444

And Dido, and eek Deiphebus; [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 445

And every tourment eek in helle [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1055

For I saugh renninge every wight, [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 152

[continues previous] Go now faste, and hy thee blyve!'
14

Book of the Duchesse: 153

[continues previous] This messager took leve and wente
13

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 126

[continues previous] And took hir leve, and hoom, and held hir stille.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 127

[continues previous] And in hir hous she abood with swich meynee
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 209

[continues previous] He took his leve, and seyde, 'I wol go henne:'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 596

[continues previous] With this he took his leve, and hoom he wente;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 597

[continues previous] And lord, how he was glad and wel bigoon!
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1537

[continues previous] And Troilus to paleys wente blyve.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 616

[continues previous] She took hir leve, and nedes wolde wende.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 730

[continues previous] They took hir leve, and hoom they wenten alle.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 227

And Pandarus, as faste as he may dryve,
10

Knight's Tale: 617

And thus he fleeth as faste as ever he may.
10

Knight's Tale: 1018

[continues previous] And thanked him with al her herte and might,
11

Knight's Tale: 1881

[continues previous] And hoom wente every man the righte way.
11

Reeve's Tale: 161

With wilde mares, as faste as he may go.
10

Hous of Fame 1: 444

[continues previous] And Dido, and eek Deiphebus;
10

Hous of Fame 1: 445

[continues previous] And every tourment eek in helle
12

Hous of Fame 3: 1056

[continues previous] As faste as that they hadden might;
11

Compleynt of Mars: 53

That Mars shal entre, as faste as he may glyde,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 229

And on a paillet, al that glade night,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 45

With which he glade may this companye?' [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 230

By Troilus he lay, with mery chere,
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 859

And he bigan with right a mery chere [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 42

The firste night had many a mery fit [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve! [continues next]
10

Monk's Prologue: 36

My lord the Monk,' quod he, 'be mery of chere; [continues next]
14

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 15

And after that he, with ful mery chere, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 44

[continues previous] Can he oght telle a mery tale or tweye,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 45

[continues previous] With which he glade may this companye?'
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 680

And in thingot putte it with mery chere, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 681

And in the water-vessel he it caste [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 149

And freendly tales, and with mery chere,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 231

To tale; and wel was hem they were y-fere.
10

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 859

[continues previous] And he bigan with right a mery chere
13

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 860

[continues previous] His tale anon, and seyde in this manere.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 43

[continues previous] With ech of hem, so wel was him on lyve!
10

Monk's Prologue: 37

[continues previous] For ye shul telle a tale trewely.
14

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 14

[continues previous] Now sire, faire falle yow for youre tale!'
14

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 15

[continues previous] And after that he, with ful mery chere,
12

Nun's Priest's Epilogue: 16

[continues previous] Seide to another, as ye shullen here.
11

Second Nun's Tale: 380

With preestes that hem cristned alle y-fere; [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 381

And afterward, whan day was woxen light, [continues next]
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 681

[continues previous] And in the water-vessel he it caste
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 64

Whan that the hous was voided of hem alle, [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 785

Agayn that other: and whan they were [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 786

Togidre almost, they threwe y-fere [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 985

And alle were they resemblable.
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 986

To hem was wel sitting and able
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 232

Whan every wight was voided but they two,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 461

And in hir walk this blinde man they mette [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 381

[continues previous] And afterward, whan day was woxen light,
11

Legend of Hypermnestra: 64

[continues previous] Whan that the hous was voided of hem alle,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 785

[continues previous] Agayn that other: and whan they were
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 233

And alle the dores were faste y-shette,
11

Knight's Tale: 1132

The dores were alle of adamant eterne,
10

Man of Law's Tale: 462

[continues previous] Croked and old, with yën faste y-shette. [continues next]
11

Melibee's Tale: 2

Upon a day bifel, that he for his desport is went in-to the feeldes him to pleye. His wyf and eek his doghter hath he left inwith his hous, of which the dores weren fast y-shette. Thre of his olde foos han it espyed, and setten laddres to the walles of his hous, and by the windowes been entred, and betten his wyf, and wounded his doghter with fyve mortal woundes in fyve sondry places; this is to seyn, in hir feet, in hir handes, in ...
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 220

Un-to his chaumbre spedde him faste allone, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 234

To telle in short, with-oute wordes mo,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 810

Tel me anon, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
13

Miller's Tale: 222

And right anon, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 464

With-outen wordes mo, they goon to bedde [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 633

He sit him up with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
10

Man of Law's Tale: 463

[continues previous] 'In name of Crist,' cryde this blinde Britoun,
14

Franklin's Prologue: 30

'Telle on thy tale with-outen wordes mo.' [continues next]
13

Pardoner's Tale: 350

And wente his wey with-outen wordes mo. [continues next]
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 702

'Of quik-silver, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
14

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 1

Thyn Astrolabie hath a ring to putten on the thoumbe of thy right hand in taking the heighte of thinges. And tak keep, for from hennes-forthward, I wol clepe the heighte of any thing that is taken by thy rewle, the altitude, with-oute mo wordes. [continues next]
13

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 2

This ring renneth in a maner turet, fast to the moder of thyn Astrolabie, in so rowm a space that hit desturbeth nat the instrument to hangen after his righte centre. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1405

To telle in short, with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 500

With-outen wordes mo, I wol be deed. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 764

For which, with-outen any wordes mo, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 235

This Pandarus, with-outen any lette,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 810

[continues previous] Tel me anon, with-outen wordes mo,
13

Miller's Tale: 222

[continues previous] And right anon, with-outen wordes mo,
13

Miller's Tale: 223

[continues previous] This Nicholas no lenger wolde tarie,
11

Miller's Tale: 464

[continues previous] With-outen wordes mo, they goon to bedde
12

Miller's Tale: 633

[continues previous] He sit him up with-outen wordes mo, [continues next]
14

Franklin's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] 'Telle on thy tale with-outen wordes mo.'
13

Pardoner's Tale: 350

[continues previous] And wente his wey with-outen wordes mo.
13

Pardoner's Tale: 351

[continues previous] He hath a thousand slayn this pestilence:
12

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 702

[continues previous] 'Of quik-silver, with-outen wordes mo,
14

Treatise on the Astrolabe 1: 2

[continues previous] This ring renneth in a maner turet, fast to the moder of thyn Astrolabie, in so rowm a space that hit desturbeth nat the instrument to hangen after his righte centre.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1405

[continues previous] To telle in short, with-outen wordes mo,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1406

[continues previous] Quod Pandarus, 'I pray yow that ye be
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 219

[continues previous] This Troilus, with-oute wordes mo,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 500

[continues previous] With-outen wordes mo, I wol be deed.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 764

[continues previous] For which, with-outen any wordes mo,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 236

Up roos, and on his beddes syde him sette,
10

Knight's Tale: 683

And sette him doun with-outen any more: [continues next]
12

Miller's Tale: 633

[continues previous] He sit him up with-outen wordes mo,
11

Merchant's Tale: 690

Doun by his beddes syde sit she than,
10

Merchant's Tale: 691

Confortinge him as goodly as she may.
13

Merchant's Tale: 703

That on his beddes syde sit ful softe.
12

Melibee's Tale: 10

... of envye, his feyned freendes that semeden reconsiled, and his flatereres, maden semblant of weping, and empeireden and agreggeden muchel of this matere, in preising greetly Melibee of might, of power, of richesse, and of freendes, despysinge the power of his adversaries, and seiden outrely that he anon sholde wreken him on his foos and biginne werre.
12

Melibee's Tale: 11

Up roos thanne an advocat that was wys, by leve and by conseil of othere that were wyse, and seyde: 'Lordinges, the nede for which we been assembled in this place is a ful hevy thing and an heigh matere, by-cause of the wrong and of the wikkednesse that hath be doon, ...
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 259

Him thoughte a man stood by his beddes syde, [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 260

And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 266

His felawe, that lay by his beddes syde, [continues next]
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 267

Gan for to laughe, and scorned him ful faste. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 359

He doun up-on his beddes feet him sette, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 360

And first he gan to syke, and eft to grone, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 682

Ful glad un-to hir beddes syde hir broughte, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 683

And toke his leve, and gan ful lowe loute, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

And doun upon his beddes syde him sette. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 234

Up-on his beddes syde a-doun him sette,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 237

And gan to speken in a sobre wyse
10

Knight's Tale: 682

[continues previous] Whan that Arcite had songe, he gan to syke,
10

Knight's Tale: 683

[continues previous] And sette him doun with-outen any more:
12

Man of Law's Tale: 55

Un-to thise Surrien marchants in swich wyse, [continues next]
14

Melibee's Prologue: 23

Al be it told som-tyme in sondry wyse [continues next]
12

Nun's Priest's Tale: 260

[continues previous] And him comaunded, that he sholde abyde,
15+

Nun's Priest's Tale: 267

[continues previous] Gan for to laughe, and scorned him ful faste.
10

Second Nun's Tale: 265

'How woostow this,' quod Tiburce, 'in what wyse?' [continues next]
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 669

He took the chalk, and shoop it in the wyse [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 426

He shal no more agilten in this wyse; [continues next]
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 436

He shal no more agilten in this wyse; [continues next]
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5193

Love ther is in sondry wyse, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 360

[continues previous] And first he gan to syke, and eft to grone,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 683

[continues previous] And toke his leve, and gan ful lowe loute,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1589

[continues previous] And doun upon his beddes syde him sette.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 238

To Troilus, as I shal yow devyse.
13

Man of Law's Tale: 56

[continues previous] Fro day to day, as I shal yow devyse.
11

Clerk's Tale: 825

Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 740

Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse: [continues next]
14

Melibee's Prologue: 24

[continues previous] Of sondry folk, as I shal yow devyse.
14

Melibee's Prologue: 25

As thus; ye woot that every evangelist,
13

Monk's Tale: 712

With boydekins, as I shal yow devyse.
13

Monk's Tale: 713

This Iulius to the Capitolie wente
10

Second Nun's Tale: 266

[continues previous] Quod Valerian, 'that shal I thee devyse.
14

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 670

[continues previous] Of an ingot, as I shal yow devyse.
13

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 671

I seye, he took out of his owene sleve,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 202

This balade, which that I shal yow devyse.
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 427

[continues previous] But he shal maken, as ye wil devyse,
11

Legend of Good Women Prologue B: 437

[continues previous] But he shal maken, as ye wil devyse,
12

Romaunt of the Rose: 5194

[continues previous] As I shal thee here devyse.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 238

In his woodnesse, as I shal yow devyse.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 239

Right as the wilde bole biginneth springe
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 735

And thus she wroughte, as I shal yow devyse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1379

And how I mene, I shal it yow devyse. [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 239

'Myn alderlevest lord, and brother dere,
11

Clerk's Tale: 825

[continues previous] Remembre yow, myn owene lord so dere,
11

Merchant's Tale: 244

Myn owene dere brother and my lord, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 740

[continues previous] Answerde and seyde as I shal yow devyse:
11

Manciple's Tale: 117

And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1359

And seyde, 'lord, and freend, and brother dere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 735

[continues previous] And thus she wroughte, as I shal yow devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1379

[continues previous] And how I mene, I shal it yow devyse.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 576

Herde I myn alderlevest lady dere
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 240

God woot, and thou, that it sat me so sore,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 491

For god it woot, he sat ful ofte and song
11

Merchant's Tale: 244

[continues previous] Myn owene dere brother and my lord,
11

Manciple's Tale: 117

[continues previous] And, god it wool, myn owene dere brother,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1220

Hit nas no game, hit sat me sore. [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1221

'So atte laste, sooth to seyn, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1359

[continues previous] And seyde, 'lord, and freend, and brother dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1360

[continues previous] God woot that thy disese dooth me wo.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 241

When I thee saw so languisshing to-yere,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 1221

[continues previous] 'So atte laste, sooth to seyn,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 242

For love, of which thy wo wex alwey more;
11

Anelida and Arcite: 222

More then my-self, an hundred thousand sythe, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 243

That I, with al my might and al my lore,
11

Anelida and Arcite: 221

[continues previous] For I loved oon with al my herte and might
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 869

But I with al myn herte and al my might,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 135

With al my wit and al my diligence,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 136

And I to han, right as yow list, comfort,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 244

Have ever sithen doon my bisinesse
10

Pardoner's Tale: 71

That it is Ioye to see my bisinesse. [continues next]
10

Second Nun's Tale: 24

I have heer doon my feithful bisinesse,
11

Manciple's Tale: 68

For ever this brid wol doon his bisinesse [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 245

To bringe thee to Ioye out of distresse;
10

Pardoner's Tale: 71

[continues previous] That it is Ioye to see my bisinesse.
10

Pardoner's Tale: 72

[continues previous] Of avaryce and of swich cursednesse
12

Monk's Tale: 408

And out of Ioye bringe men to sorwe. [continues next]
12

Monk's Tale: 409

Of Melan grete Barnabo Viscounte, [continues next]
11

Manciple's Tale: 69

[continues previous] To escape out of his cage, if he may;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 246

And have it brought to swich plyt as thou wost,
11

Monk's Tale: 407

[continues previous] Thus can fortune hir wheel governe and gye,
11

Monk's Tale: 408

[continues previous] And out of Ioye bringe men to sorwe.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 717

Thow wost thy-self whom that I love, pardee, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 718

As I best can, gon sithen longe whyle. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 247

So that, thorugh me, thow stondest now in weye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 717

[continues previous] Thow wost thy-self whom that I love, pardee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1002

I woot wel that thow wyser art than I [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 248

To fare wel, I seye it for no bost,
11

Clerk's Tale: 270

For I wol axe if it hir wille be [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1001

[continues previous] On me is nought along thyn yvel fare.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1002

[continues previous] I woot wel that thow wyser art than I
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 797

And me also; for, soothly for to seye,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 798

So ye wel fare, I recche not to deye.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 249

And wostow why? for shame it is to seye,
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 562

And wostow why? for they were used weel.
11

Clerk's Tale: 269

[continues previous] Have a collacion, and wostow why?
10

Clerk's Tale: 270

[continues previous] For I wol axe if it hir wille be
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6373

As I was wont; and wostow why?
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6374

For I dide hem a tregetry;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 908

And wostow why? for thou were wont to chace
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 80

Ne mighte a word for shame to it seye, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 253

That is to seye, for thee am I bicomen, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 250

For thee have I bigonne a gamen pleye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 80

[continues previous] Ne mighte a word for shame to it seye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 253

[continues previous] That is to seye, for thee am I bicomen,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 251

Which that I never doon shal eft for other,
10

Hous of Fame 3: 947

Nas never seen, ne shal ben eft;
10

Hous of Fame 3: 948

That, certes, in the world nis left
12

Anelida and Arcite: 343

I yeve hit up for now and ever-more;
12

Anelida and Arcite: 344

For I shal never eft putten in balaunce
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 301

Ne shal I never seen yow eft with yë.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1708

Ne shal I never doon him sacrifyse!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 253

That is to seye, for thee am I bicomen,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 249

And wostow why? for shame it is to seye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 250

For thee have I bigonne a gamen pleye
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 254

Bitwixen game and ernest, swich a mene
10

Merchant's Tale: 350

But nathelees, bitwixe ernest and game,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 255

As maken wommen un-to men to comen;
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4978

That men so preisen in her wit? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 322

Though wommen drede with us men to dele. [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene.
11

Miller's Tale: 585

By sëynt Note, ye woot wel what I mene.'
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee! [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 200

For wel thou wost that I have kept thy lyf. [continues next]
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 157

how gret sikernesse of peril to me defendede I al the senat!
12

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 4: 158

Thou wost wel that I seye sooth, ne I ne avauntede me never
11

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 33

[continues previous] 'Certes,' quod she, 'thou wost wel whennes that alle thinges
10

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 7: 1

Thanne seyde I thus: 'Thou wost wel thy-self that the coveitise
11

Hous of Fame 2: 273

Thus wost thou wel what thing is speche.
11

Against Women Unconstaunt: 20

Al light for somer, ye woot wel what I mene, [continues next]
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2617

I noot wher I sey wel or nought;
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 2618

But this I wot wel in my thought,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4977

[continues previous] 'Wost thou nought where Youthe abit,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 66

'Wher me be wo, O mighty god, thou wost!
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 67

Who is al there? I see nought trewely.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 323

[continues previous] I sey not this for no mistrust of yow,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 267

Have I thee nought honoured al my lyve,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 268

As thou wel wost, above the goddes alle?
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 591

Now mercy, lord, thou wost wel I desire
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1003

Ne I sey not nay, but in conclusioun,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1004

I mene wel, by god that sit above:' —
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 257

For thee have I my nece, of vyces clene,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 200

[continues previous] Ye woot wel what I mene of this, pardee!
12

Wife of Bath's Tale: 200

[continues previous] For wel thou wost that I have kept thy lyf.
11

Franklin's Tale: 267

I seye, whan ye han maad the coost so clene [continues next]
11

Franklin's Tale: 268

Of rokkes, that ther nis no stoon y-sene, [continues next]
11

Against Women Unconstaunt: 20

[continues previous] Al light for somer, ye woot wel what I mene,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 258

So fully maad thy gentilesse triste,
11

Franklin's Tale: 267

[continues previous] I seye, whan ye han maad the coost so clene
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 259

That al shal been right as thy-selve liste.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 759

As he dide er, and al nas but a Iape; [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 760

Right as him liste, the preest he made his ape; [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 89

sinne. But yif that god wot that, right so as thinges ben to [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 40

That ther nas noon that liste been his fo, [continues next]
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 41

But dide him al honour and companye; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 336

For it shal been right as thou wolt devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 709

For it shal been right as thou wilt desyre;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1711

Now maystow see thy-selve, if that thee liste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 260

But god, that al wot, take I to witnesse,
11

Pardoner's Tale: 155

The holy writ take I to my witnesse, [continues next]
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 759

[continues previous] As he dide er, and al nas but a Iape;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 5 Prose 3: 89

[continues previous] sinne. But yif that god wot that, right so as thinges ben to
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 40

[continues previous] That ther nas noon that liste been his fo,
10

Legend of Hypsipyle and Medea: 41

[continues previous] But dide him al honour and companye;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 994

This word to yow y-nough suffysen oughte. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1711

[continues previous] Now maystow see thy-selve, if that thee liste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 261

That never I this for coveityse wroughte,
11

Merchant's Tale: 922

Noght for no coveityse, doutelees, [continues next]
11

Merchant's Tale: 923

But only for the love I had to thee. [continues next]
11

Pardoner's Tale: 156

[continues previous] That luxurie is in wyn and dronkenesse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 993

[continues previous] Than wole I werke that I never wroughte!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 994

[continues previous] This word to yow y-nough suffysen oughte.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 262

But only for to abregge that distresse,
11

Merchant's Tale: 922

[continues previous] Noght for no coveityse, doutelees,
11

Merchant's Tale: 923

[continues previous] But only for the love I had to thee.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 267

For wel thou wost, the name as yet of here
11

Wife of Bath's Tale: 200

For wel thou wost that I have kept thy lyf.
11

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 37

A-nother manere of equaciouns of houses by the Astrolabie. Tak thyn assendent, and thanne hastow thy 4 angles; for wel thou wost that the opposit of thyn assendent, that is to seyn, thy by-ginning of the 7 hous, sit up-on the west orizonte; and the byginning of the 10 hous sit up-on the lyne meridional; and his opposit up-on the lyne of midnight. Thanne ley thy label over the degree that assendeth, and rekne fro the ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 360

And seyde, 'freend, in Aprille the laste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 361

As wel thou wost, if it remembre thee,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 268

As thou wel wost, above the goddes alle?
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 268

Among the peple, as who seyth, halwed is;
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 32

him mighty; as who seyth, in so moche as man is mighty to don a [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 59

is good; this is to seyn, as who seyth, that beinge and unitee and [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 235

effect of any gode; as who seyth, that yvel is good only to the might [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 360

Thus seyth the peple prevely.' — [continues next]
10

Hous of Fame 1: 361

But that is doon, nis not to done; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 269

For that man is unbore, I dar wel swere,
13

Merchant's Prologue: 8

She wolde him overmacche, I dar wel swere. [continues next]
13

Merchant's Prologue: 9

What sholde I yow reherce in special [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 2: 32

[continues previous] him mighty; as who seyth, in so moche as man is mighty to don a
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 59

[continues previous] is good; this is to seyn, as who seyth, that beinge and unitee and
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 235

[continues previous] effect of any gode; as who seyth, that yvel is good only to the might
10

Hous of Fame 1: 361

[continues previous] But that is doon, nis not to done;
11

Hous of Fame 1: 422

On al that ever he mighte swere, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 807

For wel I wiste, ever yit, [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 3: 808

Sith that first I hadde wit, [continues next]
15+

Book of the Duchesse: 684

I dar wel swere she took the beste! [continues next]
11

Book of the Duchesse: 820

For I dar swere, withoute doute,
11

Book of the Duchesse: 821

That as the someres sonne bright
11

Book of the Duchesse: 924

That I dar swere by the rode, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1002

And I dar seyn and swere hit wel[continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1003

That Trouthe him-self, over al and al, [continues next]
11

Former Age: 27

But cursed was the tyme, I dar wel seye, [continues next]
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 770

And saylours, that I dar wel swere [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 610

And Troilus, o thing I dar thee swere, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 611

That if Criseyde, whiche that is thy leef, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1296

And see now why; for this I dar wel seyn, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1297

That if so is that she untrewe be, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 270

That ever wiste that she dide amis.
13

Merchant's Prologue: 8

[continues previous] She wolde him overmacche, I dar wel swere.
11

Hous of Fame 1: 422

[continues previous] On al that ever he mighte swere,
11

Hous of Fame 1: 423

[continues previous] That, so she saved him his lyf,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 807

[continues previous] For wel I wiste, ever yit,
11

Hous of Fame 3: 808

[continues previous] Sith that first I hadde wit,
15+

Book of the Duchesse: 684

[continues previous] I dar wel swere she took the beste!
11

Book of the Duchesse: 924

[continues previous] That I dar swere by the rode,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 1003

[continues previous] That Trouthe him-self, over al and al,
11

Former Age: 28

[continues previous] That men first dide hir swety bysinesse
14

Romaunt of the Rose: 770

[continues previous] And saylours, that I dar wel swere
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 611

[continues previous] That if Criseyde, whiche that is thy leef,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1297

[continues previous] That if so is that she untrewe be,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 271

But wo is me, that I, that cause al this,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 566

That me is wo that I was born!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 272

May thenken that she is my nece dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 474

'No, wis,' quod he, 'myn owene nece dere.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 594

Now beth nought wrooth, my blood, my nece dere.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 595

'Now wel,' quod she, 'foryeven be it here!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 946

'That is wel seyd,' quod he, 'my nece dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 273

And I hir eem, and traytor eek y-fere!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 475

[continues previous] 'Now wel,' quod she, 'and I wol doon my peyne;
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 276

To do thy lust, and hoolly to be thyn,
12

Book of the Duchesse: 751

That thou hoolly, with al thy wit, [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 752

Do thyn entent to herkene hit.' [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 277

Why, al the world up-on it wolde crye,
10

Franklin's Tale: 500

This wyde world, which that men seye is round, [continues next]
10

Franklin's Tale: 501

I wolde it yeve, if I were lord of it. [continues next]
12

Book of the Duchesse: 751

[continues previous] That thou hoolly, with al thy wit,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1022

And that I wolde up-on thee pleyne and crye! [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1023

Eek al my wo is this, that folk now usen [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 175

Though al the world ayein it wolde stryve.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 96

For at the worste it may yet shorte our weye. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 278

And seye, that I the worste trecherye
10

Franklin's Tale: 500

[continues previous] This wyde world, which that men seye is round,
10

Franklin's Tale: 501

[continues previous] I wolde it yeve, if I were lord of it.
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1022

[continues previous] And that I wolde up-on thee pleyne and crye!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 95

[continues previous] If that I may, for somwhat shal I seye.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 96

[continues previous] For at the worste it may yet shorte our weye.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 279

Dide in this cas, that ever was bigonne,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 779

Right of him-self, that ever was bigonne; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 780

For ever som mistrust, or nyce stryf, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 280

And she for-lost, and thou right nought y-wonne.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 2: 2

wordes of Fortune; tak hede now thy-self, yif that she axeth [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 2: 3

right. "O thou man, wher-fore makest thou me gilty by thyne [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 779

[continues previous] Right of him-self, that ever was bigonne;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 281

Wher-fore, er I wol ferther goon a pas,
11

Consolatione Philosophie 2 Prose 2: 3

[continues previous] right. "O thou man, wher-fore makest thou me gilty by thyne
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 282

Yet eft I thee biseche and fully seye,
11

Miller's Tale: 414

Go, save our lyf, and that I thee biseche.' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 283

That privetee go with us in this cas,
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 799

That is to seyn, that telleth in this cas [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 414

[continues previous] Go, save our lyf, and that I thee biseche.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 284

That is to seye, that thou us never wreye;
11

Canterbury Tales Prologue: 799

[continues previous] That is to seyn, that telleth in this cas
10

Miller's Tale: 317

That to no wight thou shalt this conseil wreye;
10

Miller's Tale: 318

For it is Cristes conseil that I seye,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 2696

That is to seye, that thou be large
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 285

And be nought wrooth, though I thee ofte preye
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 580

But though that I now telle thee it ne leste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 581

Be thou nought wrooth, I hyde it for the beste.'
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1073

To be nought wrooth, though he, of his folye, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 286

To holden secree swich an heigh matere;
11

Melibee's Tale: 11

Up roos thanne an advocat that was wys, by leve and by conseil of othere that were wyse, and seyde: 'Lordinges, the nede for which we been assembled in this place is a ful hevy thing and an heigh matere, by-cause of the wrong and of the wikkednesse that hath be doon, and eek by resoun of the grete damages that in tyme cominge been possible to fallen for this same cause; and eek by resoun of the grete richesse and power of the parties bothe; for the whiche resouns ...
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1073

[continues previous] To be nought wrooth, though he, of his folye,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 287

For skilful is, thow wost wel, my preyere.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1408

'Yis, pardee,' quod Deiphebus, 'wel thow wost,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 600

Thenk eek Fortune, as wel thy-selven wost, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 342

For wel thow wost, my leve brother dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 288

And thenk what wo ther hath bitid er this,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 600

[continues previous] Thenk eek Fortune, as wel thy-selven wost,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 291

Fro day to day, right for that wikked dede;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 93

Al unwist of this false and wikked dede, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 94

His doughter, which that was in gret penaunce, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 981

For other thought nor other dede also [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 292

For which these wyse clerkes that ben dede
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 94

[continues previous] His doughter, which that was in gret penaunce,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1002

Ensample why, see now these wyse clerkes,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 1003

That erren aldermost a-yein a lawe,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1691

Felicitee, which that thise clerkes wyse
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 980

[continues previous] We have no free chois, as these clerkes rede.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 981

[continues previous] For other thought nor other dede also
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 294

That "firste vertu is to kepe tonge."
12

Manciple's Tale: 229

Is to restreyne and kepe wel thy tonge.[continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 295

And, nere it that I wilne as now tabregge
12

Manciple's Tale: 229

[continues previous] Is to restreyne and kepe wel thy tonge. —
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 296

Diffusioun of speche, I coude almost
13

Franklin's Tale: 684

Mo than a thousand stories, as I gesse, [continues next]
13

Franklin's Tale: 685

Coude I now telle as touchinge this matere. [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 297

A thousand olde stories thee alegge
13

Franklin's Tale: 684

[continues previous] Mo than a thousand stories, as I gesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 302

O tonge, allas! so often here-biforn
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 166

So many a lady fresh and mayden bright, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 303

Hastow made many a lady bright of hewe
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 166

[continues previous] So many a lady fresh and mayden bright,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1772

Bisechinge every lady bright of hewe,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 304

Seyd, "welawey! the day that I was born!"
10

Knight's Tale: 365

He seyde, 'Allas that day that I was born!
11

Reeve's Tale: 189

'Allas,' quod Iohn, 'the day that I was born!
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 297

And but thou make a feste on thilke day [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

That I was born, and make me fresh and gay, [continues next]
12

Hous of Fame 1: 345

'O, welawey that I was born!
11

Legend of Cleopatra: 79

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
11

Legend of Thisbe: 128

'Allas!' quod he, 'the day that I was born!
10

Book of the Duchesse: 566

That me is wo that I was born! [continues next]
10

Parlement of Foules: 484

Of al my lyf, sin that day I was born,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1276

That I was born; have I not seyd er this,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 305

And many a maydes sorwes for to newe;
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 298

[continues previous] That I was born, and make me fresh and gay,
10

Book of the Duchesse: 567

[continues previous] May noght make my sorwes slyde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 307

That men of yelpe, and it were brought to preve;
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 28

Ther-as ther is non other assay by preve. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 308

Of kinde non avauntour is to leve.
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 27

[continues previous] Wel oghte us than on olde bokes leve,
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 28

[continues previous] Ther-as ther is non other assay by preve.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 314

Y-wis, I am avauntour at the leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 309

Avauntour and a lyere, al is on;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 314

[continues previous] Y-wis, I am avauntour at the leste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 315

[continues previous] And lyere, for I breke my biheste.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 310

As thus: I pose, a womman graunte me
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 6: 132

torment. But lat us graunte, I pose that som man may wel demen
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 311

Hir love, and seyth that other wol she non,
12

Parlement of Foules: 587

For thogh she deyed, I wolde non other make, [continues next]
12

Parlement of Foules: 588

I wol ben hires, til that the deth me take.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 312

And I am sworn to holden it secree,
12

Parlement of Foules: 587

[continues previous] For thogh she deyed, I wolde non other make,
12

Parlement of Foules: 588

[continues previous] I wol ben hires, til that the deth me take.'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 314

Y-wis, I am avauntour at the leste,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5189

For I am redy, at the leste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 308

Of kinde non avauntour is to leve. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 309

Avauntour and a lyere, al is on; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 315

And lyere, for I breke my biheste.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 5189

[continues previous] For I am redy, at the leste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 309

[continues previous] Avauntour and a lyere, al is on;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 875

I bidde god, I never mote have Ioye! [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 316

Now loke thanne, if they be nought to blame,
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

... as doon yow reverence withouten love, your olde enemys reconsiled, your flatereres, that conseilled yow certeyne thinges prively, and openly conseilleden yow the contrarie; the yonge folk also, that conseilleden yow to venge yow and make werre anon. And certes, sir, as I have seyd biforn, ye han greetly erred to han cleped swich maner folk to your conseil; which conseillours been y-nogh repreved by the resouns afore-seyd. But nathelees, lat us now descende to the special. Ye shuln first procede after the doctrine of Tullius. Certes, the trouthe of this matere or of this conseil nedeth nat diligently enquere; for it is wel wist whiche they ... [continues next]
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 263

Than blame they folk, and wite nat what hem ayleth. [continues next]
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6151

But natheles, I wol not blame [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 859

To loven; for swich maner folk, I gesse, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 876

[continues previous] Now loke thanne, if ye, that been his love,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 317

Swich maner folk; what shal I clepe hem, what,
11

Melibee's Tale: 36

[continues previous] ... reverence withouten love, your olde enemys reconsiled, your flatereres, that conseilled yow certeyne thinges prively, and openly conseilleden yow the contrarie; the yonge folk also, that conseilleden yow to venge yow and make werre anon. And certes, sir, as I have seyd biforn, ye han greetly erred to han cleped swich maner folk to your conseil; which conseillours been y-nogh repreved by the resouns afore-seyd. But nathelees, lat us now descende to the special. Ye shuln first procede after the doctrine of Tullius. Certes, the trouthe of this matere or of this conseil nedeth nat diligently enquere; for it is wel wist whiche ...
10

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 263

[continues previous] Than blame they folk, and wite nat what hem ayleth.
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6152

[continues previous] Religious folk, ne hem diffame,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 6153

In what habit that ever they go:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 859

[continues previous] To loven; for swich maner folk, I gesse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 319

That never yet bihighte hem this ne that,
11

Prioress' Tale: 133

That never, fleshly, wommen they ne knewe.' [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 134

This povre widwe awaiteth al that night [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 19

Of tymes of hem, ne the causes [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 1: 20

For-why this more than that cause is; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 320

Ne knewe hem more than myn olde hat?
10

Knight's Tale: 790

As fer as everich of hem other knewe. [continues next]
10

Knight's Tale: 791

Ther nas no good day, ne no saluing; [continues next]
11

Prioress' Tale: 133

[continues previous] That never, fleshly, wommen they ne knewe.'
11

Hous of Fame 1: 19

[continues previous] Of tymes of hem, ne the causes
11

Hous of Fame 1: 20

[continues previous] For-why this more than that cause is;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 321

No wonder is, so god me sende hele,
10

Knight's Tale: 791

[continues previous] Ther nas no good day, ne no saluing;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 322

Though wommen drede with us men to dele.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 255

As maken wommen un-to men to comen; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1779

Ne I sey not this al-only for these men, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 323

I sey not this for no mistrust of yow,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 274

And that no wys man nedeth for to wedde, [continues next]
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 275

Ne no man that entendeth un-to hevene. [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 38

And sin it is thus, that goode men ne failen never-mo of hir mede, [continues next]
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 39

certes, no wys man ne may doute of undepartable peyne of the [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 256

[continues previous] Al sey I nought, thou wost wel what I mene.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1779

[continues previous] Ne I sey not this al-only for these men,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 324

Ne for no wys man, but for foles nyce,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 274

[continues previous] And that no wys man nedeth for to wedde,
12

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 275

[continues previous] Ne no man that entendeth un-to hevene.
11

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 3: 39

[continues previous] certes, no wys man ne may doute of undepartable peyne of the
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1257

She was not nyce, ne outrageous,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 1258

But wys and war, and vertuous,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 202

O verrey foles! nyce and blinde be ye; [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 329

For wyse ben by foles harm chastysed. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 330

But now to purpos; leve brother dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 325

And for the harm that in the world is now,
10

Parson's Tale: 70

After Avarice comth Glotonye, which is expres eek agayn the comandement of god. Glotonye is unmesurable appetyt to ete or to drinke, or elles to doon y-nogh to the unmesurable appetyt and desordeynce coveityse to eten or to drinke. This sinne corrumped al this world, as is wel shewed in the sinne of Adam and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ofte seyd to yow, and now I seye it wepinge, that they been the enemys of the croys of Crist; of whiche the ende is deeth, and ... [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 202

[continues previous] O verrey foles! nyce and blinde be ye;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 329

[continues previous] For wyse ben by foles harm chastysed.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 326

As wel for foly ofte as for malyce;
10

Parson's Tale: 70

[continues previous] After Avarice comth Glotonye, which is expres eek agayn the comandement of god. Glotonye is unmesurable appetyt to ete or to drinke, or elles to doon y-nogh to the unmesurable appetyt and desordeynce coveityse to eten or to drinke. This sinne corrumped al this world, as is wel shewed in the sinne of Adam and of Eve. Loke eek, what seith seint Paul of Glotonye. 'Manye,' seith seint Paul, 'goon, of whiche I have ofte seyd to yow, and now I seye it wepinge, that they been the enemys of the croys of Crist; of whiche the ende ...
12

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 61

For wel I wot, that folk han her-beforn [continues next]
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

... that leveth the latitude of the regioun. As thus: I suppose that the sonne is thilke day at noon 38 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte. Abate thanne thise degrees and minutes out of 90; so leveth there 51 degrees and 50 minutes, the latitude. I sey nat this but for ensample; for wel I wot the latitude of Oxenforde is certein minutes lasse, as I mighte prove. Now yif so be that thee semeth to long a taryinge, to abyde til that the sonne be in the hevedes of Aries or of Libra, thanne waite whan the sonne is in any other ... [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 327

For wel wot I, in wyse folk, that vyce
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 60

[continues previous] But wo is me, hit lyth nat in my might!
13

Legend of Good Women Prologue A: 61

[continues previous] For wel I wot, that folk han her-beforn
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 4845

For I wot wel, in sothfastnesse,
10

Romaunt of the Rose: 4846

That [who] doth now his bisynesse
10

Treatise on the Astrolabe 2: 25

[continues previous] ... that leveth the latitude of the regioun. As thus: I suppose that the sonne is thilke day at noon 38 degrees and 10 minutes of heyghte. Abate thanne thise degrees and minutes out of 90; so leveth there 51 degrees and 50 minutes, the latitude. I sey nat this but for ensample; for wel I wot the latitude of Oxenforde is certein minutes lasse, as I mighte prove. Now yif so be that thee semeth to long a taryinge, to abyde til that the sonne be in the hevedes of Aries or of Libra, thanne waite whan the sonne is in any other degree of the ...
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 329

For wyse ben by foles harm chastysed.
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 61

thenke, that the maners of shrewes ben coriged and chastysed by [continues next]
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 62

veniaunce, and that they ben brought to the right wey by the [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 324

Ne for no wys man, but for foles nyce, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 325

And for the harm that in the world is now, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 330

But now to purpos; leve brother dere,
11

Knight's Tale: 326

And soothly, leve brother, this is al. [continues next]
10

Summoner's Tale: 115

'Now, by your leve, o dere sir,' quod she, [continues next]
12

Second Nun's Tale: 213

'I leve al this thing,' quod Valerian, [continues next]
11

Second Nun's Tale: 257

So shaltow seen hem, leve brother dere,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 4 Prose 4: 62

[continues previous] veniaunce, and that they ben brought to the right wey by the
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 324

[continues previous] Ne for no wys man, but for foles nyce,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 541

And seyde, 'parde, leve brother dere, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 307

My swerd, myn helm, and, leve brother dere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 308

My sheld to Pallas yef, that shyneth clere.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 342

For wel thow wost, my leve brother dere,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 331

Have al this thing that I have seyd in minde,
11

Knight's Tale: 326

[continues previous] And soothly, leve brother, this is al.
10

Summoner's Tale: 114

[continues previous] To sprede his word is set al myn entente.'
12

Second Nun's Tale: 213

[continues previous] 'I leve al this thing,' quod Valerian,
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 542

[continues previous] Al this have I my-self yet thought ful ofte,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1415

And treweliche, as writen wel I finde,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 1416

That al this thing was seyd of good entente;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 332

And keep thee clos, and be now of good chere,
11

Hous of Fame 2: 163

So that thou wolt be of good chere. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 333

For at thy day thou shalt me trewe finde.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 737

'Though povre I be, crafty thou shalt me finde; [continues next]
11

Hous of Fame 2: 164

[continues previous] For truste wel, that thou shalt here,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 306

Yet trist alwey, ye shal me finde trewe; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 334

I shal thy proces sette in swich a kinde,
10

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 737

[continues previous] 'Though povre I be, crafty thou shalt me finde;
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 738

[continues previous] I warne thee, yet is ther more bihinde.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 306

[continues previous] Yet trist alwey, ye shal me finde trewe;
13

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 418

Swich fyr, by proces, shal of kinde colde.
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 335

And god to-forn, that it shall thee suffyse,
14

Merchant's Tale: 755

Wher that she mighte un-to his lust suffyse: [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 756

For it shal be right as he wol devyse. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 708

Quod Pandarus, 'ne drede thee never a del, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 709

For it shal been right as thou wilt desyre; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 849

'And god to-forn, so that it shal suffyse.' [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 850

'To-morwe? allas, that were a fayr,' quod he, [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 336

For it shal been right as thou wolt devyse.
13

Friar's Tale: 104

Al shal be thyn, right as thou wolt desyre.'
14

Merchant's Tale: 756

[continues previous] For it shal be right as he wol devyse. [continues next]
11

Shipman's Tale: 268

It shal be doon, right as ye wol devyse.
12

Melibee's Tale: 29

... conseillinges foles han the maistrie.' Melibeus answerde agayn, and seyde: 'I graunte wel that I have erred; but ther-as thou hast told me heer-biforn, that he nis nat to blame that chaungeth hise conseillours in certein caas, and for certeine Iuste causes, I am al redy to chaunge my conseillours, right as thow wolt devyse. The proverbe seith: that "for to do sinne is mannish, but certes for to persevere longe in sinne is werk of the devel."'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 203

This thing shal be right as I yow devyse.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 259

That al shal been right as thy-selve liste.
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 709

[continues previous] For it shal been right as thou wilt desyre; [continues next]
15+

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 849

[continues previous] 'And god to-forn, so that it shal suffyse.'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 238

In his woodnesse, as I shal yow devyse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 239

Right as the wilde bole biginneth springe
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 337

For wel I woot, thou menest wel, parde;
10

Miller's Tale: 109

That but ye wayte wel and been privee, [continues next]
10

Miller's Tale: 110

I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she. [continues next]
11

Miller's Tale: 355

Him had be lever, I dar wel undertake, [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 29

That gentil text can I wel understonde. [continues next]
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde [continues next]
12

Merchant's Tale: 756

[continues previous] For it shal be right as he wol devyse.
10

Physician's Epilogue: 26

But wel I woot, thou doost my herte to erme,
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.' [continues next]
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 109

For wel I woot, al-though I wake or winke, [continues next]
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 709

[continues previous] For it shal been right as thou wilt desyre;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 338

Therfore I dar this fully undertake.
10

Miller's Tale: 110

[continues previous] I woot right wel I nam but deed,' quod she.
11

Miller's Tale: 355

[continues previous] Him had be lever, I dar wel undertake,
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 29

[continues previous] That gentil text can I wel understonde.
11

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 30

[continues previous] Eek wel I woot he seyde, myn housbonde
10

Consolatione Philosophie 1 Prose 6: 48

[continues previous] mortal beest? I woot wel, and I confesse wel that I am it.'
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 108

[continues previous] I suffre, and yet I dar not to you pleyne;
10

Compleynt unto Pitè: 109

[continues previous] For wel I woot, al-though I wake or winke,
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5942

Ther-as they lese her good [fully].
11

Romaunt of the Rose: 5943

But natheles, this dar I saye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 339

Thou wost eek what thy lady graunted thee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 716

Lest I wolde of thy lady thee bigyle,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 1: 717

Thow wost thy-self whom that I love, pardee,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 341

Have now good night, I may no lenger wake;
10

Wife of Bath's Prologue: 810

Now wol I dye, I may no lenger speke."
14

Merchant's Tale: 612

Now day is come, I may no lenger wake.' [continues next]
10

Shipman's Tale: 360

Now, by your leve, I may no lenger dwelle,
14

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 342

And bid for me, sin thou art now in blisse,
14

Merchant's Tale: 613

[continues previous] And doun he leyde his heed, and sleep til pryme.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 704

For thou shalt in-to hevene blisse wende.' [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 705

'Now blisful Venus, thou me grace sende,' [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1623

That, there-as thou now brought art in-to blisse, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1624

That thou thy-self ne cause it nought to misse. [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 502

Quod Troilus, 'now god me grace sende, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 343

That god me sende deeth or sone lisse.'
11

Knight's Tale: 1014

Who couthe telle, or who couthe it endyte, [continues next]
10

Compleint to His Lady: 6

That, sauf the deeth, ther may no-thing me lisse,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 705

[continues previous] 'Now blisful Venus, thou me grace sende,'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1623

[continues previous] That, there-as thou now brought art in-to blisse,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1624

[continues previous] That thou thy-self ne cause it nought to misse.
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 502

[continues previous] Quod Troilus, 'now god me grace sende,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 503

[continues previous] That I may finden, at myn hom-cominge,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 344

Who mighte telle half the Ioye or feste
11

Knight's Tale: 1014

[continues previous] Who couthe telle, or who couthe it endyte,
11

Knight's Tale: 1015

[continues previous] The Ioye that is maked in the place
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 345

Which that the sowle of Troilus tho felte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1639

To smylen of this gan tho Troilus, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1443

This Troilus, that with tho wordes felte,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1444

As thoughte him tho, for pietous distresse,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 346

Heringe theffect of Pandarus biheste?
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1329

That, what for hope and Pandarus biheste, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1639

[continues previous] To smylen of this gan tho Troilus,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1640

[continues previous] And Pandarus, with-oute rekeninge,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 347

His olde wo, that made his herte swelte,
12

Franklin's Tale: 407

And whan this book was in his remembraunce, [continues next]
12

Franklin's Tale: 408

Anon for Ioye his herte gan to daunce, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1329

[continues previous] That, what for hope and Pandarus biheste,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1330

[continues previous] His grete wo for-yede he at the leste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1671

For which he felte his herte in Ioye flete; [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 362

But lord, so often gan his herte colden, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 363

Seing his freend in wo, whos hevinesse [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 348

Gan tho for Ioye wasten and to-melte,
12

Franklin's Tale: 408

[continues previous] Anon for Ioye his herte gan to daunce,
12

Franklin's Tale: 409

[continues previous] And to him-self he seyde prively:
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 140

I iape nought, as ever have I Ioye!'
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 141

Tho gan she wondren more than biforn
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1671

[continues previous] For which he felte his herte in Ioye flete;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1672

[continues previous] And feythfully gan alle the goddes herie;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 362

[continues previous] But lord, so often gan his herte colden,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 349

And al the richesse of his sykes sore
10

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 375

Among his sobbes and his sykes sore,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1196

For which at night, in sorwe and sykes sore [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 350

At ones fledde, he felte of hem no more.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1196

[continues previous] For which at night, in sorwe and sykes sore
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1197

[continues previous] He wente him hoom, with-outen any more.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 352

That han in winter dede been and dreye,
11

Knight's Tale: 917

But been a leoun, bothe in word and dede, [continues next]
11

Knight's Tale: 918

To hem that been in repentaunce and drede [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 353

Revesten hem in grene, whan that May is,
11

Knight's Tale: 917

[continues previous] But been a leoun, bothe in word and dede,
11

Knight's Tale: 918

[continues previous] To hem that been in repentaunce and drede
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

... olde wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For sothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his moder, that shal sterve yong by-cause of that ilke werre, or elles live ... [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 354

Whan every lusty lyketh best to pleye:
12

Melibee's Tale: 12

[continues previous] ... wyse, and with his hand made contenaunce that men sholde holden hem stille and yeven him audience. 'Lordinges,' quod he, 'ther is ful many a man that cryeth "werre! werre!" that woot ful litel what werre amounteth. Werre at his biginning hath so greet an entree and so large, that every wight may entre whan him lyketh, and lightly finde werre. But, certes, what ende that shal ther-of bifalle, it is nat light to knowe. For sothly, whan that werre is ones bigonne, ther is ful many a child unborn of his moder, that shal sterve yong by-cause of that ilke werre, or elles live in sorwe ...
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 356

Wex sodeynliche his herte ful of Ioye,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 955

And in his beste wyse his lady grette;
10

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 956

But lord, so she wex sodeynliche reed!
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 27

But Troilus, now farewel al thy Ioye, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1382

Than ever ich hadde, encressen in me Ioye. [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1383

For was ther never herte yet so blythe [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 357

That gladder was ther never man in Troye.
11

Canon's Yeoman's Tale: 496

That ther was never man yet yvel apayd
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1346

That never his look ne bleynte from hir face, [continues next]
10

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 28

[continues previous] For shaltow never seen hir eft in Troye!
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1382

[continues previous] Than ever ich hadde, encressen in me Ioye.
12

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1383

[continues previous] For was ther never herte yet so blythe
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 358

And gan his look on Pandarus up caste
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 253

With that she gan hir eyen doun to caste,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 254

And Pandarus to coghe gan a lyte,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 255

And seyde, 'nece, alwey, lo! to the laste,
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1259

And up his look debonairly he caste, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste. [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 155

With that she gan hir eyen on him caste [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 156

Ful esily, and ful debonairly, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 182

And him in armes took, and gan him kisse.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 183

Fil Pandarus on knees, and up his yën
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1345

[continues previous] And, lord! so he gan goodly on hir see,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1346

[continues previous] That never his look ne bleynte from hir face,
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1615

And with that word doun in his bed he lay, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1616

And Pandarus ful sobrely him herde [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 521

And Pandarus gan holde his tunge stille, [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 554

Ther-with he caste on Pandarus his[continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 555

With chaunged face, and pitous to biholde; [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 359

Ful sobrely, and frendly for to see,
12

Clerk's Tale: 240

Ful sobrely, and seyde in this manere, [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1260

[continues previous] And bekked on Pandare, and forth he paste.
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 156

[continues previous] Ful esily, and ful debonairly,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1588

And Troilus ful sobrely he grette, [continues next]
13

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1616

[continues previous] And Pandarus ful sobrely him herde
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 520

[continues previous] As licour out of alambyk ful faste;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 555

[continues previous] With chaunged face, and pitous to biholde;
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1173

And to him-self ful sobrely he seyde: [continues next]
12

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 360

And seyde, 'freend, in Aprille the laste,
12

Clerk's Tale: 240

[continues previous] Ful sobrely, and seyde in this manere,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 267

For wel thou wost, the name as yet of here [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1587

[continues previous] He com anoon, nought ones seyde he 'nay,'
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 1588

[continues previous] And Troilus ful sobrely he grette,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 268

As thou wel wost, above the goddes alle? [continues next]
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 435

But at the laste answerde and seyde, 'freend,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 5: 1173

[continues previous] And to him-self ful sobrely he seyde:
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 361

As wel thou wost, if it remembre thee,
10

Troilus and Criseyde 2: 1366

And certainly, I noot if thou it wost,
11

Troilus and Criseyde 3: 267

[continues previous] For wel thou wost, the name as yet of here
11

Troilus and Criseyde 4: 268

[continues previous] As thou wel wost, above the goddes alle?